British Academy’s Future of the Corporation

Over the last four years, the British Academy’s Future of the Corporation programme has brought together talented groups of academics, business leaders, investors, civil society leaders and policymakers to explore how business can solve problems for people and the planet. The programme has given unrivaled attention to the questions around how purpose can be placed at the heart of business through policy, practice and business education.

The British Academy invites you to join them to hear their conclusions and discuss the role of policy, practice and business education in firmly embedding purpose in the way business operates. Please register for the launch of our third and final report, Policy and Practice for Purposeful Business, and a series of discussions on adapting business education to purpose on their website.

CfP: History of Insurance in a Global Perspective

Posted on behalf of Grietjie Verhoef:

International Conference University of Basel, Switzerland 20–22 July 2022, https://history-of-insurance.dg.unibas.ch/en/

Deadline for Proposals: 30th of September 2021

The dynamic nature of financial markets was highlighted during the wave of demutualisations that occurred towards the end of the 20th century. In the 1980s and 1990s mutual insurers, mutual banks and mutual building societies demutualised in response to a number of incentives and pressures. In their wake large financial services companies emerged changing the landscape of financial markets.  Three decades on, it is timely to review the outcomes of this phase in insurance and financial history. Have the performance expectations of demutualised companies been fulfilled?

This session invites scholars to engage in different aspects of the post-demutualisation operations of insurance corporations in different geographies since the beginning of the twenty-first century. Historians and insurance specialists are called upon to address the nature of the demutualised insurance environment in various markets. 

The following questions are considered:

  • In what ways has the demutualisation trend been related to parallel trends such as bancassurance and securitization? What does that indicate about the nature of change in financial markets?
  • What was the nature of the organisational structure of post-demutualisation insurance corporations?
  • How stable have organisational structures been? Specifically what does the demutualised entity look like 3 decades on?
  • Have changes in organisational and ownership form influenced post-demutualisation investment operations, that is actual investment behaviour or related strategies?
  • How has the financial performance of demutualised insurance companies compared to the mutual phase of operations?
  • How has the global configuration of insurance companies developed?
  • What have been the strategic foci of demutualise insurance companies?
  • How did corporate governance develop in the demutualised insurance corporations?
  • How has insurance penetration developed post-demutualisation?
  • How have ex mutuals fared during the various financial crises experienced in the last 2 decades?

Proposals can be submitted by email to the session organisers by 30 September 2021.

Session Organisers: 

Grietjie Verhoef ; University of Johannesburg/ Monash University gverhoef@uj.ac.za / Grietjie.Verhoef@monash.edu

Monica Keneley ; Deakin University, Australia    mkeneley@deakin.edu.au

Antti Talonen ;  Helsinki University, Finland.     Antti.talonen@helsinki.fi

Much appreciated

Grietjie

Changes to BHC Weblog

The Exchange, the weblog of the US-based Business History Conference (BHC), is now part of the website (https://thebhc.org). The Exchange was founded by Pat Denault over a decade ago, and it has become an essential channel for announcements from and about the BHC and from our subscribers and members. Announcements from The Exchange will come up on the News section of the BHC website as they did before. However, if you wish to receive these announcements via email, and you have not done so yet, please subscribe to The Exchange by:

  1. Going to the website’s homepage (https://thebhc.org), scrolling down to the end of the page, and clicking on “Subscribe to the Latest BHC News.”
  1. Or go to the “News” section of the website’s homepage (https://thebhc.org/), and click on “The Exchange” to subscribe. Press Subscribe once you are in the blog’s page
  1. Click here https://thebhc.org/exchange and press Subscribe.

CfP: University of Tübingen & University of Glasgow PhD Summer School

Business Beyond the Abyss: Crisis Management, Institutional Memory and Learning

3-5 November 2021, Tübingen, Germany.

The University of Tübingen’s Collaborative Research Center 923 – “Threatened Orders: Societies under Stress” (Germany) – provides funding for an intensive three-day event aimed at PhD students in business history or economic history working on any topic that overlaps with the theme of the school (for more details, see “Further Notes for Applicants” below). Students will, the pandemic permitting, be hosted in the historic town of Tübingen and will present, debate and discuss their works-in-progress with leading international scholars within a world-class university.

