AOM PDW on Historic CSR

Please register for the AOM PDW!

Special Issue Paper Development Workshops

Historic Corporate Responsibility:

Its Extent, Limits, and Consequences

The guest editors of the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue on Historic Corporate Social Responsibility will arrange paper development workshops at the following conferences:

  • Academy of Management (10-14 August in Chicago),
  • International Association for Business & Society (7-10 June in Hong Kong), and
  • European Business History Association (6-8 September in Ancona, Italy)[1]

During the workshops, authors will present and discuss their papers and receive feedback from discussants and peers.

Attendance at these workshops is NOT a precondition for submission to the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue.

Confirmed discussants at the Academy of Management in Chicago include Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School), Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University), Paul C. Godfrey (Brigham Young University), Stefan Hielscher (University of Bath), Michael Rowlinson (University of Exeter), Sébastien Mena (Cass Business School), and Roy R. Suddaby (University of Victoria and Newcastle University).

 

Submission Information and Deadlines

Scholars interested in one of the workshops are asked to contact the guest editors according to requirements for each conference. Please see the following table for the key dates and contact information.

  IABS conference AoM conference EBHA conference
Require-ments Elevator pitch format. Interested authors might wish to contact Rob Phillips prior to the conference. To be considered for a PDW at either AoM or EBHA, an abstract (no more than 2’000 words or 8 pages all in) should be submitted to the responsible guest editor. The guest editors will then select promising abstracts and notify the authors. After acceptance, the authors are asked to submit a full paper (8’000-10’000 words).
Submission of abstracts none May 15, 2018 June 17, 2018
Submission of full paper July 1, 2018 August 1, 2018
Date and location of workshop June 7-10, 2018

Hong Kong

August 10-14, 2018

Chicago, IL

September 6-8, 2018

Ancona, Italy

Contact Rob Phillips

rphillips@schulich.yorku.ca

Judith Schrempf-Stirling

judith.schrempf-stirling@unige.ch

Christian Stutz

Christian.stutz@fh-hwz.ch

 

[1] The workshop proposal at the EBHA is currently under evaluation—to be confirmed.

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Video: Business & Management in the Age of Nationalism

And at long last, here is the video from the All Academy session on business & management in the Age of Nationalism: http://aom.org/Multi-Media/2017-Select-All-Academy-Theme-Sessions–Global-Events-and-Management-Scholarship/Business-and-Management-in-the-Age-of-Nationalism.aspx

(And as usual, they could not have found a still from the video in which I do not look terrible. I know people say this a lot but this really is a bad one…)

AOM PDW on Historic CSR

AOM accepted a great PDW for this year’s conference on the role of history and corporate social responsibility – come along if you are attending this year!

Call for Papers

Historic Corporate Responsibility: Its Extent, Limits, and Consequences

The guest editors of the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue on Historic Corporate Social Responsibility will arrange a paper development workshop at the Academy of Management Conference in Chicago.

There is a growing awareness of the critical but understudied role of time and history in the challenges we face in the present and the future. Businesses, universities, governments, and organizations in myriad industries and of all sizes are increasingly held to account for the actions of prior generations of leaders. The lingering effects of Monsanto’s Agent Orange, Yale University’s decision to change the name of Calhoun College, and controversies around the world concerning commemorations of leaders with complicated pasts (e.g., indigenous peoples, slavery) barely scratch the surface of this global phenomenon.

Scholars in management theory have become aware of an important  “historical turn” in organizational theory (Bucheli & Wadhwani, 2014; Maclean, Harvey, & Clegg, 2016; Mills, Suddaby, Foster & Durepos, 2016; Rowlinson, Hassard, & Decker, 2014). A recent issue of Academy of Management Review (Godfrey, Hassard, O’Connor, Rowlinson, & Ruef, 2016) included two articles addressing corporate (ir-)responsibility for long ago actions (Mena, Rintamäki, Fleming, & Spicer, 2016; Schrempf-Stirling, Palazzo, & Phillips, 2016). Though this work focuses largely on legacies of bad behavior, it may also be interesting to consider organizations with a history of being first movers on historically controversial issues. Similarly, recent work on the role of time and temporality in encouraging sustainable management practices (i.e. Slawinski & Bansal, 2015) and the observation that our implicit models of history affect our capacity to effect social change (Suddaby & Foster, 2017) reaffirms the importance of adopting a historical consciousness (Suddaby, 2016) when analyzing sustainability and corporate social responsibility (Stutz & Sachs, 2018). These contributions represent the beginning of a deeper and broader conversation about historic corporate responsibility.

