Brexit Bonanza

Brexit and History

University of York

Thu 11 October 2018, 11:00 – 17:30

DESCRIPTION

Brexit and History Conference to inform debates about the origins and impact of Brexit. Speakers will discuss; Supply-Side Policy in the Context of Brexit (Nick Crafts); UK Public Procurement before, during and after the British membership of the EU (David Clayton & David Higgins); Standardisation, Popular Politics and Euroscepticism in Britain (Aashish Velkar); Lessons from the Past for Brexit? Britain and Commercial Negotiations with Europe in the Nineteenth century (John Davis); Did we ever really understand how the EU works? (Piers Ludlow); British Political Tradition and the Crisis of Brexit (Martin Smith); The UK and the EU in the Past and Future of Global Economic Order (Tony Heron).

Tea and coffee will be provided but please bring your own lunch; alternatively food is available to purchase on campus.

This event is sponsored by The Economic History Society and supported by the Department of History, University of York.

If you are interested, you can sign up here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/brexit-and-history-tickets-50268560618

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Hyper-prolific authors

From THE:

‘Hyperprolific’ academics ‘don’t meet author criteria’ – study

Analysis shows thousands of researchers publish the equivalent of one paper every five days, but their involvement is often limited

September 14, 2018

Narratives in family business

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The Strategic Use of Historical Narratives in Family Business

I’m sharing a link to a fascinating new paper on how family firms use historical narratives strategically. The paper is doubly interesting to me as it intersects with my own research interests and is consistent with my observations about how the entrepreneurs in my extended family have used historical narratives in their ventures. Congratulations to Rania Labaki Ludovic Cailluet and Fabian Bernhard on this paper.

Labaki R., Bernhard F., Cailluet L. (2019) The Strategic Use of Historical Narratives in the Family Business. In: Memili E., Dibrell C. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Heterogeneity among Family Firms. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham

Post-Doc at Hagley

Post-Doctoral Fellowship Opportunity at the Hagley Library

The NEH-Hagley Fellowship on Business, Culture, and Society supports residencies in Hagley’s Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society by scholars who have received their doctoral degrees. Recent PhD recipients as well as advanced scholars are eligible to apply. In accordance with NEH requirements, these postdoctoral fellowships are restricted to United States citizens or to foreign nationals who have been living in the United States for at least three years. These fellowships are made possible by support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Hagley is the pre-eminent research library in the United States on business and its impact on the world. It holds more than seven miles of manuscript materials, more than 300,000 published sources, and visual items in excess of 3 million. Publications drawn from our collections provide foundational knowledge for the rise and influence of big business on politics and society as well as the cultural history of modern consumer society. Documentation of the extensive international operations of firms have provided entry for scholars exploring business and business influences in all areas of the world. While historical research is the principal purpose for most scholars, its active research grant program has funded projects from many fields in the social sciences and humanities.

Two postdoctoral fellowships are available, one of four months and one for eight months. The eight-month fellowship must be taken during the September through May academic year. The fellowships provide a monthly stipend of $4,200, amounting to $33,600 for the eight-month fellowship and $16,800 for the four-month fellowship. Fellows receive complimentary lodging in the scholar’s housing on Hagley’s property for the duration of their residency, as well as office space and the full privileges of visiting scholars, including special access to Hagley’s research collections. They are expected to be in regular and continuous residence and to participate in the Center’s scholarly programs. They must devote full time to their study and may not accept teaching assignments or undertake any other major activities during their residency. Fellows may hold other major fellowships or grants during fellowship tenure, in addition to sabbaticals and supplemental grants from their own institutions, but only those that do not interfere with their residency at Hagley. Other NEH-funded grants may be held serially, but not concurrently.

Applications are due December 1 and should be sent as a .pdf file and include, in the following order:

  • A current CV
  • A 3,000-word explanation of the project and its contributions to pertinent scholarship
  • A statement of no more than 500 words explaining how residency at Hagley would advance the project, particularly the relevance of our research collections.
  • A statement indicating a preference for the four or eight month fellowship.

Applicants also should arrange for two letters of recommendation to arrive separately by the application deadline. These should sent directly to Hagley.

All applications materials, including recommendations letters, should be sent to Carol Lockman, clockman@Hagley.org and must be received by that date for the application to be considered by the selection committee. The committee will make decisions by February 1, with residency beginning as early as July 1. Questions regarding this fellowship may be sent to Carol Lockman as well.

PDW report on Gender & History as an Analytical Lens

Gender and History as an Analytical Lens for Management and Entrepreneurship Research and Practice: Some thoughts from a PDW at the 2018 BAM conference

 

On the 4th September representatives from the Feminist Library (FL) in London, Gail Chester and Magda Oldziejewska, alongside Feminist Archive North’s (FAN) Jalna Hanmer, and academics from St Andrews, Aston, Birmingham and Stirling Universities, participated in a refreshingly non-strictly-academic workshop as part of the BAM 2018 conference at Bristol’s University of the West of England. The Library, along with FAN, introduced feminist libraries and archives (FLA) in the UK and talked about some of the unique practices of these organisations.