The school aims to provide doctoral students with an overview of relevant research and innovative tools and methodologies in the fields of business and economic history, including legal perspectives. It is the third event in this series organised jointly by the Seminar für Neuere Geschichte (Tübingen) and the Centre for Business History in Scotland (University of Glasgow), and this time joined by the Center for Law and Social Science (Emory University School of Law).

The school will take the form of presentations from students (c.25 minutes) and workshops hosted by established experts in the field. The aims of the school are:

1) to deepen students’ understanding of current themes in historical research (and how this can inform their own work);

2) to enhance research skills through masterclasses on methods for researching and writing history;

3) to explore the main theoretical underpinnings particular to business and economic history; and

4) to provide a welcoming and convivial environment in which students can discuss their research with leading scholars and peers.

Students will benefit from the experience of academics from Tübingen and beyond. Confirmed speakers include Prof. Dr. Boris Gehlen (Stuttgart), Dr Daniel Menning (Tübingen) and Dr Christopher Miller (Glasgow). We hope to confirm additional speakers in the coming weeks and months.

Funding will cover flights and/or trains (up to an agreed limit, to be reimbursed after the school), accommodation, lunches, and the conference meal for up to fourteen students. There may also be limited space for applicants who wish to self-fund or who have received funding from their own institution.

Those interested in attending the summer school should e-mail the following documents to the organisers, Dr Daniel Menning (Daniel.Menning@uni-tuebingen.de), Dr Christopher Miller (Christopher.Miller@glasgow.ac.uk), and Prof Rafael Pardo (rafael.pardo@emory.edu):

1)   a brief CV (two pages maximum);

2)   a summary of their PhD (two pages maximum); and

3)  a title and abstract for their desired presentation topic, which should incorporate one or more major themes of the student’s PhD (one page maximum).

While not required, applicants are strongly encouraged to submit with their materials an example of a work-in-progress (e.g., a draft chapter, article, or working paper), preferably in English, German, or French. Please note, however, that all presentations and discussions will be in English.

The deadline for applications is 15 July 2021A maximum of 14 funded applicants will be selected and notified shortly afterwards.

Further Notes for Applicants:

Overview of Scope and Aims of the School:

(This overview is only a guide. Students working on similar topics to those listed below are encouraged to speak to Daniel Menning and/or Christopher Miller in the first instance.)

With the COVID-19 virus spreading across the globe and many major economic countries shutting down social life and significant parts of the economy, we have been witnessing an economic contraction ensuing at an astonishing pace as well as an equally swift, though rather more varied, re- start. Though it is too early yet to estimate the effects and predict the duration of the economic difficulties (including, for example, current shortages of raw materials), it is clear that many businesses suffered and many remain in trouble. A significant number most likely will not survive, all governmental bailout packages notwithstanding. While interest in economic crises and their effects on businesses has increased over the past few years, the current conditions will likely give a new boost to research and result in a new thoughtfulness and a recalibration of research methods.

Research Background:

Business and economic history has been at the forefront of explaining some of the major changes in economies and societies – starting with the work of Alfred Chandler in the 1960s. (Chandler 1962, 1977). Nevertheless, with regards to the business history of crises and crisis management  specifically, the literature is far less well developed. There are three reasons for this neglect. First, the tradition of business history for several decades, until comparatively recently, was to study the history of individual firms, or less frequently sectors. Indeed, business history was once considered an applied branch of economic history for scholars wishing to move beyond macroeconomic trends. The net effect has been that the literature on firms has been dominated by commissioned histories where the historian is paid by the (surviving) company and given use of its archives. While often extremely valuable, these studies can tend towards “rise and fall” narratives.

Second, where business histories have studied crises specifically, commissioned works can potentially have some further methodological problems. Most obviously, many of the firms survived until at least the point the history was commissioned. Thus, it is perhaps a case of selection bias towards success – or at the very least towards the largest and most important companies (Berghoff 2006). Related to this, the nature of commissioned studies has also drawn criticism: namely, that success is often attributed to management rather than luck, while episodes of failure are attributed to external or unpredictable factors outside of management control.

