Event at the HBS Business History Initiative

Understanding and Overcoming the Roadblocks to Sustainability

Over the past several decades, a vibrant scholarly community has generated thousands of empirical and conceptual studies on the complex relationship between business and the natural environment. At the same time, many large corporations have created positions of Corporate Sustainability Officer with the goal of achieving steady improvements in their sustainability performance. Despite substantial academic research and management attention, complex ecological challenges continue to grow. This unfortunate disconnect between aspirations and reality has begun to provoke some self-reflection in the business and natural environment literature concerning its impact and relevance.

A significant body of research on corporate sustainability has examined win-win outcomes, where firms have reduced their environmental and other impacts while reaping economic benefits. Less attention has been devoted to tensions inherent in corporate sustainability, where moving in the direction of sustainability has required managers to change their business models, form risky partnerships, and otherwise incur net costs. Recent empirical business history research appears to show that profits and sustainability have been hard to reconcile throughout history. These tensions and conflicts merit careful examination from a variety of scholarly and practitioner perspectives.

This conference will focus on the roadblocks to sustainability since the 1960s and develop a research agenda for scholars seeking to overcome those roadblocks. In addition to offering a retrospective analysis of where corporate sustainability has fallen short, the conference will explore the incentives, organizational designs, and institutional systems that would allow sustainability to take hold.

Registration details can be found on the conference registration page.

 

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Re-thinking Female Entrepreneurship

Invitation to a one day Conference on

“Re-thinking Female Entrepreneurship”

Durham University Business School, UK

Millhill Lane, Durham DH1 3LB

Thursday 21st June 2018

Time: 10.00 – 17.00

Academics and practitioners are invited to come together for a one day conference on “Re-thinking female entrepreneurship” to bring to the fore the voices of female entrepreneurs (including social entrepreneurs); explore the diversity and heterogeneity of their experiences and challenge the gendered discourse of entrepreneurship.

The conference programme promises a diversity of perspectives. It will explore various aspects of (women’s) entrepreneurial experiences and identities including entrepreneurial leadership, the representation of women’s working lives, household dynamics and growth decisions, and the impact of the entrepreneur’s values on the business. The conference will also discuss enterprise policy initiatives including the policy-practice gap and the role of activist research in closing the gap.

The conference is generously funded by the British Academy as part of part of a three year British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship which explores the journey of female entrepreneurs in Yorkshire using oral history approaches. In the introductory session of the conference, I will share with the audience the project’s main findings.

I am delighted to confirm that we have secured a really strong field of expert speakers who will present their cutting-edge research on women’s working lives including:

Prof. Sarah Carter (awarded the OBE for services to women entrepreneurs in 2008) – Professor of Entrepreneurship – University of Strathclyde 

Households as a Site of Entrepreneurial Activity

 Prof. Jackie Ford – Professor of Leadership and Organisation Studies – Durham University 

Entrepreneurial Leadership: Women’s Accounts

 Prof. Mark Learmonth – Professor of Organisation Studies – Durham University 

Women’s Work: As Represented in Disney Animations

 Prof. Claire Leitch – Chair in Entrepreneurial Leadership – Lancaster University 

Gender and the Production of Entrepreneurial Legitimacy

 Dr Patricia Lewis – Reader in Management – University of Kent 

Exploring the Lived Body of (Female) Entrepreneurship in Postfeminist Times

 Prof. Sue Marlow (holder of the Queen Award for Enterprise) – Professor of Entrepreneurship – Nottingham University 

Women’s entrepreneurship – The Empresses New Clothes?

 Prof. Julia Rouse – Professor of Entrepreneurship – Metropolitan Manchester University 

How Do We Create Change for Women in Entrepreneurship? Exploring the potential of Engaged and Activist Scholarship

 Prof. Kerrie Unsworth – Chair in Organizational Behaviour – Leeds University 

What Do You Get Out of Being an Entrepreneur? Rethinking via the Goal Hierarchy

The conference will include three panel discussions and will conclude with a discussion between practitioners and academics on how both parties can work together to better represent the experiences of women business owners and make their voices heard.