PDW Overview

Each selected participant will present a brief summary of their work and include research appetizers (questions) for five minutes.

After the research appetizers have been presented, there will be roundtable discussions. The roundtables will provide the opportunity for further elaboration and in-depth discussion of the presented research topics. The discussions will be facilitated by mentors who read the submitted papers in advance. Confirmed discussants include Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School), Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University), Paul C. Godfrey (Brigham Young University), Stefan Hielscher (University of Bath), Michael Rowlinson (University of Exeter), Sébastien Mena (Cass Business School), and Roy R. Suddaby (University of Victoria and Newcastle University).

The roundtable discussions will last about 20 minutes. After the discussion, the workshop participants will reconvene into a larger group to report their findings.

Submission Information and Deadlines

Scholars interested in presenting their work are asked to submit an abstract (no more than 2’000 words or 8 pages all in) to the PDW organizers at judith.schrempf-stirling@unige.ch by April 15, 2018 (please use AOM PDW in the subject line).

Accepted authors will be asked to submit a full paper (8,000-10,000 words) by July 1, 2018.

We welcome submissions on the following topics and questions amongst others:

  1. Contours and Extent of Historic Corporate Responsibility
  • What, if anything, can current leaders do to recognize or mitigate responsibility today for past actions?
  • What is the role of forgetting and selective remembering?
  • Can the past be a strategic advantage for the organization? Is this an ethical aim given our limits on knowing the truth about the past?
  1. Boundaries and Limits of Historic Corporate Responsibility
  • How do different legal, political, economic, social, or cultural contexts of the past pose problems to current organizations that face historic corporate responsibility?
  • How does the changing nature of the corporation influence our working understanding of historic corporate responsibility?
  • When has a corporation done enough in regards to its historic responsibilities?
  1. Consequences of Historic Corporate Responsibility
  • Can an organization apologize and who can accept it? Could an apology benefit current and future societies?
  • Should stigma attach to individuals who were participants in past transgressions? How do we define participants and to what extent did they have choices in their past actions?
  • If there is no “single truth” about the past, then why should organizations engage in historic corporate responsibility?
  1. Historical inquiry into the “history” of CSR, the transformation of business-society relationships and the evolution CSR practices
  • How have CSR practices changed over time? How are they shaped by their particular historical contexts?
  • Does the examination of socially responsible business practices in particular historical settings shed new light on contemporary CSR scholarship?
  • What can we learn from historical contextualization of past academic insights?

References

Bucheli, M., & Wadhwani, R. D. (Eds.). (2014). Organizations in time: History, theory, methods. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Godfrey, P. C., Hassard, J., O’Connor, E. S. O., Rowlinson, M., & Ruef, M. (2016). What is organizational history? Toward a creative synthesis of history and organization studies. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 590–608.

Maclean, M., Harvey, C., & Clegg, S. R. (2016). Conceptualizing historical organization studies. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 609–632.

Mena, S., Rintamäki, J., Fleming, P., & Spicer, A. (2016). On the forgetting of corporate irresponsibility. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 720–738.

Mills, A. J., Suddaby, R., Foster, W. M., & Durepos, G. (2016). Re-visiting the historic turn 10 years later: Current debates in management and organizational history – an introduction. Management & Organizational History, 11(2), 67–76.

Rowlinson, M., Hassard, J., & Decker, S. (2014). Research strategies for organizational history: A dialogue between historical theory and organization theory. Academy of Management Review, 39(3), 250–274.

Schrempf-Stirling, J., Palazzo, G., & Phillips, R. A. (2016). Historic corporate social responsibility. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 700–719.

Slawinski, N., & Bansal, P. (2015). Short on Time: Intertemporal Tensions in Business Sustainability. Organization Science, 26(2), 531–549.

Stutz, C., & Sachs, S. (2018). Facing the normative challenges: The potential of reflexive historical research. Business & Society, 57(1), 98–130.

Suddaby, R., & Foster, W. M. (2017). History and Organizational Change. Journal of Management, 43(1), 19–38.

Suddaby, R. (2016). Toward a historical consciousness: Following the historic turn in management thought. M@n@gement, 19(1), 46–60.

 

PDW on Historical methods at AOM2017

Last Friday we ran our professional development workshop on the uses of historical methods at the Academy of Management. We had a full house, seven excellent presentations and lively discussions with the audience. We also distributed our draft bibliography on historical methods in a previous post and hope you can give us some feedback and suggestions.

Dan, Diego and I plan to run future events focused on historical methodology in management and organization studies and are open to your feedback, suggestions and requests. Below you find links to our presentations from the day.