Third, the causes and aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) of 2008 have generated many millions of pages of scholarship and commentary in the last decade, with the effect of prompting historians to draw comparisons with the Wall Street Crash and Great Depression. For instance, Werner Abelshauser (2009) is one of many interested in learning from economic crises explicitly through using the examples of 1931 and 2008. While not every crisis was like 2008 in cause, scale or scope, it is not necessarily a new phenomenon: the 2000 dot-com bubble was compared in much the same way. (Ojala and Uskali 2006). As a result, the stock market crash in 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression have become by far the most studied economic crisis in history, with renewed interest from 2008 (Tooze 2019), while the effect of the more regular, smaller scale, economic crises suffered by businesses before and after 1929 is largely neglected.

The current economic conditions promise to bring new momentum to the study of businesses in times of larger and smaller economic difficulties, and we are therefore inviting PhD students working in the areas of business and

–            Crisis Management

–            Institutional memory

–            Learning

to submit proposals for the summer school.

CfP: 2nd International Conference on Indian Business & Economic History [Online]

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad 

August 24 (Tue), Aug 25 (Wed), Aug 26 (Thu), Aug 27 (Fri), 2021 

Conference Website: https://conference.iima.ac.in/history/ 

Founded in 1961, the Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad (IIMA) has emerged as the leading management school of India and is regularly ranked among the Top 50 Business Schools of the world. Set amidst an iconic campus designed by Louis Kahn, it is also the birthplace of ‘business history’ as a discipline in India under the stewardship of Prof. Dwijendra Tripathi (1930-2018), a faculty member of IIMA from 1964 to 1990. 

The first International Conference on Indian Business & Economic History was held in memory of Prof. Dwijendra Tripathi at IIMA on August 29-31, 2019. 

The 2nd International Conference on Indian Business & Economic History will be hosted online, anchored by IIMA, on August 24-27, 2021. It will be a forum to host research papers, provide a workshop for PhD students, and spark conversations on this subject. The conference will draw in leading scholars working in the field within and outside India. 

Conference Organizing Committee 

Chinmay Tumbe (IIM-Ahmedabad, India) 

Tirthankar Roy (London School of Economics & Political Science) 

Medha Kudaisya (National University of Singapore) 

Bishnupriya Gupta (Warwick University) 

Chikayoshi Nomura (Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo) 

Conference Timeline 

Submission Deadline: April 30, 2021 

Notification to selected students and speakers by May 10, 2021 

Conference Dates: August 24 (PhD Student Workshop), August 25, 26, 27 (Research Papers and other sessions), 2021 

Conference Mode 

Registration to the conference is free and participants can log-on to the proceedings from anywhere in the world. 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS 

The conference invites researchers to submit research papers and ideas to two separate tracks of the conference – PhD Student Workshop and Conference Research Papers. 

PhD Student Workshop 

The conference will commence online on Tuesday, August 24th, 2021, with a 1-day workshop for PhD students working on Indian business or economic history or keen to explore this research interest in the near future. Students may belong to any disciplinary background. The workshop will provide feedback on the student’s research topics and ideas and have sessions conducted by leading scholars of the field. 

To apply, students have to submit their CV, one-page synopsis of their ongoing research and a one-page statement of interest, as a zipped file, via the conference website submission link, before April 30, 2021. 

Students from within and outside India are encouraged to apply for the workshop. Women and students from historically marginalized communities are particularly encouraged to apply for the workshop. MPhil and Masters’ level students can also apply if they are able to demonstrate their keenness to work in the field, and the application would require an additional reference letter from their research supervisor. 

Selected students will be notified about their applications by May 10, 2021, and are expected to participate in all the days of the conference proceedings. 

Conference Research Papers 

The conference theme is broad with the following suggestive themes covering the Indian subcontinent in the 19th and 20th centuries, 

  • Merchants and Trade 
  • The legacy of colonial and princely states on economic development 
  • Regional variations in development in historical perspective 
  • Urban histories 
  • Sector wise histories: eg. Aviation, Media, Advertising, Finance, Real Estate, Coal, etc. 
  • Firm level histories and individual biographies 
  • Management histories 
  • Histories of business associations 
  • Technology transfer and international collaborations 
  • Business in Periods of Crises 

The conference also invites research spanning other time periods and topics. 

A 500-1000 word abstract with title and participant’s affiliation, should be submitted online via the conference website submission link, before April 30, 2021. Selected speakers will be notified by May 10, 2021, and full research papers are expected to be submitted by August 1, 2021. PhD students close to submitting their final theses can also submit their work in this track for consideration. 

