ACCOUNTING HISTORY WORKSHOP

The workshop is being held by the Accounting History Special Interest Group (AH SIG) at Southampton University on Monday, 30 March 2020 10:30–17:00, before the main BAFA Annual Conference.

Accounting history research involves investigating the development and role of accounting in the past. The stories of history are gleaned from several sources, including documents in archives, libraries, private collections, and oral recollections. They are illuminated by knowledge of context, including, social, economic, commercial, legal, educational, financial, and religious factors identified in the literature. And they are interpreted and explained using those factors, often in combination with a selection of theories.

The aim of this workshop is to demonstrate the relevance of accounting history; to encourage participation in this genre of research; to describe various methods for carrying out accounting history research; to focus on how to publish historical research; and to provide an opportunity to establish networks and identify mentors and co-authors. Attendees will also have the opportunity to receive feedback on their research ideas and projects.

Workshop Programme

The one-day workshop will begin with an overview of accounting history methods and practice and an introduction to the Accounting History Special Interest group, followed by sessions on:

·       Carrying out accounting history research.

·       How to find primary sources.

·       How to find secondary sources.

·       Writing-up historical research: what should you include?

·       How to publish accounting history in leading journals.

·       Feedback on your ideas and projects (small group session)

Target Audience

The workshop is suitable for anyone considering beginning historical accounting research and anyone currently working in this area.

Registration

Full Ticket: £55
Reduced Rate for PhD Students Only: £25

The fee includes lunch. 

Buying a workshop ticket registers you for this event. Tickets to BAFA conferences are only available to members. To purchase a ticket, log in to your account on the BAFA Membership Portal (https://members.bafa.ac.uk/) and click the ‘Purchase Tickets’ button. Select the appropriate ticket for the event you want to attend, and follow instructions.

If you are not already a member of BAFA, please sign up for membership at https://members.bafa.ac.uk/signup. Further information on how to register for BAFA events can be found here: http://www.bafa.ac.uk/assets/uploads/conference-workshop-registration.pdf.

BAFA Annual Membership rates: Academic Staff: £30 
Unsalaried PhD/MPhil Student or Retired Academic: £15

Look forward to seeing you there!

Workshop on the History of Industrial Clusters in the UK

The British Academy of Management Management and Business History SIG and the Henley Business School, University of Reading, Centre for International Business History, are running an event on ‘A History of Industrial Clusters: Knowledge, Innovation Systems and Sustainability in the UK’ .

This workshop brings together some of the leading researchers across the field of business and economic history showcasing the breadth and depth of current work. At its core are the themes of innovation, knowledge and sustainability and a framework developed by David Charles bringing these together. This will allow new questions to be asked and provide a historical dimension to regional economic development in the UK. The research presented will also offer some contemporary insights into policy-making and industrial strategy.

The core research output arising from the workshop will be a new edited collection on industrial clusters (under the same title as the workshop and edited by Chris Corker, Joe Lane and John Wilson). This is currently under contract with Routledge for publication in 2021 and will form part of their ‘International Studies in Business History’ series.

Date:  4th and 5th of March 2020 (full day on the 4th and half day on the 5th of March)

Location: Henley Business School, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus

Speakers: 

  • Professor John Wilson
  • Dr Joe Lane
  • Dr Chris Corker
  • Dr Harry Smith
  • Professor David Charles
  • Dr Emily Buchnea

Registration deadline: 28 February 2020

For more information on this event and to register, please access the following link:  event link

New African Studies track at BAM2020

I am really pleased that BAM now has, in addition to the long-standing Business and Management History track, a new track for African Studies that is open to wide variety of approaches, including historical research.

We would like to bring to your attention a new track on African Studies for the BAM 2020 conference in Manchester. The African Studies track is committed to examining submissions that foster dialogue on contemporary African research which directly impacts BAM members and the wellbeing of the broader academic research community. We are especially keen to receive full and development papers (both conceptual and empirical based) as well as workshop styled interventions on the following topical areas:  

  • African entrepreneurial process & other spatial/temporal issues on African entrepreneurship.
  • African culture, alternative institutions and indigenous networks.
  • Policy & practice issues on African development and SMEs.
  • African development finance, including formal & informal sources of finance, financial bootstrapping, small business, venture capital, & bank credits. 
  • African leadership and leadership development.
  • African research on female & gender entrepreneurship.
  • African  research methodologies & methods

We have an open list for potential submissions but are interested in papers which explore an African theme. The BAM2020 submission site can be located via the following link:  https://www.conftool.pro/bam2020. We look forward to your submissions.