Due to the high calibre of the speakers we are expecting a high level of demand for conference places, so please book your place before 22 May 2018 by sending an email to business.researchadmin@durham.ac.uk.  Please make sure you can make the date before you book your place.

The conference is free of charge with lunch and refreshments included. Please advise of any dietary requirements.

We look forward to seeing you for a day-long engagement for what we expect to be some fascinating discussions and debates on gender and entrepreneurship.

Dr Hannah Dean

British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Durham University Business School

 

A Short Bio of the Keynote Speakers

Professor Sara Carter OBE FRSE is Associate Principal (Learning & Teaching) at the University of Strathclyde and Professor of Entrepreneurship at the Hunter Centre for Entrepreneurship, Strathclyde Business School. Her research examines the effects of business ownership on the individual, the economic wellbeing of entrepreneurial households, and the consequences of structural inequalities on resource access, particularly finance, on the SME sector. Sara holds several external appointments. She is a member of the Council of Economic Advisers to the First Minister of Scotland; the Enterprise & Skills Strategic Board; the Scottish Framework and Action Plan for Women in Enterprise Action Group; Non-Executive Director of Women’s Enterprise Scotland; and a member of the Leverhulme Trust Research Awards Advisory Committee. Previously, she served on the UK Government’s Women’s Enterprise Task Force, and was awarded the OBE for services to women entrepreneurs in 2008. From 2006 – 2012 Sara was Editor and Senior Editor of Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice.

Dr Hannah Dean is a British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Durham University. Hannah’s research focuses on gender and entrepreneurship using critical perspectives and innovative research methods.  Most recently Hannah extended her work to look at the experiences of social entrepreneurs.  Hannah is currently leading a three years project funded by the British Academy Postdoctoral Research Grant. The project involves collecting oral history accounts from women business owners in Yorkshire. The interviews will be deposited in “Feminist Archive North” will bring to light women’s achievements.

 Professor Jackie Ford is Professor of Leadership and Organization Studies at Durham University Business School. Throughout her career, Jackie has fostered a long-established passion for her work in critical leadership studies and in gender and organization theory, and as former 50th Anniversary Chair in Leadership and Organization Studies at Bradford School of Management and before that Professor of Leadership and Organization Studies at Leeds University, she founded an interdisciplinary research centre and led an active research group in critical leadership studies. She has been committed to develop this research field, informed by her interests in feminist, critical, poststructural, and psychosocial research methods and approaches that enable rich interpretive accounts of experiences of working and organizational life.

 Professor Mark Learmonth is Professor of Organisation Studies at Durham University. Mark spent the first 17 years of his career in management posts within the British National Health Service. Prior to taking up his post in Durham he has worked at the universities of Nottingham and York.

Mark has particular research interests in:

  • Critical perspectives on health care management and/or public sector management;
  • Leadership as discourse;
  • Debates aboutthe use of interpretative methods;
  • The nature of “knowledge” and “evidence” in management and organization studies;
  • Popular images of executives and their impact on managerial identity work.

Professor Claire Leitch holds the Chair in Entrepreneurial Leadership at Lancaster University Management School and currently is Head of Department of Leadership and Management. Her research sits at the interface between entrepreneurship and leadership and takes a critical perspective, drawing on ideas of gender and power to examine the interrelationships between the micro-level and macro-level experiences that shape women’s understanding and experiences. Recent work explores the enduring and global problem of the underrepresentation of women in leadership roles and positions of influence, including in entrepreneurial ventures. Her work has been published in a number of leading international journals and she is Editor of International Small Business Journal.

Professor Susan Marlow is Professor of Entrepreneurship and divisional research director for management at Nottingham University Business School, UK. She is holder of the Queens Award for Enterprise, an Editor for Entrepreneurship, Theory and Practice, Consulting Editor for the International Small Business Journal, Fellow of the UK Institution for Small Business and Entrepreneurship and Distinguished Visiting Professor at Manchester Metropolitan University and AUB, Beirut, Lebanon. Her research interests focus upon entrepreneurial behaviour with a particular expertise in gender issues having published in this area in top rated US and UK journals.