Tentative Programme 

Tuesday, August 24, 2021: 

Workshop for PhD Students with sessions taken by leading scholars of the field 

Wed-Thu-Fri, August 25-26-27, 2021: 

Conference Research Papers 

Session on Archives 

Session on Teaching Business & Economic History 

The proceedings are likely to take place between 4pm-8pm Indian Standard Time. The program will be updated with further details in early-August 2021. 

Contact Us 

Please send all conference related queries to history21@iima.ac.in. 

Conference related details will be regularly updated on the conference website: 

BAM conference 2021 – Management & Business History Track

BAM2021 Conference in the Cloud, Lancaster University Management School.

31st August – 3rd September 2021

BAM2021 Key Dates and Deadlines

  • Paper submission site opens (15th January)
  • Deadline to submit paper (5th March)
  • Review process starts (12th March)
  • Paper acceptance notification (29th April)
  • Deadline for at least ONE author to register for the Conference (28th May)
  • Final paper upload (18th June)
  • Asynchronous paper presentation deadline (16th July)

Link to Conference and Paper Submission Guidelines: https://www.bam.ac.uk/events-landing/conference.html

Track:Management and Business History

Track Chairs: James Fowler, University of Essex James.Fowler@essex.ac.uk

 Roy Edwards, University of Southampton r.a.edwards@soton.ac.uk

Track description: This track encourages the growing number of management and business historians who work in business schools and social science departments to engage in constructive debate with a wide range of management scholars. The 2021 conference theme, ‘‘Covid Economy Recovery and the Role of Responsible Management’’, is a superb opportunity to explore the value of historical study for current management. This year the conference will remain online, but we are keen to offer the opportunity for all accepted papers to be presented live online and to receive the kind of commentary and feedback that would normally be expected at a face to face conference.

In this track we specialize in chronologically or longitudinally motivated research. Histories of organizations, industries and institutions give us the opportunity to understand how managers have dealt with crises in the past. History is replete with disasters of varying magnitude. We would welcome papers that explore how economies and wider society have responded to extreme circumstances – from war to natural disasters and economic collapse, humanity has been remarkably resilient in dealing with adversity. But how has this happened? What has been the role of the private and public sector in dealing with emergency?

We welcome papers, symposia or workshop proposals either using new and innovative methodologies or applying archival methodology to a new disciplinary context. We are also interested in context specific papers using more traditional historical methodology but which take innovative approaches to relate their findings to wider social science concerns including the diversity of experience in present day businesses, regions and communities. While the main conference theme ought to feature prominently in all submissions, we encourage cross-disciplinary papers and workshop submissions that link different Tracks.

As a group we are inherently multi-disciplinary and believe in the application of theory to historical analysis, and there is no single epistemology for approaching this. We aim to encourage theoretically orientated social science history with a clear relationship to present day debates in the management discipline. Contributions might focus on but are not limited to: the economic or social history of business, historical case studies for theory building, theoretical contributions on the relevance of history to management studies, the uses of history, history as a method for management studies. Please note that while we are open-minded work not featuring a historical dimension, broadly defined, will not be accepted.

This article is a useful initial point of reference:

Tennent, K. (2020). Management and business history – a reflexive research agenda for the 2020s. Journal of Management Historyhttps://doi.org/10.1108/JMH-09-2020-0061.

These articles offer commentary on the ‘dual integrity’ of business history methods as a combination of social science and historical craft:

Decker, S., Usidken, B., Engwall, L. & Rowlinson, M. (2018). Special issue introduction: Historical research on institutional change. Business History, 60(5). pp613-627. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2018.1427736

Maclean, M., Harvey, C. and Clegg, S.R., (2016). Conceptualizing historical organization studies. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), pp.609-632. DOI:
10.5465/amr.2014.0133

Rowlinson, M., Hassard, J. & Decker, S. (2014). Research Strategies for Organisational History: A Dialogue between Historical Theory and Organisation Theory. Academy of Management Review, 39(3), pp250–274. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5465/amr.2012.0203

EGOS tracks relevant to history

And as the end of the year nears, so do the January deadlines for AOM and EGOS. EGOS 2021 offers bountiful opportunities for submitting history-based and history-inspired pieces of organizational scholarship this year. Below a quick summary of the main tracks that are likely interested in historical perspectives:

