BizHisCol Webinar – How was the Manila trade financed?

An alternative institutional approach to long-distance trade finance, 1668-1828

27/04/2021 17.00 UK (NB – Time rescheduled, previously 16.00 UK)

Register here

Presenter: Juan José Rivas Moreno (London School of Economics and Political Science)
Discussant: Fernando Arteaga González (University of Pennsylvania)
Chair: Manuel A. Bautista-González (Columbia University in the City of New York)

This paper seeks to explain the financial model of the Pacific silver trade that linked Spanish America and Asia through Manila during the Early Modern period, focusing specially on the era between 1668 and 1828.This research therefore seeks to understand the business and financial model of the Manila trade, its resilience in time as well as its successful monopolisation of the Pacific route (the most direct route for the exchange of silver pesos for Asian manufactures) in the context of corporate, business, and institutional history. It does so by reconstructing and analysing for the first time the universe of the financial markets in Manila, which rested on a combination of financial and risk-mitigating instruments such as sea loans, investment vehicles like legacy funds grouped under the administration of confraternities and tertiary orders, and a legal framework that combined differing jurisdictions including Canon, Civil, and consuetudinary law. It explores the interaction of all this elements in the context of a trade defined by lack of substitutes, high risks, and oligopsonic structures in order to explain the rationale behind the instruments and organisations used.It crucially uses for the first time a database of over 525 sea loans from the notarial protocols of Manila (NAP) as well as the only surviving year-on-year account books of 23 legacy funds that invested in the Manila trade (APSR). The result is an alternative business model that relied on horizontal specialisation rather than vertical integration, in which Manila played a specialised role as a risk manager and financier of the trade, which allowed it to remain competitive and to fend-off encroachment attempts from interlopers and the East India companies without adopting a corporate form. 

Second HiMOS virtual seminar

We are excited to invite you to our next HiMOS virtual seminar (https://historymos.wordpress.com/). The aim of this seminar series is to help open up the black box of “practicing” history in the context of management and organization studies. 

We are very proud to have another great lineup of speakers sharing their insights and workshopping their papers, including Eero Vaara (Saïd Oxford, keynote), Christina Lubinski (Copenhagen Business School), and Antti Sihvonen (JSBE). 

Event details: 

Date: Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Time:   2pm-5pm (UTC+2, Finland)

1pm-4pm (UTC+1, Central European Time)

Noon-3pm (UTC+0, UK)

Please register by click here

After the registration, you will receive the Zoom link, passcode, and the full version of the working papers one week before the seminar.

Program

Keynote: 

Eero Vaara (Saïd Oxford): ”How to learn from unusual organizations?”

Working paper presentations:

Christina Lubinski (Copenhagen Business School): ”The Sound of Opportunity: Aural Temporality, Entrepreneurial Opportunity & the Evolution of Markets” (with Dan Wadhwani, University of Southern California)

Antti Sihvonen (JSBE): “Chance, Strategy and Change: The Structure of Contingency in the Evolution of the Nokia Corporation, 1986–2015” (with Jaakko Aspara, NEOMA; Juha-Antti Lamberg, JSBE; Henrikki Tikkanen, Aalto)

HiMOS is organized by the Strategy and Entrepreneurship research group of Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics (JSBE). The purpose of the seminar series is the advancement of historical research in management and organization studies. Seminars are organized twice per year. In each seminar we will have one keynote speaker with a recent history-related publication sharing their insights and experiences and 2–3 advanced working paper presentations. 

If you are interested in presenting in future seminars, contact the organizers Zeerim Cheung (zeerim.cheung@jyu.fi) and Christian Stutz (christian.stutz@jyu.fi).

We are looking forward to your participation!

Canadian Business History Association’s new YouTube channel

Past CBHA/ACHA Talks
Now Available for Viewing
on CBHA/ACHA YouTube Channel

Unmaking the Made Beaver: Money and Monopoly in the Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Fur Trade.
The Historical Anniversaries of the Hudson’s Bay Company and the Province of Manitoba
The History of Coffee, Cannabis, and Alcohol: From Stigmatized to Normalized
The Price of Gold – Lessons From Previous Price Cycles

View the presentations HERE.

