CfP Emotions and History of Business

Emotions and the History of Business

Mandy Cooper (UNC-Greensboro) and Andrew Popp (Copenhagen Business School)

We are developing a proposal for an edited volume on emotions and the history of business and seek further contributions. In the first instance, the proposal will be submitted to a series on the history of emotions edited by Peter Stearns and Susan Matt and published Bloomsbury.

Why emotions and the history of business?
A small but growing body of work has already begun to demonstrate the potential in bringing the histories of emotions and of business into greater dialogue.[1] We aim to more fully and systematically explore that potential through this proposed volume. What does bringing emotions in add to the history of business? Does business not inhabit a world of rationality? We firmly believe that from individual entrepreneurs to family firms to massive corporations, businesses have in many ways relied on, leveraged, generated, and been shaped by emotions for centuries. Examining business in all its facets through the lens of the history of emotion allows us to recognize the emotional structures behind business decisions and relationships and to question them. The very presence—or absence—of emotions and emotional language have the power to alter the structure and content of relationships between individuals and between businesses and communities. This collection asks what happens when emotions and emotional situations, whether fear/anxiety, nostalgia, love, or the longing of distance and separation, affect businesses and, in turn, how businesses affect the emotional lives of individuals and communities. In terms of framing, therefore, we emphasize the work that emotions do and recognize the performative nature of emotions.

Scope:
We do not wish to impose any restrictions in terms of geographic or temporal scope and would strongly welcome proposals from or on the Global South. Existing work in this area has often focused on emotions in family firms, but we welcome proposals across the full range of potential business settings and contexts. Likewise, much work in the history of emotions has adopted micro-historical perspectives and methodologies; we would particularly welcome work exploring emotions in large or macro-scale business contexts or phenomena, market crashes (or booms) being only the most obvious possibility. Similarly, we are open to studies utilizing the full range of historical sources and methodologies. Studies exploring change in the relationships between emotions and business over time will be warmly welcomed, as will studies exploring the relationship between race, gender, and business. Proposals may well be themed around a specific emotion, but that is not the only approach imaginable. Naturally, proposals from across a wide range of cognate disciplines – economic history, the history of capitalism, cultural and social history, material history and more – are most welcome.

A far from exhaustive list of possible themes might include:

  • Gendered and/or racialized emotion and business
  • Boredom/ennui
  • Love
  • Fear and anxiety
  • Rationality as an emotion
  • Subjugation
  • Satisfaction/fulfilment
  • Disappointment
  • Identity formation/the self/authenticity
  • Contagion, risk, and panic
  • Solidarity
  • Business as drama
  • The forms of expression of business emotions: language, sites, rites, rituals, symbols
  • Cultural representations of business emotions
  • Commemoration and history as emotions
  • Emotions as commodities
  • Alienation and estrangement

Logistics:

Please send proposals of no more than 500 words to emotionsandbusiness@gmail.com by July 31st 2020. Please include a brief biography of all authors, as well as contact details. Proposals should seek to present setting, theme, perspective or framing, and sources and methods. Please use the same email address to approach us with any questions or queries.

Mandy Cooper
Lecturer, Department of History UNC-Greensboro

Andrew Popp
Professor of history, Department of Management, Politics, and Philosophy Copenhagen Business School

[1] See, for example, the special issue on “Emotions et Enterprises Familiales,” Enterprises et Histoire, No. 91 (2018)

OHN returns & CfP “Entrepreneurship and Transformations”

Hello everyone and apologies for the long pause between posts, which was partly due to illness, but also, as you can imagine, due to the extraordinary times we find ourselves in. Many of us had to prepare online teaching at short notice, and many of the events we blog about have been cancelled due to the ongoing pandemic. Going forward, we will only run one blog per week on Fridays, as there simply not as many events and updates as there would usually be.

But today we have some good news, as one of our great editors, Christina Lubinski, is looking for submissions for an exciting new special issue in Business History on historical entrepreneurship.