 

The FL, having been around since 1975, the height of the Women’s Liberation Movement, has since accumulated over 7,000 books, 1,500 periodical titles and countless items of archival material and ephemera, among them innumerable titles on women in education, feminist educational practices, women in management and business. FAN archive contains a wealth of contemporary material in local, regional, national and international collections donated by individuals and organisations, including conference papers, pamphlets, journals, newsletters, dissertations, oral history interviews, audio tapes, films, posters, badges, t-shirts and banners. However, far from these being like regular libraries and archives, the importance of understanding the FLA resources in the context of where they come from was highlighted, i.e. the feminist theories and practices key to the management and survival of these resources: collective working, intersectionality, diversity, and a focus on accessibility.

 

Alongside this compelling account of the construction and maintenance of the Feminist Library, including the contemporary challenges of archiving social media and of course the eternal funding challenges of this kind of work, workshop participants also addressed questions of how and why we conduct historical research with women and feminism at its centre. Organizer Hannah Dean (St Andrews) framed the workshop with an explanation of her British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship. Dr. Dean collected and archived women’s life history accounts of business ownership, creating an invaluable resource for her own research and for future scholars. Dr. Linda Perriton (Stirling) made clear why business historians need to ‘pick up the gauntlet’ that feminist historians have thrown down, and engage fully with the messy, marginal practices that are so fundamental to mainstream/malestream accounts of most business history.

 

Professor Stephanie Decker (Aston) followed this with a clear-sighted explanation of how archives can be approached as a site for fieldwork, as well as a source repository. Participants were encouraged again to take account of the nexus of power/knowledge that all history/History is embedded within. Finally, Dr. Scott Taylor (Birmingham) talked around the possibility of feminist methodologies for history, and what they mean for how we bear witness to the lives and activities of women in business history.

 

The stimulating resulting discussion focused on the importance of preserving/uncovering the lesser known/hidden voices of women, and at least one attendee was inspired to conduct her own research into this under-explored area, focusing on women’s work in Turkey in the middle ages.

 

All in all, it was heartening to be part of such an inspiring event that brought together historians, feminists, feminist allies, social scientists, archivists, and activists. Contemporary feminist activism and archivist practices have much to say to business and management research; historical analysis of women’s experiences and feminism even more so!

Business Historian Podcast Alert: Wharton’s Natalya Vinokurova On Whether the U.S. Headed for Another Mortgage Crisis?

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

From the Knowledge@Wharton blog:

Ten years after the mortgage-fueled Great Recession, several of the market and structural components remain in place that could set the environment for the next crisis. In her latest research, Wharton management professor Natalya Vinokurova takes a historical look at the development of mortgage-backed securities and finds fascinating parallels to the present day. She spoke to Knowledge@Wharton about her papers, “Failure to Learn from Failure: The 2008 Mortgage Crisis as a Déjà vu of the Mortgage Meltdown of 1994” (Business History) and “How Mortgage-Backed Securities Became Bonds: The Emergence, Evolution, and Acceptance of Mortgage-Backed Securities in the United States, 1960–1987,” (Enterprise and Society) and why one should heed the warnings of history.

You can listen to the podcast here.

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PhDs & PostDocs at Stellenbosch University

A new generation of historians and other social scientists is reinterpreting African history using individual-level archival records. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded Biography of an Uncharted People project builds on this momentum, using micro-level evidence of groups often excluded from aggregate statistical records, charting a new biography of South Africans.

Want to be at the frontier of new methodological innovations? Want to study the lives of people often neglected in historical sources? Want to be part of an exciting team of international scholars in the beautiful university-town of Stellenbosch? Then join us in 2019.

PhD and postdoc positions are available. Specific competencies in historical geography (GIS) are highly recommended for one of the postdoc positions, but applications from all subfields of history are welcome. Please visit unchartedpeople.org for more information. Applications close 1 October 2018.

Johan Fourie
johanf@sun.ac.za

Call for Editors – Journal of Global History

Reblogged from Imperial and Global Forum:

Imperial & Global Forum

Professor William Gervase Clarence Smith, Professor Barbara Watson Andaya, and Professor Merry Wiesner-Hanks will shortly be coming to the end of their tenure as editors of the Journal of Global History (JGH). Cambridge University Press, in collaboration with an Editorial Board search committee, is now inviting applications for their successor(s).

The deadline for applications is 30 September, 2018.

