Accounting History International Emerging Scholars’ Colloquium

Call for Research Proposals

The Accounting History International Emerging Scholars’ Colloquium

Portsmouth, United Kingdom, 8 September 2021

The Accounting History International Emerging Scholars’ Colloquium (AHIESC) will be held as part of the eleventh Accounting History International Conference (11AHIC) being held in Portsmouth, United Kingdom during 8-10 September 2021.

This international forum is designed for emerging scholars of all ages and career stages, including doctoral degree students, new faculty and other emerging accounting researchers who have an interest in accounting history, and who seek to obtain feedback from senior faculty members on their historical accounting research projects in an intellectually stimulating environment.

Please find attached the ‘Call for Research Proposals’. Further details about the 11AHIC can be found at the following site: https://www.port.ac.uk/11AHIC

Please also note these important dates:

  • 2 November 2020 Submission opening
  • 19 March 2021 Submission deadline

Best wishes

Carolyn, Carolyn and Laura

Carolyn Cordery, Carolyn Fowler and Laura Maran

Editors, Accounting History

EBHA E-Congress

This week our blog comes out on Monday to highlight the EBHA eConference taking place this week Friday – below the registration details and the day’s timetable.

September 11th, 2020

Hosted by CUNEF – Madrid (Zoom platform)

Registration: https://ebha.org/public/C3

Globalization Challenged

Keynote Speech

9.15 – 10.15 am (CEST) Introduction and Chair: Andrea Colli, EBHA President

Keynote speech: Martin Wolf, Financial Times

Discussant: Teresa da Silva Lopes, EBHA Vice-president

Globalization Challenged: the perspective of Business History

10.30 – 12.15 pm (CEST) Introduction and Chair: Bram Bouwens, Utrecht University and EBHA Council member

Panelists:

  • Tomasz Olejniczak, Department of Management, Kozminski University (Warsaw)
  • Grace Ballor, Harvard Business School
  • Ann-Kristin Bergquist, Unit of Economic History and Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics, Umeå University
  • Edoardo Altamira, Department of International History, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (Geneva)

EBHA Annual General Meeting

12.30 – 1.15 pm (CEST) Separate virtual room.

EBHA members can register at: https://ebha.org/public/C5

Roundtable “Teaching Business History in Distance Learning”

2.30 – 4.00 pm (CEST) Coordinator: Maiju Wuokko, University of Turku

Panelists:

  • Adoración Álvaro-Moya, CUNEF University (Madrid) and EBHA Secretary
  • Ludovic iCaullet, Edhec Business School (Roubaix)
  • Andrea Colli, Bocconi University Milan and
  • EBHA President Andrew Smith, University of Liverpool 

BAM2020 and how history can help us to “Take Race Seriously”

It’s been a great start to the BAM2020 Conference in the Cloud today. A genuinely nice way to start the new academic years, which is nearly upon us (and promises to be a genuinely strange experience at universities everywhere). And as it is 2020, the conference is of course virtual, and consequently in a different format. Individual presentations only take place asynchronously, so I am not clear how much feedback and engagement anyone who has submitted papers will receive, but it is an interesting innovation.

The main conference is now a series of panel discussion around key topics, which so far have been informative and practical (such as “The Art of Reviewing”) as well as timely and topical. The BAM fellows session addressed issues of “Taking Race Seriously”, and highlighted not just what is happening in businesses and other organizations, but also in academia. Prof Nelarine Cornelius emphasised the role that a more critical approach to teaching business and imperial history could play in making our curricula more diverse. She particularly referred to the role of chartered companies, such as the East India company, and merchant venturers as creating the institutions that anchored global trade – an influence that continues to the present day. Including any history in business school curricula, either as standalone modules or within existing ones, is often advocated (particularly when there’s a crisis on) but it is not clear how to engage students in history when this is not what they came to management and business schools for. Mention anything before the year 2000, and enjoy the puzzled look in your students faces (back when you could actually still see them).