Stay safe & healthy

Stephanie

Business History Special Issue

Entrepreneurship and Transformations

Special Issue Editor(s)

Deadline: 30 September 2020

Entrepreneurship and Transformations

Research on entrepreneurship has flourished in recent years, and the public interest in it has arguably never been greater. Few would disagree that entrepreneurship is one of the primary drivers of industry dynamics, economic and societal change, and innovation. However, the rapidly growing field of entrepreneurship studies has not displayed great strength in capturing dynamics and evolutions over time, partly due to a lack of historical empirical work of the sort that Schumpeter (1939) has already called for several decades ago. This special issue sets out to bring together an interdisciplinary group of scholars analyzing the links between entrepreneurship and (societal and market) transformations.

The Special Issue “Entrepreneurship and Transformations” takes its starting point in the critique that the field of entrepreneurship studies suffers from a fixation on the micro-processes governing the interaction of individuals and opportunities (Shane 2003), while largely ignoring the macro-dynamics of which entrepreneurship is part. It builds on the growing interdisciplinary dialogue between history and entrepreneurship studies (Wadhwani and Jones 2014, Perchard, MacKenzie et al. 2017, Wadhwani, Kirsch et al. 2020 pre-published online) that has triggered much needed methodological and theoretical reflections on historical entrepreneurship research.

The editors of this SI give an overview of this field of study in their annotated bibliography and encourage authors to engage with (a sub-set of) this literature. In particular, they welcome contributions that build on these insights to empirically explore the links between entrepreneurship and (societal and market) transformations over time. We see a research opportunity for scholars who use historical methods and sources to explore

  1. opportunity recognition and opportunity exploitation as a long-term process. Artur Cole (1959), for example, introduced the idea of an “entrepreneurial stream”—a metaphor highlighting that entrepreneurial opportunities often unfold over long period of time, with one opportunity building on previous ones. These long-term developments easily become hidden if we focus too closely on one individual or one company; however, the question how new opportunities emerge from existing ones, and how (experiential and codified) knowledge travels between individuals and institutions is of great importance for understanding the entrepreneurial process in and between companies (Galambos and Amatori 2016).
  2. the interactions between entrepreneurship and the cultural and socioeconomic environment they are embedded in (Welter and Gartner 2016, Baker and Welter 2018). So far, scholarly approaches to contextualizing entrepreneurship have varied widely. One set of work, drawing on institutional theory and following Baumol (1990), have interpreted contexts as a source of constraints and incentives on entrepreneurial behavior. A second approach, drawing on social movement and social group research, have approached contextualization as a matter of “embedding” entrepreneurial processes within social groups, movements, and networks (Hiatt, Sine et al. 2009). A third approach, drawing on a social constructivist view of contexts, examines how entrepreneurial actors shape and even create the contexts for their actions (Jones and Pitelis 2015). Historical research, particularly work that takes a comparative or international perspective, has long emphasized the role of context in shaping the very definition of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial processes. But how exactly does historical work lead us to reconsider and rethink the conceptualization of context? How can context be operationalized and studied using a historical lens? We believe that non-Western contexts and “deep histories”, in particular, can help us question and revise some of the taken-for-granted assumptions around entrepreneurship and context.
  3. Finally, we specifically encourage interdisciplinary collaborations between historians and scholars from other disciplines that significantly advance our understanding of entrepreneurship and market transformations and develop approaches that are useful to scholars exploring entrepreneurship historically. 

