EURAM’s new History Track

It is with great pleasure that we announce that the track entitled “Historical Research in Management Studies”has been inserted into the program of the European Academy of Management 2023 (Dublin, June 14th-16th). Click here to open the Call for Papers.

The deadline for paper submission is January 10th, 2023.

This initiative will collect also scientific contributions that will be published as chapters in our Edited Management History book series.

Historical Research in Management Studies

The track ‘Historical Research in Management Studies’ addresses the historical development of management and related areas (e.g., entrepreneurship, international business, marketing, retailing, strategy, accounting, auditing, management tools, etc.), concepts, theories, and practices as well as the application and evolution of historical research methods. We aim to encourage theoretically orientated social science history, and its methods, with a clear relationship to present-day debates and practices in the management discipline; from that, the types of contributions that are looked for fall into the following two categories. First, historical analyses of management concepts, theories, and practices. Second, contributions regarding revisitation or new directions

UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG):

Goal 4: Quality education, Goal 8: Decent work and economic growth, Goal 9: Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure, Goal 16: Peace, justice and strong institutions

Matteo Cristofaro, University of Rome Tor Vergata – matteo.cristofaro@uniroma2.it

CfP for JIBS SI on Historical Approaches in IB

Great news! A new call for papers for a history-oriented special issue in the Journal of International Business Studies.

CALL FOR PAPERS

Special Issue of the Journal of International Business Studies

INTEGRATING HISTORICAL APPROACHES IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS: MOVING BEYOND “HISTORY MATTERS”

Special Issue Editors:

Deadline for submissions: August 1, 2023

Introduction

International business in all its forms, whether cross-border activities by multinational companies or non-equity forms of investment, and the international environment it operates in is shaped by the historical legacies of countries and their international relations. The analysis of historical data played an important role in early stages of the development of international business (IB) as a field of research (Dunning 1958; Vernon, 1971). Yet, in recent years historical research on international phenomena that engage with business and management theories is more commonly published outside of IB journals (Gao, Zuzul, Jones, & Khanna, 2017; Lubinski, 2018). Once IB became academically established, interest in historical research waned, despite occasional calls for its revival (e.g., Jones & Khanna, 2006). Even rarer are historical studies in IB that are directly based on archival sources (Bucheli, Salvaj, & Kim, 2019; Minefee & Bucheli, 2021). This special issue seeks to bring together IB scholars interested in exploring how historical approaches can enrich and expand theory development on international business phenomena.

In recent years, IB journals have not seen the same development of historically-informed theorizing as related fields (Decker, Hassard, & Rowlinson, 2021; Maclean, Harvey, & Clegg, 2016; Rowlinson, Hassard, & Decker, 2014). For example, the editors of the Academy of Management Journal have, in an editorial, remarked upon “the value of these analyses in making us see the social, cultural, and institutional construction of organizational and managerial phenomena in historical context” (Bansal, Smith, & Vaara, 2018, p. 4). This appreciation is reflected in the substantial number of special issues over the last few years that have integrated historical approaches into key debates in strategy (Argyres, De Massis, Foss, Frattini, Jones, & Silverman, 2020), entrepreneurship (Wadhwani, Kirsch, Welter, Gartner, & Jones, 2020), organization studies (Wadhwani, Suddaby, Mordhorst, & Popp, 2018), and management theory (Godfrey, Hassard, O’Connor, Rowlinson, & Ruef, 2016), and further special issues currently in progress in family business (Suddaby, Silverman, Massis, Jaskiewicz, & Micelotta, 2021), the history of business schools (McLaren et al., 2021) and occupations and professions (Coraiola, Maclean, Suddaby, & Muzio, 2022). This special issue seeks to open up a similar dialogue between IB scholars and historical researchers.

How history matters for IB research

At its inception, the field of IB paid close attention to the evolution of firms’ international activities in their historical context (Vernon, 1971; Wilkins, 1974). Subsequently, however, IB and international business history have often addressed different questions and employed different methods: archival, mostly qualitative, research in the case of business historians, and a variety of mostly quantitative, though increasingly also qualitative, methodological approaches in IB in their historical context. This distinction is increasingly challenged (Buckley, 2016; Burgelman, 2011), but history also matters beyond its potential methodological contribution to IB. Greater attention to history would enable IB scholars to ask questions about change over time and develop theories addressing how and why some of these patterns have become dominant at certain points of time, and why they might be changing. Such theories may include, but are not limited to, institutional theory, organizational learning, knowledge-based view, organizational memory and forgetting, power, and dynamic capabilities.

Engagement with history and historical methods can help IB scholars respond to recent calls for more process-based approaches, qualitative research and an engagement with scholarly work beyond IB (Buckley, 2009; Nielsen et al., 2020; Shenkar, 2004; Welch & Paavilainen-Mäntymäki, 2014). It would also help develop scholarship towards a deeper understanding of phenomena (Doh, 2015) and their context (Meyer, 2015; Tsui, 2004). For example, in their decade award-winning article in this journal, Welch et al. (2011) promoted more contextualized approaches to IB research through a focus on the case method, and in their recent retrospective (Welch et al., 2021) they explicitly highlight historical research as one of four approaches that engage context in their research design.