Track Chairs

Dr. Kingsley Omeihe, Edinburgh Napier University              k.omeihe@napier.ac.uk

Dr. Christian Harrison, University of the West of Scotland   Christian.Harrison@uws.ac.uk
The BAM Team | British Academy of Management  
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Call for EBHA doctoral summer school

At Business History, we are very proud to be one of the sponsors of this year’s EBHA doctoral summer school!

Keynote Speaker: Albert Carreras (Pompeu Fabra University).

Faculty Members: Adoración Álvaro Moya (CUNEF), Veronica Binda (Bocconi University), Andrea Colli (Bocconi University), Christina Lubinski (Copenhagen Business School) and Jari Ojala (University of Jyvaskyla).

Local organizers: Paloma Fernández and Miquel Gutiérrez (University of Barcelona).

The 10th edition of the EBHA (European Business History Association) Summer School will take place at Barcelona, from Wednesday, July 8th to Friday, July 10th, 2020. The school, titled Challenges for Business History in a Changing World, aims to encourage a fresh and rigorous exchange of thoughts, ideas, and new research being done by doctoral students in early stages of their doctoral work, in fields closely related to Business History. It is organised jointly by the European Business History Association (EBHA) and the University of Barcelona (UB) in cooperation with the Spanish Association of Economic History (AEHE).

The school will focus on theoretical, methodological and practical issues which are of relevance for advanced research in business history. The main aims of the school are to provide students with a full understanding of the newest trends in research in the field and to provide a friendly atmosphere in which to discuss their preliminary findings with leading scholars as well as among their peers. In this respect, the program features both lectures and seminars given by faculty and student presentations of their research projects. Each student will have 20 minutes maximum to present her/his project, stressing especially: research questions and goals, methodology, sources, challenges and provisional outcomes. After her/his presentation, each student will receive questions and comments from other students and from faculty members.

Students will be accommodated in the beautiful and lively city of Barcelona. The organisers will cover all local costs (accommodation in double room and food), but participants are expected to pay their own travel expenses.

Those interested in attending the summer school should send the following documents by e-mail to Paloma Fernández (palomafernandez@ub.edu):

1) a brief CV (not exceeding one page);

2) a summary of their dissertation project (not exceeding three pages);

3) (if possible) an example of their work in progress, e.g. a draft chapter or a working paper (in any language).

The deadline for applications is February 29th, 2020. A maximum of 10 participants will be selected from these applications and will be notified by March 30th, 2020.

New database of company archives

The University of Florida’s History Department program in the History of Capitalism has created a curated and searchable database of corporate archives and is proud to announce that this new digital resource is now available. The name and virtual location of the database are Inquire Capitalism at https://inquirecapitalism.omeka.net/

https://inquirecapitalism.omeka.net/

Inquire Capitalism seeks to both unify information about corporate archives and also to connect scholars, archivists, and businesses by making information about company archives more discoverable. In addition, the researchers collecting the information about company archives have focused on finding out what is the digital presence of companies’ history, whether through digital archives or by having heritage sites and chronologies as part of the company’s website. The database contains information mostly about the United States, but the team at the University of Florida plans to continue expanding the list by including information from other parts of the world. Inquire Capitalism has counted with the partnership of the German Historical Institute in Washington D.C. and the Hagley Museum and Library to start the project and wishes to create new partners to make this list global and even more useful. Comments and new contributions are most appreciated and welcomed. Please contact the team by emailing to inquirecapitalism@history.ufl.edu.


I would be thrilled to know what you think of the project. I am also writing to find out if you would be willing to hear more about how we created it and how we intend to make it permanent. It would be great if we can find a way to maybe integrate it as part of one of your working projects, or possibly discuss a way to (once again) pursue research grants opportunities so that this resource can become even more useful and internationally generated and powered.

