CfP in JHRM: Past Practices as Prologema

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing

Call for Papers

Special Issue on ‘Past Practices as Prologema: Marketing Before, During and After COVID-19’

The Journal of Historical Research in Marketing invites submissions for a special issue focused on ‘Past Practices as Prologema: Marketing Before, During and After COVID-19.’  The global reaction to mitigate the COVID-19 pandemic is having a significant impact on people and organizations around the globe.  Whether it is loss of revenue due to closures of retail and service workplaces as mandated by public health organizations; disruptions to manufacturing of goods and product distribution due to the interruption of previously synchronized cross-border flows in supply chains; the almost complete cessation of demand for international travel, tourism and hospitality; or the uncertainties reverberating through commodity and futures markets; few, if any, sectors remain untouched.  Despite a long history of pandemics, COVID-19 is the first in modern times that has both been global in nature – and has been seen to be global in nature.  Pandemics are treated as unusual events because of the gaps in time between them; or as disasters/crises that overwhelm our ability to respond.  Consequently, their apparent rarity has meant little engagement with pandemics from a marketing perspective.  What little research there is, focuses on the AIDS pandemic or can be found in the tourism and destination marketing literatures.  Paradoxically, while marketing academics have paid little if any attention to past pandemics and their effects on the practices of marketing, the current COVID-19 crisis has spurred the American Marketing Association to provide education and issue guidance to its membership – a sign of the looming importance of understanding the relationship between pandemics, their effects and impacts, and the general practice of marketing.  The intent of the special issue is to seek ‘lessons’ from the past that will help inform practitioners and researchers in the present/future.  We are soliciting submissions that explore the general themes of marketing activities during pandemics and of marketing’s contribution to the creation of post-pandemic ‘normalities.’  Papers may investigate these from either positive (e.g., retooling on a voluntary basis to produce needed medical protective equipment) or negative perspectives (e.g., the sale of ‘miracle’ cures). 

For this special issue of JHRM, specific themes and topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Advertising and Communications
    • Social Marketing/Public Relations (in)effective enterprise or organizational response to stakeholder communications during a pandemic
    • How do organizations orient themselves as actors in relation to their stakeholders (with regard to pricing, public relations, etc.)
  • Products
    • Repositioning/rebranding of products/services to meet pandemic needs
    • New product/service development
    • Repurposing or alternative uses of existing product offerings
  • Marketing Ethics in a Pandemic
    • Anti-Marketing or Propaganda
    • Marketing/Selling of miracle cures
    • Price gouging
  • Changes in Marketing Practices
    • Changes to distribution/value proposition
    • Marketing changes introduced during crisis that have persisted
    • Demarketing
  • Tourism and Event Marketing
    • Destination Marketing in Pandemics
    • Sports and Event Marketing in Pandemics
  • Pandemic Marketing in Other Organizations
    • Higher Education Marketing
    • Public Health Marketing


The submission window for this special issue is May 1, 2021 to June 30, 2021
with an expected publication date in Volume 14, 2022.  If you are unsure of the suitability of your topic, or have questions regarding a submission, please contact the special issue guest editors Donna Sears, Associate Professor of Marketing, F.C. Manning School of Business, Acadia University, at donna.sears@acadiau.ca or Terrance Weatherbee, Professor of Management, F.C. Manning School of Business, Acadia University, at terrance.weatherbee@acadiau.ca.  

How to submit to the Journal of Historical Research in Marketing

Submissions for this special issue of JHRM should be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system. Registration and access is available on the journal’s ScholarOne site: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jhrm. Full information and guidance on using ScholarOne Manuscripts is available at the Emerald ScholarOne Manuscripts Support Centre: http://msc.emeraldinsight.com/.

Crowdsourcing digitisation in archives

In another instalment of our digital history series, I wanted to highlight that there is increasingly work being done involving crowdsourcing. Many of you may have read the media reports that during the lock down, a crowdsourcing project to digitise rainfall records has barrelled ahead as people enthusiastically engaged. The project is now complete. Does make you wonder what other archival resources may benefit from such an approach.

The National Archives UK has been exploring this recently as well and the potential for expanding this is really not something that was on my radar at all until recently. An interesting insight into what is happening is provided by a chapter by Alexandra Everleigh, ‘Crowding out the Archivist?’ in an edited volume on Crowdsourcing our Heritage. I am not aware that there are any organization or business-focused crowdsourcing projects underway, but may just be my ignorance. Do let us know if this is something that is being explored or ongoing in an archive near you!

Coleman Prize session is going digital this year

Unfortunately, the ABH conference is not taking place due to COVID-19, but the Coleman Prize session will now be held virtually on Thursday, 25 June, 14:00-15:00 (UK time).