Aims and scope of the special issue

In the light of these developments in our field and beyond, the time has come to take stock and move beyond affirmations that “history matters” and flesh out the ways in which historical approaches matter to IB research in terms of theory, method, and novel perspectives. Here, we seek contributions that go beyond just analyzing data collected over time (such as survey data collection repeated after a certain number of years) in favour of studies that include the rich historical context into their analysis and theorizing. Historical approaches have the potential to offer new perspectives on the complex, multi-level, and contextually specific nature of multinational activities and the evolution of the global economy. We are particularly interested in contributions that can connect historical approaches with IB debates, and which draw on ongoing conversations in other disciplines and fields. We are interested in both quantitative and qualitative approaches, as well as methodological and conceptual/theoretical contributions. IB scholars who use historical approaches, as well as business and management historians who engage deeply with IB theories, are welcome to submit to the special issue.

Possible examples of research topics that would be suitable for inclusion in this Special Issue include (but are not limited to):

  1. Plurality of historical approaches. Other management disciplines such as Organization Studies, Strategy, and Entrepreneurship have expanded their use of historical research, as seen in a series of special issues and other contributions. The key theoretical contributions have outlined a spectrum of approaches from more social science-oriented contributions to more historically oriented narratives (Rowlinson et al., 2014; Maclean et al., 2016; Decker et al., 2021). Such work demonstrates that history provides new perspectives on advancing theory or challenging concepts and constructs and poses questions that are under-represented in IB research, such as how processes evolve over time (Gao et al, 2017). Historical approaches enable IB researchers to consider the past as an empirical setting to explore theoretical concerns, which are difficult to adequately study in the present, or which require a long-term perspective, such as global challenges or internationalisation. How can historical approaches benefit process and longitudinal research on IB topics? How can a dialogue between process researchers and historians form the basis for advances in IB theory?
  • Historical theories of IB.In recent years, historical research has become more theoretically oriented, driven by key contributions in organization theory, strategy (Argyres et al., 2020), and entrepreneurship (Wadhwani, Kirsch, Welter, Gartner, & Jones, 2020). Increasingly, such contributions are being extended to IB theory (da Silva Lopes, Casson, & Jones, 2019; Minefee & Bucheli, 2021) and this special issue seeks to expand on this interdisciplinary repertoire.
  • Long Run Change Processes. IB scholars have investigated environmental change mainly by exploring business responses to clearly identifiable disruptions. Yet, we know comparatively little of the historically embedded, contextually specific co-evolution of multinational organizations and their local, national, regional, and international environment. Emerging economies, in particular, have brought to the fore the importance of understanding the political, social, cultural and economic contexts of business activities (Meyer, 2015; Tsui, 2004). Multinationals often resolve key tensions by shifting the focus of their activities over time to stay aligned with the different trends and concerns in host and home societies. How do international actors and the global economy co-evolve? What factors influence such processes? What is the role of disruptive events (such as disasters, pandemics or wars) vs. slower, more long-term processes in changing international business strategies and practices?
  • Historical processes in IB and the role of time. Many key theories in IB, such as internationalisation theory, implicitly or explicitly theorise the passage of time as part of a process that becomes cumulative, experiential and changes organizations both in their structure, strategies and their practices (Verbeke & Kano, 2015; Welch & Paavilainen-Mäntymäki, 2014). How does the historical evolution of organizations shape their operations, structure, and practises? How do international organizations deal with historical legacies, such as colonialism, past wrongdoing, war and conflict, and ideological disagreements?
  • History as a method for IB researchers. Historical research routinely covers long time periods in rich and detailed narratives based on archival records that can have a fly-on-the-wall immediacy unmatched by other types of public documents. These “eventful” accounts (Decker, 2022) offer new insights particularly for qualitative longitudinal research to scale up in terms of time periods covered. Frynas et al. (2017, p. 568) highlighted the potential contribution from historical evidence in studying the “long-term cooperative interactions and reciprocity by the actors involved.” Welch (2000, p. 198) considers archival data as an opportunity to add “empirical depth” and explain “processes of change and evolution”. Buckley (2016, 2020) has also explored the potential for historical methods to expand the types of questions IB researchers can ask. What methodological innovations are required to embed historical approaches into qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method IB scholarship?
  • Historical perspectives on the construction of national and cultural boundaries. A nation, in IB’s usual meaning, consists of a group of people living within a geographic area who are sovereignly governed by explicit laws and institutions which apply within a national government’s boundaries. Governments historically negotiated these boundaries with governments representing other similarly governed and bounded groups through warfare and treaties. IB scholars, however, are sometimes encouraged to take on the challenge of considering alternative societal boundaries besides nations (Hutzschenreuter, Matt, & Kleindienst, 2020; Peterson, Søndergaard, & Kara, 2018; Tung, 2008). Accepting that challenge suggests the importance of historical analysis for understanding how specific countries came to be legitimated, how countries continue to compete with sub-country and trans-country groups of people having shared political interests, and how alternative groupings support different business practices and transactions across not only country but other boundaries. This special issue supports analyses that make systematic use of a broad range of influential historical perspectives that have been taken to the geographic area they consider and to the construction of national, sub-national and trans-national groupings (Reckendrees, Gehlen, & Marx, 2022). Such submissions would need to show how these groupings, and the contests between them, have continuing implications for cross-border business.
  • Institutions in IB. IB scholars often turn to institutions to capture aspects of the external environment affecting businesses. Yet, their treatment of institutions has been criticised for being “hobbled by a thin account of institutions and their effect on business performance” (Doh, Lawton, & Rajwani, 2012, p. 27). Institutions are inherently historical in nature, as acknowledged for example in studies on IB in transition economies that emphasize the temporal nature of the institutional environment (Meyer & Peng, 2016). Nevertheless, institutional theory in its variants popular in management research favours ahistorical measurements and tends to ignore their historical evolution. More research is needed, not just on the interaction of different dimensions of institutions, but also on how they affect strategy both in terms of the firm’s home and host economies. How do institutions affecting IB change over time, and how do people and organizations purposefully or coincidentally change them? What new theoretical insights into IB topics can be gained from historical institutionalism, which to date has been little used by IB scholars?