My best, Paula
Paula A. de la Cruz-Fernández, Ph.D.
Historiadora, Administradora de Patrimonio || Historian, Heritage Manager

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3535-7195
Editora || Editor The Exchange, the BHC blog
Redes sociales || Contact@cruzmosu or LinkedIn

AHRC funding for digital business archives research

I am really pleased to announce that, together with a team of investigators including Dr Adam Nix (De Montford University), Prof David Kirsch (University of Maryland and University of Oxford) and our heritage partners, The National Archives (UK) and the Hagley Museum & Library (USA), we have been awarded funding from the AHRC to investigate how historical researchers may be able to research emails as historical sources, and use this resource to historicise the dot.com boom from the perspective of a software development company. See below for a description of our new project!

Historicizing the dot.com bubble and contextualizing email archives

Summary

Future researchers will have to engage with emails if they are to understand the lives of those who lived in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. This is particularly true of organizations and their employees, for whom email has become the default form of internal and external communication. As it currently stands, publicly available email archives are rare, and there has been minimal engagement with them as a historical resource. Indeed, one of the most well-known examples, the Enron Email Corpus, only exists because of high-profile legal proceedings that followed the firm’s bankruptcy and has seen minimal historical investigation since its publication. While this is partly due to its comparative recency, the reading of emails as a historical source is a developing practice and requires particular skills and knowledge that are not traditionally associated with historical enquiry. Despite this, archives and other heritage organizations are increasingly collecting and preserving email data and we are fast moving into the period where the events of the 1990s are of historical interest. We believe that our project offers a timely opportunity to address the gap between current efforts to preserve email and the future requirements that will allow them to actually be read and engaged with.

To address this issue, we seek a better understanding of how email archives can be made more accessible for the purposes of historical learning and research. The problem we focus on here is that, while emails offer valuable insight to researchers, a lack of context often presents a challenge to those wishing to understand their content, inter-relationship and wider historical significance. This de-contextualization can represent a barrier to engagement, to both trained historians and general interest users. Furthermore, existing examples of email archives often purposefully remove personal information, further disconnecting emails from their authors, recipients and connection to related material. For these reasons, our project will make an email archive available in such a way that maintains the relational and network properties that emails hold, as these allow individual emails to be understood in terms of their connection to those that precede and follow them. Furthermore, we will bring the historical context back to otherwise de-contextualized data, allowing researchers to interpret isolated items of communication in a way that appreciates the wider historical circumstances in which they were created.

We will address this challenge through a UK-US collaboration between three universities (University of Bristol, De Montfort University, University of Maryland) and two heritage sector partners (The National Archives, UK, and Hagley Museum and Library, US). Through these collaborations, the project will focus on accessioning and re-contextualizing a worked example of an email archive from a failed US software company from the dot.com era, making it available in various forms to suit the diverse requirements of its potential readers. More specifically, the project has three overall work packages that together deliver on the project’s aim and objectives. The first aspect of the project centres around work linking the constituent emails in the archive together to retain the basic network structure of the communications and making relational links to otherwise disconnected emails based on their content. This will be combined with a user interface that allows the whole archive to be searched and read. The second aspect of the project provides a historical case study of the failed US company based on its archive and will require the development of both a narrative explanation of its history and an online platform for public engagement with it. The final package focuses on the project’s legacy and deals with issues of long-term preservation of the archive, description of best practice, and engagement with project stakeholders.

CfP for ABH extended until 10 Feb!

Please find the Call for Papers for the ABH 2020 conference below.  Please note the closing date for papers/sessions has been extended to 10.02.2020.  

Please encourage applicants for the Coleman Prize, which has also been extended to 10.02.2020. 

You can submit your papers by visiting the ABH website athttps://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH/index.html, then click on Please view here.

If you require any further information, please do not hesitate to contact us, or the ABH 2020 conference organisers, email: Business-Historians2020@Nottingham.ac.uk.

BUBBLES AND CRISES; MAYHEM AND MISERY; CORRUPTION AND DISRUPTION

26–27 June 2020

Nottingham University Business School Jubilee Campus

As we continue to live with the worldwide fallout of the 2008 economic crisis, we have to wonder whether we have learned anything about business, bubbles, and crises over the centuries. This conference will address the historical consequences of bubbles and crises and their ramifications in terms of human and financial misery and the difficulties caused at national level (e.g., in respect of lower tax revenues and consequent reductions to public goods and services) and to businesses, communities and individuals.

