The problem with Harvard Business School case studies

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The discipline of business history has long been linked to the case-study method of teaching. It will therefore interest many readers of this blog to learn of a new article in the business press that talks about the historical origins of the case study method, which began at Harvard Business School and which was later adopted in management schools around the world. The article in Quartz disseminates some of the key findings presented in A New History of Management, an important new book by John Hassard, Michael Rowlinson, Stephen Cummings, and Todd Bridgman. Regardless of whether you are a friend or a foe of the use of case studies, I would encourage you to check out the piece in Quartz and the underlying scholarly works.

Personally, I’m glad to see that the life and ideas of HBS Dean Wallace Donham (1877-1954) is being investigated. In the 1920s, Donham was one of the most influential critics of shareholder primacy and the related idea that the maximization of shareholder value is the best criterion for judging the performance of managers. At a time when the idea of shareholder primacy is being scrutinized once again, it is encouraging to know that people are paying attention to Donham.

Advertisements

Reconstructing the B-School

Reblogged from NEP-HIS:

Mitch Larson very kindly reviewed our article in Business History: “Clio in the Business School: Historical Approaches in Strategy, International Business and Entrepreneurship”, which the publishers have made available for free for a time: Business History, 59(6): 904-27

Review by Mitchell J. Larson (University of Central Lancashire)

Recently Martin Parker (Bristol) has taken to the airwaves promoting the idea of bulldozing the business school. In sharp contrast, Andrew Perchard, Niall MacKenzie, Stephanie Decker, and Giovanni Favero make a compelling case for certain disciplines in the management sciences to open themselves to alternative methodological and epistemological approaches. They argue that the fields of strategy, international business, and entrepreneurship have not embraced historically-oriented research to the same extent as other fields within business and management studies. The authors also admit that many scholars conducting historical business research have not made a sufficiently solid case about the robustness of their historical methodology(s) or data to convince other social scientists about the validity of their claims. Drawing upon an impressive range of previous works to develop their discussion, the paper attempts to reconcile these discrepancies to highlight how a more explicit articulation of the historian’s process could overcome the concerns of ‘mainstream’ management scholars regarding theorization and methodology in these three fields specifically and in management studies generally.

To continue reading, click here: https://nephist.wordpress.com/2018/07/24/reconstructing-the-b-school/

 

Video: A new history of management

Have a look at this video summary of the new book A new history of management, by Stephen Cummings, Victoria University of Wellington; Todd Bridgman, Victoria University of Wellington; John Hassard, University of Manchester; Michael Rowlinson, University of Exeter.

Read more at http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/management/organisation-studies/new-history-management#AR8fSzRrR3hWUYRv.99

Or: www.cambridge.org/historyofmanagement

 

 

 

 

 

BAM event: Management History and Strategy in Conversation

Book Your Place NowJoint SIG Event: Management History and Strategy In Conversation – Can Movements Inform Responsibility?

The BAM Management and Business History and the BAM Strategy SIG are delighted to announce that joint SIG event, Management History and Strategy In Conversation – Can Movements Inform Responsibility? is taking place on Thursday 1st March 2018, at Newcastle Business School, Northumbria University from 13.00 – 16.30.

There is continued and increasing academic interest in corporate responsibility and how this interacts and informs strategic management. On the one hand, contemporary movements such as the UN Global Compact sustainable development goals, as well as initiatives such as B-corporation accreditation have gained increasing attention, and yet what strategizing managers can learn from historical movements has received less attention. This seminar seeks to redress this balance. We bring together academics with expertise in the management history of movements such as the cooperative movement, credit unions, the mutuality movement, how Quakers as a religious movement left their mark, and we explore a case study of how Taylor’s scientific management was enacted in a ‘responsible’ business context.

The aim is to bring together researchers and doctoral students from academic and management contexts. We will outline the latest research being conducted in historical movements and discuss what lessons can be learned by contemporary organisations.

The benefits of such an event include increasing awareness of the types and foci of research in this community, to look for synergies in research streams such as strategy, responsible business, management history, and law, etc, and to find ways of collaborating that build bridges between different disciplines. We hope that participants will influence this discussion and the directions in which research could travel.

Who Should Attend

This event is aimed at researchers and doctoral students who are interested in how academic research interests can be aligned and who wish to collaborate across different fields.

Speakers

  • Prof John Wilson – Northumbria University
  • Sallyanne Decker – Greenwich University
  • Mark Billings – Exeter University
  • John Quail – York University
  • Nicholas Burton – Northumbria University

Event Fee 

  • BAM Student members: FREE
  • BAM members: FREE
  • Non-BAM members: £20

Date: Thursday 1st March
Time: 13.00 – 16.30
Location: City Campus East Lecture Theatre 002, Newcastle Business School, Northumbria University, Newcastle, NE1 8ST

Contact

For specific information about this event please contact the workshop facilitator(s):

Dr Nicholas Burton – n.burton@northumbria.ac.uk 

For general enquiries please contact the BAM Office on +44(0)2073837770, or at bam@bam.ac.uk

Rowntree Lectures

The Rowntree Lectures and the British Interwar Management Movement

Workshop, 18 January 2018

The Research Team (from the University of Exeter and the School of Management at the University of Bath) are running a Research Workshop on 18 January 2018 at The University of Bath’s Building, 83 Pall Mall, St. James’, London SW1Y 5ES. The morning session is designed to develop skills in being more effective in archives, discussing (and demonstrating) data capture and Optical Character Recognition software. We expect participants to undertake a small-scale OCR project. The team will be joined by Dr Mike Anson, Archive Manager at the Bank of England Archive, who will discuss the Bank Archive’s recent experiments with automated transcription software. This practical session continues methods of retrieving that material in writing up research. In the afternoon session, Professors Alan Booth, Gareth Shaw and Mairi Maclean will present interim findings and conclusions on the Rowntree Lectures and the interwar management movement.