Submission Process and Deadlines

Manuscripts must be submitted through http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jibs between July 18, 2023, and August 1, 2023. All submissions will go through the JIBS regular double-blind review process and follow standard norms and processes. For more information about this call for papers, please contact the Special Issue Editors or the JIBS Managing Editor (managing-editor@jibs.net ).

Workshop and Symposium

We plan to organize a webinar early 2023 for authors interested in submitting to the special issue, which we will advertise widely on scholarly social media and on AIB-L. To help authors who receive an invitation to revise their submission further develop their papers, we intend to organize a paper development workshop in late 2023. We encourage multi-disciplinary and multi-cultural co-author teams.

REFERENCES

Argyres, N. S., De Massis, A., Foss, N. J., Frattini, F., Jones, G., & Silverman, B. S. 2020. History-informed strategy research: The promise of history and historical research methods in advancing strategy scholarship. Strategic Management Journal, 41(3), 343–368.

Bansal, P., Smith, W. K., & Vaara, E. 2018. From the Editors: New Ways of Seeing through Qualitative Research. Academy of Management Journal, 61(4), 1–7.

Bucheli, M., Salvaj, E., & Kim, M. 2019. Better together: How multinationals come together with business groups in times of economic and political transitions. Global Strategy Journal, 9(2), 176–207.

Buckley, P. J. 2009. Business history and international business. Business History, 51(3), 307–333.

Buckley, P. J. 2016. Historical Research Approaches to the Analysis of Internationalisation. Management International Review, 56(6), 879–900.

Buckley, P. J. 2021. The Role of History in International Business: Evidence, Research Practices, Methods and Theory. British Journal of Management, 32(3), 797-811.

Burgelman, R. A. 2011. Bridging history and reductionism: A key role for longitudinal qualitative research. Journal of International Business Studies, 42(5), 591–601.

Coraiola, D. M., Maclean, M., Suddaby, R., & Muzio, D. 2022. Call for Papers for a Special Issue: Occupations and Memory in Organization Studies. Journal of Management Studies.

da Silva Lopes, T., Casson, M., & Jones, G. 2019. Organizational innovation in the multinational enterprise: Internalization theory and business history. Journal of International Business Studies, 50(8), 1338–1358.

Decker, S. 2022. Introducing the Eventful Temporality of Historical Research into International Business. Journal of World Business, 57(6), 101380.

Decker, S., Hassard, J., & Rowlinson, M. 2021. Rethinking history and memory in organization studies: The case for historiographical reflexivity. Human Relations, 74(8), 1123–1155.

Doh, J. P. 2015. From the editor: Why we need phenomenon-based research. Journal of World Business, 50(4), 609–611.

Doh, J. P., Lawton, T. C., & Rajwani, T. 2012. Advancing nonmarket strategy research: Institutional perspectives in a changing world. Academy of Management Perspectives, 26(3), 22–39.

Dunning, J.H. 1958. American Investment in British Manufacturing Industry, London: Allen and Unwin.

Frynas, J. G., Child, J., & Tarba, S. Y. 2017. Non-market Social and Political Strategies – New Integrative Approaches and Interdisciplinary Borrowings. British Journal of Management, 28(4): 559–574.

Gao, C., Zuzul, T., Jones, G., & Khanna, T. 2017. Overcoming Institutional Voids: A Reputation-Based View of Long-Run Survival. Strategic Management Journal, 38(11), 2147–2167.

Godfrey, P. C., Hassard, J. S., O’Connor, E. S., Rowlinson, M., & Ruef, M. 2016. Introduction To Special Topic Forum What Is Organizational History? Toward a Creative Synthesis of History and Organization Studies. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 590–608.