The first bubble was famously that of the ‘Tulip Mania’ of 1636 followed by the crash of early 1637. In the British context, there was also the railway mania of the mid-19th century, and in the context of the United States, the great crash and depression of the 1930s, which had worldwide consequences. More recently we have seen various financial crises and stock market crashes e.g.: the UK in 1987; the 1997 financial crisis in Asia; the 1998 Russian financial crisis; the ‘dot.com’ bubble of the 1990s; the housing/property market bubbles in China, Japan and Australia in the early 2000s; the recent economic crises in Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Greece and Spain.

As we approach the tri-centenary of the British ‘South Sea Bubble’ and the French ‘Mississippi Bubble’, this conference aims to revisit various bubbles and crises around three themes with various sub-questions.:

Bubbles and Crises

What macro forces are at play? Are financial bubbles and crises historically and economically cyclical and inevitable? How do they affect businesses and the economy more widely?

Mayhem and Misery

Are there ever rational bubbles? Who wins? Who loses? What national and international social and economic public policy changes were proposed or made in response to alleviate the consequences? What were the consequences for businesses, communities and individuals?

Corruption and Disruption

Who is to blame? Whom do we blame? What is the relationship between business and individual behaviour and corruption? What were the outcomes from crises in terms of political and economic regulation? Who are the beneficiaries of crises? What can we learn about the persistence and circulation of business elites?

We will particularly welcome papers on businesses’ role and involvement, collectively or individually, in these or related themes, but will also consider papers that sit outside this framework.

How to submit a paper or session proposal

The programme committee will consider both individual papers and entire panels. Individual paper proposals should include a one-page (up to 300-word) abstract and one-page curriculum vitae (CV). Panel proposals should include a cover letter stating the rationale for the panel and the name of its contact person; one-page (300-word) abstract and author’s CV for each paper; and a list of preferred panel chairs and commentators with contact information. Note that each academic session lasts 90 minutes, allowing time for 3 or at a pinch 4 papers. The deadline for submissions is 10 February 2020.

If you have any questions please contact the Conference Organisers: Business- Historians2020@Nottingham.ac.uk.

Submissions must be made online at: https://unternehmensgeschichte.de/db/public/C1. Begin by selecting between uploading a single paper or a full panel. Have your abstract and CV ready. The software will guide you through the uploading and submission process.

Any other suggestions for the conference – workshops, poster sessions, panel discussions – should be made to the programme committee through Business- Historians2020@Nottingham.ac.uk.

Call for Tony Slaven Doctoral Workshop in Business History, 25th June 2020

The ABH will hold its eight annual Tony Slaven Doctoral Workshop on 25th June 2020. This event immediately precedes the 2020 ABH Annual Conference at Nottingham University Business School. Participants in the Workshop are encouraged to attend the main ABH Annual Conference following the Workshop. The Workshop is an excellent opportunity for doctoral students to discuss their work with other research students and established academics in business history in an informal and supportive environment. Students at any stage of their doctoral studies, whether in their first year or very close to submitting, are urged to apply. In addition to providing new researchers with an opportunity to discuss their work with experienced researchers in the discipline, the Workshop will also include at least one skills- related session. The Workshop interprets the term ‘business history’ broadly, and it is intended that students in areas such as (but not confined to) the history of international trade and investment, financial or economic history, agricultural history, the history of not-for- profit organisations, government-industry relations, accounting history, social studies of technology, and historians or management or labour will find it useful. Students undertaking topics with a significant business history element but in disciplines other than economic or business history are also welcome. We embrace students researching any era or region of history. Skills sessions are typically led by regular ABH members; in the past these have included ‘getting published’, ‘using historical sources’, and ‘preparing for your viva examination’ sessions. There will be ample time for discussion of each student’s work and the opportunity to gain feedback from active researchers in the field.

How to Apply for the Tony Slaven Workshop

Your application should be no more than 4 pages sent together in a single computer file: 1) a one page CV; 2) one page stating the name(s) of the student’s supervisor(s), the title of the theses (a proposed title is fine), the university and department where the student is registered and the date of commencement of thesis registration; 3) an abstract of the work to be presented.

You may apply via email to Dr Mitch Larson at mjlarson@uclan.ac.uk. Please use the subject line “Tony Slaven Workshop” and submit by the 10 February 2020.