Important event happening later today: Racial Justice at the Intersection of Business & Society

SOCIAL ISSUES IN MANAGEMENT DIVISION PRESENTS:

RACIAL JUSTICE AT THE INTERSECTION OF BUSINESS AND SOCIETY

March 26, 2021, 11:00am-12:30pm EST – Racial Justice, History, and Business Ethics

Hosts: Paul T. Harper (Pittsburgh) & David Wasieleski (Duquesne)

REGISTRATION: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/racial-justice-history-and-business-ethics-tickets-133140341345

Andrew Smith (Liverpool)

Jennifer Johns (Bristol)

Leon Prieto (Clayton State)

Simone Phipps (Middle Georgia State)

Panel will provide examples of the ways ahistorical methods and temporal frames expose and occlude the role of race in knowledge creation processes. The Atlantic Slave Trade as a context for understanding current management practices will be discussed as well as the unrecognized history of Black entrepreneurship in the U.S.

Event Sponsor: Viragh Institute for Ethics in Business

Upcoming Event:

May 7, 2021, 11:00am-12:30 EST – Racial Justice and Sustainability

Hosts: Robbin Derry (Lethbridge) & Jeffrey York (Colorado)

REGISTRATION: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/racial-justice-and-sustainability-tickets-133144676311

Visit SIM Website for full series details: https://sim.aom.org/new-item7

JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS – Special Issue on “Racial Justice and Business Ethics”

Guest Editors: Paul T. Harper (Pittsburgh), Robbin Derry (Lethbridge), and Gregory Fairchild (Virginia)

Submission Deadline: October 1, 2021

Visit JBE website for full details: https://www.springer.com/journal/10551/updates/18290364

BizHisCol Webinar: Benefits offered by historical explanation to statistical studies in strategic management

23/03/2021 16.00 UK

Register here

Presenters: Sandeep Pillai (Bocconi University), Brent Goldfarb, and David Kirsch (University of Maryland)
Chair: Adam Nix (De Montfort University)

Abstract:

We contribute the literature on research methodologies in strategy research (CITE) and argue that historical explanation is essential to improve the internal validity, external validity, and objectivity of statistical reasoning. To enhance internal validity, tools used by historians offer statistical reasoning explanatory virtues, visibility across time and levels of analyses, the ability to identify mechanisms, and the ability to test that a proposed hypothesis is invariant. Explanatory practices followed by historians improved external validity because it provides readers with embedded generalizations from logically rigorous analytic narratives and contextualized thick descriptions that the readers can then use to determine whether the explanations are generalizable to contexts that are of interest to the readers. Further, to improve objectivity, historical explanation complements statistical reasoning through source criticism and hermeneutic interpretation, which enables the evaluation of inferences from the perspective of the authors of the records.

Digital archives events

Next week our AHRC-funded project on “Contextualising email archives” will be presenting at two digital archives events – at the same time!

Adam will present follow on work at the third and final AURA event (16 March, 10:30-17:00), while I will be presenting our work at the Digital Archives Learning Event (DALE) “Strictly on the Download” event run by The National Archives (16 March 2-4pm).

Information on the AURA event follows below and you can book here.

Information on the the DALE event follows after the AURA information, and you can book here.

Artificial Intelligence and Archives: What comes next?

This final workshop will bring together all key actors in the archive “circuit”: from creators of data, to archivists and to users (thereby crossing the boundaries between Computer Scientists and Humanities Scholars) with the aim of planning new projects on AI and Archives.

Workshop 3 is organised by the University of Edinburgh in partnership with the AURA project team.

Tuesday 16th March

Programme:

  • 10:30 – 10:40 Welcome (Lise Jaillant and Melissa Terras)
  • 10:40 – 11:40 Keynote presentation, “Can Archives make AI Better?”