Hutzschenreuter, T., Matt, T., & Kleindienst, I. 2020. Going subnational: A literature review and research agenda. Journal of World Business, 55(4): 101076.

Jones, G., & Khanna, T. 2006. Bringing history (back) into international business. Journal of International Business Studies, 37(4), 453–468.

Lubinski, C. 2018. From ‘History as Told’ to ‘History as Experienced’: Contextualizing the Uses of the Past. Organization Studies, 39(12), 1785–1809.

Maclean, M., Harvey, C., & Clegg, S. R. 2016. Conceptualizing Historical Organization Studies. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 609–632.

McLaren, P. G., Spender, J., Cummings, S., O’Connor, E., Lubinski, C., Bridgman, T., & Durepos, G. 2021. New Histories of Business Schools and How They May Inspire New Futures. Academy of Management Learning and Education.

Meyer, K. E. 2015. Context in management research in emerging economies. Management and Organization Review, 11(3), 369–377.

Meyer, K. E., & Peng, M. W. 2016. Theoretical foundations of emerging economy business research. Journal of International Business Studies, 47(1), 3–22.

Minefee, I., & Bucheli, M. 2021. MNC responses to international NGO activist campaigns: Evidence from Royal Dutch / Shell in apartheid South Africa. Journal of International Business Studies.

Nielsen, B. B., Welch, C., Chidlow, A., Miller, S. R., Aguzzoli, R., Gardner, E., Karafyllia, M., Pegoraro, D. 2020. Fifty years of methodological trends in JIBS: Why future IB research needs more triangulation. Journal of International Business Studies, 51(9), 1478–1499.

Peterson, M. F., Søndergaard, M., & Kara, A. 2018. Traversing cultural boundaries in IB: The complex relationships between explicit country and implicit cultural group boundaries at multiple levels. Journal of International Business Studies, 49(8): 1081–1099.

Reckendrees, A., Gehlen, B., & Marx, C. 2022. International Business, Multinational Enterprises and Nationality of the Company: A Constructive Review of Literature. Business History, (forthcoming).

Rowlinson, M., Hassard, J., & Decker, S. 2014. Research Strategies for Organizational History: A Dialogue between Historical Theory and Organization Theory. Academy of Management Review, 39(3), 205–274.

Shenkar, O. 2004. One more time: International business in a global economy. Journal of International Business Studies, 35(2), 161–171.

Suddaby, R., Silverman, B. S., Massis, A. De, Jaskiewicz, P., & Micelotta, E. R. 2021. Special Issue On: History-informed Family Business Research. Family Business Review.

Tsui, A. S. 2004. Contributing to global management knowledge: A case for high quality indigenous research. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 21(4), 491–513.

Tung, R. L. 2008. The cross-cultural research imperative: the need to balance cross-national and intra-national diversity. Journal of International Business Studies 2007 39:1, 39(1): 41–46.

Verbeke, A., & Kano, L. 2015. The New Internalization Theory and Multinational Enterprises from Emerging Economies: A Business History Perspective. Business History Review, 89(3), 415–445.

Vernon, R. 1971. Sovereignty at bay: the multinational spread of US enterprises. New York: Basic Books.

Wadhwani, R. D., Kirsch, D. A., Welter, F., Gartner, W. B., & Jones, G. G. 2020. Context, time, and change: Historical approaches to entrepreneurship research. Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, 14(1), 3–19.

Wadhwani, R. D., Suddaby, R., Mordhorst, M., & Popp, A. 2018. History as Organizing: Uses of the Past in Organization Studies. Organization Studies, 39(12), 1663–1683.

Welch, C. 2010. The archaeology of business networks: The use of archival records in case study research. Journal of Strategic Marketing, 8(2), 179–208.

Welch, C., & Paavilainen-Mäntymäki, E. 2014. Putting Process (Back) In: Research on the Internationalization Process of the Firm. International Journal of Management Reviews, 16(1), 2–23.

Welch, C., Paavilainen-Mäntymäki, E., Piekkari, R., Plakoyiannaki, E. 2022. Reconciling Theory and Context: How the Case Study Can Set a New Agenda for IB Research. Journal of International Business Studies, 53(1): 4–26.

Welch, C., Piekkari, R., Plakoyiannaki, E., & Paavilainen-Mäntymäki, E. 2011. Theorising from case studies: Towards a pluralist future for international business research. Journal of International Business Studies, 42(5), 740–762.

Wilkins, M. 1974. The Maturing of Multinational Enterprise: American Business Abroad from 1914 to 1970. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

About the Guest Editors

Stephanie Decker is Professor of Strategy at Birmingham Business School and Visiting Professor in African Business History at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Her work focuses on historical approaches in Organisation Studies and Strategy, and she has published in journals such as Academy of Management Review, Human Relations, Journal of Management Studies, Organization, Business History Review, and Business History. She is co-editor-in-chief of Business History, on the editorial board of Organization Studies and Accounting History, and Co-Vice Chair for Research & Publications at the British Academy of Management.