Sub-theme 01: [SWG] Organization & Time: The Situated Activity of Time Enactment

Convenors:
Tor Hernes Copenhagen Business School, Denmarkth.ioa@cbs.dk
Joanna Karmowska Oxford Brookes University, United Kingdomjkarmowska@brookes.ac.uk
Claus Rerup Frankfurt School of Finance and Management, Germanyc.rerup@fs.de


Call for Papers


The third sub-theme of Standing Working Group (SWG) 01 will concern the more situated, on-going activity of time enactment in organizations. The on-going time enactment is crucial for understanding a host of issues, including the very agency of the moment, the roles of temporal structures, and the on-going interplay between evoked pasts and projected futures. It will lend focus to temporal structure, including routines, practices and materiality, through which time is enacted in organizations. It will connect the situated time enactment to different variations and combinations of near and distant pasts and futures, while considering factors such as agency, emotions and aesthetics. The empirical focus invites, but not exclusively, papers on topics such as digitalisation, creative organizations and start-ups.

Sub-theme 24: Craft in Modern Society

Convenors:
Jochem Kroezen University of Cambridge, United Kingdomj.kroezen@jbs.cam.ac.uk
Innan Sasaki University of Warwick, United Kingdominnan.sasaki@wbs.ac.uk
Pursey P.M.A.R. Heugens Erasmus University, The Netherlandspheugens@rsm.nl


Call for Papers


The last two decades have witnessed an extraordinary resurgence of interest in craft and craftsmanship. Once thought to be an obsolete mode of organizing and producing for modern society, now craft movements appear to be reconfiguring entire sectors, with examples ranging from beer brewing (Kroezen & Heugens, 2019), to watchmaking (Raffaelli, 2019), to barbering (Ocejo, 2017) and to maker spaces (Browder et al., 2019). In addition to the transformative powers of craft production, there is also a surprisingly broad range of instances where heritage crafts have managed to survive despite pressures of modernization and globalization, such as the case in musical instrument making (Cattani et al., 2017) or Japanese family firms (Sasaki et al., 2019). Increasingly, management and organization scholars are paying attention to these phenomena across various strands of research and are contributing to a growing understanding of (1) what defines craft as opposed to established theories of organizing and (2) how empirically craft may be valued and organized differently across time and space. This sub-theme intends to offer a setting for scholars interested in craft and craftsmanship to advance our collective understanding of the concept and related phenomena and firmly establish craft as an object of investigation and theorization in its own right.

Sub-theme 33: Historical Organization Studies in Action: Strategy, Entrepreneurship, and Social Innovation

Convenors:
Mairi Maclean University of Bath, United Kingdomkmm57@bath.ac.uk
Roy Suddaby University of Victoria, Canadarsuddaby@uvic.ca
Stewart Clegg University of Technology, Sydney, Australiastewart.clegg@uts.edu.au


Call for Papers


Historical organization studies is ‘organizational research that draws on historical sources, methods and knowledge to explore, refine and develop theoretical ideas and conceptual insights’ (Maclean et al., 2016). Put simply, it seeks to blend history and organization studies. Its status is that of emergent academic movement rather than established community of practice. For over two decades, organization theorists have emphasized the need for more and better research recognizing the importance of the past in shaping the present and future (Clegg, 2006; Kieser, 1994). Some have identified a distinct historic turn in organization studies led by scholars who perceive the field to have been constrained by its orientation towards contemporary cross-sectional studies covering limited periods of time (Clark & Rowlinson, 2004; Mills et al., 2016). By historicising organizational research, it is argued, the contexts and forces bearing upon organizations might be more fully recognized and analyses of organizational dynamics might be improved. But how, precisely, might a traditionally empirically-oriented discipline, such as history, be incorporated into a theoretically-oriented discipline such as organization studies? In recent years this has been the topic of extensive debate, giving rise to a number of ground-breaking publications (Bucheli & Wadhwani, 2014; Kipping & Üsdiken, 2014; Rowlinson et al., 2014; Suddaby et al., 2010) and a flurry of Special Issues in journals including, inter alia. Academy of Management ReviewOrganization StudiesManagement Learning, and Organization.