References

  • Baker, T. and F. Welter (2018). “Contextual Entrepreneurship: An Interdisciplinary Perspective.” Foundations and Trends®in Entrepreneurship 14(4): 357-426.
  • Baumol, W. J. (1990). “Entrepreneurship: Productive, Unproductive, and Destructive.” Journal of Political Economy 98(5): 893-921.
  • Cole, A. (1959). Business Enterprise in its Social Setting. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.
  • Galambos, L. and F. Amatori (2016). “The Entrepreneurial Multiplier.” Enterprise & Society 17(4): 763-808.
  • Hiatt, S. R., W. D. Sine and P. S. Tolbert (2009). “From Pabst to Pepsi: The Deinstitutionalization of Social Practices and the Creation of Entrepreneurial Opportunities.” Administrative Science Quarterly 54(4): 635-667.
  • Jones, G. and C. Pitelis (2015). “Entrepreneurial Imagination and a Demand and Supply-Side Perspective on MNE and Cross-Border Organisation.” Journal of International Management 21(4): 309-321.
  • Perchard, A., N. G. MacKenzie, S. Decker and G. Favero (2017). “Clio in the Business School: Historical Approaches in Strategy, International Business and Entrepreneurship.” Business History: 1-24.
  • Schumpeter, J. A. (1939). Business Cycles: A Theoretical, Historical and Statistical Analysis of the Capitalist Process, Vol. I. New York and London, McGraw-Hill.
  • Shane, S. (2003). A General Theory of Entrepreneurship:The Individual–Opportunity Nexus. Cheltenham, Edward Elgar.
  • Wadhwani, D. R., D. Kirsch, F. Welter, W. B. Gartner and G. Jones (2020 pre-published online). “Context, Time, and Change: Historical Approaches to Entrepreneurship Research.” Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal.
  • Wadhwani, R. D. and G. Jones (2014). Schumpeter’s Plea: Historical Reasoning in Entrepreneurship Theory and Research. Organizations in Time: History, Theory and Methods. M. Bucheli and R. D. Wadhwani. Oxford, Oxford University Press: 192-216.
  • Welter, F. and W. B. Gartner, Eds. (2016). A Research Agenda for Entrepreneurship and Context. Cheltenham, UK, Edward Elgar Publishing.

 

Submission instructions

We welcome contributions to the outlined research agenda that are based on original research and innovative analysis. We particularly encourage contributions by interdisciplinary teams of authors and those that combine source-based historical analysis with insights, concepts or data from other disciplines.

Papers should not exceed 8,000 words, inclusive of tables and footnotes, and use US spelling. By submitting to the SI, authors confirm that their contributions are not under consideration elsewhere. All proposals should be submitted via ScholarOne, indicating that they are contributions to this Special Issue “Entrepreneurship and Transformations”. All articles will go through a peer-review process. It is the responsibility of the author(s) to ensure that the manuscript fully complies with the publishing guidelines of Business History.

Instructions for authors

Submit an article

For questions about this Special Issue, please contact Christina Lubinski, cl.mpp@cbs.dk

New African Studies track at BAM2020

I am really pleased that BAM now has, in addition to the long-standing Business and Management History track, a new track for African Studies that is open to wide variety of approaches, including historical research.

We would like to bring to your attention a new track on African Studies for the BAM 2020 conference in Manchester. The African Studies track is committed to examining submissions that foster dialogue on contemporary African research which directly impacts BAM members and the wellbeing of the broader academic research community. We are especially keen to receive full and development papers (both conceptual and empirical based) as well as workshop styled interventions on the following topical areas:  

  • African entrepreneurial process & other spatial/temporal issues on African entrepreneurship.
  • African culture, alternative institutions and indigenous networks.
  • Policy & practice issues on African development and SMEs.
  • African development finance, including formal & informal sources of finance, financial bootstrapping, small business, venture capital, & bank credits. 
  • African leadership and leadership development.
  • African research on female & gender entrepreneurship.
  • African  research methodologies & methods

We have an open list for potential submissions but are interested in papers which explore an African theme. The BAM2020 submission site can be located via the following link:  https://www.conftool.pro/bam2020. We look forward to your submissions.