Geoffrey Jones is Isidor Straus Professor of Business History at the Harvard BusinessSchool in the United States. He researches the history, impact and ecological and social responsibility of business. He is a Fellow of Academy of International Business (AIB), a Fellow of the Japan Academy of International Business Studies, and a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. His books include Multinational and Global Capitalism: From the Nineteenth Century to the Twenty-First Century (OUP 2005), Profits and Sustainability: A History of Green Entrepreneurship (OUP 2017) and Deeply Responsible Business. A Global History of Values-Driven Leadership (Harvard University Press, 2023). He has published in Journal of International Business Studies and Strategic Management Journal.

Klaus Meyer is a Professor of International Business and William G. Davis Chair in International Trade at Ivey Business School, London, Ontario, Canada.  He is a leading scholar in international business, focusing on the strategies and operations of multinational enterprises in and from emerging economies. His research emphasizes the role of context on many aspects of management, and the contextual boundaries of theories of management. He is a Fellow of the Academy of International Business (AIB), and in 2015 he received the Decade award of the Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS). He has served as Vice President of the AIB, and as an area editor of JIBS and is currently serving on the Executive Committee of the International Management Division of the Academy of Management. He has published over 90 articles in leading scholarly journals such as Journal of International Business Studies, Strategic Management Journal and Journal of Management Studies, and he published nine books.

Catherine Welch is Chair of Strategic Management at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland and a Distinguished Visiting Professor at Aalto University, Finland. Her research has concentrated on two areas: qualitative research methodology and process approaches to studying firm internationalization. Her work has appeared in leading journals in international business and management. She was the first author on a paper which won the 2021 Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS) Decade Award. Catherine is the current Book Review Editor of JIBS and a member of the journal’s Research Methods Advisory Committee. She is an Associate Editor of Organizational Research Methods. She is a Vice-President and co-founder of the Academy of International Business (AIB) Research Methods Shared Interest Group (RM-SIG). She currently serves on the AIB’s board as Vice President Programs.

Rebecca Piekkari is Marcus Wallenberg Chair of International Business at Aalto University School of Business, Finland. She is an incoming Associate Editor of the Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS) and sits on several editorial boards of IB and management journals. Rebecca’s recent research interests focus on translation as a perspective on IB phenomena, the shifting meaning of location for cross-border activities, as well as questions of social sustainability, diversity and inclusion in multinational corporations. She is known for her expertise in qualitative research methods and language-sensitive research in IB. Together with her co-authors she won the 2021 JIBS Decade award on theorizing from case studies. Rebecca has also co-edited several handbooks and book chapters on these topics. She is Fellow of the Academy of International Business and the European International Business Academy.

CfP: BHC Doctoral Colloquium

The BHC Doctoral Colloquium (DC) in Business History will be held on March 8th and 9th, 2023.  The participants will be invited for a welcome dinner in Detroit on March 7th. During the days of DC, there will also be professional development sessions scheduled. 

Typically limited to ten students, the colloquium is open to doctoral candidates who are pursuing dissertation research within the broad field of business history from any relevant discipline (e.g., from economic sociology, political science, cultural anthropology, or management, as well as history). Most participants are in year 3 or 4 or their degree program, though in some instances applicants at a later stage make a compelling case that their thesis research had evolved in ways that led them to see the advantages of an intensive engagement with business history.

We welcome proposals from students working within any thematic area of business history. Topics (see link for past examples) may range from the early modern era to the present, and explore societies across the globe. Participants work intensively with a distinguished group of BHC-affiliated scholars (including the incoming BHC president), discussing dissertation proposals, relevant literatures and research strategies, and career trajectories. 

Applications are due by Friday December 9th, 2022, via email to Carol Lockman (clockman@Hagley.org). Questions about the colloquium should be sent to its director, Prof. Eric Godelier (eric.godelier@polytechnique.edu). Applicants will receive notification of the selection committee’s decisions by Monday January 16th (2023). If they travel to Detroit, all participants will receive a stipend that partially defrays travel costs to the annual meeting. 

Colloquium participants have a choice of pre-circulating one of the following:

·       a 15-page dissertation prospectus or updated overview of the dissertation research plan; or

·       a draft dissertation chapter, along with a one-page dissertation outline/description. 

Participants should choose the option they feel will most assist them at this stage in their research and writing. We will need either the prospectus/overview or a chapter draft and outline by February 27th.  Those will then be posted on a Colloquium webpage on the BHC website and shared with all participants to read in advance.

BHC mid-year virtual event

We are very proud to be presenting our work with email archives (workshop 2.2) at @the_BHC mid-year event “Methods and Madness” this month. For the up-to-date programme, please see: https://thebhc.org/node/86174 .

Preliminary program for September 30, 2022. Venue: Zoom (Link provided with Registration). All times in Eastern Time (EST). Download PDF of the program here. To see the extended program and post questions to convenors in advance please check out the working document here.