What is the Coleman Prize

Named in honour of the British Business Historian Donald Coleman, this prize is awarded annually by the Association of Business Historians to recognise excellence in new research in Britain. It is open to PhD dissertations in Business History either having a British subject or completed at a British University. All dissertations completed in the previous two calendar years to that of their submission are eligible (with the exception of previous submissions). It is a condition of eligibility for the Prize that shortlisted finalists will present their findings at the Association’s annual conference.

Sponsors

The value of the prize is £500 and it is sponsored by Taylor & Francis Group. It is a scholarly publisher, which makes available original manuscript collections, rare printed books and other primary source materials in microform and electronic format.

On the shortlist this year are:

  • Akram Beniamin, “Cotton, Finance and Business Networks in a Globalised World: The Case of Egypt during the first half of the Twentieth century “.
  • Adam Nix, “The Social Foundations of Organisational Corruption”.
  • David Paulson, “Small and medium sized Enterprises in Britain and West Germany c.1949-1979”.

If you would like to attend, please email Professor Neil Rollings (Neil.Rollings[at]Glasgow.Ac.Uk) for the joining details.

List of former Coleman Prize winners.

Online seminars in Business History

In a mix up of our normal publishing schedule, I am running our weekly blog tonight to make you all aware of the start of a great initiative tomorrow afternoon: A new series of online seminars in Business History, facilitated by the GUG.

The aims of this series of online seminars is to help ECRs/PHDs to disseminate work in the absence of physical conferences. You can find the current schedule of events here: https://unternehmensgeschichte.de/Online-Seminare

If you have any questions about the event, please get in touch with Nicholas Wong (nicholas.d.wong@northumbria.ac.uk), who has disseminated the event on behalf of a group colleagues, who put this great initiative together.

BH ToC 62,3

Our April copy features a special issue on:

Between Coercion and Private Initiative: Entrepreneurial Freedom of Action during the ‘Third Reich’

Special Issue Articles

Introduction: The room for manoeuvre for firms in the Third Reich
Ralf Banken
Pages: 375-392 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2020.1713105

Sewing for Hitler? The clothing industry during the ‘Third Reich’
Roman Köster & Julia Schnaus
Pages: 393-409 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1502749

The Munich Re: an internationally-oriented reinsurer in the Nazi era
Christopher Kopper
Pages: 410-420 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1259312

A hard-to-untangle business conglomerate: The economic empire of the German labour front
Rüdiger Hachtmann
Pages: 421-437 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1691799

Between values orientation and economic logic: Bosch in the Third Reich
Johannes Bähr
Pages: 438-450 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1691343

Commercial expansion in the steel industry of World War II: The case of Henry J. Kaiser and Friedrich Flick
Tim Schanetzky
Pages: 451-467 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1691336

Property, control and room for manoeuvre: Royal Dutch Shell and Nazi Germany, 1933–1945
Marten Boon & Ben Wubs
Pages: 468-487 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1205034

Original Articles

The country-of-origin effect and the international expansion of Spanish fashion companies, 1975–2015
José Antonio Miranda
Pages: 488-508 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1374370

Microfinances in the banking houses of Rio de Janeiro in 1864
Carlos Eduardo Valencia Villa
Pages: 509-535 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1454432

Book Reviews

La sidérurgie française et la maison de Wendel pendant les Trente Glorieuses
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 536-538 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1326573

Policy signals and market responses: a 50-year history of Zambia’s relationship with foreign capital
Simone Halleen
Pages: 539-540 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1483863

Small business, education, and management. The life and times of John Bolton
Silvia Milanesi
Pages: 541-542 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1483866

Les bassins industriels des territoires occupés, 1914–1918. Des opérations militaires à la reconstruction
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 543-544 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1326575

History of the WWW and the ‘digital tsunami’

If you are interested in how our research practices are likely to shift as a result of the ‘digital tsunami’ that is facing archives, digital history is the place to go. But business and organizational historians have not really been part of these debates so far. We are starting a series of occasional posts about some of the resources that are out there on digital tools and debates.

For a bit of reading, a good place to start is Ian Milligan’s History in the age of abundance? How the web is transforming historical research (2019). We have a review in Business History by Adam Nix, and he has kindly agreed to make the code for 50 free offprints available – just click here. (FYI – when they are gone, they are gone.)