Track Chairs

Dr. Kingsley Omeihe, Edinburgh Napier University              k.omeihe@napier.ac.uk

Dr. Christian Harrison, University of the West of Scotland   Christian.Harrison@uws.ac.uk
The BAM Team | British Academy of Management  
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British Academy of Management, Five Kings House, Queen Street Place, London, EC4R 1QS, UK
T: +44 (0)2073 837 770 | F: +44 (0) 2073 830 377 | bam@bam.ac.uk 
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Call for EBHA doctoral summer school

At Business History, we are very proud to be one of the sponsors of this year’s EBHA doctoral summer school!

Keynote Speaker: Albert Carreras (Pompeu Fabra University).

Faculty Members: Adoración Álvaro Moya (CUNEF), Veronica Binda (Bocconi University), Andrea Colli (Bocconi University), Christina Lubinski (Copenhagen Business School) and Jari Ojala (University of Jyvaskyla).

Local organizers: Paloma Fernández and Miquel Gutiérrez (University of Barcelona).

The 10th edition of the EBHA (European Business History Association) Summer School will take place at Barcelona, from Wednesday, July 8th to Friday, July 10th, 2020. The school, titled Challenges for Business History in a Changing World, aims to encourage a fresh and rigorous exchange of thoughts, ideas, and new research being done by doctoral students in early stages of their doctoral work, in fields closely related to Business History. It is organised jointly by the European Business History Association (EBHA) and the University of Barcelona (UB) in cooperation with the Spanish Association of Economic History (AEHE).

The school will focus on theoretical, methodological and practical issues which are of relevance for advanced research in business history. The main aims of the school are to provide students with a full understanding of the newest trends in research in the field and to provide a friendly atmosphere in which to discuss their preliminary findings with leading scholars as well as among their peers. In this respect, the program features both lectures and seminars given by faculty and student presentations of their research projects. Each student will have 20 minutes maximum to present her/his project, stressing especially: research questions and goals, methodology, sources, challenges and provisional outcomes. After her/his presentation, each student will receive questions and comments from other students and from faculty members.

Students will be accommodated in the beautiful and lively city of Barcelona. The organisers will cover all local costs (accommodation in double room and food), but participants are expected to pay their own travel expenses.

Those interested in attending the summer school should send the following documents by e-mail to Paloma Fernández (palomafernandez@ub.edu):

1) a brief CV (not exceeding one page);

2) a summary of their dissertation project (not exceeding three pages);

3) (if possible) an example of their work in progress, e.g. a draft chapter or a working paper (in any language).

The deadline for applications is February 29th, 2020. A maximum of 10 participants will be selected from these applications and will be notified by March 30th, 2020.

CfP for ABH extended until 10 Feb!

Please find the Call for Papers for the ABH 2020 conference below.  Please note the closing date for papers/sessions has been extended to 10.02.2020.  

Please encourage applicants for the Coleman Prize, which has also been extended to 10.02.2020. 

You can submit your papers by visiting the ABH website athttps://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH/index.html, then click on Please view here.

If you require any further information, please do not hesitate to contact us, or the ABH 2020 conference organisers, email: Business-Historians2020@Nottingham.ac.uk.

BUBBLES AND CRISES; MAYHEM AND MISERY; CORRUPTION AND DISRUPTION

26–27 June 2020

Nottingham University Business School Jubilee Campus

As we continue to live with the worldwide fallout of the 2008 economic crisis, we have to wonder whether we have learned anything about business, bubbles, and crises over the centuries. This conference will address the historical consequences of bubbles and crises and their ramifications in terms of human and financial misery and the difficulties caused at national level (e.g., in respect of lower tax revenues and consequent reductions to public goods and services) and to businesses, communities and individuals.