9:00 Welcome
9:15Session 1Reinventing Interpretation
 Workshop 1.1Interpreting Visual Sources Rick Halpern (University of Toronto) and Carol Quirke (State University of New York, Old Westbury) Chair: Beatriz Rodriguez-Satizabal (Universidad del Pacífico)
 Workshop 1.2Interpreting the Senses Ai Hisano (University of Tokyo) and Sven Kube (Florida International University) Chair: Sven Kube (Florida International University)
 Workshop 1.3Material Culture Jen Black (Misericordia University) and Marina Moskowitz (University of Wisconsin) Chair: Paula de la Cruz-Fernández (BHC)
 Workshop 1.4 Topic Modeling Marta Villamor (University of Maryland) and Fabian Prieto-Nañez (Virginia Tech) Chair: Ghassan Moazzin (University of Hong Kong)
 Workshop 1.5Databases, Network Analysis and QCA Erica Salvaj (Universidad del Desarrollo), Alberto Rinaldi (Unimore) and Susie Pak (St. John’s University) Chair: Valeria Giacomin (Bocconi University)
 Workshop 1.6Built and Natural Environment Jeremy Zallen (Lafayette College) and Bartow Elmore (Ohio State University) Chair: Christoph Viebig (Copenhagen Business School)
10:15BreakAttendees are welcomed to stay connected during the 15 minutes break
10:30Session 2Reinventing Sources
 Workshop 2.1Account Books Rachel Van (Cal Poly, Pomona), Caitlin Rosenthal (University of California, Berkeley), William Deringer (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Chair: Ellen Nye (Harvard University)
 Workshop 2.2Email archives Stephanie Decker (Birmingham Business School), David Kirsch (University of Maryland), and Adam Nix (University of Birmingham) Chair: Christoph Viebig (Copenhagen Business School)
 Workshop 2.3Online Archives Philip Scranton (Rutgers University), Edward Balleisen (Duke University), Andrea Lluch (CONICET) and Geoffrey Jones (Harvard Business School) Chair: Ghassan Moazzin (University of Hong Kong)
 Workshop 2.4Advertisements  Susmita Das (University of Illinois) and Cynthia Meyers (College of Mount Saint Vincent) Chair: Paula de la Cruz-Fernández
 Workshop 2.5Forms and Reports  Sean Vanatta (University of Glasgow) and Gabriela Recio Chair: Beatriz Rodriguez-Satizabal (Universidad del Pacífico)
 Workshop 2.6Legal sources Ashton Merck (North Carolina State University), Anna Hrom (William & Connolly LLP), Nate Holdren (Drake University), and Justene Hill Edwards (University of Virginia) Chair: Ashton Merck (North Carolina State University)
11:30BreakAttendees are welcomed to stay connected during the 15 minutes break
11:45Session 3Reinventing Form
 Workshop 3.1Visualizing the past David Staley (Ohio State University) Chair: Ellen Nye (Harvard University)
 Workshop 3.2History-as-Dialogue: Podcasting Bernardo Batiz-Lazo (Northumbria University) and Gregory Hargreaves (Hagley Museum & Library) Chair: Beatriz Rodriguez-Satizabal (Universidad del Pacífico)
 Workshop 3.3 Business History and Business/Policy in Practice  John Wilson (Newcastle University Business School) and Anna Tilba (Durham University) Chair: TBA
 Workshop 3.4 Microhistory  Andrew Popp (Copenhagen Business School) and Susan Lewis (State University of New York at New Paltz) Chair: Sven Kube (Florida International University)
 Workshop 3.5Curation Marina Moskowitz (University of Wisconsin) Chair: Paula de la Cruz-Fernández
 Workshop 3.6Tiktok History  Zhaojin Zeng (Duke Kunshan University) Chair: Valeria Giacomin (Bocconi University)
12:45BreakAttendees are welcomed to stay connected during the 15 minutes break
13:00 Wrap Up: Where Might We Go From Here?

Business Archives Council Bursary

The Business Archives Council’s bursary for business history research provides financial support for researchers to access business and organisational archives who would not otherwise be able to do so. The closing date for this year has been extended, but applications must be in by 30 September. Information about the bursary, eligibility and how to apply can be found on the BAC website – 

https://businessarchivescouncil.org.uk/activitiesobjectives/bursary/

EiCs for Scandinavian Economic History Reivew

The Scandinavian economic history review

Call for two positions as editor-in-chief

The Scandinavian Economic History Review is the leading economic history journal in Scandinavia. It has been published by the Scandinavian Society for Economic and Social History since 1953. The journal publishes articles and reviews in the fields of economic, business, and social history with a particular focus on the Nordic countries and the Baltic region. The journal also publishes contributions from closely related fields, such as demographic and labor history, as well as articles dealing with theoretical and methodological issues. The editors in chief, and the editorial office, rotate between Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Denmark by every three years. By 2023, it is time for the Swedish community to host the editorial office.

