Re-thinking Female Entrepreneurship Conference

Re-thinking Female Entrepreneurship – How intersectionality shapes the experience of female entrepreneurs

14 – 15 January 2020

University of St Andrews School of Management

Building on the success of the first “Re-thinking Female Entrepreneurship” Conference which took place in June 2018, this two-day conference will continue to challenge the gendered discourse of entrepreneurship and to explore further the diversity of female entrepreneurs and their journeys.

The conference will bring together academics, entrepreneurs, consultants as well as community leaders and not for profit organisations. The conference will cover a broad range of topics including the intersectionality of gender and; age, race, class, sexuality and disability. The conference will also critically discuss the persistence of gender inequality, the challenges facing female entrepreneurs in male dominated industries, the agency of female entrepreneurs as well as the rhetoric of entrepreneurship as being a source of empowerment. In addition, the conference will present a case study on how academic can engage with non-academics to promote female entrepreneurship.

The conference is free of charge with lunch and refreshments included.

The conference is generously funded by the British Academy as part of Rising Star Engagement Award (BARSEA).

The conference aims to support Early Career Researchers who are interested in researching gender and entrepreneurship.

We will able to cover the travel and the accommodation expenses of Early Career Researchers. However, the fund will be limited to a certain number of applicants and will be offered on first come first served basis.

Due to the calibre of the speakers a high level of demand for conference places is expected so please book as soon as you can by sending an email to mmno@st-andrews.ac.uk and hd48@st-andrews.ac.uk

The Conference keynote speakers will be:

Dr Hannah Dean; Lecturer of Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Creativity – University of St Andrews

Prof. Jackie Ford; Professor of Leadership and Organisation Studies – Durham University 

Dr Sally Jones; Reader in Entrepreneurship and Gender Studies – Metropolitan Manchester University

Ms Sara Hawthorn; Managing Director – InFusion Comms

Dr Gretchen Larsen; Associate Professor of Marketing – Faculty Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion – Durham University

Prof. Claire Leitch; Professor of Entrepreneurial Leadership – Lancaster University

Prof. Susan Marlow; (holder of the Queen Award for Enterprise) – Professor of Entrepreneurship – University of Birmingham

Ms Anne Meikle; Policy Manager – Women’s Enterprise Scotland (CIC)

Prof. Kiran Trehan; Professor of Leadership and Enterprise Development – Director of WE LEAD [Women’s Entrepreneurship, Leadership Economy and Diversity] – Head of Group – Entrepreneurship and Local Economy- University of Birmingham 

Prof. Fiona Wilson; Professor of Organisational Behaviour – University of Glasgow

Ms Terry Wragg; Director – Leeds Animation Workshop

Details of the presentations together with a brief bio of the speakers will be available very soon on the following link;

https://female-entrepreneur.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk

Looking forward to welcoming you to what promises to be an exciting event full of networking opportunities and fruitful debates.

Hannah Dean

Lecturer of Entrepreneurship, Innovation, Creativity

University of St Andrews School of Management

VIU Summer School on Responsible Capitalism

Dear Faculty,

this is to inform you that the Application form of the VIU Summer School on Responsible Capitalism: Micro and Macro-institutional Conditions of Transformation (June 16-20, 2020) is now open and available at the VIU dedicated web-page:

http://www.univiu.org/study/summer-schools/responsible-capitalism

I take the occasion to attach here the printable brochure (“booklet” option) and the draft program available at the same web-page.

The Call is open until February 28 and the participation fees are:

  • Students of VIU member universities: € 200 incl. VAT.
  • Students of other universities: € 300 incl. VAT

The costs of accommodation on campus in shared multiple rooms (triple or quadruple) with other participants is 240,00 euro for 5 nights incl. taxes (check in June 15 – check out June 20).

I take the occasion to remind you that we will open the School with a Welcome Cocktailon Monday, June 15 in the evening (around 6:30 pmtbd).

Thank you for sharing the Call for application among your students and colleagues!

Looking forward to meeting you all at VIU next June.
With Kind regards,

Elisa

AOM2020 Management History Calls for submission

The Management History (MH) Division invites PDW, symposium, and paper submissions for the 80th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management to be held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada from 7 – 11 August 2020. You may send us your submissions through the AOM Submission Center until it closes on Tuesday, 14 January 2020 at 5:00 PM ET (NY Time). The Submission Center opens in early December 2019.