– Professor Andrew Prescott, University of Glasgow

Chair: Bea Alex, University of Edinburgh

  • 10 minute break
  • 11:50 – 12:50 Focus on Digital Humanities

– Dr Larry Stapleton, “The INSYTE Cooley Laboratory, Waterford Institute of Technology: A Survey of Key Themes, Recent Research and Future Directions”

– Angeliki Tzouganatou, University of Hamburg, “AI, openness and participation in digital cultural archives”

– Dr Jennifer O’Mahoney, Waterford Institute of Technology, “The role of born digital data in confronting a difficult and contested past through digital storytelling”

Chair: Rachel Hosker, University of Edinburgh

  • 1 hour lunch break
  • 13:50 – 14:50 Focus on machine learning/ AI techniques

– Dr Giorgio Maria Di Nunzio, University of Padova, “Bias and Fairness in AI: New Challenges with Open Data?”

– Professor Matthieu d’Aquin, National University of Ireland, Galway, “AI for archives and collections: From processing metadata to analysing content”

– Bram van der Warf, “What comes next? AI for discovery or destruction?”

Chair: Rachel Foss, British Library

  • 15 minute break
  • 15:05 – 15:45 Focus on Ethics

– Dr Jenny Bunn and Mark Bell, The National Archives, “Archives and AI: What now?”

– Dr Adam Nix, De Montfort University, “Finding light in dark archives: Using AI to connect context and content in email”

Chair: David Canning, Cabinet Office

  • 15:45 – 16:45 Roundtable discussion

Melissa Terras; Joe Nockels; Rachel Hosker; Mike Bennet; Kirsty Lingstadt; Anthea Seles

  • 16:45 – 17:00 Short talk and closing remarks (Dr Annalina Caputo, Dublin City University)

Digital preservation in action

About this Event

‘Strictly on the download: digital preservation in action’ will explore how services are utilising digital preservation tools and resources to take next steps in delivering effective and high quality projects, and to think about the needs of a new generation of digital researchers. The event will also include an update on ‘Plugged In, Powered Up’, The National Archives’ strategy to increase digital capacity across the archive sector.

DALE is the Digital Archives Learning Exchange, a network facilitated by The National Archives to explore digital challenges, build capacity and improve digital skills across the sector.

Event programme:

14:00-14:10 Welcome, introductions and Plugged In, Powered Up update

Jo Pugh, The National Archives

14:10-14:30 ‘From Guidance to Action: Implementing Digital Preservation Processes at the Garden Museum’

Rosie Vizor, The Garden Museum

14:35-15:05 ‘Introduction to Digital Archives Graphical Risk Assessment Model (DiAGRAM)’

David Underdown, The National Archives

15:15-15:35 ‘Finding light in dark archives: Searching email archives by connecting content and context’

Prof. Stephanie Decker, University of Bristol

All presentations will be followed by a short Q&A session

BizHisCol Webinar: Gender differential and financial inclusion in Spain: Female shareholders of Banco Hispano Americano (1922-1935)

09/03/2021 16.00 UK

Register here

Presenters: Susana Martínez-Rodríguez and Carmen María Hernández-Nicolás (University of Murcia)
Chair: Beatriz Rodríguez-Satizabal (Universidad del Pacífico/GHE UniAndes)

Within the context of financial modernization in Spain, the analysis of the female shareholders of Banco Hispano Americano (BHA hereafter) aims to contribute to a new narrative about financial inclusion and gender differential from a historical perspective. The bank first appeared as a modern corporation in 1900. The BHA was a modern national bank, spread all over the country, with an urban profile that attacked a large spectrum of shareholders, and surprisingly female shareholders. There is no previous literature in Spain that recollects on female shareholders. Therefore this study aims to make a first attempt to the literature on this prolific topic in Spain.

BizHisCol Webinar – Advertising, business, and neoliberalism under Pinochet in Chile

Presenters: Pablo Pryluka (Princeton University)
Chair: Ashton Merck (Duke University)

