MHRG Annual Workshop meeting report

For those of us who missed it, Chris Corker has kindly provided us with a short report on the Management History Research Group event, which has, like many others, gone virtual this autumn:

The 2020 edition of the Management History Research Group (MHRG) Annual Workshop took place, via Zoom, on Thursday, 1st October with two panels comprising a total of five papers presented, with participants as far away as Japan and Washington DC.

Original plans for the workshop, in the pipeline since our successful 2019 workshop in Preston, had been to head to Newcastle and continue the tradition of the MHRG to host a predominantly single-track workshop with a range of papers, either developmental or fully formed, for constructive and critical feedback.

Keen to not loose this approach, the Zoom version of MHRG followed the same focus. With a total of 20 participants, the first paper from Ayumu Sugawara (Tohoku University, Japan) explored BOLSA’s encounter with Japan in the 1960s Eurodollar market, followed by Leo McCann and Simon Mollan (University of York) on Placing Camelot: Cultivating Leadership and Learning in the Kennedy Presidency, the first panel concluding with James Fowler (University of Essex) discussing The Management, Politics and Strategic Narratives of Decline and Turnaround at London Transport 1970-87.

Following a brief recess, the second panel featured Simon Mollan (University of York), Beverly Geesin (University of Dundee), and Joel Tannenbaum (Community College of Philadelphia) work titled ‘American Caesar? Authoritarian leadership and the American Right’, and concluded with Leo McCann (University of York) and John Heath (American University, Washington DC, USA) discussing ‘A Parable about Power’: Management and Leadership in Robert McNamara’s Presidency of the World Bank.

Overall, the contributions were informative and interesting for all participants, with much discussion, debate and feedback was generated for the presenters.

Like many events across academia, the MHRG Workshop had to adapt and the Zoom approach worked for everyone involved. Still small, supportive, and constructive as prior MHRG workshops have been, the change in format worked for this year.

What was missing, as it is for every postponed or adapted conference, was the sense of community among colleagues and friends who traditionally work in a multitude of places and come together in person infrequently to catch up, talk about new projects and potential collaborations, and bring into the community new members, emerging scholars, and encourage doctoral students.

The chat in a local licensed premise, the discussions over a meal, the conversation in coffee breaks and the chance to bounce an idea among participants without the formal structure of a presentation, are what is missing.

Virtual conferences and workshops may be keeping our research alive and our discipline-specific communities together, but the informal chat, the catching up with friends and talking about family, hobbies, and all the non-research stuff, the chance to see a new town or city and the opportunity to travel are understandably absent and hard to replicate with the video conferencing format.

The world of academic conferences and workshops is likely to continue in this at distance approach for the foreseeable future in light of the devastating effect the pandemic is having on the world, but in time our communities will reform in person, drinks will be consumed, ideas exchanged, enthusiasm for research reignited, and the shared love for research experienced.

It is the hope of the MHRG committee to run a face to face workshop in September 2021. We embrace management history in all its forms, and contributions from associated sub-disciplines of history. If you would like to join our mailing list for next year, or just find out some more, please get in touch with me.

Chris Corker, MHRG Chairman

Chris.Corker@York.ac.uk

AOM2020 Management History Calls for submission

The Management History (MH) Division invites PDW, symposium, and paper submissions for the 80th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management to be held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada from 7 – 11 August 2020. You may send us your submissions through the AOM Submission Center until it closes on Tuesday, 14 January 2020 at 5:00 PM ET (NY Time). The Submission Center opens in early December 2019.

Conference Theme: This year’s conference theme is “20/20: Broadening our Sight” and encourages us to widen our view when examining our domain, practice and organizational phenomena. We encourage you to make connections to the theme wherever possible in preparing your submission.

Our Domain: The Management History (MH) Division is a wide-ranging network of scholars interested in the antecedents of modern business practice and thought. We invite submissions of empirical and conceptual papers, as well as proposals for symposia (including panel discussions, debates, and roundtables), for consideration for inclusion in the division’s scholarly program. We encourage submissions from all members of the academy interested in devoting or sharing their work in management history broadly defined.

As there is an element of history within every division in the Academy, the division is open to a variety of methodological approaches and themes ranging from historical events in management practice (empirical focus) to studies that engage with historiography, philosophies of history, and the history of ideas and management thought (theoretical orientation). In this spirit, the MH Division welcomes scholarly contributions that generate meaningful and original contributions in history from across all AOM divisions’ interest groups. Submissions for sessions sponsored jointly with other Academy divisions are regarded as particularly attractive, and highly encouraged. The MH Division encourages submissions from doctoral students. Papers with a PhD student as the first or sole author should be clearly identified when submitted to allow identification of possible winners of the Best Graduate Student Paper.