When it comes to thinking about how to draw on history to raise awareness for the racist and violent expansion of imperialist powers in the “First Global Economy”, it brings with it a critical and at times subversive view on the very models and approaches that we teach. Whether it is the origins of management ideas in the plantation economy of the antebellum South US (and therefore in the management of slave labour) or a more general reassessment of how we think management ideas were developed – this kind of knowledge challenges what we thing we know about the past as much as the present.

But it also raises the issue that perhaps not enough of this research has taken place and that there is a scarcity of material out there that we can teach our students about. It is not solely WHAT to teach them (although that is an issue as well), but also HOW to link this into the broader curriculum and learning objectives. It is of course one way in which business and management schools could decolonise the curriculum, but finding and integrating such resources is not always easily done. This was particularly highlighted by a very interested talk I chaired for the Business History Collective (on Twitter: @bizhiscol) last week. Profs Leon C Prieto and Simone Phipps talked about their research about the ‘hidden’ pioneers of African-American management thought, focusing on three individuals few management scholars may have heard of, because their contribution to business history and management ideas were ignored in many ways, both at the time and by posterity. You can access a recording of their talk here (you will need to enter this password: 0?bUF83n).

Going forward, we will hopefully see more of this kind of research that we can bring into our teaching. While business and management journals, of course, continue to publish a wide variety of research, there is a noticeable shift in many mainstream journals towards engaging with these issues. See, for example, a recent issue in AMLE featuring articles bringing historical and postcolonial perspectives to bear on management education. Nevertheless, such work still needs to contribute to theory and address the key concerns of journals by making a connection to existing conversations. Tomorrow, BAM2020 will start with our regular Meet the Editors session – again chaired by yours truly. Even if you cannot be there, do make sure you watch the really informative advance video of the editors of BJM, IJMR, EMJ and JMS, which is a great resource to better understand how to get published in these journals. As historical research is becoming more mainstream and the issues with what we think we know about the origins of management practices and thought ever more apparent and controversial, it is important to join these wider conversations.

Coleman Prize presentations

Unfortunately this year’s Association of Business Historians (ABH) conference in Nottingham did not take place due to the ongoing pandemic. One session that was launched virtually was the Coleman Prize session, via Zoom. It was a strong year with three excellent presentations, which all three candidates on the shortlist agreed to share (see below).

First up, the Coleman Prize winner, Dr Akram Benjamin (University of Reading), who talked about his fascinating research on business networks and the financing of cotton in Egypt.

This was followed by a presentation on organizational corruption at Enron in the California Energy Crisis, by Dr Adam Nix (Aston University, now at De Montfort University).

Finally, the talk by David Paulson (University of Cambridge, now Queens University Belfast) compares SMEs in Britain and West Germany in 1950s, ’60s and ’70s, on the basis of painstaking work in multiple archives.

Virtual AOM symposium: Temporality of entrepreneurial opportunities

Entrepreneurial opportunities—as situations (e.g., Shane & Venkataraman, 2000), social constructs (e.g., Alvarez & Barney, 2007) and/or objects of entrepreneurial discourse (e.g., Cornelissen and Clarke, 2010)—may have something to do with a contrast between the status quo (i.e. the past) and the imagined future which may be realized through action in the present. But we’ve noticed that the entrepreneurship literature rarely deals explicitly or directly with the relationship between entrepreneurial opportunities and the passage of time. 

Join us on July 24, 2020 at 8 AM Pacific Time for a panel discussion and dialogue on the question—how does an explicit focus on time, temporality or history shape the way you conceptualize and study entrepreneurial opportunity? 

Panelists include Dimo Dimov, David Kirsch, Jacqueline Kirtley, Tanja Leppäaho, Rob Mitchell, Dan Raff, Andrew Smith, Dan Wadhwani and Matt Wood.