Programme

10 am                  Workshop opens

10.15                   Brief Introduction and Welcome: Alan Booth

10.30                   Practical Skills in the Archive: Alan Booth, Rachel Pistol and Mike Anson

This session will involve the use of a digital camera in the archive and the use of OCR software to process those images. We intend to create an OCR exercise for participants

11.45                   Databases and other forms of information retrieval: Alan Booth, Rachel Pistol

The session will demonstrate an Access database designed for the individual scholar and a more ambitious project suited to bigger research teams.

12.30                   Lunch

1.30                     Preliminary Findings

Gareth Shaw, ‘An Introduction to the Rowntree Papers as a Research Resource’

Alan Booth, ‘The cliff edge: British Industry and the pervading sense of crisis after the First World War’

Mairi Maclean, ‘Management Learning and the Rowntree material’.

4.00                     Workshop closes

For further details, please contact Professor Alan Booth at a.e.booth@exeter.ac.uk

A New History of Management

We are very pleased to announce that a new publication on the history of management is out now:

A New History of Management

 

Existing narratives about how we should organize are built upon, and reinforce, a concept of ‘good management’ derived from what is assumed to be a fundamental need to increase efficiency. But this assumption is based on a presentist, monocultural, and generally limited view of management’s past. A New History of Management disputes these foundations. By reassessing conventional perspectives on past management theories and providing a new critical outline of present-day management, it highlights alternative conceptions of ‘good management’ focused on ethical aims, sustainability, and alternative views of good practice. From this new historical perspective, existing assumptions can be countered and simplistic views disputed, offering a platform from which graduate students, researchers and reflective practitioners can develop alternative approaches for managing and organizing in the twenty-first century.

GoogleBooks

ResearchGate

CfP: MHRG annual workshop

Call for Papers: Management History Research Group annual workshop

The 2017 Management History Research Group’s workshop will be held at the People’s History Museum, Manchester on July 10th and 11th.

The full call for papers is displayed on the MHRG webpages:

http://mgt-hist.org/index.php/2017/02/26/call-for-papers-mhrg-annual-workshop-2017-peoples-history-museum-manchester-july-10-11/

Further info about the workshop, e.g. registration fees and process, will be displayed there in due course.

We look forward to receiving your abstracts and/or suggestions for panels. The deadline for the receipt of abstracts is May 5th. Please send any abstracts to this dedicated email address below:

mhrg.manchester@gmail.com

Kind regards

Prof Leo McCann (on behalf of the workshop organizing committee).

AOM2017 Meet the editors session

Session Type: PDW Workshop

Submission: 10093 | Sponsor(s): (MH)

 

Meet the Editors

Friday 10.30-12.00pm, Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Embassy Hall G 
Organizer: James M. Wilson, U. of Glasgow 

Presenter: Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School 

Presenter: Cheryl McWatters, U. of Ottawa 

Presenter: Paul Miranti, Rutgers U. 

The editors of Business History will provide a general discussion of their journal, describing its aims and scope, along with their general policies and practices regarding submissions. They will also discuss what they perceive to be current hot topics or emerging trends in the field of Management History. The editors and/or representatives of the Accounting History Review and Accounting History will discuss current topics and emerging interests in the field. They will also describe their journals’ general policies and practices regarding submissions. There will be sufficient time to discuss in general terms any individual projects conference attendees may have in mind for publication.

Search Terms: Business History | Editors | Journal

AOM 2017 PDW on historical methods

Session Type: PDW Workshop

Submission: 12154 | Sponsor(s): (MH, CMS)

 

Historical Methods for Management and Organizational Research

Friday 12.15-2.45pm, Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Embassy Hall E
Coordinator: Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School 

Coordinator: Diego Coraiola, U. of Alberta 

Participant: William Foster, U. of Alberta 

Participant: Sarah Robinson, U. of Leicester 

Participant: JoAnne Yates, MIT Sloan School of Management 

Participant: Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Bus, York U. 

Participant: Michael Rowlinson, U. of Exeter 

Presenter: Christina Lubinski, Copenhagen Business School 

Historical approaches to management and organizations have seen many promising developments in recent years, with several articles, special issues and edited books highlighting the important contribution that historical research can make to our understanding of contemporary organizations. Theoretical debates on the status of historical approaches within management and organization studies have dominated so far. These are important as they determine what kind of historical methods align with scholars’ epistemological and theoretical approach. Hence this PDW has two aims: to introduce scholars interested in the more practical questions of how we can use historical methods for organizational research to a range of option, and by highlighting the methodological implications of using specific historical approaches. This PDW will bring together several scholars who have used historical methodologies in their research. Their presentations will introduce participants to a range of methodologies and offer them the opportunity to subsequently discuss the relevance of these approaches for participants’ research projects in small groups in the second half of the session.

Search Terms: Methodology | Historical Research | Management and Organization Research

Resource on management history

I have just come across this new YouTube channel (thanks to Scott Taylor) about the History of Management.

New History of Management channel is a repository for videos that look at the history of management in new and interesting ways in order to encourage thinking differently about management and management education today. It is named after the book A New History of Management, written by Stephen Cummings, Todd Bridgman, John Hassard & Michael Rowlinson, which will be published by Cambridge University Press later in 2017.