Conference Theme: This year’s conference theme is “20/20: Broadening our Sight” and encourages us to widen our view when examining our domain, practice and organizational phenomena. We encourage you to make connections to the theme wherever possible in preparing your submission.

Our Domain: The Management History (MH) Division is a wide-ranging network of scholars interested in the antecedents of modern business practice and thought. We invite submissions of empirical and conceptual papers, as well as proposals for symposia (including panel discussions, debates, and roundtables), for consideration for inclusion in the division’s scholarly program. We encourage submissions from all members of the academy interested in devoting or sharing their work in management history broadly defined.

As there is an element of history within every division in the Academy, the division is open to a variety of methodological approaches and themes ranging from historical events in management practice (empirical focus) to studies that engage with historiography, philosophies of history, and the history of ideas and management thought (theoretical orientation). In this spirit, the MH Division welcomes scholarly contributions that generate meaningful and original contributions in history from across all AOM divisions’ interest groups. Submissions for sessions sponsored jointly with other Academy divisions are regarded as particularly attractive, and highly encouraged. The MH Division encourages submissions from doctoral students. Papers with a PhD student as the first or sole author should be clearly identified when submitted to allow identification of possible winners of the Best Graduate Student Paper.

See our call for PDWs: https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Faom.org%2Fannualmeeting%2Fsubmission%2Fcall%2Fmh%2Fpdw%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cs.decker%40aston.ac.uk%7C37d1deba710c4c7d5b2108d7736c83c2%7Ca085950c4c2544d5945ab852fa44a221%7C0%7C0%7C637104782223824129&sdata=2HRobwAYRgVxdUDAUHumsrId9Ce4IosuZeS6rSQbs8Y%3D&reserved=0

And our call for the scholarly program: https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Faom.org%2Fannualmeeting%2Fsubmission%2Fcall%2Fmh%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cs.decker%40aston.ac.uk%7C37d1deba710c4c7d5b2108d7736c83c2%7Ca085950c4c2544d5945ab852fa44a221%7C0%7C0%7C637104782223824129&sdata=x%2FYFjHP%2BN%2BV6ysqk9y7IdqEiJBgBebWVDuyur3DipIs%3D&reserved=0

We’re looking forward to seeing you in Vancouver,

Roy Suddaby, Program Chair (rsuddaby@uvic.ca) and Trish McLaren, PDW Chair (pmclaren@wlu.ca)

CfP: Crafting World-Leading Outputs from Qualitative Research

31st March & 1st April 2020

University of Liverpool Management School, in association with NARTI, SAMS and ESRC

Following the success of the 2017 PhD led conference, the doctoral community at the University of Liverpool Management School (ULMS) is organising a two-day event to take place in March 2020. The purpose of this workshop is to support PhD students and early career researchers (ECR) scholarly development by offering a space to assist in developing and refining research papers for publication in prominent journals and to facilitate academic socialisation. The theme for this year’s event is ‘Crafting World Leading Outputs for Qualitative Research’: to support PhD candidates and early career researchers in developing their ‘job market’ papers. We welcome submissions from a wide variety of topics in business, management and organization studies.

We expect around 30 participants from across the UK and Europe and an academic panel of ten to facilitate an intense, intellectually stimulating and socially enjoyable forum. The event commences on Tuesday, 31st March in the morning and ends on Wednesday, 1st of April, in the afternoon. All sessions will be held in the University of Liverpool Management School and an evening meal is also included.


Eligibility

The event will be open to all doctoral (from second year onwards) and early career researchers.