Sub-theme 49: Organizational Memory Studies: Toward an Inclusive Research Agenda

Convenors:
Hamid Foroughi University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom foroughi.hamid@gmail.com
Sébastien Mena City, University of London, United Kingdom sebastien.mena.1@city.ac.uk
William M. Foster University of Alberta, Canada wfoster@ualberta.ca


Call for Papers


Collective memories are powerful factors in shaping both individual perceptions and social behaviour, and as such, are important for organizing processes. Organizations are also arenas for the engagement of various social actors in collective processes of remembering and forgetting. While organizational research has tended to adopt a psychological metaphor of storage and retrieval of knowledge to understand organizational memory (e.g., Walsh & Ungson, 1991; Ren & Argote, 2011), recent advances have also engaged with sociological perspectives on memory (e.g., Hatch & Schultz, 2017; Foroughi, 2019; Mena et al., 2016; Ravasi et al., 2019). For instance, the interest in the social construction of organizational mnemonics (Coraiola et al., 2015) has fuelled the development of theoretical approaches on the practices of remembering and the uses of the past in achieving organizational strategies (e.g., Foster, et al., 2017; Wadhwani et al., 2018). Others have also looked at the importance of organizations for broader processes of social remembering and forgetting, such as the perpetuation of inequalities or the collective forgetting of corporate irresponsibility (e.g., Cutcher et al., 2019; Mena, et al., 2016). Yet, others have highlighted the role of diverse stakeholders, such as employees, customers and investors/donors, in shaping an organizational memory (Bell & Taylor, 2016; Foroughi & Al-Amoudi, 2019). Altogether, these examinations of memory in and around organizations from various perspectives have been called ‘Organizational Memory Studies’ (OMS) (Rowlinson et al., 2010).

Sub-theme 59: Organizing in the Age of Nationalism

Convenors:
Alexei Koveshnikov Aalto University, Finland alexei.koveshnikov@aalto.fi
Sally Riad Victoria Universiy of Wellington, New Zealand sally.riad@vuw.ac.nz
Eero Vaara University of Oxford, United Kingdom eero.vaara@sbs.ox.ac.uk


Call for Papers


Nationalism is a fundamentally important dynamic force in contemporary society (Billig, 1995; Gellner & Breuilly, 1983; Wodak, 2017). There are different interpretations of what nationalism is and a multitude of approaches to study it (Delanty & Kumar, 2006). Among these, Benedict Anderson’s (1983) idea of nations as “imagined communities” is based on the assumption that people in societies can imagine their unity and develop a sense of belonging by way of myths, symbols, and stories that help them to identify with and as a community that is (seen as) the nation. It applies well to studying contemporary nationalism in its multiple forms, and it has proved to be useful for moving discussions from objectivist to subjectivist conceptions of national unity (Segal & Handler, 2006). It is especially relevant today as we enter an era of “post-truth” politics and “alternative facts” (Knight & Tsoukas, 2019) where nationalism and constructions of nationalism become increasingly prominent parts of language games played by powerful societal actors such as politicians and corporate executives for the purposes of political mobilization and legitimation.

Distinguished lecture: “The Structural Reshaping of Globalization” by Peter Buckley

I am pleased to share details on the forthcoming distinguished lecture with Peter Buckley, Professor of International Business at Leeds University Business School, who will talk on The Structural Reshaping of Globalization. Alain Verbeke, Professor of International Business Strategy at the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary will serve as a discussant. 

This talk examines the role of theory, specifically internalization theory, in examining the structural reshaping of globalization. Four empirical changes in the global economy are identified.

  • (1) The fracture in the global economy between the USA and China, including “the splinternet”. 
  • (2) “Systemic Competition” and its consequences. 
  • (3) Rising VUCA (Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity) and corporate responses. 
  • (4) Innovation. The theoretical response is presented by nested theories of internalization, relying on common principles and concepts.

Details of the online talk through Zoom are listed as follows. You are welcome to join this online lecture and hope to meet you online soon!