See our call for PDWs: https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Faom.org%2Fannualmeeting%2Fsubmission%2Fcall%2Fmh%2Fpdw%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cs.decker%40aston.ac.uk%7C37d1deba710c4c7d5b2108d7736c83c2%7Ca085950c4c2544d5945ab852fa44a221%7C0%7C0%7C637104782223824129&sdata=2HRobwAYRgVxdUDAUHumsrId9Ce4IosuZeS6rSQbs8Y%3D&reserved=0

And our call for the scholarly program: https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Faom.org%2Fannualmeeting%2Fsubmission%2Fcall%2Fmh%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cs.decker%40aston.ac.uk%7C37d1deba710c4c7d5b2108d7736c83c2%7Ca085950c4c2544d5945ab852fa44a221%7C0%7C0%7C637104782223824129&sdata=x%2FYFjHP%2BN%2BV6ysqk9y7IdqEiJBgBebWVDuyur3DipIs%3D&reserved=0

We’re looking forward to seeing you in Vancouver,

Roy Suddaby, Program Chair (rsuddaby@uvic.ca) and Trish McLaren, PDW Chair (pmclaren@wlu.ca)

AOM MH division election results

The election results from the Academy of Management, Management History Division are in. It’s with great pleasure that I read that the following three colleagues were elected. Congratulations!!

Patricia McLaren, Wilfrid Laurier University—PDW Chair

Andrew Smith, University of Liverpool—Division Representative-at-Large

Nicholous (Nick) Deal, Saint Mary’s University—Division Graduate Student/Junior Faculty Representative-at-Large

Thank you to all who ran on the ballot this year. I greatly appreciate your willingness to serve. I hope to see everyone in Boston!

Stephanie Pane Haden

Texas A&M University-Commerce

Past Division Chair

The problem with Harvard Business School case studies

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The discipline of business history has long been linked to the case-study method of teaching. It will therefore interest many readers of this blog to learn of a new article in the business press that talks about the historical origins of the case study method, which began at Harvard Business School and which was later adopted in management schools around the world. The article in Quartz disseminates some of the key findings presented in A New History of Management, an important new book by John Hassard, Michael Rowlinson, Stephen Cummings, and Todd Bridgman. Regardless of whether you are a friend or a foe of the use of case studies, I would encourage you to check out the piece in Quartz and the underlying scholarly works.

Personally, I’m glad to see that the life and ideas of HBS Dean Wallace Donham (1877-1954) is being investigated. In the 1920s, Donham was one of the most influential critics of shareholder primacy and the related idea that the maximization of shareholder value is the best criterion for judging the performance of managers. At a time when the idea of shareholder primacy is being scrutinized once again, it is encouraging to know that people are paying attention to Donham.

Reconstructing the B-School

Reblogged from NEP-HIS:

Mitch Larson very kindly reviewed our article in Business History: “Clio in the Business School: Historical Approaches in Strategy, International Business and Entrepreneurship”, which the publishers have made available for free for a time: Business History, 59(6): 904-27

Review by Mitchell J. Larson (University of Central Lancashire)

Recently Martin Parker (Bristol) has taken to the airwaves promoting the idea of bulldozing the business school. In sharp contrast, Andrew Perchard, Niall MacKenzie, Stephanie Decker, and Giovanni Favero make a compelling case for certain disciplines in the management sciences to open themselves to alternative methodological and epistemological approaches. They argue that the fields of strategy, international business, and entrepreneurship have not embraced historically-oriented research to the same extent as other fields within business and management studies. The authors also admit that many scholars conducting historical business research have not made a sufficiently solid case about the robustness of their historical methodology(s) or data to convince other social scientists about the validity of their claims. Drawing upon an impressive range of previous works to develop their discussion, the paper attempts to reconcile these discrepancies to highlight how a more explicit articulation of the historian’s process could overcome the concerns of ‘mainstream’ management scholars regarding theorization and methodology in these three fields specifically and in management studies generally.

To continue reading, click here: https://nephist.wordpress.com/2018/07/24/reconstructing-the-b-school/

 

Video: A new history of management

Have a look at this video summary of the new book A new history of management, by Stephen Cummings, Victoria University of Wellington; Todd Bridgman, Victoria University of Wellington; John Hassard, University of Manchester; Michael Rowlinson, University of Exeter.

Read more at http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/management/organisation-studies/new-history-management#AR8fSzRrR3hWUYRv.99

Or: www.cambridge.org/historyofmanagement

 

 

 

 

 

BAM event: Management History and Strategy in Conversation

Book Your Place NowJoint SIG Event: Management History and Strategy In Conversation – Can Movements Inform Responsibility?

The BAM Management and Business History and the BAM Strategy SIG are delighted to announce that joint SIG event, Management History and Strategy In Conversation – Can Movements Inform Responsibility? is taking place on Thursday 1st March 2018, at Newcastle Business School, Northumbria University from 13.00 – 16.30.