Academic panel

Professor Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School)
Professor Caroline Gatrell (University of Liverpool Management School)
Professor Charles Harvey (University of Newcastle)
Professor Daniel Hjorth (Copenhagen Business School & Nottingham Business School)
Professor Robin Holt (Copenhagen Business School & Nottingham Business School)
Professor Christian Garmann Johnsen (Copenhagen Business School)
Professor Martin Kornberger (University of Edinburgh Business School)
Professor Mairi Maclean (University of Bath)
Professor Roy Suddaby (University of Victoria & University of Liverpool Management School)
Professor Mike Zundel (University of Liverpool Management School & Copenhagen Business School)

Contact

Please submit extended abstracts to: t.davis@liverpool.ac.uk

More information: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/management/conferences-and-events/crafting-world-leading-outputs/2020/

CFP: Uses of the Past – Perspectives, Forms and Concepts in Business History

CBS Paper Development Workshop

Business History Conference, Charlotte, NC, March 12, 2020

Submission deadline: January 10, 2020

In thepast years, uses of the past hasbecome a prominent research theme for business historians and organizationscholars alike. Studies on the usefulness and appropriation of the past haveappeared across diverse fields such as business history, organization studies,marketing, learning & education, and CSR. Uses of history is fashionable. Butwhere will the field go in the future?

In the CBSPDW we seek to focus on questions that have yet to asked, and we would like toexplore the theories and methods that might take the field forward.

The workshop offers an opportunity to getfeedback and generate ideas of how to develop concrete paper drafts that deal,one way or the other, with uses of the past. In addition, the PDW will serve asa forum where we can discuss future directions and opportunities (and potentialdead ends) going forward with a ‘uses-of-the-past’ agenda. What are thequestions and research that are yet to be explored, and what are the role forbusiness historians in shaping a ‘uses-of the past’ research agenda?

Themes to be explored in the papers could include,amongst others:

  • Uses of the past for branding, strategy and identity purposes
  • Corporate and public museums
  • The use (andabuse?) of organizational anniversaries
  • Uses of historyin action
  • The role and practices of historical consultancies (e.g. WinthropGroup, The History Factory andothers)
  • Historical CSR
  • Theoretical andmethodological perspectives connected to uses of the past.
  • Criticalperspectives on uses of the past

Submitted texts could take form asextended abstracts or full paper drafts. The important thing is that readers canidentify the key arguments, theories and empirical material, for them toprovide useful feedback, suggestions and comments.

Depending on the submitted abstracts andfull papers, the participants and organizers could potentially explore theopportunity of a subsequent special issue on uses of the past in arelevant academic publication, such as, for example Business History. 

Participants are expected to read allcirculated papers. Please submit a paper draft or extended abstract before January10, 2020 to the workshop organizers.

Anders Ravn Sørensen, ars.mpp@cbs.dk

Morten Tinning, mti.mpp@cbs.dk

GDPR & Historical Archives

You have one more week for submitting your proposal!

The deadline for submissions for the upcoming workshop ‘GDPR & Historical Archives’ expires on 1 December 2019.

This workshop – a joint effort of eabh and the European Central Bank – aims to look at the impact of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) on historical archives, in particular, but not exclusively, in the financial sector. 

The full Call for Papers is available at  http://bankinghistory.org/wp-content/uploads/GDPRHistoricalArchives_CfP.pdf

The event will be held on 23 March 2020 at the European Central Bank in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Capri Summer School – Research Methods in Management

Aim

Capri Summer School was born on the impulse of AIDEA (the Italian Academy of Business Administration and Management). The overall aim of the summer school is to enhance participants’ research capabilities.

Capri Summer School provides a chance for doctoral students and early career researchers to develop their understanding of research methods in management studies, benefiting from an interdisciplinary setting, under the guidance of a panel of internationally renowned scholars.

The school is organized in cooperation with the British Academy of Management (BAM).

Audience and Method

The course is aimed at doctoral students and early stage researchers in the areas of management, interested in qualitative studies of accounting, management, finance, organization, etc. Candidates who are developing interesting ideas but who still have time to be influenced by participation in the summer school will receive the strongest consideration. Admission will be on a competitive basis.

About 30 participants will be admitted: in addition to overall quality of content, factors such as position within the doctoral process and institutional representation will be taken into account. Participants will be selected by the faculty together with the organizing committee. Lectures will cover epistemological issues, data collection methods and analytic techniques such as content and discourse analysis.

Venue

The summer school will be held on the Island of Capri at Villa Orlandi, a seventeenth century villa re-stored by the University of Napoli Federico II. The Villa, surrounded by a nice park, is particularly suited for study and  includes all essential facilities. Over ten desks equipped with PCs and Internet connections are available.

