2022 BHC Mid-Year Conference (online)

The Business History Conference (BHC) will host a one-day virtual conference on September 30, 2022. The 2022 BHC Mid-Year Conference enables members from around the world to easily and cost-effectively participate in the BHC during a turbulent time and also launches the BHC’s activities for the 2022-2023 academic year. The 2023 BHC Annual meeting will take place in person in Detroit on March 9-11, 2023. 

The theme for the 2022 BHC Mid-Year Conference is “Method and Madness: Reinventing Business History in a New Age of Extremes.” The one-day conference will be organized around three sets of 1.5 hour workshops. The first set of workshops will examine new sources and new uses of old sources in business history research. Sessions will include the uses of visual materials, legal records, account books, and big data, among other sources. The second set of workshops will cover interpretive and analytical techniques, including the interpretation of senses, network analysis, and the rhetorical uses of history. The third set of workshops will cover changes in the representation and dissemination of business history, including both conventional formats (books, scholarly articles) and newer formats (podcasts, social media, etc). 

Given that the conference is organized around short workshops rather than presentations, we will request participants to only fill out a registration form. The registration website will go live August 22 and participants will be notified of their acceptance by September 1. BHC members who are students and emerging scholars can register for free; fees for regular BHC members and nonmembers will be modest. In the meantime, please save the date.

If you have any questions or suggestions please don’t hesitate to reach out to BHC president Dan Wadhwani: dwadhwani@marshall.usc.edu. Interested people may also follow/tag @TheBHCNewsBHC’s Facebook, and BHC’s LinkedIn, and the hashtag #BHCMidYear. 

AOM 2022 PDW: Digital archives search

Are you interested in learning about how to use email in your research? If so, please come to a special Professional Development Workshop (PDW) at the 2022 Academy of Management (AOM) Annual Meeting to learn how other scholars are using email and to participate in a study about knowledge discovery in large-scale, organizational email corpora.

Emails are materially different from the correspondence of the pre-digital age, but their significance as traces of the past is substantial, especially for organizations, where email is not only used as a form of correspondence but also as an informal mode of record keeping. We believe that the preservation of a meaningful, relatively complete email archive is one plausible pathway to supporting scholarly research on organizations.

The forthcoming PDW — “Introducing the ‘Digitally Curious’ to Email Archives for Organizational Research and History (session 183)” — is sponsored by the Management History (MH) division of AOM and will introduce the “digitally curious” scholar to email archives for organizational research. It will be moderated by Prof David Kirsch (University of Maryland, US), Dr Adam Nix (University of Birmingham, UK), Shubhangkar Girish Jain (University of Maryland, US) in person, and online by Prof Stephanie Decker (University of Birmingham, UK, and University of Gothenburg, Sweden) and Dr Santhilata Kuppili Venkata (independent scholars).

The PDW will take place on Friday, August 5, from 2:00-4:00pm PDT in a hybrid format with both in-person and virtual participation supported. To allow participants to access the email tools and collections, pre-registration is requested. If you would like to register or to learn more about the workshop and the project, please email Shubhangkar Girish Jain (shubhangkar.girishjain@marylandsmith.umd.edu).

Attendees at the PDW are invited to contribute to research on the use of email and will be encouraged to complete a post-workshop survey that will constitute an input to our ongoing research in this area. Completion of the survey is not required to attend and participate in the workshop.

New funding for Email Archives Research Project

EMCODIST – The Next Phase

Following the publication of our Dotcom-Archive website [link to Monday’s post] we’re delighted to announce that we’ve been awarded follow-on funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation [https://mellon.org] via the Email Archives: Building Capacity and Community (EA:BCC) programme at the University of Illinois [https://emailarchivesgrant.library.illinois.edu].

 “Discovery environments for using email archives: Evaluating user needs with prototype version of EMailCOntextualisationDIScovery Tool” (or just “EMailCOntextualisationDIScovery”) is a new project that will build on Contextualizing Email Archives and the ECOMDIST discovery prototype we developed.