Introduction: AOM2017_PDW Hist Meth intro

JoAnne Yates: JY history and organizational studies AOM 2017

Michael Rowlinson: AOM pdw Historical Methods

Steph Decker: AOM2017_PDW-Archival Ethnography

Bill Foster: 2017 AOM Ethnostatistics PDW presentation

Christina Lubinski: AOM Distant Markets Christina

Michael Prietula: AoM-2017-PDW-prietula-2

 

All Academy Event on economic nationalism

On Sunday the Management History division at the Academy of Management hosted an all academy symposium on historical perspectives on business and management in an age of rising nationalism.

The panel comprised of Dan Wadhwani as the host and moderator, Matthias Kipping (York University), Takafumi Kurosawa (Kyoto University) and myself, Stephanie Decker (Aston University).

We argued that history can provide management scholars with a unique lens for understanding the current rise of nationalism, and the choices that businesses, managers, and entrepreneurs face in response to those changes. In part, this is because both supporters and critics of the current wave of nationalism point to historical examples and their consequences in justifying their positions. But, even more so, historical waves of globalization and de-globalization allow us a mirror for reflecting on the options and consequences that both policymakers and managers face today.

For instance, on the eve of World War I, much of the world economy was economically integrated, with the relatively free mobility of firms, people, and capital across borders. This earlier wave of global integration fell apart with the rise of nationalism and nationalist policies during the interwar period, and a different kind of globally integrated economy had to be rebuilt by policymakers and businesspeople in the post-World War II world.

We discussed not only potential lessons of earlier waves of nationalism de-globalization, but also the uses of the past by politicians, and the way in which corporate strategies can be shaped in the long term by historical experiences.

Ultimately, the discussion revolved around the relevance of history for understanding managerial choices and consequences in the face of nationalism in our own time.

AOM PDW on Historical methods

*** Apologies for cross-posting ***

 

PDW on “Historical Methods for Management and Organizational Research”

 

Coordinators

Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School

Diego M. Coraiola, U. of Alberta

 

Participants

William Foster, U. of Alberta

JoAnne Yates, MIT Sloan School of Management

Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Bus, York U.

Michael Rowlinson, U. of Exeter

Christina Lubinski, Copenhagen Business School

 

Program Information

Session Type: PDW Workshop

Program Session: 107 | Submission: 12154 | Sponsor(s): (MH, CMS)

Scheduled: Friday, Aug 4 2017 12:15PM – 2:45PM at Hyatt Regency Atlanta in Embassy Hall E

 

 

Description

The PDW will be divided in two parts.

  1. In the first part the participants will present on topics related to the use of historical methods in management and organizational research. After the presentations we will have time for questions and answers from the audience.
  2. In the second part the participants will be distributed in roundtables and the audience will be invited to join them to discuss specific topics of the practice and publishing of historical research in management journals and receive feedback on their research projects.

 

Registration

***No registration required.

 

We do not require a formal registration. However, if you are planning to join us, we strongly encourage you to prepare a brief summary of a research project you are working on together with any doubts or puzzling issues you have been facing that you might want to discuss and get feedback on during the roundtables.

 

Abstract

Historical approaches to management and organizations have seen many promising developments in recent years, with several articles, special issues and edited books highlighting the important contribution that historical research can make to our understanding of contemporary organizations. Theoretical debates on the status of historical approaches within management and organization studies have dominated so far. These are important as they determine what kind of historical methods align with scholars’ epistemological and theoretical approach. Hence this PDW has two aims: to introduce scholars interested in the more practical questions of how we can use historical methods for organizational research to a range of option, and by highlighting the methodological implications of using specific historical approaches. This PDW will bring together several scholars who have used historical methodologies in their research. Their presentations will introduce participants to a range of methodologies and offer them the opportunity to subsequently discuss the relevance of these approaches for participants’ research projects in small groups in the second half of the session.

 

 

 

AOM PDW: Frontiers of Digital History Methods

Academy of Management Meeting, Atlanta

PDW Workshop

Frontiers of Digital History Methods and Tools for Management, Organization, and History Scholars

Friday, Aug 4 2017 2:00PM – 4:00PM
Session Type: PDW Workshop
Submission: 16488
Sponsor: MH
Scheduled: Friday, Aug 4 2017 2:00PM – 4:00PM at Hyatt Regency Atlanta in Hanover Hall E

Organizer: Robin Gustafsson, Aalto U.
Organizer: Mirko Ernkvist, Ratio Institute
Presenter: Charles Edward Harvey, Newcastle U.
Presenter: Mirko Ernkvist, Ratio Institute
Presenter: Mairi Maclean, U. of Bath
Presenter: Johann Peter Murmann, U. of New South Wales
Presenter: Michael Rowlinson, U. of Exeter
Presenter: David A. Kirsch, U. of Maryland