How to apply

Applicants are invited to submit a single PDF file consisting of:

  1. A 4-page extended abstract of their thesis project/research idea. Clearly specifying :
    1. Originality and importance of their intended topic;
    2. Contribution of the work (expected);
    3. Methodological perspectives or epistemological positions they would think as useful to discuss during the summer school.
  2. CV;
  3. motivation letter explaining the reasons behind the application.

All materials should be sent as a single PDF file by 2nd May 2020. An email receipt of the letter will be sent to acknowledge submissions.

Fees will be limited to Euro 460,00 for each participant (not including transports and accommodation).

Apply online at:  http://www.caprisummerschool.it/

EGOS Subtheme 31 CFP: Imprints, Path Dependencies and Beyond

The second EGOS track devoted to history is on the theme of “Intricacies of Organizational Stability and Change: Historical Imprints, Path Dependencies, and Beyond.” For more information, see below or click here.

Sub-theme 31: Intricacies of Organizational Stability and Change: Historical Imprints, Path Dependencies and Beyond

To upload your short paper, please log in to the Member Area.
Convenors:
Christopher Marquis
Cornell University, USA
Georg Schreyögg
Freie Universität Berlin, Germany, & University of Graz, Austria
Jörg Sydow
Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

Call for Papers


This sub-theme seeks to bring together researchers from all over the world who study how organizations deal with change when they are confronted with processes that promote stability, including imprinting, path dependence and inertia more generally. The aim is to foster exchange of fresh empirical insights and new theoretical ideas to further understand stabilizing and destabilizing mechanisms in organizations and inter-organizational relations. The sub-theme connects to the general theme of the 36th EGOS Colloquium – “Organizing for a Sustainable Future: Responsibility, Renewal & Resistance – by examining the dynamics of resistance and renewal in and between organizations. It focuses on the dialectics of making use of routines, its reinforcement and unintended consequences in terms of rigidities, dysfunctional flips, organizational conservatism, and related processes.

The field of stabilizing dynamics – or more generally, the tension between stability and change – provides a particularly advantageous context for exploring the consequences of change efforts as they are developing on different levels: group, organizational, inter-organizational and organizational field, embedded in different institutional environments and numerous strategic contexts. At the same time, research on such types of processes and the evolution of organizational dynamics could benefit from EGOS, as the Colloquium provides a particularly fruitful context for bringing together research from a wide variety of disciplines, theoretical backgrounds, and institutional settings.

The sub-theme wishes to attract both high-quality contributions that are ready to be submitted to a research journal as well as research in progress that explores these challenging issues. It seeks to provide an opportunity for engaging in constructive dialogue and to encourage mutual learning among participating scholars.

We particularly invite contributions that focus on one or more of the following issues:

  • The role of initial conditions, internal and external to an organization, for triggering stabilizing dynamics in terms of imprinting, path dependence and inertial alignments
  • Making stabilizing dynamics reflexive in everyday organizing
  • Stabilizing processes as systemic forces that transcend individual routine compliance
  • Self-reinforcing processes as drivers of stabilizing dynamics
  • Diffusion of stabilizing and change dynamics and contextual factors that foster their emergence
  • Processes and interventions likely to modify or to stop stabilizing dynamics (e.g. external shocks, paradoxical interventions, charismatic leadership or unlearning)
  • Re-conceiving the tension between stabilizing and change dynamics as multi-level-phenomena

Papers studying such issues and related topics, empirically or conceptually, comparatively or monographically, with regard to recent or historical developments, are cordially invited.