The award (approximately $57,000) will fund tool development, testing and user experience analysis in 2022 and 2023.

Why email?

Emails are materially different from correspondence of the pre-digital age, but their significance as traces of the past is substantial, especially for organizations, where email is not only used as a form of correspondence but also as an informal mode of record keeping. We believe that the preservation of a meaningful, relatively complete email archive is one plausible pathway to supporting scholarly research on organizations. 

Our work focuses on how researchers will engage with such resources, having previously developed an AI-based discovery tool (ECOMDIST), which we used to explore a dotcom-era email archive [https://dotcomarchive.bristol.ac.uk/]. Our new project will bring this technology to researchers in management and organization history, one of the key scholarly use cases for large-scale email corpora, and see how it can best be developed to support a context-sensitive discovery process.

Going to AoM?

One of our first activities on the project will be a Professional Development Workshop (PDW) at this year’s Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management in Seattle [https://aom.org/events/annual-meeting]. Sponsored by the Management History (MH) division, Introducing the “digitally curious” to email archives for organizational history will:

  1. introduce “digitally curious” management scholars to the use of email collections as contexts for research;
  2. orient scholars to new tools for interacting with sample email collections, including EMCODIST; and 
  3. provide a forum for scholars to share and learn from each other about emerging best practices in the use of email as a context for research. 

The PDW will take place on Friday, August 5, from 2:00-4:00p PDT in a hybrid format with in-person and virtual participation supported. To allow participants to access the email tools and collections, pre-registration is required. If you would like to register or to learn more about the workshop and the project, please email Shubhangkar Girish Jain (shubhangkar.girishjain@marylandsmith.umd.edu).​

17th Accounting History Symposium

Accounting History Special Interest Group (AFAANZ) logo

Dear Accounting History community members, 

The Accounting History Special Interest Group of AFAANZ is pleased to announce that the 17th Accounting History Symposium will be held fully online on July 2, 2022 in the morning (AEST).

The event will be free of charge for the AH-SIG members.

A fee of AUD$15 will be charged for non-members (including non-AFAANZ members).

As per our tradition, part of the event will be dedicated to research proposal presentations by accounting history scholars.

You are welcome to submit your research proposal according to the attached call for research proposals for the 17th Accounting History Symposium.

Feel also free to pass on this call to other interested colleagues and PhD students.

Further information on the event and our SIG can be found at https://www.afaanz.org/interest-group/accounting-history-special-interest-group

Registrations to the event are already open at https://www.afaanzconference.com/sigs

Thank you and best wishes

Giulia Leoni, Accounting History SIG Convenor

Maryam Safari, Accounting History SIG Deputy Convenor

HiMOS webinar April 27th

Great news everyone!

The HiMOS series (https://historymos.com/) returns!

We are delighted to host Grace Augustine (Bayes Business School) and Sandeep Pillai (Bocconi University) at the next event.

Grace will provide a “behind-the-scene” presentation about her recent Organization Science article (https://doi.org/10.1287/orsc.2021.1450) on abortion provision in the US. She will share her insights to publish historical research in a top management journal. We recommend reading the article before the workshop to get the most out of the presentation. 

Sandeep will present his working paper that aims to enhance our methodological knowledge of doing history in the strategic management context. We will circulate his working paper one week before the event.

Date: Wednesday, Apr 27th, 2022

Time: 14:00–16:00 (Eastern European Summer Time, UTC+3, Finland); 13:00–15:00 (Italy); 12:00–14:00 (UK)

Register here to get your Zoom link: https://link.webropolsurveys.com/EP/292288F111B87897

Speakers:

Senior Lecturer Grace Augustine (Bayes Business School, City, University of London): Capturing Voices, Experiences, and Identities Through Archival Data

Assistant Professor Sandeep Pillai (Bocconi University): The Role of Historical Methods in Strategy Research: Bridging the Gap between Loveliness and Likeliness

Best regards,

Christian and Zeerim

Dr Grace Augustine (Bayes) and Dr Sandeep Pillai (Bocconi) will speak at the next HiMOS event.