Here the link to participate in the session. The meeting ID is 986 4484 7268. The password for the meeting will be ENT&Time. Upon joining the meeting, you will be prompted to provide your consent to participating in a recorded meeting. We will be posting a video recording of this meeting for further discussion and engagement as an asynchronous event of the Academy of Management annual meeting co-hosted by the entrepreneurship and management history divisions.Best regards,Trevor 

Coleman Prize session is going digital this year

Unfortunately, the ABH conference is not taking place due to COVID-19, but the Coleman Prize session will now be held virtually on Thursday, 25 June, 14:00-15:00 (UK time).

What is the Coleman Prize

Named in honour of the British Business Historian Donald Coleman, this prize is awarded annually by the Association of Business Historians to recognise excellence in new research in Britain. It is open to PhD dissertations in Business History either having a British subject or completed at a British University. All dissertations completed in the previous two calendar years to that of their submission are eligible (with the exception of previous submissions). It is a condition of eligibility for the Prize that shortlisted finalists will present their findings at the Association’s annual conference.

Sponsors

The value of the prize is £500 and it is sponsored by Taylor & Francis Group. It is a scholarly publisher, which makes available original manuscript collections, rare printed books and other primary source materials in microform and electronic format.

On the shortlist this year are:

  • Akram Beniamin, “Cotton, Finance and Business Networks in a Globalised World: The Case of Egypt during the first half of the Twentieth century “.
  • Adam Nix, “The Social Foundations of Organisational Corruption”.
  • David Paulson, “Small and medium sized Enterprises in Britain and West Germany c.1949-1979”.

If you would like to attend, please email Professor Neil Rollings (Neil.Rollings[at]Glasgow.Ac.Uk) for the joining details.

List of former Coleman Prize winners.

Online seminars in Business History

In a mix up of our normal publishing schedule, I am running our weekly blog tonight to make you all aware of the start of a great initiative tomorrow afternoon: A new series of online seminars in Business History, facilitated by the GUG.

The aims of this series of online seminars is to help ECRs/PHDs to disseminate work in the absence of physical conferences. You can find the current schedule of events here: https://unternehmensgeschichte.de/Online-Seminare

If you have any questions about the event, please get in touch with Nicholas Wong (nicholas.d.wong@northumbria.ac.uk), who has disseminated the event on behalf of a group colleagues, who put this great initiative together.

New African Studies track at BAM2020

I am really pleased that BAM now has, in addition to the long-standing Business and Management History track, a new track for African Studies that is open to wide variety of approaches, including historical research.

We would like to bring to your attention a new track on African Studies for the BAM 2020 conference in Manchester. The African Studies track is committed to examining submissions that foster dialogue on contemporary African research which directly impacts BAM members and the wellbeing of the broader academic research community. We are especially keen to receive full and development papers (both conceptual and empirical based) as well as workshop styled interventions on the following topical areas:  

  • African entrepreneurial process & other spatial/temporal issues on African entrepreneurship.
  • African culture, alternative institutions and indigenous networks.
  • Policy & practice issues on African development and SMEs.
  • African development finance, including formal & informal sources of finance, financial bootstrapping, small business, venture capital, & bank credits. 
  • African leadership and leadership development.
  • African research on female & gender entrepreneurship.
  • African  research methodologies & methods

We have an open list for potential submissions but are interested in papers which explore an African theme. The BAM2020 submission site can be located via the following link:  https://www.conftool.pro/bam2020. We look forward to your submissions.

Track Chairs

Dr. Kingsley Omeihe, Edinburgh Napier University              k.omeihe@napier.ac.uk

Dr. Christian Harrison, University of the West of Scotland   Christian.Harrison@uws.ac.uk
The BAM Team | British Academy of Management  
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British Academy of Management, Five Kings House, Queen Street Place, London, EC4R 1QS, UK
T: +44 (0)2073 837 770 | F: +44 (0) 2073 830 377 | bam@bam.ac.uk 
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CfP for ABH extended until 10 Feb!

Please find the Call for Papers for the ABH 2020 conference below.  Please note the closing date for papers/sessions has been extended to 10.02.2020.  

Please encourage applicants for the Coleman Prize, which has also been extended to 10.02.2020. 