Here’s the opening to get you started:

“The late twentieth century and early millennium are fast becoming focal periods for historians; as Milligan notes, we are now further from the 1990s than we were from the 1960s when substantive historical work began on that pivotal decade. Given the tendency towards comparatively recent historical contexts, business historians are likely to be among the first to start exploring these periods. However, to do so, they will need to engage with a new and challenging set of sources: sources that were created digitally; sources like those deriving from the World Wide Web. Ultimately, it is this engagement that Milligan’s latest book seeks to encourage and enable, and in doing so, he provides readers with a comprehensive and well-articulated view into the web as a focus for historical research. …”

Ian Milligan has posted about the review here in case you are interested.

CfP Emotions and History of Business

Emotions and the History of Business

Mandy Cooper (UNC-Greensboro) and Andrew Popp (Copenhagen Business School)

We are developing a proposal for an edited volume on emotions and the history of business and seek further contributions. In the first instance, the proposal will be submitted to a series on the history of emotions edited by Peter Stearns and Susan Matt and published Bloomsbury.

Why emotions and the history of business?
A small but growing body of work has already begun to demonstrate the potential in bringing the histories of emotions and of business into greater dialogue.[1] We aim to more fully and systematically explore that potential through this proposed volume. What does bringing emotions in add to the history of business? Does business not inhabit a world of rationality? We firmly believe that from individual entrepreneurs to family firms to massive corporations, businesses have in many ways relied on, leveraged, generated, and been shaped by emotions for centuries. Examining business in all its facets through the lens of the history of emotion allows us to recognize the emotional structures behind business decisions and relationships and to question them. The very presence—or absence—of emotions and emotional language have the power to alter the structure and content of relationships between individuals and between businesses and communities. This collection asks what happens when emotions and emotional situations, whether fear/anxiety, nostalgia, love, or the longing of distance and separation, affect businesses and, in turn, how businesses affect the emotional lives of individuals and communities. In terms of framing, therefore, we emphasize the work that emotions do and recognize the performative nature of emotions.

Scope:
We do not wish to impose any restrictions in terms of geographic or temporal scope and would strongly welcome proposals from or on the Global South. Existing work in this area has often focused on emotions in family firms, but we welcome proposals across the full range of potential business settings and contexts. Likewise, much work in the history of emotions has adopted micro-historical perspectives and methodologies; we would particularly welcome work exploring emotions in large or macro-scale business contexts or phenomena, market crashes (or booms) being only the most obvious possibility. Similarly, we are open to studies utilizing the full range of historical sources and methodologies. Studies exploring change in the relationships between emotions and business over time will be warmly welcomed, as will studies exploring the relationship between race, gender, and business. Proposals may well be themed around a specific emotion, but that is not the only approach imaginable. Naturally, proposals from across a wide range of cognate disciplines – economic history, the history of capitalism, cultural and social history, material history and more – are most welcome.

A far from exhaustive list of possible themes might include:

  • Gendered and/or racialized emotion and business
  • Boredom/ennui
  • Love
  • Fear and anxiety
  • Rationality as an emotion
  • Subjugation
  • Satisfaction/fulfilment
  • Disappointment
  • Identity formation/the self/authenticity
  • Contagion, risk, and panic
  • Solidarity
  • Business as drama
  • The forms of expression of business emotions: language, sites, rites, rituals, symbols
  • Cultural representations of business emotions
  • Commemoration and history as emotions
  • Emotions as commodities
  • Alienation and estrangement

Logistics:

Please send proposals of no more than 500 words to emotionsandbusiness@gmail.com by July 31st 2020. Please include a brief biography of all authors, as well as contact details. Proposals should seek to present setting, theme, perspective or framing, and sources and methods. Please use the same email address to approach us with any questions or queries.

Mandy Cooper
Lecturer, Department of History UNC-Greensboro

Andrew Popp
Professor of history, Department of Management, Politics, and Philosophy Copenhagen Business School

[1] See, for example, the special issue on “Emotions et Enterprises Familiales,” Enterprises et Histoire, No. 91 (2018)

BH ToC 62,2

I have gotten a little behind as I said before, so here are some updates on recent issues in Business History. Enjoy your Bank Holiday if you are in the UK, otherwise TGIF!