Archival surveying conference in memory of Michael Moss

Re-appraisal of surveying: a vital archival tool for contemporary collecting

27-28 April 2022. 

Online conference in memory of Professor Michael S Moss.

The event, which is being jointly organised by the Business Archives Council, Business Archives Council of Scotland and The National Archives, with the support of the British Records Association, will consist of short papers and sessions spread over two half-days, on 27 and 28 April 2022.

Surveying remains a universally useful tool for all archivists and we are seeking speakers on archival surveying of all kinds, not just in relation to business archives, both from the UK and globally. We hope that this conference will provide a space to share best practice, and expect the event to be followed by practical half-day face-to-face workshops on surveying techniques across the UK.

This conference will consider the UK’s extraordinary track record of successful archival surveying and look at the many ways in which surveys can not only contribute to the collecting function of an archive but also ensure that the heritage of an organisation, region or nation is appropriately reflected in its archival collections.

For more information and further updates visit: busarchscot.org.uk/events/surveying-conference/

Business History Initiative

Upcoming Event: “Forms of Capitalism”

The Business History Initiative invites you to a two-day virtual conference, organized by Sophus Reinert, Robert Fredona, and Teresa da Silva Lopes. The conference will take place on Friday, May 6, and Friday, May 13, 2022, from 12:00 PM – 4:00 PM (East Coast US Time). The schedule is listed below.

Over the past two decades scholars in the fields of economics, management, and comparative political theory have addressed and explored the wide range of existing varieties of capitalism. Taking their insights as a launching point, “Forms of Capitalism” seeks to understand the forms that capitalism has taken historically, from those it took as early as the seventeenth century, to those it currently takes and that are likely to persist into the future.

The very word “Capitalism” emerged originally out of languages of both critique and analysis, and capitalisms—past, present, and future—remain protean, elusive, and politically-contested phenomena. This event will encourage thinking with the past about the range and forms of capitalism that are now possible, especially as the need for a more sustainable, equitable, and ethical capitalism continues to become increasingly urgent.  

Please join us on May 6 and May 13. To receive a link to the conference meeting, please RSVP by email to bhi@hbs.edu.

May 6, 12:00 to 4:00 (East Coast US Time) 

Geoff Jones (HBS), Introduction
 
Mattias Fibiger (HBS), Chair 
Rebecca Henderson (HBS), “Reimagining Capitalism” 
Peter Hall (Harvard), “Growth Regimes” 
Quinn Slobodian (Wellesley), Comment 
 
Jeremy Friedman (HBS), Chair 
Mary O’Sullivan (University of Geneva), “The Ruin of Britain’s Manufactures: Capitalism and Colonialism through the Lens of Pitt’s 1785 Irish Proposals” 
D’Maris Coffman (UCL), “The First Crisis Economists: Lescure, Aftalion and the Theorization of Periodic and General Crises in Industrial Capitalism” 
Carolyn Biltoft (Graduate Institute, Geneva), Comment 
 
May 13, 12:00 to 4:00 (East Coast US Time) 

Sophus Reinert (HBS), Introduction 

Marlous van Waijenburg (HBS), Chair 
Sebouh Aslanian (UCLA), “‘Taking Risks Beyond the Bounds of Common Sense’? An Indo-Armenian ‘Bill of Exchange’ from Isfahan, c. 1730, and Trust Relations between Julfan Armenians and Marwari Indians” 
Joel Bakan (British Columbia, Law), “The Corporate Form of Capitalism” 
Francesca Trivellato (IAS), Comment 
 
Charlotte Robertson (HBS), Chair 
Mary Hicks (Chicago), “Captivity’s Commerce: The Theory and Methodology of Slaving and Capitalism” 
Bernard Harcourt (Columbia, Law), “The Kraken, perhaps, but what about the Behemoth?” 
Carl Wennerlind (Barnard), Comment 
 

BHC event on publishing in business historical journals

The BHC Emerging Scholars Committee will host a workshop on academic publishing for early-career scholars (see the Emerging Scholars interest group site here) as part of the “Mentoring Week 2022.”