The Scandinavian Society for Economic and Social History is now looking for two new editors-in-chief for the journal. As editor-in-chief, you are responsible for the content and direction of the journal and for the contact with the publishing house Taylor and Francis. You also have the mandate to delegate the responsibility of manuscripts to the three associate editors. The position equals about ten percent of full-time, which should be financed by the editor’s home department.
To be eligible for the position of editor-in-chief you have to have a doctoral degree in economic history and be based at a Swedish University. You should have documented knowledge about Scandinavian economic history and extensive experience in publishing articles in high-quality academic journals and documented experience in peer-reviewing papers for academic journals. Capacity to collaborate with others and organizational skills are required to be considered for the position. Over the years, the majority of editors-in-chief have been male. The Scandinavian Society for Economic and Social History therefore especially welcomes women to apply for the position.

The application should be sent to erik.green@ekh.lu.se, and include the following:

Complete academic CV

List of publication

Motivation letter (max 1 page)

Deadline for submissions: 30 September 2022, 15:00hrs

If you have any questions, please email erik.green@ekh.lu.se

Archives & Artificial Intelligence

We are very pleased to be part of the AURA special issue in AI & Society 37,3. The special issue explores how modern data analytics affect archival practice, through conceptual and applied articles as well as elaborated case studies. Contributions consider a variety of issues, from new and exciting opportunities for exploration to continuing exclusion of communities, and provide food for thought for anyone interested in the future of history in a world increasingly captivated by AI.

CfP JMH SI: Latin America and the Caribbean Management History

Latin America and the Caribbean Management History

The evolution of management thought in Europe has its roots in the books of classic economists like Smith, Jevons, Marshall, Mills, Say, and Babbage (George & Álvarez, 2005). In the United States, the mainstream ideas that appeared at the beginning of managerial thought belong to mechanical engineering, especially in the books of Metcalfe, Towne, Taylor, Emerson, Gantt, Moller, and Gilbreth (Wren & Bedeian, 2018).

In Latin America and the Caribbean – LAC, the origin was different. The law and political sciences were the cornerstones of developing managerial ideas (Dávila, 1991a; Wahrlich, 1978). While Simón Bolívar was fighting for liberty, the general Francisco de Paula Santander considered that administration was part of the knowledge that the new nation needed to create itself. Santander, governing Great Colombia (today Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador and Panama), signed the Decree of March 18, 1826, to include ‘administrative sciences’ in the lawyer’s curriculum in Caracas, Quito, and Bogota (Orozco, 2015).

To further support the formation of a federal state, Florentino González went beyond the ideas about public administration available at that time: the Prussian concept of Policey Wissenschaft and the proposal of Charles-Jean Bonnin in the Principes d’Administration Publique to create an original proposal called ‘Elementos de Ciencia Administrativa’ in 1840 (Guerrero, 1997; Orozco, 2015). In the prologue González (1840, p. 1) pointed out that it is “a book that deals with an unknown science in the Americas, a science that we need to foster if we want to be happy some day” (Guerrero, 1997, p. 52, free translation from the guest editors).

The commerce schools appeared in México and Colombia to teach grammatical, accounting, law, languages, geography, and commercial techniques. The first one was the Escuela Superior de Comercio y Administración in Mexico in 1845, followed by the School of Commerce of Barranquilla in 1881 (Orozco, 2015). In Medellín, the National School of Mining was founded in 1886, seeking to create a new entrepreneurial elite in Colombia, led by Alejandro López (Orozco & Anzola, 2018).

In Argentina, the Universidad de Buenos Aires began to teach issues in management in 1913 under the influence of the railroad and British economists (Fernández & Gantman, 2011). Finally, the Jesuits established the first schools of administration at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile in 1924 and Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul in Brasil, in 1931 (Orozco, 2015).

The development of management thinking in LAC has been neglected in the annals of management history. Well-known books that are part of normal science, like Wren and Bedeian, George, or Witzel, lack chapters or presentations about LAC management thinking. The process, cultural and cognitive contexts, the tensions between the political and industrial organization, the relationships between schools, practitioners, and entrepreneurs, and the public and private forms of managing business are some of the knowledge gaps about LAC that we currently have. This special issue tries to begin filling this gap and proposes a landscape to include LAC in management history.

List of topic areas

  • Regional contributions to administrative and organizational theory,
  • specificities in management and business development in LAC,
  • epistemologies and ontologies in management thinking and research in LAC,
  • the role of the school of management (including globalization and international accreditations, epistemic independence, convergences, and distances between global North and global South)
  • the role (or lack thereof) of gender and multiple / mixed ethnicities in shaping the managerial organization and thinking in LAC countries
  • other forms of organizing present in LAC contexts (e.g., organizaciones otras in Mexico)
  • cultural studies of managerial practices and thinking in LAC, strategy and long-term thinking of nations and large corporations in LAC,
  • impact of the business organization on the communities in LAC, trans-disciplinary phenomena approached by management and social sciences in LAC

Guest Editors

Luis Antonio Orozco | University Externado de Colombia; Colombia

Olga Lucía Anzola Morales | University Externado de Colombia, Colombia

Fredy Vargas Lama | University Externado de Colombia, Colombia

Submissions Information

Submissions are made using ScholarOne Manuscripts. Registration and access are available at: mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jmh

Author guidelines must be strictly followed. Please see: www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/…

Authors should select (from the drop-down menu) the special issue title at the appropriate step in the submission process, i.e. in response to “”Please select the issue you are submitting to”.