  • Topic: The Structural Reshaping of Globalization
  • Date and Time: Nov 20, 2020; 10:00 AM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

https://westernuniversity.zoom.us/j/95450147539

  • Meeting ID: 954 5014 7539
  • Passcode: 361691

For more information about Professor Peter Buckley, you can refer to

https://business.leeds.ac.uk/divisions-international-business/staff/248/peter-j-buckley-

For more information about Professor Alain Verbeke, you can refer to

https://www.ucalgary.ca/verbeke/

MHRG Annual Workshop meeting report

For those of us who missed it, Chris Corker has kindly provided us with a short report on the Management History Research Group event, which has, like many others, gone virtual this autumn:

The 2020 edition of the Management History Research Group (MHRG) Annual Workshop took place, via Zoom, on Thursday, 1st October with two panels comprising a total of five papers presented, with participants as far away as Japan and Washington DC.

Original plans for the workshop, in the pipeline since our successful 2019 workshop in Preston, had been to head to Newcastle and continue the tradition of the MHRG to host a predominantly single-track workshop with a range of papers, either developmental or fully formed, for constructive and critical feedback.

Keen to not loose this approach, the Zoom version of MHRG followed the same focus. With a total of 20 participants, the first paper from Ayumu Sugawara (Tohoku University, Japan) explored BOLSA’s encounter with Japan in the 1960s Eurodollar market, followed by Leo McCann and Simon Mollan (University of York) on Placing Camelot: Cultivating Leadership and Learning in the Kennedy Presidency, the first panel concluding with James Fowler (University of Essex) discussing The Management, Politics and Strategic Narratives of Decline and Turnaround at London Transport 1970-87.

Following a brief recess, the second panel featured Simon Mollan (University of York), Beverly Geesin (University of Dundee), and Joel Tannenbaum (Community College of Philadelphia) work titled ‘American Caesar? Authoritarian leadership and the American Right’, and concluded with Leo McCann (University of York) and John Heath (American University, Washington DC, USA) discussing ‘A Parable about Power’: Management and Leadership in Robert McNamara’s Presidency of the World Bank.

Overall, the contributions were informative and interesting for all participants, with much discussion, debate and feedback was generated for the presenters.

Like many events across academia, the MHRG Workshop had to adapt and the Zoom approach worked for everyone involved. Still small, supportive, and constructive as prior MHRG workshops have been, the change in format worked for this year.

What was missing, as it is for every postponed or adapted conference, was the sense of community among colleagues and friends who traditionally work in a multitude of places and come together in person infrequently to catch up, talk about new projects and potential collaborations, and bring into the community new members, emerging scholars, and encourage doctoral students.

The chat in a local licensed premise, the discussions over a meal, the conversation in coffee breaks and the chance to bounce an idea among participants without the formal structure of a presentation, are what is missing.

Virtual conferences and workshops may be keeping our research alive and our discipline-specific communities together, but the informal chat, the catching up with friends and talking about family, hobbies, and all the non-research stuff, the chance to see a new town or city and the opportunity to travel are understandably absent and hard to replicate with the video conferencing format.

The world of academic conferences and workshops is likely to continue in this at distance approach for the foreseeable future in light of the devastating effect the pandemic is having on the world, but in time our communities will reform in person, drinks will be consumed, ideas exchanged, enthusiasm for research reignited, and the shared love for research experienced.

It is the hope of the MHRG committee to run a face to face workshop in September 2021. We embrace management history in all its forms, and contributions from associated sub-disciplines of history. If you would like to join our mailing list for next year, or just find out some more, please get in touch with me.

Chris Corker, MHRG Chair

Chris.Corker@York.ac.uk

Accounting History International Emerging Scholars’ Colloquium

Call for Research Proposals

The Accounting History International Emerging Scholars’ Colloquium

Portsmouth, United Kingdom, 8 September 2021

The Accounting History International Emerging Scholars’ Colloquium (AHIESC) will be held as part of the eleventh Accounting History International Conference (11AHIC) being held in Portsmouth, United Kingdom during 8-10 September 2021.

This international forum is designed for emerging scholars of all ages and career stages, including doctoral degree students, new faculty and other emerging accounting researchers who have an interest in accounting history, and who seek to obtain feedback from senior faculty members on their historical accounting research projects in an intellectually stimulating environment.

Please find attached the ‘Call for Research Proposals’. Further details about the 11AHIC can be found at the following site: https://www.port.ac.uk/11AHIC

Please also note these important dates:

  • 2 November 2020 Submission opening
  • 19 March 2021 Submission deadline

Best wishes

Carolyn, Carolyn and Laura

Carolyn Cordery, Carolyn Fowler and Laura Maran

Editors, Accounting History