Dr Patricia Lewis is a Reader in Management in the Kent Business School, University of Kent. Working in the area of Gender and Organization Studies she has published in a range of journals including Organization Studies, British Journal of Management, Human Relations, Work, Employment & Society, Journal of Business Ethics, Gender, Work & Organization & International Journal of Management Reviews. Her current research involves critical use of the concept of postfeminism in understanding gendered organizational phenomena. She has recently edited (with Yvonne Benschop and Ruth Simpson) a book entitled Postfeminism and Organization, published by Routledge 2018. She is currently Joint-Editor-in-Chief of Gender, Work & Organization and previously was an Associate Editor of the journal for seven years

Professor Julia Rouse is the Director of ‘Decent Work and Productivity’, a newly formed research and knowledge exchange centre at Manchester Metropolitan University. She founded the Sylvia Pankhurst Gender and Diversity Research Centre that now sits within Decent Work and Productivity. She has a passionate interest in creating feminist research communities and was the founder of the Gender and Enterprise Network. She is developing an Engaged-Activist methodology that experiments with ways of creating change through scholarship in projects concerned with entrepreneur maternity rights and Generating Routes for Women’s Leadership (GROWL).

Professor Kerrie Unsworth is a Professor of Organisational Behaviour and Head of the Management Division at Leeds University Business School. She is Director of the Workplace Behaviour Research Centre, a research group dedicated to improving the world through better organisational behaviour. Kerrie is interested in understanding how people juggle their different goals and identities and the effect this has on their behaviours and well-being. She has published in a range of top academic journals such as Journal of Applied Psychology and has won in excess of £1.5m in public and private sector research funding.

 

 

AOM PDW on Historic CSR

Please register for the AOM PDW!

Special Issue Paper Development Workshops

Historic Corporate Responsibility:

Its Extent, Limits, and Consequences

The guest editors of the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue on Historic Corporate Social Responsibility will arrange paper development workshops at the following conferences:

  • Academy of Management (10-14 August in Chicago),
  • International Association for Business & Society (7-10 June in Hong Kong), and
  • European Business History Association (6-8 September in Ancona, Italy)[1]

During the workshops, authors will present and discuss their papers and receive feedback from discussants and peers.

Attendance at these workshops is NOT a precondition for submission to the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue.

Confirmed discussants at the Academy of Management in Chicago include Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School), Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University), Paul C. Godfrey (Brigham Young University), Stefan Hielscher (University of Bath), Michael Rowlinson (University of Exeter), Sébastien Mena (Cass Business School), and Roy R. Suddaby (University of Victoria and Newcastle University).

 

Submission Information and Deadlines

Scholars interested in one of the workshops are asked to contact the guest editors according to requirements for each conference. Please see the following table for the key dates and contact information.

  IABS conference AoM conference EBHA conference
Require-ments Elevator pitch format. Interested authors might wish to contact Rob Phillips prior to the conference. To be considered for a PDW at either AoM or EBHA, an abstract (no more than 2’000 words or 8 pages all in) should be submitted to the responsible guest editor. The guest editors will then select promising abstracts and notify the authors. After acceptance, the authors are asked to submit a full paper (8’000-10’000 words).
Submission of abstracts none May 15, 2018 June 17, 2018
Submission of full paper July 1, 2018 August 1, 2018
Date and location of workshop June 7-10, 2018

Hong Kong

August 10-14, 2018

Chicago, IL

September 6-8, 2018

Ancona, Italy

Contact Rob Phillips

rphillips@schulich.yorku.ca

Judith Schrempf-Stirling

judith.schrempf-stirling@unige.ch

Christian Stutz

Christian.stutz@fh-hwz.ch

 

[1] The workshop proposal at the EBHA is currently under evaluation—to be confirmed.

New history piece in AMR!