The first bubble was famously that of the ‘Tulip Mania’ of 1636 followed by the crash of early 1637. In the British context, there was also the railway mania of the mid-19th century, and in the context of the United States, the great crash and depression of the 1930s, which had worldwide consequences. More recently we have seen various financial crises and stock market crashes e.g.: the UK in 1987; the 1997 financial crisis in Asia; the 1998 Russian financial crisis; the ‘dot.com’ bubble of the 1990s; the housing/property market bubbles in China, Japan and Australia in the early 2000s; the recent economic crises in Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Greece and Spain.

As we approach the tri-centenary of the British ‘South Sea Bubble’ and the French ‘Mississippi Bubble’, this conference aims to revisit various bubbles and crises around three themes with various sub-questions.:

Bubbles and Crises

What macro forces are at play? Are financial bubbles and crises historically and economically cyclical and inevitable? How do they affect businesses and the economy more widely?

Mayhem and Misery

Are there ever rational bubbles? Who wins? Who loses? What national and international social and economic public policy changes were proposed or made in response to alleviate the consequences? What were the consequences for businesses, communities and individuals?

Corruption and Disruption

Who is to blame? Whom do we blame? What is the relationship between business and individual behaviour and corruption? What were the outcomes from crises in terms of political and economic regulation? Who are the beneficiaries of crises? What can we learn about the persistence and circulation of business elites?

We will particularly welcome papers on businesses’ role and involvement, collectively or individually, in these or related themes, but will also consider papers that sit outside this framework.

How to submit a paper or session proposal

The programme committee will consider both individual papers and entire panels. Individual paper proposals should include a one-page (up to 300-word) abstract and one-page curriculum vitae (CV). Panel proposals should include a cover letter stating the rationale for the panel and the name of its contact person; one-page (300-word) abstract and author’s CV for each paper; and a list of preferred panel chairs and commentators with contact information. Note that each academic session lasts 90 minutes, allowing time for 3 or at a pinch 4 papers. The deadline for submissions is 10 February 2020.

If you have any questions please contact the Conference Organisers: Business- Historians2020@Nottingham.ac.uk.

Submissions must be made online at: https://unternehmensgeschichte.de/db/public/C1. Begin by selecting between uploading a single paper or a full panel. Have your abstract and CV ready. The software will guide you through the uploading and submission process.

Any other suggestions for the conference – workshops, poster sessions, panel discussions – should be made to the programme committee through Business- Historians2020@Nottingham.ac.uk.

Call for Tony Slaven Doctoral Workshop in Business History, 25th June 2020

The ABH will hold its eight annual Tony Slaven Doctoral Workshop on 25th June 2020. This event immediately precedes the 2020 ABH Annual Conference at Nottingham University Business School. Participants in the Workshop are encouraged to attend the main ABH Annual Conference following the Workshop. The Workshop is an excellent opportunity for doctoral students to discuss their work with other research students and established academics in business history in an informal and supportive environment. Students at any stage of their doctoral studies, whether in their first year or very close to submitting, are urged to apply. In addition to providing new researchers with an opportunity to discuss their work with experienced researchers in the discipline, the Workshop will also include at least one skills- related session. The Workshop interprets the term ‘business history’ broadly, and it is intended that students in areas such as (but not confined to) the history of international trade and investment, financial or economic history, agricultural history, the history of not-for- profit organisations, government-industry relations, accounting history, social studies of technology, and historians or management or labour will find it useful. Students undertaking topics with a significant business history element but in disciplines other than economic or business history are also welcome. We embrace students researching any era or region of history. Skills sessions are typically led by regular ABH members; in the past these have included ‘getting published’, ‘using historical sources’, and ‘preparing for your viva examination’ sessions. There will be ample time for discussion of each student’s work and the opportunity to gain feedback from active researchers in the field.

How to Apply for the Tony Slaven Workshop

Your application should be no more than 4 pages sent together in a single computer file: 1) a one page CV; 2) one page stating the name(s) of the student’s supervisor(s), the title of the theses (a proposed title is fine), the university and department where the student is registered and the date of commencement of thesis registration; 3) an abstract of the work to be presented.