JGH addresses the main problems of global change over time, together with the diverse histories of globalization. It also examines counter-currents to globalization, including those that have structured other spatial units. The journal seeks to transcend the dichotomy between ‘the West and the rest’, straddle traditional regional boundaries, relate material to cultural and political history, and overcome thematic fragmentation in historiography. The journal also acts as a forum for interdisciplinary conversations across a wide variety of social and natural sciences.

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OS SI CfP: Power & Performativity

Organization Studies

Call for Papers

Special Issue on Power and performativity as interweaving dynamics of organizing

Guest Editors for the Special Issue

Barbara Simpson, University of Strathclyde

Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Peter Fleming, City University of London

Viviane Sergi, UQAM

Anthony Hussenot, Université Côte d’Azur

 Deadline for Submissions: 31 March 2019


Power and performativity are recurrent but distinct themes in contemporary organization studies. Each has been theorized in multiple ways, but what still remains largely unexamined is the interplay between them in the ongoing flow of organizing. It is the dynamic and co-productive potential of this confluence that provides the focus for this Special Issue. In particular we propose that by re-visioning both power and performativity through a processual lens, new possibilities for understanding their entwinements will emerge.

 Power has traditionally been understood as a property or a possession that may be seized and wielded, either overtly or in hidden ways, in order to exert ‘power over’ others (Clegg, Courpasson, & Phillips, 2006). In this context it is often conceived in dualistic terms as some ‘thing’ that is available to the few for controlling the many. By contrast, process approaches endeavour to transcend this dualistic formulation, focussing instead on how power produces movement and change in our worlds. For instance, Foucault (1979) saw power as fundamentally relational and generative, and Follett (1924) argued for a ‘power with’ perspective that continuously emerges out of the actions of people working together.

A similar scenario can be drawn for performativity (Gond, Cabantous, Harding, & Learmonth, 2016), which may refer to managerial efforts to produce outcomes (Fournier & Grey, 2000), or to tactics to help managers change the status quo (Alvesson & Spicer, 2012). From a more processual perspective though, performativity offers a theory of how language constitutes experienced ‘realities’ (Austin, 1962), how organizations are made in communication (Taylor, Cooren, Giroux, & Robichaud, 1996), and how that which appears given and unchangeable is constituted moment by moment (Butler, 1997) through intra-acting material agencies (Barad, 2003).

In this Special Issue, we want to draw attention to the possibilities that arise if both power and performativity are conceived as dynamic processes that, through their continuous swirling together and apart offer novel opportunities to engage differently with organizing. Recent developments in philosophical and theoretical thinking about organizing have clarified the distinction between ontologically oriented assumptions of emergence, continuity and becoming, and more epistemologically oriented accounts of how organizational outcomes are produced (Helin, Hernes, Hjorth, & Holt, 2014; Langley & Tsoukas, 2017). However, the uptake of process as an ontological mode of inquiry has been hampered by the paucity of conceptual and methodological devices to support empirical studies. We need new tools that allow us to unravel the alternative logics of process-as-it-happens, to engage with the evolving nature of the categories we use to define (and redefine) the phenomena of working and living, and to re-configure the boundaries of more processual understandings of organizing. Developing such tools will not only contribute new ways of studying power and performativity together, but also new ways of carrying out research into organizing more generally. As an added bonus, it may further serve to address the immediate concerns of organizational practitioners, who are so often let down by the inadequacies of conventional theory when it comes to examining their own lived experiences of work.

This Special Issue seeks to advance process studies of organizing by re-imagining power and performativity as mutually constituting dynamics. Broadly we are interested in questions such as how might we better understand the performativity of power and the power of performativity, and how, in their interweaving, do power and performativity constitute the emergent becoming of organizing. We especially welcome empirical contributions that, in offering partial, localized or ephemeral accounts of power and performativity, open up new ways of engaging with these dynamic processes by entering into the emergent flow of organizing. Our specific aim is to focus more on the ‘doing of’ rather than the ‘thinking about’ process research.

Potential topics for submissions include, but are by no means limited to:

  • Research methods that engage with the processual logics of power and performativity
  • Ways of writing from/as/about material aspects of power and performativity
  • The engagement of power with performativity in the communicative constitution of organizing
  • Reflexivity, surprise and playfulness in the experience of power and performativity
  • The role of body and language in the performative accomplishment of power
  • Temporality in the entwinement of power and performativity in organizing
  • The power of performance in new collaborative practices such as freelancing and co-working
  • The performance of power in new organizational forms such as those introduced through the gig economy and democracy-based organization
  • The power of non-human agencies in the performative accomplishment of organizing
  • The performative power of contemporary research methods

Submissions

Please submit papers through the journal’s online submission system, SAGE track at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/orgstudies, create your user account (if you have not done so already), and for “Manuscript Type” please choose the corresponding Special Issue. All papers that enter the reviewing process will be double-blind reviewed following the journal’s normal review process and criteria. You will be able to submit your paper for this Special Issue between the 15th and 31st of March 2019.