There is continued and increasing academic interest in corporate responsibility and how this interacts and informs strategic management. On the one hand, contemporary movements such as the UN Global Compact sustainable development goals, as well as initiatives such as B-corporation accreditation have gained increasing attention, and yet what strategizing managers can learn from historical movements has received less attention. This seminar seeks to redress this balance. We bring together academics with expertise in the management history of movements such as the cooperative movement, credit unions, the mutuality movement, how Quakers as a religious movement left their mark, and we explore a case study of how Taylor’s scientific management was enacted in a ‘responsible’ business context.

The aim is to bring together researchers and doctoral students from academic and management contexts. We will outline the latest research being conducted in historical movements and discuss what lessons can be learned by contemporary organisations.

The benefits of such an event include increasing awareness of the types and foci of research in this community, to look for synergies in research streams such as strategy, responsible business, management history, and law, etc, and to find ways of collaborating that build bridges between different disciplines. We hope that participants will influence this discussion and the directions in which research could travel.

Who Should Attend

This event is aimed at researchers and doctoral students who are interested in how academic research interests can be aligned and who wish to collaborate across different fields.

Speakers

  • Prof John Wilson – Northumbria University
  • Sallyanne Decker – Greenwich University
  • Mark Billings – Exeter University
  • John Quail – York University
  • Nicholas Burton – Northumbria University

Event Fee 

  • BAM Student members: FREE
  • BAM members: FREE
  • Non-BAM members: £20

Date: Thursday 1st March
Time: 13.00 – 16.30
Location: City Campus East Lecture Theatre 002, Newcastle Business School, Northumbria University, Newcastle, NE1 8ST

Contact

For specific information about this event please contact the workshop facilitator(s):

Dr Nicholas Burton – n.burton@northumbria.ac.uk 

For general enquiries please contact the BAM Office on +44(0)2073837770, or at bam@bam.ac.uk

Rowntree Lectures

The Rowntree Lectures and the British Interwar Management Movement

Workshop, 18 January 2018

The Research Team (from the University of Exeter and the School of Management at the University of Bath) are running a Research Workshop on 18 January 2018 at The University of Bath’s Building, 83 Pall Mall, St. James’, London SW1Y 5ES. The morning session is designed to develop skills in being more effective in archives, discussing (and demonstrating) data capture and Optical Character Recognition software. We expect participants to undertake a small-scale OCR project. The team will be joined by Dr Mike Anson, Archive Manager at the Bank of England Archive, who will discuss the Bank Archive’s recent experiments with automated transcription software. This practical session continues methods of retrieving that material in writing up research. In the afternoon session, Professors Alan Booth, Gareth Shaw and Mairi Maclean will present interim findings and conclusions on the Rowntree Lectures and the interwar management movement.

Programme

10 am                  Workshop opens

10.15                   Brief Introduction and Welcome: Alan Booth

10.30                   Practical Skills in the Archive: Alan Booth, Rachel Pistol and Mike Anson

This session will involve the use of a digital camera in the archive and the use of OCR software to process those images. We intend to create an OCR exercise for participants

11.45                   Databases and other forms of information retrieval: Alan Booth, Rachel Pistol

The session will demonstrate an Access database designed for the individual scholar and a more ambitious project suited to bigger research teams.

12.30                   Lunch

1.30                     Preliminary Findings

Gareth Shaw, ‘An Introduction to the Rowntree Papers as a Research Resource’

Alan Booth, ‘The cliff edge: British Industry and the pervading sense of crisis after the First World War’

Mairi Maclean, ‘Management Learning and the Rowntree material’.

4.00                     Workshop closes

For further details, please contact Professor Alan Booth at a.e.booth@exeter.ac.uk

A New History of Management

We are very pleased to announce that a new publication on the history of management is out now:

A New History of Management

 

Existing narratives about how we should organize are built upon, and reinforce, a concept of ‘good management’ derived from what is assumed to be a fundamental need to increase efficiency. But this assumption is based on a presentist, monocultural, and generally limited view of management’s past. A New History of Management disputes these foundations. By reassessing conventional perspectives on past management theories and providing a new critical outline of present-day management, it highlights alternative conceptions of ‘good management’ focused on ethical aims, sustainability, and alternative views of good practice. From this new historical perspective, existing assumptions can be countered and simplistic views disputed, offering a platform from which graduate students, researchers and reflective practitioners can develop alternative approaches for managing and organizing in the twenty-first century.

GoogleBooks

ResearchGate

CfP: MHRG annual workshop

Call for Papers: Management History Research Group annual workshop

The 2017 Management History Research Group’s workshop will be held at the People’s History Museum, Manchester on July 10th and 11th.

The full call for papers is displayed on the MHRG webpages:

http://mgt-hist.org/index.php/2017/02/26/call-for-papers-mhrg-annual-workshop-2017-peoples-history-museum-manchester-july-10-11/

Further info about the workshop, e.g. registration fees and process, will be displayed there in due course.

We look forward to receiving your abstracts and/or suggestions for panels. The deadline for the receipt of abstracts is May 5th. Please send any abstracts to this dedicated email address below:

mhrg.manchester@gmail.com

Kind regards

Prof Leo McCann (on behalf of the workshop organizing committee).