You may apply via email to Dr Mitch Larson at mjlarson@uclan.ac.uk. Please use the subject line “Tony Slaven Workshop” and submit by the 10 February 2020.

Call for Coleman Prize for Best PhD Dissertation, Nottingham University Business School, 26–27 June 2020

Named in honour of the British business historian Donald Coleman (1920-1995), this prize is awarded annually by the Association of Business Historians to recognise excellence in new research in Britain. It is open to PhD dissertations in Business History (broadly defined) either having a British subject or completed at a British university. All dissertations completed in the previous calendar year to that of the Prize are eligible. In keeping with the ABH’s broad understanding of business history, applications are strongly encouraged from candidates in economic history, social history, labour history, intellectual history, cultural history, environmental history, the history of science and technology, the history of medicine, or any other subfield. The value of the prize is £500, sponsored by the Taylor & Francis Group, a scholarly publisher. To be eligible for the Prize, finalists must present their findings in person at the Association’s annual conference, held on 26–27 June 2020. A complete list of previous winners may be found at: http://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH/coleman.html

How to Apply for the Coleman Prize
Supervisors are encouraged to nominate recent PhDs, and self-nominations are also strongly welcomed. Please send a PDF including the title of your PhD dissertation and a brief abstract (up to 2 double-spaced pages) to christine.leslie@glasgow.ac.uk by 10 February 2020. Shortlisted candidates will be requested to submit electronic copies of their theses by 20 February 2020. Finalists will be notified by 19 March 2020.

Everyone appearing on the programme must register for the meeting. PhD students whose papers are accepted for the meeting may apply for funds to partially defray their travel costs by applying to the Francesca Carnevali Travel Grant for PhD Students. A limited number of scholarships are available from the Francesca Carnevali fund of the ABH to contribute towards the travel, accommodation and registration costs of students doing a PhD in the United Kingdom, who are presenting in the Slaven Workshop, the ABH conference or the Coleman Prize.

Further details can be found at – https://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH

WCBH application deadline extended

Good news for those who missed the application deadline for the Second World Congress of Business History (WCBH) at Nanzan University, Nagoya, Japan (September 10th -12th, 2020). 

The program committee decided to extend the deadline for panel and paper proposals to January 29 (Wednesday), 2020.

WCBH 2020 is a world-wide congress jointly organized by EBHA and BHSJ, and it is positioned as the 24th Congress of the European Business History Association, and also as a specially organized international conference by BHSJ. Please visit:
http://bhs.ssoj.info/WCBH2020/index.html

Travel Support Information

The local organizers have secured funds for partial travel support for Young Scholars (PhD students are prioritized, but other young scholars eligible) and for participants from regions that do not usually have the chance to attend academic conferences in Japan. The exact amount of support is not yet determined, but the organizers hope to be able to offer between $300 to $1000 according to region. 
Applicants from the above categories whose papers have been selected for the Congress will be approached individually to apply for travel support. 
More details will follow, but in the meantime we encourage applications from the above categories.

We are looking forward to welcoming you in Japan!

Program Committee of WCBH

ProgramCommittee@worldbhc.org

CfP EBHS Conference

The 45th Annual Economic and Business History Society (EBHS) Conference will be held at the Sheraton in downtown Atlanta between May 28 and May 30 2020. 

The call for papers can be viewed here:

http://www.ebhsoc.org/conference/index.php/ebhsoc/Atlanta2020

Call for Papers is open until January 15, 2020. 