This PDW This PDW sets out to provide a broad overview and insights to management, organization, and history scholars at large on the current research forefront in how digital databases, methods and tools could contribute to the integration of management, organization, and history research. Overall the PDW centers on the idea for outlining opportunities and current frontier work with digital methods and tools for systematic digital reconstruction of historical sources, rigor and transparency of analysis and inference from evidence. These methodological advances enable new forms of scholarship and research groups collaborations. This PDW will: (1) introduce the participants to the historical developments of digital databases, tools and methods; (2) provide perspectives by forerunner management, organization, and business history researchers on methodological advantages, challenges and opportunities with digital history methods and tools for the integration of management, organization, and historical research; (3) present leading recent research work with digital methods and tools using large-scale digitized historical sources and evidence; (4) provide ample of time for Q&As and open discussions.

AOM2017 Meet the editors session

Session Type: PDW Workshop

Submission: 10093 | Sponsor(s): (MH)

 

Meet the Editors

Friday 10.30-12.00pm, Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Embassy Hall G 
Organizer: James M. Wilson, U. of Glasgow 

Presenter: Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School 

Presenter: Cheryl McWatters, U. of Ottawa 

Presenter: Paul Miranti, Rutgers U. 

The editors of Business History will provide a general discussion of their journal, describing its aims and scope, along with their general policies and practices regarding submissions. They will also discuss what they perceive to be current hot topics or emerging trends in the field of Management History. The editors and/or representatives of the Accounting History Review and Accounting History will discuss current topics and emerging interests in the field. They will also describe their journals’ general policies and practices regarding submissions. There will be sufficient time to discuss in general terms any individual projects conference attendees may have in mind for publication.

Search Terms: Business History | Editors | Journal

AOM 2017 PDW on historical methods

Session Type: PDW Workshop

Submission: 12154 | Sponsor(s): (MH, CMS)

 

Historical Methods for Management and Organizational Research

Friday 12.15-2.45pm, Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Embassy Hall E
Coordinator: Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School 

Coordinator: Diego Coraiola, U. of Alberta 

Participant: William Foster, U. of Alberta 

Participant: Sarah Robinson, U. of Leicester 

Participant: JoAnne Yates, MIT Sloan School of Management 

Participant: Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Bus, York U. 

Participant: Michael Rowlinson, U. of Exeter 

Presenter: Christina Lubinski, Copenhagen Business School 

Historical approaches to management and organizations have seen many promising developments in recent years, with several articles, special issues and edited books highlighting the important contribution that historical research can make to our understanding of contemporary organizations. Theoretical debates on the status of historical approaches within management and organization studies have dominated so far. These are important as they determine what kind of historical methods align with scholars’ epistemological and theoretical approach. Hence this PDW has two aims: to introduce scholars interested in the more practical questions of how we can use historical methods for organizational research to a range of option, and by highlighting the methodological implications of using specific historical approaches. This PDW will bring together several scholars who have used historical methodologies in their research. Their presentations will introduce participants to a range of methodologies and offer them the opportunity to subsequently discuss the relevance of these approaches for participants’ research projects in small groups in the second half of the session.

Search Terms: Methodology | Historical Research | Management and Organization Research

AOM 2018: Call for reviewers for MH division

As readers of this blog, you may well be attending the Academy of Management conference next year. Please sign up to review for the Management History division in order to review submissions to help our community to grow!

Participate in the 
77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management
August 4-8, 2017
Atlanta, Georgia, United States

Call for Reviewers

We would like to invite all members to sign up as volunteer reviewers of proposals received for the 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management. We encourage you to sign up as a volunteer reviewer for the divisions or interest groups (DIGs) that you are planning to submit to, or DIGs you are interested in, or DIGs that you are a member of. Divisions and Interest Groups will also be following up with those of you who have reviewed in the past. Please note that even if you have reviewed in the past, you still need to sign up again to review for the 2017 Annual Meeting.

Reviewer Sign Up: NOW
Review Period: January 18, 2017 – February 16, 2017

You can sign up to review for a maximum of two (2) divisions and/or interest groups, and you may be asked to review up to three (3) submissions (papers and symposia) for each division or interest group that you select. The maximum number of review assignments that you could potentially receive is six (6).

To sign up, please visit our website. You will have to choose your areas of expertise (keywords) for the divisions or interest groups for which you want to review. The signup process should not take more than 10 minutes. Reviewers are advised to carefully review the reviewer guidelines and resources on the Reviewer Information website.