I am very pleased to see Alistair’s work on how history reframes our understanding of institutional logics in print, especially in AMR. Congratulations!Academy of Management Review Vol. 43, No. 2Articles

Practice, Substance, and History: Reframing Institutional Logics

Published Online:https://doi.org/10.5465/amr.2015.0303

 

Roger Friedland’s characterization of institutional logics as a combination of substance and practices opens the door to a more complex reading of their influence on organizational life. His focus suggests attention to feelings and belief as much as cognition and choice. In this article I use history to develop these ideas by paying attention to the perennial features of our embodied relations with the world and other persons. Historical work draws our attention to neglected domains of social life, such as play, which can have profound impacts on organizations. The study of history suggests that such institutions have a long-run conditioning influence that calls into question accounts that stress individual agential choice and action in bringing about change. Analytical narratives of the emergence of practices can provide the means to combine the conceptual apparatus of organization theory with the attention to temporality of history.

CFP: Business History Conference 2019, Cartagena

Reblogged from the Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

The 2019 annual meeting of the Business History Conference will be held in Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, on March 14–16. The theme of the meeting will be “Globalization and De-Globalization: Shifts of Power and Wealth.” The recent phenomena of the spread of populist and economic nationalist regimes throughout North America, Europe, Asia and elsewhere taking positions against the major trading blocks and the free movement of people and goods make the topic of this conference very timely. The conference aims to concentrate on business history research agendas that enable a nuanced understanding of the phenomena of globalization and de-globalization.

The conference theme encourages contributions from a variety of approaches to business history research, covering a broad range of geographies and periods. The program committee of Marcelo Bucheli (co-chair), Andrea Lluch (co-chair), Takafumi KurosawaEspen StorliLaura Sawyer, and Teresa da Silva Lopes (BHC president) invites paper proposals…

View original post 730 more words

Imagining Britain’s economic future, c.1800-1975

Reblogged from the Imperial & Global Forum:

Imperial & Global Forum

David Thackeray, Richard Toye, and Andrew Thompson
University of Exeter

This book considers how Britain has imagined its economic role in the wider world and how British ideas have influenced global debates about market relationships between the start of the nineteenth century and the UK’s first European referendum. In doing so, the authors explore the interplay between the high political thought of theorists, the activities of officials and businesspeople, and the everyday experience of the wider public. Across the contributions to this book there is a consideration of the competing factors which affected market decisions and the processes of ‘economic imagination’.

The economist Joseph Schumpeter put the concept of imagination at the heart of the entrepreneurial process. It was this quality which, above all, businesspeople required if they were to succeed: ‘the capacity of seeing things in a way which proves afterwards to be true, even though it cannot be…

View original post 675 more words

ToC: BH 60,5 SI on Institutional Change

Special issue in: Historical research on institutional change

Special issue introduction: Historical research on institutional change
Stephanie Decker, Behlül Üsdiken, Lars Engwall & Michael Rowlinson
Pages: 613-627 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1427736

Interfield Dynamics: Law and the creation of new organisational fields in the nineteenth-century United States
R. Daniel Wadhwani
Pages: 628-654 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1346610

Moral dividends: Freemasonry and finance capitalism in early-nineteenth-century America
Pamela A. Popielarz
Pages: 655-676 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1248946

Hey DJ, don’t stop the music: Institutional work and record pooling practices in the United States’ music industry |
Neil Thompson
Pages: 677-698 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1308485

Managing the paradox of unwanted efficiency: The symbolic legitimation of the hypermarket format in Finland, 1960–1975
Jarmo Seppälä
Pages: 699-727 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1304540

Change dynamics in institutional discontinuities: Do formal or informal institutions change first? Lessons from rule changes in professional American baseball
Aya S. Chacar, Sokol Celo & William Hesterly
Pages: 728-753 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1342811

From data problems to questions about sources: elements towards an institutional analysis of population-level organisational change. The case of British building societies, 1845–1980
Olivier Butzbach
Pages: 754-777 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1274304
Corrigendum

Correction to: Interfield Dynamics: Law and the creation of new organisational fields in the nineteenth-century United States
Pages: x-x | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1432458

PDWs on Historic Corporate Responsibility

Special Issue Paper Development Workshops

Historic Corporate Responsibility:

Its Extent, Limits, and Consequences

The guest editors of the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue on Historic Corporate Social Responsibility will arrange paper development workshops at the following conferences:

  • Academy of Management (10-14 August in Chicago),
  • International Association for Business & Society (7-10 June in Hong Kong), and
  • European Business History Association (6-8 September in Ancona, Italy)[1]

During the workshops, authors will present and discuss their papers and receive feedback from discussants and peers.

