HiMOS webinar April 27th

Great news everyone!

The HiMOS series (https://historymos.com/) returns!

We are delighted to host Grace Augustine (Bayes Business School) and Sandeep Pillai (Bocconi University) at the next event.

Grace will provide a “behind-the-scene” presentation about her recent Organization Science article (https://doi.org/10.1287/orsc.2021.1450) on abortion provision in the US. She will share her insights to publish historical research in a top management journal. We recommend reading the article before the workshop to get the most out of the presentation. 

Sandeep will present his working paper that aims to enhance our methodological knowledge of doing history in the strategic management context. We will circulate his working paper one week before the event.

Date: Wednesday, Apr 27th, 2022

Time: 14:00–16:00 (Eastern European Summer Time, UTC+3, Finland); 13:00–15:00 (Italy); 12:00–14:00 (UK)

Register here to get your Zoom link: https://link.webropolsurveys.com/EP/292288F111B87897

Speakers:

Senior Lecturer Grace Augustine (Bayes Business School, City, University of London): Capturing Voices, Experiences, and Identities Through Archival Data

Assistant Professor Sandeep Pillai (Bocconi University): The Role of Historical Methods in Strategy Research: Bridging the Gap between Loveliness and Likeliness

Best regards,

Christian and Zeerim

Dr Grace Augustine (Bayes) and Dr Sandeep Pillai (Bocconi) will speak at the next HiMOS event.

Archival surveying conference in memory of Michael Moss

Re-appraisal of surveying: a vital archival tool for contemporary collecting

27-28 April 2022. 

Online conference in memory of Professor Michael S Moss.

The event, which is being jointly organised by the Business Archives Council, Business Archives Council of Scotland and The National Archives, with the support of the British Records Association, will consist of short papers and sessions spread over two half-days, on 27 and 28 April 2022.

Surveying remains a universally useful tool for all archivists and we are seeking speakers on archival surveying of all kinds, not just in relation to business archives, both from the UK and globally. We hope that this conference will provide a space to share best practice, and expect the event to be followed by practical half-day face-to-face workshops on surveying techniques across the UK.

This conference will consider the UK’s extraordinary track record of successful archival surveying and look at the many ways in which surveys can not only contribute to the collecting function of an archive but also ensure that the heritage of an organisation, region or nation is appropriately reflected in its archival collections.

For more information and further updates visit: busarchscot.org.uk/events/surveying-conference/

Business History Initiative

Upcoming Event: “Forms of Capitalism”

The Business History Initiative invites you to a two-day virtual conference, organized by Sophus Reinert, Robert Fredona, and Teresa da Silva Lopes. The conference will take place on Friday, May 6, and Friday, May 13, 2022, from 12:00 PM – 4:00 PM (East Coast US Time). The schedule is listed below.

Over the past two decades scholars in the fields of economics, management, and comparative political theory have addressed and explored the wide range of existing varieties of capitalism. Taking their insights as a launching point, “Forms of Capitalism” seeks to understand the forms that capitalism has taken historically, from those it took as early as the seventeenth century, to those it currently takes and that are likely to persist into the future.

The very word “Capitalism” emerged originally out of languages of both critique and analysis, and capitalisms—past, present, and future—remain protean, elusive, and politically-contested phenomena. This event will encourage thinking with the past about the range and forms of capitalism that are now possible, especially as the need for a more sustainable, equitable, and ethical capitalism continues to become increasingly urgent.  

Please join us on May 6 and May 13. To receive a link to the conference meeting, please RSVP by email to bhi@hbs.edu.

May 6, 12:00 to 4:00 (East Coast US Time) 

Geoff Jones (HBS), Introduction
 
Mattias Fibiger (HBS), Chair 
Rebecca Henderson (HBS), “Reimagining Capitalism” 
Peter Hall (Harvard), “Growth Regimes” 
Quinn Slobodian (Wellesley), Comment 
 
Jeremy Friedman (HBS), Chair 
Mary O’Sullivan (University of Geneva), “The Ruin of Britain’s Manufactures: Capitalism and Colonialism through the Lens of Pitt’s 1785 Irish Proposals” 
D’Maris Coffman (UCL), “The First Crisis Economists: Lescure, Aftalion and the Theorization of Periodic and General Crises in Industrial Capitalism” 
Carolyn Biltoft (Graduate Institute, Geneva), Comment 
 
May 13, 12:00 to 4:00 (East Coast US Time) 

