Reminder – Webinar: Historical Methods for Management Scholars

This week, the British Academy of Management (BAM) is hosting a webinar on historical methods, 28 July 2021, 2pm – 4pm, on Zoom. The event is free for BAM members, and £25 for non-members (£15 for doctoral students).

Description

In this webinar we will introduce participants to the basics of historical research methods and focus on how business and management scholars have integrated historical evidence and archival sources in their research. We focus on the elements of historical narrative, critical source interpretation, and how to identify and do research in archives (company archives and public archives).

Speakers  

Kevin Tennent, University of York

Stephanie Decker, University of Bristol

Chair

David Sarpong, Brunel University

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Benefits of attending 

Participants will gain a better understanding of:

  • How historical research has been used in business and management research
  • How to apply historical methods in your own research projects
  • How to write up historical evidence for publication
  • How to identify archives, gain access and conduct archival research

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Contact

Please contact the BAM Office at eventsofficer@bam.ac.uk with any queries.  

“The History of the Corporation” Virtual Workshop

The Yale Law School and CGCG are presenting a virtual workshop on ‘The History of the Corporation’ on 10 June 2021, beginning at 9:00 EDT.  The program follows.  All are welcome to register for the event by visiting the following website:  https://bit.ly/2PeXhGL  

Introduction
Naomi Lamoreaux (Yale University)
Henry Hansmann (Yale Law School and ECGI)

Shareholder Democracy under Autocracy:  Voting Rights and Corporate Performance in Imperial Russia 
Amanda Gregg (Middlebury College), Steven Nafziger (Williams College)

Legal Origins of Corporate Governance:  Choice of Company Law in Egypt, 1887-1913
Cihan Artunç (Middlebury College)

Legal Transplants and Local Custom in China: The Struggle over Apportioned Liability for External Debt of Partnerships
Madeleine Zelin (Columbia University)

Corporate Ownership and Control in the Gilded Age
Eric Hilt (Wellesley College)

Managerial Failure and Corporate Ownership in Edwardian Britain Revisited
Michael Aldous (Queen’s University, Belfast), Philip Fliers (Queen’s University, Belfast), John Turner (Queen’s University, Belfast) 

General Discussion
Tim Guinnane (Yale University)
Giuseppe Dari-Mattiacci (University of Amsterdam)

Concluding Remarks
Naomi Lamoreaux (Yale University)
Henry Hansmann (Yale Law School and ECGI)

BizHisCol Webinar – Department stores and modernization of retail in socialist Yugoslavia, 1950s-1960s

18/05/2021 16.00 UK

Register here

Presenter: Ivana Mihaela Žimbrek (Central European University)
Chair: Nicholas Wong (Northumbria University)

In my presentation, I would like to discuss a draft of a chapter from my dissertation, which focuses on the activities of two of the largest Yugoslav department store chains—”Na-Ma” from Zagreb and “Beograd” from Belgrade—in the period from the mid-1950s to the late 1960s as the initial phase of the institutionalization of modern retail spaces in Socialist Yugoslavia. I am particularly interested in the discussion and planning activities of the department store chains’ expert actors, their republic, federal as well as transnational spaces of exchange, and the way that category of gender played into their agency and interests. More precisely, I intend to analyze the planning and business activities of these department store chains that took place on the intersection between retail, architectural design and urban planning in order to explore the broader connection and development between modernization of retail and transformations of the urban environment under Yugoslav state socialism. I wish to argue that focusing on the spatial dimension of modern retail and its manifestation in various urban areas is crucial for understanding the particular relationship between retailing as an increasingly important professional sphere in socialist states, the physical construction of old and new urban spaces, as well as the social planning and managing of life in urban areas under state-socialism.

BizHisCol Webinar – Twentieth-Century Chinese business history (double feature)

Presenters: Mengxing Yu (Kyoto University) and Ghassan Moazzin (University of Hong Kong)

Chair: Adam Nix (De Montfort University)

11/05/2021 at 14.00-15:30 UK | Register here

Paper 1: The evolution of pulp and paper firms: The example of coastal areas in China since 1978

Mengxing Yu (Kyoto University)

The past half century witnessed the rapid increase of the Chinese share in the world paper production from 3.1% in 1977 to 26.4% in 2016, and thus China became the largest paper producer. This study examines the history of various types of the Chinese paper firms, and addresses how they have developed and influenced other domestic industries. This study focuses on the changes of Chinese paper firms since 1978, and compares its developing model with Japan, the Nordics and Britain. The creativity of entrepreneurship to the transformation of Chinese paper firms will also be studied. In particular, special attention will be paid to the private entrepreneurs that started their business since the 1990s, which was the boom period of the Chinese paper industry. In doing so, this study argues that the changes of the paper firms in China have been tightly in pace with Chinese economic development since 1978. In addition, this study reveals how a Chinese industry has maximized the limited resources and developed from a relatively low industrialized level to the world largest producer and consumer.