References

  • Farjoun, M. (2010): “Beyond Dualism: Stability and Change as a Duality.” Academy of Management Review, 35 (2), 202–225.
  • Gilbert, C.G. (2005): “Unbundling the Structure of Inertia: Resource versus Routine Rigidity.” Academy of Management Journal, 48 (5), 741–763.
  • Kremser, W., & Schreyögg, G. (2016): “The Dynamics of Interrelated Routines. Introducing the Cluster Level.” Organization Science, 27 (3), 698–721.
  • Marquis, C., & Kunyuan, Q. (2018): “Waking from Mao’s Dream: Communist Ideological Imprinting and the Internationalization of Entrepreneurial Ventures in China.” Administrative Science Quarterly, first published online on September 14, 2018; https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0001839218792837
  • Marquis, C., & Tilcsik, A. (2013): “Imprinting: Toward a Multilevel Theory.” Academy of Management Annals, 7 (1), 195–245.
  • Schreyögg, G., & Sydow, J. (2010): “Organizing for Fluidity? Dilemmas of New Organizational Forms.” Organization Science, 21 (6), 1251–1262.
  • Sydow, J., Schreyögg, G., & Koch, J. (2009): “Organizational Path Dependence: Opening the Black Box.” Academy of Management Review, 34 (4), 689–709.
  • Tripsas, M. (2009): “Technology, Identity, and Inertia Through the Lens of ‘The Digital Photography Company’.” Organization Science, 20 (2), 441–460.
Christopher Marquis is currently Samuel C. Johnson Professor in Sustainable Global Enterprise at Cornell University, USA. His recent research focuses on global sustainability and imprinting, especially how these processes have unfolded in China and emerging markets.
Georg Schreyögg is Professor emeritus at Freie Universität Berlin, Germany, and Professor of Managment und Organizational Capabilities at the University of Graz, Austria. He was a member of the editorial board of several national and international journals. Georg’s current research interests include organizational change, routines, organizational capabilities and path dependence.
Jörg Sydow is Professor of Management and Inter-firm Cooperation at the School of Business & Economics of Freie Universität Berlin, Germany. His recent research focuses on creative industries, inter-firm networking, especially in service and science-based industries.
To upload your short paper, please log in to the Member Area.

Organization & Time: Understanding the Past (and Future) in the Present

EGOS Conference Hamburg, 2-4 July 2020

Sub-Theme 1 (SWG)

Convenors:

David Chandler
University of Colorado Denver, USA
david.chandler@ucdenver.edu

Majken Schultz
Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
ms.ioa@cbs.dk

Roy Suddaby
University of Victoria, Canada, & University of Liverpool, United Kingdom
rsuddaby@uvic.ca


Call for Papers


Contemporary organizations operate increasingly according to a logic of speed and instantaneity, while at the same time increasing their temporal spans to either draw upon their histories or to cope with distant future challenges (Schultz & Hernes, 2013). Within widely varying “temporal depths” (Bluedorn, 2002), different organizational actors carve out wide combinations of temporal structures (Ancona et al., 2001) and trajectories (Lawrence et al., 2001) that shape the organizations themselves and their relationships with other organizational actors. Recent work in organization theory has begun the search for ways to analytically and empirically handle the temporal complexity that organizational actors face (Hussenot & Missonier, 2016). This sub-theme aims to extend this work through joint inquiry.

Within organization theory, many of the actions and outcomes we study are the result of processes that occur over long periods of time (Bluedorn & Denhardt, 1988; Goodman et al., 2001; Lee & Liebenau, 1999). These processes reach into the distant past, but also stretch into the unknown future. In spite of this, within much macro-level research, temporal issues are rarely theorized rigorously. As such, we seek to host a discussion among colleagues from across the range of organization theories to (a) more comprehensively theorize the past, present, and future in relation to organizations and organizing, and (b) stimulate work on theories of time itself (Pierson, 2004). This discussion, we believe, will have profound implications for our understanding of organizations and how they evolve. In particular, this sub-theme builds on the first sub-theme of the SWG (in 2019) to focus on the various ways the past are used in organizations and enacted in the present. We also include topics related to how expectations for the future intersect with uses of the past. Organizations draw upon their own past across widely different timespans, which may extend from a few days to centuries; they also draw upon past practices and symbols from craft, traditions, regions, or myths (e.g., Dacin et al., 2018; Schultz & Hernes, 2013).

Our goal for this sub-theme, therefore, is twofold – to more comprehensively theorize the past, present, and future in relation to organizations and organizing (e.g., fostering more complete analyses of complex temporal processes), but also to stimulate theory about the past, present, and future in a phenomenological sense. We seek to build an inclusive conversation that appeals to many theories and methods within organization theory. For example, we are not simply interested in understanding long periods of time as path-dependent processes, but in understanding things like temporal trajectories, time as a social construct, the past as a resource in the present, and the cumulative evolution of institutions and their underlying values.