Our general theme is Economic and Business History at the Crossroads. Here we would encourage reflections on ‘crossroads’, as sign of cultural and commercial interchange, geographic meeting places, exchanges and entrepots, and temporal and historical moments of divergence and contingency. However, individual proposals for presentations on any aspect of economic, business, or financial history are welcome, as are proposals for whole panels. We also encourage submissions from graduate students and non-academic affiliates.If you have any queries, please get in touch with either myself or Craig McMahon (Program Chair): craig.mcmahon@villanova.edu

Re-thinking Female Entrepreneurship Conference

Re-thinking Female Entrepreneurship – How intersectionality shapes the experience of female entrepreneurs

14 – 15 January 2020

University of St Andrews School of Management

Building on the success of the first “Re-thinking Female Entrepreneurship” Conference which took place in June 2018, this two-day conference will continue to challenge the gendered discourse of entrepreneurship and to explore further the diversity of female entrepreneurs and their journeys.

The conference will bring together academics, entrepreneurs, consultants as well as community leaders and not for profit organisations. The conference will cover a broad range of topics including the intersectionality of gender and; age, race, class, sexuality and disability. The conference will also critically discuss the persistence of gender inequality, the challenges facing female entrepreneurs in male dominated industries, the agency of female entrepreneurs as well as the rhetoric of entrepreneurship as being a source of empowerment. In addition, the conference will present a case study on how academic can engage with non-academics to promote female entrepreneurship.

The conference is free of charge with lunch and refreshments included.

The conference is generously funded by the British Academy as part of Rising Star Engagement Award (BARSEA).

The conference aims to support Early Career Researchers who are interested in researching gender and entrepreneurship.

We will able to cover the travel and the accommodation expenses of Early Career Researchers. However, the fund will be limited to a certain number of applicants and will be offered on first come first served basis.

Due to the calibre of the speakers a high level of demand for conference places is expected so please book as soon as you can by sending an email to mmno@st-andrews.ac.uk and hd48@st-andrews.ac.uk

The Conference keynote speakers will be:

Dr Hannah Dean; Lecturer of Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Creativity – University of St Andrews

Prof. Jackie Ford; Professor of Leadership and Organisation Studies – Durham University 

Dr Sally Jones; Reader in Entrepreneurship and Gender Studies – Metropolitan Manchester University

Ms Sara Hawthorn; Managing Director – InFusion Comms

Dr Gretchen Larsen; Associate Professor of Marketing – Faculty Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion – Durham University

Prof. Claire Leitch; Professor of Entrepreneurial Leadership – Lancaster University

Prof. Susan Marlow; (holder of the Queen Award for Enterprise) – Professor of Entrepreneurship – University of Birmingham

Ms Anne Meikle; Policy Manager – Women’s Enterprise Scotland (CIC)

Prof. Kiran Trehan; Professor of Leadership and Enterprise Development – Director of WE LEAD [Women’s Entrepreneurship, Leadership Economy and Diversity] – Head of Group – Entrepreneurship and Local Economy- University of Birmingham 

Prof. Fiona Wilson; Professor of Organisational Behaviour – University of Glasgow

Ms Terry Wragg; Director – Leeds Animation Workshop

Details of the presentations together with a brief bio of the speakers will be available very soon on the following link;

https://female-entrepreneur.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk

Looking forward to welcoming you to what promises to be an exciting event full of networking opportunities and fruitful debates.

Hannah Dean

Lecturer of Entrepreneurship, Innovation, Creativity

University of St Andrews School of Management

AOM2020 Management History Calls for submission

The Management History (MH) Division invites PDW, symposium, and paper submissions for the 80th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management to be held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada from 7 – 11 August 2020. You may send us your submissions through the AOM Submission Center until it closes on Tuesday, 14 January 2020 at 5:00 PM ET (NY Time). The Submission Center opens in early December 2019.

Conference Theme: This year’s conference theme is “20/20: Broadening our Sight” and encourages us to widen our view when examining our domain, practice and organizational phenomena. We encourage you to make connections to the theme wherever possible in preparing your submission.

Our Domain: The Management History (MH) Division is a wide-ranging network of scholars interested in the antecedents of modern business practice and thought. We invite submissions of empirical and conceptual papers, as well as proposals for symposia (including panel discussions, debates, and roundtables), for consideration for inclusion in the division’s scholarly program. We encourage submissions from all members of the academy interested in devoting or sharing their work in management history broadly defined.