Paper 2: The Business of Electrification – Hu Xiyuan, Oppel Lamp Manufacturers Ltd. and the Birth of the Chinese Electric Lamp Industry, 1921–1937

Ghassan Moazzin (University of Hong Kong)

Electric light was first introduced into China in the 1870s. However, until the 1920s it were foreign companies and products that dominated the Chinese market for electric lamps. Only during the 1920s and 30s – the years before the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War in 1937 – did the Chinese electric lamp industry start to flourish and manage to compete with the established foreign firms and goods. This paper uses the case study of Chinese entrepreneur Hu Xiyuan and his Oppel Lamp Manufacturers Ltd., which pioneered early Chinese electric lamp manufacturing, to explore the hitherto understudied emergence of the indigenous electric lamp manufacturing industry in China during the 1920s and 1930s and its attempts of competing with foreign imports and manufacturers in China. In particular, this paper will focus on two aspects of the development of Oppel Lamp Manufacturers Ltd. First, it will discuss how Hu emulated foreign-produced light bulb technology and adapted foreign technological knowledge to the Chinese market managed to build up a successful light bulb manufacturing business that could produce light bulbs on an industrial scale. Second, this paper will show how Hu intentionally marketed his products as national Chinese (as opposed to foreign) commodities to gain an advantage against his foreign competitors, including the international Phoebus light bulb cartel that tried to dominate the global production and sale of light bulbs at the time.

Hagley Library – Avon Archive event 7 May (Zoom)

AVON: AN INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON ITS ARCHIVE

Sponsored by the Hagley Library, Wilmington DE

Friday May 7, 9 am – 12 noon EST via Zoom

In the 20 years since Avon Products, Inc., deposited its records at Hagley Library they have become one of our most popular research collections. A virtual event on May 7 will bring attention to their contribution to history. 

Avon Products, Inc., is one of the oldest direct selling companies in America. It traces its origins to 1886, when David H. McConnell bought the Union Publishing Company and started manufacturing perfumes to give away with his books. McConnell discovered that his customers were more interested in the fragrances than the books, so he decided to concentrate on selling perfumes. The business was renamed the California Perfume Company (CPC) in an effort to associate its products with the perceived beauty of the Golden State.

From the beginning, CPC sold directly to the consumer through a national network of sales representatives, primarily women, who were looking for economic opportunity and flexible part-time employment. In 1929, CPC introduced the Avon brand in an effort to modernize its image. The corporation was renamed Avon Products, Inc. in 1950. Avon rapidly expanded into the international market during the 1950s and 1960s, principally Latin America and Europe. By the early 1970s, Avon International operated in sixteen countries. 

Speakers at the event will come from around the USA and Europe and discuss Avon’s activities in the United States, Brazil, and Italy, as well as its efforts to reach out to African American women and diversity its American salesforce. The event’s keynote will be offered by Katina Manko, who helped bring the Avon Collection to Hagley. Manko’s book, Ding Dong! Avon Calling!: The Women and Men of Avon Products, Incorporated will be published in June.  Full details of the forum at https://www.hagley.org/avon-international-forum-its-archive .

Katina Manko, Independent Scholar, “Ding Dong! Avon Calling!: The Women and Men of Avon Products, Incorporated”

Jessica Burch, Denison University, “‘Soap and Hope’: Direct Sales and the Culture of Work and Capitalism in Postwar America

Jessica Chelekis, Brunel Business School, “Avon in the Brazilian Amazon: Direct Sales and Consumption among Vulnerable Communities”

Lindsey Feitz, University of Denver, “Creating a Multicultural Soul: Avon, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Race in the 1970s”

Shawn Moura, Director of Research at NAIOP, “Exploring Avon’s Encounter with Gender, Race, and Class in Brazil, 1958-1975”

Emanuela Scarpellini, University of Milan, “Transnational Beauty: Avon International and the Case of Italy”

Advance registration is required to view the pre-circulated papers and to participate in the conference sessions; there is no fee to register.  Register at https://www.hagley.org/research/conferences/avon-forum-conference-registration

DALE: Strictly on the Download now on YouTube

It was a great pleasure to be invited to talk about our AHRC project and user perspectives on digital archives with the Digital Archives Learning Exchange (DALE), hosted by The National Archives (TNA). The event focused on how to integrate digital archives into existing archival practice and featured talks by Rosie Vizor (The Garden Museum), David Underdown (TNA) and me (Stephanie Decker, University of Bristol). The recording can found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHD9mAkzx3M

BizHisCol Webinar – How was the Manila trade financed?