Call for Coleman Prize for Best PhD Dissertation, Nottingham University Business School, 26–27 June 2020

Named in honour of the British business historian Donald Coleman (1920-1995), this prize is awarded annually by the Association of Business Historians to recognise excellence in new research in Britain. It is open to PhD dissertations in Business History (broadly defined) either having a British subject or completed at a British university. All dissertations completed in the previous calendar year to that of the Prize are eligible. In keeping with the ABH’s broad understanding of business history, applications are strongly encouraged from candidates in economic history, social history, labour history, intellectual history, cultural history, environmental history, the history of science and technology, the history of medicine, or any other subfield. The value of the prize is £500, sponsored by the Taylor & Francis Group, a scholarly publisher. To be eligible for the Prize, finalists must present their findings in person at the Association’s annual conference, held on 26–27 June 2020. A complete list of previous winners may be found at: http://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH/coleman.html

How to Apply for the Coleman Prize
Supervisors are encouraged to nominate recent PhDs, and self-nominations are also strongly welcomed. Please send a PDF including the title of your PhD dissertation and a brief abstract (up to 2 double-spaced pages) to christine.leslie@glasgow.ac.uk by 10 February 2020. Shortlisted candidates will be requested to submit electronic copies of their theses by 20 February 2020. Finalists will be notified by 19 March 2020.

Everyone appearing on the programme must register for the meeting. PhD students whose papers are accepted for the meeting may apply for funds to partially defray their travel costs by applying to the Francesca Carnevali Travel Grant for PhD Students. A limited number of scholarships are available from the Francesca Carnevali fund of the ABH to contribute towards the travel, accommodation and registration costs of students doing a PhD in the United Kingdom, who are presenting in the Slaven Workshop, the ABH conference or the Coleman Prize.

Further details can be found at – https://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH

WCBH application deadline extended

Good news for those who missed the application deadline for the Second World Congress of Business History (WCBH) at Nanzan University, Nagoya, Japan (September 10th -12th, 2020). 

The program committee decided to extend the deadline for panel and paper proposals to January 29 (Wednesday), 2020.

WCBH 2020 is a world-wide congress jointly organized by EBHA and BHSJ, and it is positioned as the 24th Congress of the European Business History Association, and also as a specially organized international conference by BHSJ. Please visit:
http://bhs.ssoj.info/WCBH2020/index.html

Travel Support Information

The local organizers have secured funds for partial travel support for Young Scholars (PhD students are prioritized, but other young scholars eligible) and for participants from regions that do not usually have the chance to attend academic conferences in Japan. The exact amount of support is not yet determined, but the organizers hope to be able to offer between $300 to $1000 according to region. 
Applicants from the above categories whose papers have been selected for the Congress will be approached individually to apply for travel support. 
More details will follow, but in the meantime we encourage applications from the above categories.

We are looking forward to welcoming you in Japan!

Program Committee of WCBH

ProgramCommittee@worldbhc.org

New historical article in JMS

The January issue of JMS features a really interesting piece by Andrew Smith and Miriam Kaminishi about the historical origins of the concept of the ‘Confucian entrepreneur’. As anyone who has taught on the basis of international business textbooks can attest, the way in which Confucianism in drawn upon to explain phenomena in China’s political economy is often quite odd and uncomfortable. Below is the reference and abstract. Happy reading!

Confucian Entrepreneurship: Towards a Genealogy of a Conceptual Tool

Andrew Smith

Miriam Kaminishi

First published: 16 February 2019 

https://doi.org/10.1111/joms.12439

Abstract

The concept of the ‘Confucian Entrepreneur’ is now used by many scholars to understand entrepreneurship in China and other East Asian countries. This paper traces the development of this concept from its roots in the writings of nineteenth‐century Western authors to its use in modern management journals. We show that while this conceptual tool has been adapted over time, the claims associated with it have remained largely similar. Use of the term Confucian entrepreneur implies belief that Confucian ideas induce Chinese entrepreneurs to behave differently than their Western counterparts, a claim for which the empirical foundations are weak. We do not go so far as to say that those who research Chinese entrepreneurship should discard the concept of the Confucian entrepreneur simply because of its historical origins in colonialism. However, we do call on researchers to reflect on the historical origins of their conceptual tools. By historicising our theories of entrepreneurship, this paper should encourage greater scholarly reflexivity and thus the development of entrepreneurship and management theory with greater predictive power.