Submitted articles must not have been previously published, nor should they be under consideration for publication anywhere else, while under review for this journal.

Key deadlines

Opening date for manuscripts submissions: 2 February 2023

Closing date for manuscripts submission: 30 October 2023

Closing date for abstract submission: 3 February 2023

Email for abstract submissions: luis.orozco@uexternado.edu.co

For the original call see: https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/calls-for-papers/latin-america-and-caribbean-management-history

Assistant Professor post at University of Maryland

University of Maryland College Park 
Robert H. Smith School of Business

Assistant Professor Faculty Posting
Management and Organization Department
Position Number:127566
Tenure Track

The Department of Management and Organizations at the Robert H. Smith School of Business, University of Maryland, College Park invites applications for faculty positions in Organizational Behavior/Human Resources, Strategy or Entrepreneurship at the rank of Assistant Professor. Position openings are subject to budgetary approval. Candidates must have a Ph.D., or equivalent degree and a track record of high-impact and creative research. Successful applicants will be expected to conduct top-level scholarly research, deliver high-quality teaching to undergraduate, MBA, MS, and PhD students and perform service.

The Robert H. Smith School of Business, one of 12 schools and colleges located on the University of Maryland, College Park campus, is a recognized leader in management research and education for the global economy. A comprehensive business school, Smith offers undergraduate, full-time and part-time MBA, M.S., Executive MBA, PhD, and non-degree executive education programs as well as outreach services to the corporate community. The school is consistently ranked among the top business schools by leading business publications such as Bloomberg Business Week, Financial Times, U.S. News & World Report, and The Wall Street Journal.

Minimum Qualifications: Candidates should have a Ph.D. already in hand or expected by Fall 2023 and a record of research excellence. All applicants are also expected to possess excellent teaching skills, including the ability to incorporate the latest insights from research and practice into existing and new courses.

Application Process and Deadlines. Application materials should be uploaded at: https://ejobs.umd.edu [Refer to position #127566 in the faculty listing]. When applying, please include a PDF version of your cover letter, personal statement, curriculum vitae, and 2 or 3 recent publications or job market paper. Three reference letters from scholars who know the applicant’s work well should be emailed to Tina Marie Rollason at trollaso@umd.edu. Applicants are encouraged to apply by October 1, 2022 or as soon as possible for best consideration. Consideration of candidates will begin upon receipt of applications and will continue until suitable candidates are identified. Questions regarding the positions can be directed to Gilad Chen at gchen3@umd.edu (applicants for the Organizational Behavior/Human Resources areas) or David Kirsch at dkirsch@umd.edu (applicants for the Strategy or Entrepreneurship areas).

About Us: For more information about the University of Maryland, please visit: http://www.umd.edu. For information about the Robert H. Smith School of Business, visit our Web site at: http://www.rhsmith.umd.edu. For more information about the Department of Management and Organizations visit our website at: www.rhsmith.umd.edu/faculty-research/…

Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of Maryland, College Park, an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations regarding nondiscrimination and affirmative action; all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment. The University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, physical or mental disability, protected veteran status, age, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, creed, marital status, political affiliation, personal appearance, or on the basis of rights secured by the First Amendment, in all aspects of employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions.

——————————
David Kirsch
University of Maryland

And this year’s winner of the ABH Coleman Prize is …

On the 1st of July, the Association of Business Historians (ABH) held the Coleman Prize session which featured four excellent presenters: Ian Jones, Nicolaas Strydom, Jeannette Strickland, and Gaurav Pratap Sud. The eventual winner was Ian Jones with his thesis titled Using the past: Authenticity, reliability, and the role of archives in Barclays plc’s use of the past strategies. Ian’s thesis was completed at the University of Liverpool and he was supervised by Dr Margaret Procter and Dr Andrew Smith and Barclays Group Archivists Maria Sienkiewicz. Ian’s thesis analyses the role of Barclays Group Archives (BGA) in the delivery of Barclays’ strategic objectives, abstract below:

Recent scholarship in organisation studies has begun to address how organisations perceive and use their history. However, how organisations preserve and access their history, and how this affects how they are able to use their history is less researched. This thesis investigates how Barclays Group Archives (BGA) contribute to Barclays plc delivering its strategic objectives. It asks, how does BGA, as a specific unit of the organisation, facilitate the delivery of Barclays plc’s strategic objectives? The researcher was embedded in the archives, enabling the gathering of observational data on how BGA operate as well as a unique level of access to archival organisational records. These were used to target and gain access to Barclays plc employees to conduct interviews to ascertain how they used BGA’s resources and what benefits they felt BGA brought. Using interviews, observation, and other qualitative research methods, this thesis introduces archival science theory to the study of how organisations can benefit from using their history, introducing the archival science ideas of authenticity, reliability, usability, and integrity to inform the research on organisational memory and use of the past strategies.