Attendance at these workshops is NOT a precondition for submission to the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue.

Confirmed discussants at the Academy of Management in Chicago include Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School), Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University), Paul C. Godfrey (Brigham Young University), Stefan Hielscher (University of Bath), Michael Rowlinson (University of Exeter), Sébastien Mena (Cass Business School), and Roy R. Suddaby (University of Victoria and Newcastle University).

Submission Information and Deadlines

Scholars interested in one of the workshops are asked to contact the guest editors according to requirements for each conference. Please see the following table for the key dates and contact information.

  IABS conference AoM conference EBHA conference
Require-ments Elevator pitch format. Interested authors might wish to contact Rob Phillips prior to the conference. To be considered for a PDW at either AoM or EBHA, an abstract (no more than 2’000 words or 8 pages all in) should be submitted to the responsible guest editor. The guest editors will then select promising abstracts and notify the authors. After acceptance, the authors are asked to submit a full paper (8’000-10’000 words).
Submission of abstracts none May 15, 2018

(extended deadline)

June 17, 2018
Submission of full paper July 1, 2018 August 1, 2018
Date and location of workshop June 7-10, 2018

Hong Kong

August 10-14, 2018

Chicago, IL

September 6-8, 2018

Ancona, Italy

Contact Rob Phillips

rphillips@schulich.yorku.ca

Judith Schrempf-Stirling

judith.schrempf-stirling@unige.ch

Christian Stutz

Christian.stutz@fh-hwz.ch

 [1] The workshop proposal at the EBHA is currently under evaluation—to be confirmed.

CfP: 50 years of Management Learning

Call for Papers: Anniversary Special Issue of Management Learning
Celebrating 50 years of Management Learning:
Historical reflections at the intersection of the past and future

Deadline for submissions: June 01, 2018
Guest Editors:
Gabrielle Durepos, Mount Saint Vincent University, Canada
Rafael Alcadipani, FGV-EAESP, Brazil
Mairi Maclean, University of Bath, UK
Stephen Cummings, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
Management Learning marks its 50th anniversary in 2020. Management Learning has a
long history of publishing critical, reflexive scholarship on organizational knowledge and learning. This special issue provides a forum to celebrate and build on this history
through critical and reflective engagement with the past, present and future of
management learning, knowledge and education. Taking a historical approach is all the
more pressing given recent and impending crises – geo-political, technological,
environmental and humanitarian – since some crises only make sense when seen in the
fullness of time (Casson and Casson, 2013). We therefore encourage scholarship that
challenges the disciplinary past of management knowledge, learning and education and
enables more diverse, innovative futures to be imagined.
There are a growing variety of approaches and conceptual frameworks in management
and organization studies for writing histories of organizations (Maclean, Harvey and
Clegg, 2016; Rowlinson, Hassard and Decker, 2014), management thought (Bucheli and
Wadhwani, 2014; Cummings, Bridgman, Hassard and Rowlinson, 2017) and researching
management in historically conscious ways (Jacques, 1996; Kieser, 1994). This has been
accompanied by a rise in critical organizational histories (Cooke, 1999; Ibarra-Colado,
2006; Scott, 2007). Although diverse, this scholarship is characterized by reflexivity
(Cunliffe, 2002), anti-performativity – history is generated for reasons beyond improving
future business efficiency and effectiveness – and commitment to an agenda of denaturalizing both hegemonic organizations, by exposing problematic pasts, and dominant historiography like positivism that seeks unitary truth (Fournier and Grey, 2000). The rise of critical history research has involved scholarship on management learning and education that challenges the dominant history of management thought in a number of ways (Jacques, 1996; Genoe Mclaren, Mills and Weatherbee, 2015). While some have exposed processes of exclusion and marginalization of management knowledge in textbooks (Cummings and Bridgman, 2011; Grant and Mills, 2006), others have uncovered knowledge politics and marginalization around geographical boundaries.

 

Full details are here: http://journals.sagepub.com/pb-assets/cmscontent/MLQ/ML%2050%20anniversary%20SI.pdf