Original Articles

Multinational mining companies, employment and knowledge transfer: Chile and Norway from ca. 1870 to 1940
Kristin Ranestad
Pages: 197-221 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1407313

Managing policy lapse risk in Sweden’s life insurance market between 1915 and 1947
Mike Adams, Lars-Fredrik Andersson, Magnus Lindmark, Liselotte Eriksson & Elena Veprauskaite
Pages: 222-239 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1418331

Business failure in an age of globalisation: Interpreting the rise and fall of the LG project in Wales, 1995–2006
Leon Gooberman
Pages: 240-260 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1426748

The professionalisation of selling and the transformation of a family business: Kenrick & Jefferson, 1878–1940
David Paulson
Pages: 261-291 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1426749

Corporate social responsibility before CSR: Practices at Aluminium du Cameroun (Alucam) from the 1950s to the 1980s
Marie-Claire Loison, Celine Berrier-Lucas & Anne Pezet
Pages: 292-342 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1427070

Extending William Baumol’s theory on entrepreneurship and institutions: lessons from post-Second World War Greece
Zoi Pittaki
Pages: 343-363 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1451515

Book Review

Indochine années vingt. L’âge d’or de l’affairisme colonial (1918–1928). Banquiers, hommes d’affaires et patrons en réseaux
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 364-366 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1269524

Equity capital. From ancient partnerships to modern exchange traded funds
Tim Kooijmans
Pages: 367-368 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1480132

Baking powder wars: the cutthroat food fight that revolutionized cooking
Marco Marigliano
Pages: 369-370 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1480575

The rise of the global company: multinationals and the making of the modern world
Julian Faust
Pages: 371-372 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1482822

Green capitalism? Business and the environment in the twentieth century
Mattias Näsman
Pages: 373-374 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1483301

ACCOUNTING HISTORY WORKSHOP

The workshop is being held by the Accounting History Special Interest Group (AH SIG) at Southampton University on Monday, 30 March 2020 10:30–17:00, before the main BAFA Annual Conference.

Accounting history research involves investigating the development and role of accounting in the past. The stories of history are gleaned from several sources, including documents in archives, libraries, private collections, and oral recollections. They are illuminated by knowledge of context, including, social, economic, commercial, legal, educational, financial, and religious factors identified in the literature. And they are interpreted and explained using those factors, often in combination with a selection of theories.

The aim of this workshop is to demonstrate the relevance of accounting history; to encourage participation in this genre of research; to describe various methods for carrying out accounting history research; to focus on how to publish historical research; and to provide an opportunity to establish networks and identify mentors and co-authors. Attendees will also have the opportunity to receive feedback on their research ideas and projects.

Workshop Programme

The one-day workshop will begin with an overview of accounting history methods and practice and an introduction to the Accounting History Special Interest group, followed by sessions on:

·       Carrying out accounting history research.

·       How to find primary sources.

·       How to find secondary sources.

·       Writing-up historical research: what should you include?

·       How to publish accounting history in leading journals.

·       Feedback on your ideas and projects (small group session)

Target Audience

The workshop is suitable for anyone considering beginning historical accounting research and anyone currently working in this area.

Registration

Full Ticket: £55
Reduced Rate for PhD Students Only: £25

The fee includes lunch. 

Buying a workshop ticket registers you for this event. Tickets to BAFA conferences are only available to members. To purchase a ticket, log in to your account on the BAFA Membership Portal (https://members.bafa.ac.uk/) and click the ‘Purchase Tickets’ button. Select the appropriate ticket for the event you want to attend, and follow instructions.

If you are not already a member of BAFA, please sign up for membership at https://members.bafa.ac.uk/signup. Further information on how to register for BAFA events can be found here: http://www.bafa.ac.uk/assets/uploads/conference-workshop-registration.pdf.

BAFA Annual Membership rates: Academic Staff: £30 
Unsalaried PhD/MPhil Student or Retired Academic: £15

Look forward to seeing you there!

Workshop on the History of Industrial Clusters in the UK

The British Academy of Management Management and Business History SIG and the Henley Business School, University of Reading, Centre for International Business History, are running an event on ‘A History of Industrial Clusters: Knowledge, Innovation Systems and Sustainability in the UK’ .

This workshop brings together some of the leading researchers across the field of business and economic history showcasing the breadth and depth of current work. At its core are the themes of innovation, knowledge and sustainability and a framework developed by David Charles bringing these together. This will allow new questions to be asked and provide a historical dimension to regional economic development in the UK. The research presented will also offer some contemporary insights into policy-making and industrial strategy.

The core research output arising from the workshop will be a new edited collection on industrial clusters (under the same title as the workshop and edited by Chris Corker, Joe Lane and John Wilson). This is currently under contract with Routledge for publication in 2021 and will form part of their ‘International Studies in Business History’ series.

Date:  4th and 5th of March 2020 (full day on the 4th and half day on the 5th of March)

Location: Henley Business School, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus

Speakers: 

  • Professor John Wilson
  • Dr Joe Lane
  • Dr Chris Corker
  • Dr Harry Smith
  • Professor David Charles
  • Dr Emily Buchnea

Registration deadline: 28 February 2020

For more information on this event and to register, please access the following link:  event link