Administrative support and general queries

Sophia Tzagaraki, Managing Editor, Organization Studies: OSofficer@gmail.com

For further information please contact any of the Guest Editors for this Special Issue:

Barbara Simpson: barbara.simpson@strath.ac.uk

Nancy Harding: H.N.Harding@bath.ac.uk

Peter Fleming: Peter.Fleming.1@city.ac.uk

Viviane Sergi: sergi.viviane@uqam.ca

Anthony Hussenot: anthony.hussenot @unice.fr

 References:

Alvesson, M., & Spicer, A. (2012). Critical leadership studies: The case for critical performativity. Human Relations, 65(3), 367-390.

Austin, J. L. (1962). How to do things with words. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Barad, K. (2003). Posthumanist performativity: Toward an understanding of how matter comes to matter. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 28(3), 801-831.

Butler, J. (1997). Excitable speech: A politics of the performative. New York: Routledge.

Clegg, S. R., Courpasson, D., & Phillips, N. (2006). Power and organizations. London: SAGE.

Follett, M. P. (1924). Creative experience. New York: Longmans, Green.

Foucault, M. (1979). Discipline and Punish (A. Sheridan, Trans.). New York Vintage.

Fournier, V., & Grey, C. (2000). ‘At the critical moment’: Conditions and prospects for Critical Management Studies. Human Relations, 53(1), 7-32.

Gond, J.-P., Cabantous, L., Harding, N., & Learmonth, M. (2016). What Do We Mean by Performativity in Organizational and Management Theory? The Uses and Abuses of Performativity. International Journal of Management Reviews, 18(4), 440-463.

Helin, J., Hernes, T., Hjorth, D., & Holt, R. (Eds.). (2014). The Oxford Handbook of Process Philosophy and Organization Studies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Langley, A., & Tsoukas, H. (Eds.). (2017). The SAGE Handbook of Process Organization Studies. London: Sage.

Taylor, J., Cooren, F., Giroux, N., & Robichaud, D. (1996). The communicational basis of organization: Between conversation and the text. Communication Theory, 6, 1-39.

CHORD conference: Retailing & Distribution in 18C

CHORD conference ‘Retailing and Distribution in the Eighteenth Century’

by Laura Ugolini

The 2018 CHORD conference on ‘Retailing and Distribution in the Eighteenth Century’

will take place at the University of Wolverhampton, UK

on 13 September 2018.

The programme, together with abstracts, registration details and further information, can be found at:
https://retailhistory.wordpress.com/2018/05/29/2018/

The programme includes:

Steven Sanders, Oxford Brookes University
The Upholder in the Age of Thomas Chippendale: Upholders as Appraisers, Brokers, and Auctioneers

Anna Knutsson, European University Institute
Selling British Contraband in Eighteenth Century Sweden

Jenni Dixon, BCU
From Cabinets to Toy-Shops: Curious Spaces in the Eighteenth-Century

Aidan Collins, University of York
Defining ‘Traders’ in Bankruptcy Proceedings, 1700-1750

Elisabeth Gernerd
Fancy Feathers: the Feather Trade in Britain and the Atlantic World

Jessica Davidson, St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford
‘Here mirth and merchandise are mix’d’: Buying and selling at the English provincial fair reconsidered

Matthew Mauger, Queen Mary University of London
Grocers’ Trade cards and the Cultural Imaginaries of China

David Fallon, University of Roehampton
Bookselling, Sociable Retailing and Identity by Distribution: The Case of Thomas Payne

Serena Dyer, University of Warwick
Stitching and Shopping: The Material Literacy of the Consumer

Clare Rose, The Royal School of Needlework, London
Quilted petticoats in eighteenth century London: genuine and imitation, bought and stolen

Jon Stobart, Manchester Metropolitan University
Clothing the countryside: textiles and haberdashery in English village shops, c.1660-1720

The conference will be held at the University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton City Campus.

The fee is £22.

Registration is via the University of Wolverhampton’s e-store, at:
https://www.estore.wlv.ac.uk/product-catalogue/conferences-events/faculty-of-social-sciences/chord-workshop-retailing-and-distribution-in-the-eighteenth-century

Or see the conference web-pages, at:
https://retailhistory.wordpress.com/2018/05/29/2018/

Or contact Laura Ugolini, at: L.Ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

Information about CHORD events can also be found here: https://retailhistory.wordpress.com/

Prof. Laura Ugolini
Professor of History

Dept. of History, Politics, War Studies
Faculty of Social Sciences
Room MH124
Mary Seacole (MH) Building
University of Wolverhampton
Wolverhampton
WV1 1LY