The resulting discussion presents the opportunity for an exciting avenue of research that includes, but is not limited, to the following:

  • To explore the effects of “ancestry” and “legacy” on the founding, evolution, and dissolution of descendent organizations (Walsh & Bartunek, 2011).
  • To understand the role of rhetoric in constructing history that serves as a source of competitive advantage for organizations (Suddaby et al., 2010).
  • To focus on the nature of the distant past, exploring how organizations draw on historical artifacts and narratives to build authenticity and shape identity (Hatch & Schultz, 2017).
  • To understand how organizations and other social actors use history strategically to foster identification with key stakeholders (Suddaby et al., 2015).
  • To study character and values as historically-accreted commitments that create meaning for individuals within institutional contexts (Chandler, 2014; Kraatz & Flores, 2015).
  • To conceptualize how distant pasts and distant futures connect, in the present (Chandler & Foster, 2015; Schultz & Hernes, forthcoming). Distant pasts can be evoked in the present, but in a processual or pragmatist view any evoking of the past has a future orientation.

 
In this spirit, researchers across the range of organization theories are encouraged to apply for this sub-theme to help place the past, present, and future on a firmer theoretical footing. Our goal is to foster discussions that encompass theory (e.g., path dependence, sedimentation) and methodology (e.g., qualitative analysis, rhetorical analysis) to enable the more effective theorization and empirical study of the essential role of the past, present, and future in understanding organizations and organizing processes.

 

References

  • Ancona, D.G., Goodman, P.S., Lawrence, B.S., & Tushman, M.L. (2001): “Time: A New Research Lens.” Academy of Management Review, 26 (4), 645–663.
  • Bluedorn, A.C. (2002): The Human Organization of Time: Temporal Realities and Experience. Stanford, CA: Stanford Business Books.
  • Bluedorn, A.C., & Denhardt, R.B. (1988): “Time and Organizations.” Journal of Management, 14 (2), 299–320.
  • Chandler, D. (2014): “Morals, Markets, and Values-based Businesses.” Academy of Management Review, 39 (3), 396–406.
  • Chandler, D., & Foster, W.M. (2015): “A Present Past: A Historical Perspective on Institutional Maintenance and Change.” Academy of Management Annual Meeting. Vancouver, Canada.
  • Dacin, T.M., Dacin, P.A., & Kent, D. (2018): “Tradition in Organizations: A Custodianship Framework.” Academy of Management Annals, 13 (1), 342–373.
  • Goodman, P.S., Lawrence, B.S., Ancona, D.G., & Tushman, M.L. (2001): “Introduction to the Special Issue: Time in Organizations.” Academy of Management Review, 26 (4), 507–511.
  • Hatch, M.J., & Schultz, M. (2017): “Toward a Theory of Using History Authentically: Historicizing in the Carlsberg Group.” Administrative Science Quarterly, 62 (4), 657–697.
  • Hussenot, A.&, Missonier, S. (2016): “Encompassing Stability and Novelty in Organization Studies: An Events-based Approach.” Organization Studies, 37 (4), 523–546.
  • Kraatz, M.S., & Flores, R. (2015): “Reinfusing Values.” In: M.S. Kraatz (ed.): Institutions and Ideals: Philip Selznick’s Legacy for Organizational Studies. Research in the Sociology of Organizations, Vol. 44. Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 353–381.
  • Lawrence, T.B., Winn, M.I., & Jennings, P.D. (2001): “The Temporal Dynamics of Institutionalization.” Academy of Management Review, 26 (4), 624–644.
  • Lee, H., & Liebenau, J. (1999): “Time in Organizational Studies: Towards a New Research Direction.” Organization Studies, 20 (6), 1035–1058.
  • Pierson, P. (2004): Politics in Time: History, Institutions, and Social Analysis. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Schultz, M., & Hernes, T. (forthcoming): ““Temporal interplay between strategy and identity: Punctuated, subsumed and sustained modes.” Strategic Organization, first published online on April 30, 2019; https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1476127019843834
  • Suddaby, R., Foster, W., & Quinn Trank, C. (2010): “Rhetorical history as a source of competitive advantage.” In: B. Joel A.C. & J. Lampel (eds.): The Globalization of Strategy Research. Advances in Strategic Management, Vol. 27. Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 147–173.
  • Suddaby, R., & Foster, W.M., & Quinn Trank, C. (2015): “Organizational Re-Membering: The Use of Rhetorical History to Create Identification.” In: M. Pratt, M. Schultz, B. Ashforth & D. Ravasi (eds.): Oxford Handbook of Organizational Identity. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 297–316.
  • Walsh, I.J., & Bartunek, J.M. (2011): “Cheating the Fates: Organizational Foundings in the Wake of Demise.” Academy of Management Journal, 54 (5), 1017–1044.