Sophus Reinert (HBS), Introduction 

Marlous van Waijenburg (HBS), Chair 
Sebouh Aslanian (UCLA), “‘Taking Risks Beyond the Bounds of Common Sense’? An Indo-Armenian ‘Bill of Exchange’ from Isfahan, c. 1730, and Trust Relations between Julfan Armenians and Marwari Indians” 
Joel Bakan (British Columbia, Law), “The Corporate Form of Capitalism” 
Francesca Trivellato (IAS), Comment 
 
Charlotte Robertson (HBS), Chair 
Mary Hicks (Chicago), “Captivity’s Commerce: The Theory and Methodology of Slaving and Capitalism” 
Bernard Harcourt (Columbia, Law), “The Kraken, perhaps, but what about the Behemoth?” 
Carl Wennerlind (Barnard), Comment 
 

BHC event on publishing in business historical journals

The BHC Emerging Scholars Committee will host a workshop on academic publishing for early-career scholars (see the Emerging Scholars interest group site here) as part of the “Mentoring Week 2022.”

“Joining the Scholarly Discourse: How to Publish in the Business History Field” will feature workshop speakers:

  • Walter Friedman, Co-Editor-in-Chief Business History Review
  • Stephanie Decker, Co-Editor-in-Chief Business History
  • Andrew Popp, Editor-in-Chief Enterprise & Society

In part, the #BHC2022 pre-conference event has been organized to provide information and support for the #BHC2022online hosted on Zoom Events. The link to the #BHC2022 pre-conference will be sent out to everyone who has registered for the #BHC2022 by March 21st. 

If you have not registered yet to attend #BHC2022, please do so here
https://thebhc.org/annual-meeting-registration

The full program of the pre-conference event is now available here: https://thebhc.org/pre-conference-event

Hagley History Hangout: What created the ‘sundown towns’ in the Great Migration (US)

New episode of Hagley History Hangout Available: Millions of black Americans left the Deep South fleeing violence and seeking opportunity during the Great Migration, one of the most dramatic demographic shifts in twentieth-century American history. Some communities welcomed these newcomers with open arms, going so far as to actively recruit them as industrial labor, while others attempted to shut their doors, to maintain their homogeneity through the threat of violence against black people. These different reactions could take place in towns adjacent to one another, with locally-specific causes shaping the divergence. 

Social historian Matthew O’Neal, PhD candidate at the University of Georgia, uncovers the story of two eastern-Kentucky towns that reacted differently to the Great Migration: Lynch, a U.S. Steel company town which became a relatively diverse, welcoming community, and Corbin, a railroad hub that became an infamous “sundown town,” or place unsafe for black people to live in or visit. The economic base of wither town, and the resulting social organizations within them, shaped the divergence. O’Neal notes the policies of racial inclusion or exclusion that characterized the unions attached to the steel versus the railroad industry as one source. Rising from parochial concerns, and local bigotry, a system of shadow segregation grew outside of the Deep South, and continues to shape American society in the twenty-first century. 

The audio only version of this program is available on our podcast.

Interview available at https://www.hagley.org/research/history-hangout-matthew-oneal

Recorded on Zoom and available anywhere once they are released, our History Hangouts include interviews with authors of books and other researchers who have use of our collections, and members of Hagley staff with their special knowledge of what we have in our stacks. We began the History Hangouts in the summer of 2020 and now are releasing programs every two weeks on alternate Mondays. Our series is part of the Hagley from Home initiative by the Hagley Museum and Library. The schedule for upcoming episodes, as well as those already released, is available at https://www.hagley.org/hagley-history-hangout

Hagley Seminar on Business, Culture, and Politics

Building on the 30-year legacy of the Hagley Research seminar, the Hagley Seminar on Business, Culture, and Politics features original and creative work in progress essays that make use of business history sources. 