“Joining the Scholarly Discourse: How to Publish in the Business History Field” will feature workshop speakers:

  • Walter Friedman, Co-Editor-in-Chief Business History Review
  • Stephanie Decker, Co-Editor-in-Chief Business History
  • Andrew Popp, Editor-in-Chief Enterprise & Society

In part, the #BHC2022 pre-conference event has been organized to provide information and support for the #BHC2022online hosted on Zoom Events. The link to the #BHC2022 pre-conference will be sent out to everyone who has registered for the #BHC2022 by March 21st. 

If you have not registered yet to attend #BHC2022, please do so here
https://thebhc.org/annual-meeting-registration

The full program of the pre-conference event is now available here: https://thebhc.org/pre-conference-event

Hagley History Hangout: What created the ‘sundown towns’ in the Great Migration (US)

New episode of Hagley History Hangout Available: Millions of black Americans left the Deep South fleeing violence and seeking opportunity during the Great Migration, one of the most dramatic demographic shifts in twentieth-century American history. Some communities welcomed these newcomers with open arms, going so far as to actively recruit them as industrial labor, while others attempted to shut their doors, to maintain their homogeneity through the threat of violence against black people. These different reactions could take place in towns adjacent to one another, with locally-specific causes shaping the divergence. 

Social historian Matthew O’Neal, PhD candidate at the University of Georgia, uncovers the story of two eastern-Kentucky towns that reacted differently to the Great Migration: Lynch, a U.S. Steel company town which became a relatively diverse, welcoming community, and Corbin, a railroad hub that became an infamous “sundown town,” or place unsafe for black people to live in or visit. The economic base of wither town, and the resulting social organizations within them, shaped the divergence. O’Neal notes the policies of racial inclusion or exclusion that characterized the unions attached to the steel versus the railroad industry as one source. Rising from parochial concerns, and local bigotry, a system of shadow segregation grew outside of the Deep South, and continues to shape American society in the twenty-first century. 

The audio only version of this program is available on our podcast.

Interview available at https://www.hagley.org/research/history-hangout-matthew-oneal

Recorded on Zoom and available anywhere once they are released, our History Hangouts include interviews with authors of books and other researchers who have use of our collections, and members of Hagley staff with their special knowledge of what we have in our stacks. We began the History Hangouts in the summer of 2020 and now are releasing programs every two weeks on alternate Mondays. Our series is part of the Hagley from Home initiative by the Hagley Museum and Library. The schedule for upcoming episodes, as well as those already released, is available at https://www.hagley.org/hagley-history-hangout

Hagley Seminar on Business, Culture, and Politics

Building on the 30-year legacy of the Hagley Research seminar, the Hagley Seminar on Business, Culture, and Politics features original and creative work in progress essays that make use of business history sources. 

All seminars are held on Zoom between noon and 1:30 p.m. Eastern USA time. Seminars are based on a paper that is circulated in advance. Preregistration is required and space is limited. To find registration links as well as additional information on the seminars, please go to https://www.hagley.org/research/research-seminars. Questions may be sent to Carol Lockman, clockman@Hagley.org

2022 Spring Seminar series

February 23, noon-1:30

Kelly Goodman, West Chester University, “’Let’s Freeze Government Too’: The Business Campaign for Tax Limitation”

Comment: Ben Waterhouse, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

March 23, noon-1:30

Dylan Gottlieb, Hagley Library NEH Fellow, “Good Taste: Yuppie Gourmet Culture in the Age of Inequality”

Comment: Amy Bentley, New York University

April 20, noon-1:30

Karen Mahar, Sienna College, “Eugenics and the Creation of the Business Executive, 1900-1920”

Comment: Wendy Gamber, Indiana University

May 18, noon-1:30 

Salem Elzway, University of Michigan, “Marxist Manipulators: Robots on the Line at Lordstown”

Comment: Nelson Lichtenstein, University of California, Santa Barbara