You can submit your papers by visiting the ABH website athttps://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH/index.html, then click on Please view here.

If you require any further information, please do not hesitate to contact us, or the ABH 2020 conference organisers, email: Business-Historians2020@Nottingham.ac.uk.

BUBBLES AND CRISES; MAYHEM AND MISERY; CORRUPTION AND DISRUPTION

26–27 June 2020

Nottingham University Business School Jubilee Campus

As we continue to live with the worldwide fallout of the 2008 economic crisis, we have to wonder whether we have learned anything about business, bubbles, and crises over the centuries. This conference will address the historical consequences of bubbles and crises and their ramifications in terms of human and financial misery and the difficulties caused at national level (e.g., in respect of lower tax revenues and consequent reductions to public goods and services) and to businesses, communities and individuals.

The first bubble was famously that of the ‘Tulip Mania’ of 1636 followed by the crash of early 1637. In the British context, there was also the railway mania of the mid-19th century, and in the context of the United States, the great crash and depression of the 1930s, which had worldwide consequences. More recently we have seen various financial crises and stock market crashes e.g.: the UK in 1987; the 1997 financial crisis in Asia; the 1998 Russian financial crisis; the ‘dot.com’ bubble of the 1990s; the housing/property market bubbles in China, Japan and Australia in the early 2000s; the recent economic crises in Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Greece and Spain.

As we approach the tri-centenary of the British ‘South Sea Bubble’ and the French ‘Mississippi Bubble’, this conference aims to revisit various bubbles and crises around three themes with various sub-questions.:

Bubbles and Crises

What macro forces are at play? Are financial bubbles and crises historically and economically cyclical and inevitable? How do they affect businesses and the economy more widely?

Mayhem and Misery

Are there ever rational bubbles? Who wins? Who loses? What national and international social and economic public policy changes were proposed or made in response to alleviate the consequences? What were the consequences for businesses, communities and individuals?

Corruption and Disruption

Who is to blame? Whom do we blame? What is the relationship between business and individual behaviour and corruption? What were the outcomes from crises in terms of political and economic regulation? Who are the beneficiaries of crises? What can we learn about the persistence and circulation of business elites?

We will particularly welcome papers on businesses’ role and involvement, collectively or individually, in these or related themes, but will also consider papers that sit outside this framework.

How to submit a paper or session proposal

The programme committee will consider both individual papers and entire panels. Individual paper proposals should include a one-page (up to 300-word) abstract and one-page curriculum vitae (CV). Panel proposals should include a cover letter stating the rationale for the panel and the name of its contact person; one-page (300-word) abstract and author’s CV for each paper; and a list of preferred panel chairs and commentators with contact information. Note that each academic session lasts 90 minutes, allowing time for 3 or at a pinch 4 papers. The deadline for submissions is 10 February 2020.

If you have any questions please contact the Conference Organisers: Business- Historians2020@Nottingham.ac.uk.

Submissions must be made online at: https://unternehmensgeschichte.de/db/public/C1. Begin by selecting between uploading a single paper or a full panel. Have your abstract and CV ready. The software will guide you through the uploading and submission process.

Any other suggestions for the conference – workshops, poster sessions, panel discussions – should be made to the programme committee through Business- Historians2020@Nottingham.ac.uk.

Call for Tony Slaven Doctoral Workshop in Business History, 25th June 2020

The ABH will hold its eight annual Tony Slaven Doctoral Workshop on 25th June 2020. This event immediately precedes the 2020 ABH Annual Conference at Nottingham University Business School. Participants in the Workshop are encouraged to attend the main ABH Annual Conference following the Workshop. The Workshop is an excellent opportunity for doctoral students to discuss their work with other research students and established academics in business history in an informal and supportive environment. Students at any stage of their doctoral studies, whether in their first year or very close to submitting, are urged to apply. In addition to providing new researchers with an opportunity to discuss their work with experienced researchers in the discipline, the Workshop will also include at least one skills- related session. The Workshop interprets the term ‘business history’ broadly, and it is intended that students in areas such as (but not confined to) the history of international trade and investment, financial or economic history, agricultural history, the history of not-for- profit organisations, government-industry relations, accounting history, social studies of technology, and historians or management or labour will find it useful. Students undertaking topics with a significant business history element but in disciplines other than economic or business history are also welcome. We embrace students researching any era or region of history. Skills sessions are typically led by regular ABH members; in the past these have included ‘getting published’, ‘using historical sources’, and ‘preparing for your viva examination’ sessions. There will be ample time for discussion of each student’s work and the opportunity to gain feedback from active researchers in the field.