All seminars are held on Zoom between noon and 1:30 p.m. Eastern USA time. Seminars are based on a paper that is circulated in advance. Preregistration is required and space is limited. To find registration links as well as additional information on the seminars, please go to https://www.hagley.org/research/research-seminars. Questions may be sent to Carol Lockman, clockman@Hagley.org

2022 Spring Seminar series

February 23, noon-1:30

Kelly Goodman, West Chester University, “’Let’s Freeze Government Too’: The Business Campaign for Tax Limitation”

Comment: Ben Waterhouse, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

March 23, noon-1:30

Dylan Gottlieb, Hagley Library NEH Fellow, “Good Taste: Yuppie Gourmet Culture in the Age of Inequality”

Comment: Amy Bentley, New York University

April 20, noon-1:30

Karen Mahar, Sienna College, “Eugenics and the Creation of the Business Executive, 1900-1920”

Comment: Wendy Gamber, Indiana University

May 18, noon-1:30 

Salem Elzway, University of Michigan, “Marxist Manipulators: Robots on the Line at Lordstown”

Comment: Nelson Lichtenstein, University of California, Santa Barbara

Historical Studies of Capitalism event

Dear colleagues,

We are a network of scholars who seek to develop enchantment as an organizing theme in historical studies of capitalism. We hope to provide a platform for those interested in the historical role of enchantment as a tool, structure, or foundation for the organization and the development of modern markets, economic institutions, and economic relationships.

The first meeting of the network will take place on February 24, at 14:30 GMT on Zoom. It will be led by two expert speakers on magic and religion, Professor Owen Davies and Professor Jason Ānanda Josephson Storm. 

This is the first of a series of reading-group style workshops, intended to reflect on the meaning of enchantment and its uses in existing scholarship across different disciplines, with a longer-term view to redirect the concept and shed new light on the history of capitalism. 

More information on the first and future meetings, assigned pre-readings, as well as registration to the meeting and to our mailing list, are available on the network website: https://economic-enchantments.net/

We hope that many of you will join us on this intellectual journey!

Anat Rosenberg and Astrid Van den Bossche

Hagley Seminar on Business, Culture, and Politics

Building on the 30-year legacy of the Hagley Research seminar, the Hagley Seminar on Business, Culture, and Politics features original and creative work in progress essays that make use of business history sources. 

All seminars are held on Zoom between noon and 1:30 p.m. Eastern USA time. Seminars are based on a paper that is circulated in advance. Preregistration is required and space is limited. To find registration links as well as additional information on the seminars, please go to https://www.hagley.org/research/research-seminars. Questions may be sent to Carol Lockman, clockman@Hagley.org

2022 Spring Seminar series

February 23, noon-1:30

Kelly Goodman, West Chester University, “’Let’s Freeze Government Too’: The Business Campaign for Tax Limitation”

Comment: Ben Waterhouse, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

March 23, noon-1:30

Dylan Gottlieb, Hagley Library NEH Fellow, “Good Taste: Yuppie Gourmet Culture in the Age of Inequality”

Comment: Amy Bentley, New York University

April 20, noon-1:30

Karen Mahar, Sienna College, “Eugenics and the Creation of the Business Executive, 1900-1920”

Comment: Wendy Gamber, Indiana University

May 18, noon-1:30 

Salem Elzway, University of Michigan, “Marxist Manipulators: Robots on the Line at Lordstown”

Comment: Nelson Lichtenstein, University of California, Santa Barbara

Research seminar by the Organizational Memory Studies community

Please see below the details for a research seminar by Andrea Casey and Sonia Coman.

Title: New directions in organizational and management history: interdisciplinary perspectives on the field

Date: January 28, 2022

Time: 13:00 GMT/8:00 EST/6:00 MST/5:00 PST

See the link below on our RG page:https://www.researchgate.net/project/Organizational-Memory-Studies-Research-Community

In case not on RG,https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89410675180

Newcastle Business History Group Seminar series

 Newcastle Business School 

BUSINESS HISTORY GROUP 

Seminar Series 

2021-22  

19th January 2022 Dr Jessica van Horssen (Leeds Beckett University): Medical Risks vs. Financial Rewards: Corporate Social Responsibility in the Global Asbestos Trade, 1930-197 

23rd February 2022 Dr Andrew Smith (University of Liverpool): How Do Professionals Investors Benefit from Learning About Financial History? Insights from an Interview-Based Study 

March 2022 Professor Jillian Gordon and Professor Niall MacKenzie (University of Glasgow): TBC 

20th April 2022 Dr Peter Buckles (University of Liverpool): Crisis and Uncertainty in the Bristol-West India Sugar Trade, 1783-1802 

May 2022 BHG Research Showcase Event Two 

8th June 2022 Professor Daniel Raff (University of Pennsylvania): Historical Explanation Reconsidered and Some Tasks for Business History 

For more information, please get in touch with the seminar convenors: Dr Ian Jones and Ellie Charalambous 

Email: ian.g.jones@northumbria.ac.uk 

Twitter: @bhg_nbs