David Chandler is Associate Professor of Management at the University of Colorado Denver, USA. His research focuses on understanding how organizations interact with their complex institutional environments. This research has been published in ‘Administrative Science Quarterly’, ‘Organization Science’, ‘Academy of Management Review’, and ‘Journal of Management’. He has also written the book “Corporate Social Responsibility: A Strategic Perspective” (Business Expert Press, 2015) as part of the UN PRME book collection and is author of the textbook “Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility: Sustainable Value Creation” (5th edition, SAGE Publications, 2020).

Majken Schultz is Professor of Management and Organization Studies at Copenhagen Business School (CBS), Denmark, and member of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters. She is co-founder of the Center for Organizational Time at CBS. Her recent research focuses on temporality in organizations, including how history is used for the future, as well as how future strategy becomes meaningful through identity. She has published in ‘Academy of Management Journal’, ‘Academy of Management Review’, ‘Administrative Science Quarterly’, ‘Human Relations’, ‘European Journal of Marketing’ and co-written/edited more than a dozen books.

Roy Suddaby is Professor & Winspear Chair at the Peter B. Gustavson School of Business, University of Victoria, Canada. He is also Research Professor at Newcastle University Business School, Newcastle University, United Kingdom. His research focuses on organizational and social change and has been published in ‘Academy of Management Journal’, ‘Academy of Management Review’, ‘Administrative Science Quarterly’, ‘Human Relations’, ‘Journal of Business Venturing’ and related leading management journals.

Deadline approaching for BHC Doctoral Colloquium submissions!

The BHC Doctoral Colloquium in Business History will be held once again in conjunction with the 2020 BHC annual meeting. This prestigious workshop, funded by Cambridge University Press, will take place in Charlotte, North Carolina on Wednesday, March 11th and Thursday March 12th, 2020. Typically limited to ten students, the colloquium is open to doctoral candidates who are pursuing dissertation research within the broad field of business history, from any relevant discipline (e.g., from economic sociology, political science, cultural anthropology, or management, as well as history).  Most participants are in year 3 or 4 or their degree program, though in some instances applicants at a later stage make a compelling case that their thesis research had evolved in ways that led them to see the advantages of an intensive engagement with business history.

The theme of the 2020 BHC annual meeting is “Collaboration in Business and Business History.”  We welcome proposals from students working within the conference theme, as well as any other thematic area of business history.  Topics (see link for past examples) may range from the early modern era to the present, and explore societies across the globe.  Participants work intensively with a distinguished group of BHC-affiliated scholars (including the incoming BHC president), discussing dissertation proposals, relevant literatures and research strategies, and career trajectories. 

Applications are due by 15 November 2019 via email to amy.feistel@duke.edu and should include: a statement of interest; CV; preliminary or final dissertation prospectus (10-15 pages); and a letter of support from your dissertation supervisor (or prospective supervisor).  All participants receive a stipend that partially defrays travel costs to the annual meeting.  Applicants will receive notification of the selection committee’s decisions by the end of 2019.

The director of the Colloquium is Edward Balleisen, Professor of History and Public Policy, Duke University.  Other faculty participants include:

Gustavo del Angel, Professor of Economics, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE), Mexico City (Mexican and Latin American Business History)

Neil Rollings, Professor of Economic and Business History, University of Glasgow (European Business History)

Susie Pak, Professor of History, St. Johns University (American Business History)

Madeleine Zelin, Professor of History, Columbia University (Chinese and Asian Business History)