An alternative institutional approach to long-distance trade finance, 1668-1828

27/04/2021 17.00 UK (NB – Time rescheduled, previously 16.00 UK)

Register here

Presenter: Juan José Rivas Moreno (London School of Economics and Political Science)
Discussant: Fernando Arteaga González (University of Pennsylvania)
Chair: Manuel A. Bautista-González (Columbia University in the City of New York)

This paper seeks to explain the financial model of the Pacific silver trade that linked Spanish America and Asia through Manila during the Early Modern period, focusing specially on the era between 1668 and 1828.This research therefore seeks to understand the business and financial model of the Manila trade, its resilience in time as well as its successful monopolisation of the Pacific route (the most direct route for the exchange of silver pesos for Asian manufactures) in the context of corporate, business, and institutional history. It does so by reconstructing and analysing for the first time the universe of the financial markets in Manila, which rested on a combination of financial and risk-mitigating instruments such as sea loans, investment vehicles like legacy funds grouped under the administration of confraternities and tertiary orders, and a legal framework that combined differing jurisdictions including Canon, Civil, and consuetudinary law. It explores the interaction of all this elements in the context of a trade defined by lack of substitutes, high risks, and oligopsonic structures in order to explain the rationale behind the instruments and organisations used.It crucially uses for the first time a database of over 525 sea loans from the notarial protocols of Manila (NAP) as well as the only surviving year-on-year account books of 23 legacy funds that invested in the Manila trade (APSR). The result is an alternative business model that relied on horizontal specialisation rather than vertical integration, in which Manila played a specialised role as a risk manager and financier of the trade, which allowed it to remain competitive and to fend-off encroachment attempts from interlopers and the East India companies without adopting a corporate form. 

Second HiMOS virtual seminar

We are excited to invite you to our next HiMOS virtual seminar (https://historymos.wordpress.com/). The aim of this seminar series is to help open up the black box of “practicing” history in the context of management and organization studies. 

We are very proud to have another great lineup of speakers sharing their insights and workshopping their papers, including Eero Vaara (Saïd Oxford, keynote), Christina Lubinski (Copenhagen Business School), and Antti Sihvonen (JSBE). 

Event details: 

Date: Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Time:   2pm-5pm (UTC+2, Finland)

1pm-4pm (UTC+1, Central European Time)

Noon-3pm (UTC+0, UK)

Please register by click here

After the registration, you will receive the Zoom link, passcode, and the full version of the working papers one week before the seminar.

Program

Keynote: 

Eero Vaara (Saïd Oxford): ”How to learn from unusual organizations?”

Working paper presentations:

Christina Lubinski (Copenhagen Business School): ”The Sound of Opportunity: Aural Temporality, Entrepreneurial Opportunity & the Evolution of Markets” (with Dan Wadhwani, University of Southern California)

Antti Sihvonen (JSBE): “Chance, Strategy and Change: The Structure of Contingency in the Evolution of the Nokia Corporation, 1986–2015” (with Jaakko Aspara, NEOMA; Juha-Antti Lamberg, JSBE; Henrikki Tikkanen, Aalto)

HiMOS is organized by the Strategy and Entrepreneurship research group of Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics (JSBE). The purpose of the seminar series is the advancement of historical research in management and organization studies. Seminars are organized twice per year. In each seminar we will have one keynote speaker with a recent history-related publication sharing their insights and experiences and 2–3 advanced working paper presentations. 

If you are interested in presenting in future seminars, contact the organizers Zeerim Cheung (zeerim.cheung@jyu.fi) and Christian Stutz (christian.stutz@jyu.fi).

We are looking forward to your participation!

Canadian Business History Association’s new YouTube channel

Past CBHA/ACHA Talks
Now Available for Viewing
on CBHA/ACHA YouTube Channel

Unmaking the Made Beaver: Money and Monopoly in the Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Fur Trade.
The Historical Anniversaries of the Hudson’s Bay Company and the Province of Manitoba
The History of Coffee, Cannabis, and Alcohol: From Stigmatized to Normalized
The Price of Gold – Lessons From Previous Price Cycles

View the presentations HERE.