02/03/2021 16.00 UK

Register here

In July of 1974, the J. Walter Thompson advertising company signed a contract with the Chilean Junta in order to organize a global campaign to improve the international image of the dictatorship. Around two months later the agreement was made public, first in the United States and then around the world. The reaction was immediate—over the next few days, European and American JWT managers began to complain about the agreement. By the end of September, 1974, it was clear that the collaboration would have to be severed, which finally happened in October. The existence of such an agreement had some impact at the time, but afterwards remained almost unnoticed. So far, two approaches have hegemonized the history of the so-called neoliberal turn of the 1970s and 1980s. On the one hand, approaches coming from political economy and other social sciences underlined the impact of structural reforms on economic growth and inequality. On the other hand, the new histories of neoliberalism delved into the intellectual debates that preceded and supported the new economic policies, interested in tracing how these ideas traveled from the pen of Friedrich Hayek to global institutions and policymakers. This paper takes a different approach by returning a forgotten actor to the story: private companies. As the case of the J. Walter Thompson and its connection with the Chilean Military Junta illustrates, this methodological shift challenges the current narratives about the transformations of the 1970s and 1980s.

Business History Collective Spring Webinar series

We at the Business History Collective (Global) are pleased to announce our program for the spring webinar series, which will take place between March and June.These events are intended primarily as a platform to share and discuss ongoing research, including working papers, dissertation chapters, and manuscripts under review. As such, the series does not follow a particular theme or set of topics; however, we have tried to prioritize proposals of particular novelty, use of qualitative approaches, and historical periods preceding 1800 or subsequent to 1950.For this series, we have decided to include some ‘double features’ in the program. These longer sessions will host presentations from two speakers, allowing us to include as many papers as possible, while maintaining a manageable schedule.All events will be hosted on Zoom and bookable via Eventbrite. Sign-up links will be published on our various social media profiles and sent directly to our mailing list (sign-up here).We look forward to seeing you at our events.Program: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1RTSNN8qtUyDWSHDMAZ31BlJjyXOfLnH9/view?usp=sharing

Ashton Merck (Duke University) and Adam Nix (De Montfort University)
Conveners Spring 2021
Business History Collective | Colectivo de Historia Empresarial

Follow us | Siguenos @bizhiscol

AOM SIM event on “RACIAL JUSTICE AT THE INTERSECTION OF BUSINESS AND SOCIETY”

The Social Issues in Management Division at the Academy of Management are running an online event this week, which is part of a series. In one of the next events (26 March) they are specifically considering “Racial Justice, History, and Business Ethics“. Details for these can be found under the Eventbrite booking page.

RACIAL JUSTICE AT THE INTERSECTION OF BUSINESS AND SOCIETY

February 12, 2021, 11:00am-12:30pm EST – Racial Justice and Social Theory

Hosts: Paul T. Harper (Pittsburgh) & Cristina Neesham (Newcastle)

REGISTRATION: www.eventbrite.com/e/…

Rabbi Gideon Pogrund (Univ. of Pretoria)

Smriti Sharma (Newcastle)

Paul T. Harper (Pittsburgh)

Panel will challenge and extend dominant social and political theories operating within business scholarship through a critical engagement with Black studies, post-colonial studies, and global feminism. Diversity professionals will articulate strategies for building communities of trust across identity boundaries.

Event Sponsor: Viragh Institute for Ethics in Business

Upcoming series events:

March 5, 2021, 11:00am-12:30 EST – Racial Justice and Business Technologies

Hosts: Paul T. Harper (Pittsburgh) & Kirsten Martin (Notre Dame)

REGISTRATION: www.eventbrite.com/e/…

March 26, 2021, 11:00am-12:30pm EST – Racial Justice, History, and Business Ethics

Hosts: Paul T. Harper (Pittsburgh) & David Wasieleski (Duquesne)

REGISTRATION: www.eventbrite.com/e/…

May 7, 2021, 11:00am-12:30 EST – Racial Justice and Sustainability

Hosts: Robbin Derry (Lethbridge) & Jeffrey York (Colorado)

REGISTRATION: www.eventbrite.com/e/…

Visit SIM Website for full series details: sim.aom.org/new-item7

JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS – Special Issue on “Racial Justice and Business Ethics”

Guest Editors: Paul T. Harper (Pittsburgh), Robbin Derry (Lethbridge), and Gregory Fairchild (Virginia)

Submission Deadline: October 1, 2021

Visit JBE website for full details: www.springer.com/journal/10551/updates/18290364

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Vincenzo Vastola
SIM AOM Connect Manager
Montpellier Business School
Montpellier, France
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