As there is an element of history within every division in the Academy, the division is open to a variety of methodological approaches and themes ranging from historical events in management practice (empirical focus) to studies that engage with historiography, philosophies of history, and the history of ideas and management thought (theoretical orientation). In this spirit, the MH Division welcomes scholarly contributions that generate meaningful and original contributions in history from across all AOM divisions’ interest groups. Submissions for sessions sponsored jointly with other Academy divisions are regarded as particularly attractive, and highly encouraged. The MH Division encourages submissions from doctoral students. Papers with a PhD student as the first or sole author should be clearly identified when submitted to allow identification of possible winners of the Best Graduate Student Paper.

See our call for PDWs: https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Faom.org%2Fannualmeeting%2Fsubmission%2Fcall%2Fmh%2Fpdw%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cs.decker%40aston.ac.uk%7C37d1deba710c4c7d5b2108d7736c83c2%7Ca085950c4c2544d5945ab852fa44a221%7C0%7C0%7C637104782223824129&sdata=2HRobwAYRgVxdUDAUHumsrId9Ce4IosuZeS6rSQbs8Y%3D&reserved=0

And our call for the scholarly program: https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Faom.org%2Fannualmeeting%2Fsubmission%2Fcall%2Fmh%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cs.decker%40aston.ac.uk%7C37d1deba710c4c7d5b2108d7736c83c2%7Ca085950c4c2544d5945ab852fa44a221%7C0%7C0%7C637104782223824129&sdata=x%2FYFjHP%2BN%2BV6ysqk9y7IdqEiJBgBebWVDuyur3DipIs%3D&reserved=0

We’re looking forward to seeing you in Vancouver,

Roy Suddaby, Program Chair (rsuddaby@uvic.ca) and Trish McLaren, PDW Chair (pmclaren@wlu.ca)

CfP: Crafting World-Leading Outputs from Qualitative Research

31st March & 1st April 2020

University of Liverpool Management School, in association with NARTI, SAMS and ESRC

Following the success of the 2017 PhD led conference, the doctoral community at the University of Liverpool Management School (ULMS) is organising a two-day event to take place in March 2020. The purpose of this workshop is to support PhD students and early career researchers (ECR) scholarly development by offering a space to assist in developing and refining research papers for publication in prominent journals and to facilitate academic socialisation. The theme for this year’s event is ‘Crafting World Leading Outputs for Qualitative Research’: to support PhD candidates and early career researchers in developing their ‘job market’ papers. We welcome submissions from a wide variety of topics in business, management and organization studies.

We expect around 30 participants from across the UK and Europe and an academic panel of ten to facilitate an intense, intellectually stimulating and socially enjoyable forum. The event commences on Tuesday, 31st March in the morning and ends on Wednesday, 1st of April, in the afternoon. All sessions will be held in the University of Liverpool Management School and an evening meal is also included.


Eligibility

The event will be open to all doctoral (from second year onwards) and early career researchers.


Academic panel

Professor Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School)
Professor Caroline Gatrell (University of Liverpool Management School)
Professor Charles Harvey (University of Newcastle)
Professor Daniel Hjorth (Copenhagen Business School & Nottingham Business School)
Professor Robin Holt (Copenhagen Business School & Nottingham Business School)
Professor Christian Garmann Johnsen (Copenhagen Business School)
Professor Martin Kornberger (University of Edinburgh Business School)
Professor Mairi Maclean (University of Bath)
Professor Roy Suddaby (University of Victoria & University of Liverpool Management School)
Professor Mike Zundel (University of Liverpool Management School & Copenhagen Business School)

Contact

Please submit extended abstracts to: t.davis@liverpool.ac.uk

More information: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/management/conferences-and-events/crafting-world-leading-outputs/2020/