How to Apply for the Tony Slaven Workshop

Your application should be no more than 4 pages sent together in a single computer file: 1) a one page CV; 2) one page stating the name(s) of the student’s supervisor(s), the title of the theses (a proposed title is fine), the university and department where the student is registered and the date of commencement of thesis registration; 3) an abstract of the work to be presented.

You may apply via email to Dr Mitch Larson at mjlarson@uclan.ac.uk. Please use the subject line “Tony Slaven Workshop” and submit by the 10 February 2020.

Call for Coleman Prize for Best PhD Dissertation, Nottingham University Business School, 26–27 June 2020

Named in honour of the British business historian Donald Coleman (1920-1995), this prize is awarded annually by the Association of Business Historians to recognise excellence in new research in Britain. It is open to PhD dissertations in Business History (broadly defined) either having a British subject or completed at a British university. All dissertations completed in the previous calendar year to that of the Prize are eligible. In keeping with the ABH’s broad understanding of business history, applications are strongly encouraged from candidates in economic history, social history, labour history, intellectual history, cultural history, environmental history, the history of science and technology, the history of medicine, or any other subfield. The value of the prize is £500, sponsored by the Taylor & Francis Group, a scholarly publisher. To be eligible for the Prize, finalists must present their findings in person at the Association’s annual conference, held on 26–27 June 2020. A complete list of previous winners may be found at: http://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH/coleman.html

How to Apply for the Coleman Prize
Supervisors are encouraged to nominate recent PhDs, and self-nominations are also strongly welcomed. Please send a PDF including the title of your PhD dissertation and a brief abstract (up to 2 double-spaced pages) to christine.leslie@glasgow.ac.uk by 10 February 2020. Shortlisted candidates will be requested to submit electronic copies of their theses by 20 February 2020. Finalists will be notified by 19 March 2020.

Everyone appearing on the programme must register for the meeting. PhD students whose papers are accepted for the meeting may apply for funds to partially defray their travel costs by applying to the Francesca Carnevali Travel Grant for PhD Students. A limited number of scholarships are available from the Francesca Carnevali fund of the ABH to contribute towards the travel, accommodation and registration costs of students doing a PhD in the United Kingdom, who are presenting in the Slaven Workshop, the ABH conference or the Coleman Prize.

Further details can be found at – https://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH

WCBH application deadline extended

Good news for those who missed the application deadline for the Second World Congress of Business History (WCBH) at Nanzan University, Nagoya, Japan (September 10th -12th, 2020). 

The program committee decided to extend the deadline for panel and paper proposals to January 29 (Wednesday), 2020.

WCBH 2020 is a world-wide congress jointly organized by EBHA and BHSJ, and it is positioned as the 24th Congress of the European Business History Association, and also as a specially organized international conference by BHSJ. Please visit:
http://bhs.ssoj.info/WCBH2020/index.html

Travel Support Information

The local organizers have secured funds for partial travel support for Young Scholars (PhD students are prioritized, but other young scholars eligible) and for participants from regions that do not usually have the chance to attend academic conferences in Japan. The exact amount of support is not yet determined, but the organizers hope to be able to offer between $300 to $1000 according to region. 
Applicants from the above categories whose papers have been selected for the Congress will be approached individually to apply for travel support. 
More details will follow, but in the meantime we encourage applications from the above categories.

We are looking forward to welcoming you in Japan!

Program Committee of WCBH

ProgramCommittee@worldbhc.org