Coleman Prize session is going digital this year

Unfortunately, the ABH conference is not taking place due to COVID-19, but the Coleman Prize session will now be held virtually on Thursday, 25 June, 14:00-15:00 (UK time).

What is the Coleman Prize

Named in honour of the British Business Historian Donald Coleman, this prize is awarded annually by the Association of Business Historians to recognise excellence in new research in Britain. It is open to PhD dissertations in Business History either having a British subject or completed at a British University. All dissertations completed in the previous two calendar years to that of their submission are eligible (with the exception of previous submissions). It is a condition of eligibility for the Prize that shortlisted finalists will present their findings at the Association’s annual conference.

Sponsors

The value of the prize is £500 and it is sponsored by Taylor & Francis Group. It is a scholarly publisher, which makes available original manuscript collections, rare printed books and other primary source materials in microform and electronic format.

On the shortlist this year are:

  • Akram Beniamin, “Cotton, Finance and Business Networks in a Globalised World: The Case of Egypt during the first half of the Twentieth century “.
  • Adam Nix, “The Social Foundations of Organisational Corruption”.
  • David Paulson, “Small and medium sized Enterprises in Britain and West Germany c.1949-1979”.

If you would like to attend, please email Professor Neil Rollings (Neil.Rollings[at]Glasgow.Ac.Uk) for the joining details.

List of former Coleman Prize winners.

Online seminars in Business History

In a mix up of our normal publishing schedule, I am running our weekly blog tonight to make you all aware of the start of a great initiative tomorrow afternoon: A new series of online seminars in Business History, facilitated by the GUG.

The aims of this series of online seminars is to help ECRs/PHDs to disseminate work in the absence of physical conferences. You can find the current schedule of events here: https://unternehmensgeschichte.de/Online-Seminare

If you have any questions about the event, please get in touch with Nicholas Wong (nicholas.d.wong@northumbria.ac.uk), who has disseminated the event on behalf of a group colleagues, who put this great initiative together.

BH ToC 62,3

Our April copy features a special issue on:

Between Coercion and Private Initiative: Entrepreneurial Freedom of Action during the ‘Third Reich’

Special Issue Articles

Introduction: The room for manoeuvre for firms in the Third Reich
Ralf Banken
Pages: 375-392 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2020.1713105

Sewing for Hitler? The clothing industry during the ‘Third Reich’
Roman Köster & Julia Schnaus
Pages: 393-409 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1502749

The Munich Re: an internationally-oriented reinsurer in the Nazi era
Christopher Kopper
Pages: 410-420 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1259312

A hard-to-untangle business conglomerate: The economic empire of the German labour front
Rüdiger Hachtmann
Pages: 421-437 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1691799

Between values orientation and economic logic: Bosch in the Third Reich
Johannes Bähr
Pages: 438-450 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1691343

Commercial expansion in the steel industry of World War II: The case of Henry J. Kaiser and Friedrich Flick
Tim Schanetzky
Pages: 451-467 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1691336

Property, control and room for manoeuvre: Royal Dutch Shell and Nazi Germany, 1933–1945
Marten Boon & Ben Wubs
Pages: 468-487 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1205034

Original Articles

The country-of-origin effect and the international expansion of Spanish fashion companies, 1975–2015
José Antonio Miranda
Pages: 488-508 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1374370

Microfinances in the banking houses of Rio de Janeiro in 1864
Carlos Eduardo Valencia Villa
Pages: 509-535 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1454432

Book Reviews

La sidérurgie française et la maison de Wendel pendant les Trente Glorieuses
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 536-538 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1326573

Policy signals and market responses: a 50-year history of Zambia’s relationship with foreign capital
Simone Halleen
Pages: 539-540 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1483863

Small business, education, and management. The life and times of John Bolton
Silvia Milanesi
Pages: 541-542 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1483866

Les bassins industriels des territoires occupés, 1914–1918. Des opérations militaires à la reconstruction
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 543-544 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1326575

CfP Emotions and History of Business

Emotions and the History of Business

Mandy Cooper (UNC-Greensboro) and Andrew Popp (Copenhagen Business School)

We are developing a proposal for an edited volume on emotions and the history of business and seek further contributions. In the first instance, the proposal will be submitted to a series on the history of emotions edited by Peter Stearns and Susan Matt and published Bloomsbury.

Why emotions and the history of business?
A small but growing body of work has already begun to demonstrate the potential in bringing the histories of emotions and of business into greater dialogue.[1] We aim to more fully and systematically explore that potential through this proposed volume. What does bringing emotions in add to the history of business? Does business not inhabit a world of rationality? We firmly believe that from individual entrepreneurs to family firms to massive corporations, businesses have in many ways relied on, leveraged, generated, and been shaped by emotions for centuries. Examining business in all its facets through the lens of the history of emotion allows us to recognize the emotional structures behind business decisions and relationships and to question them. The very presence—or absence—of emotions and emotional language have the power to alter the structure and content of relationships between individuals and between businesses and communities. This collection asks what happens when emotions and emotional situations, whether fear/anxiety, nostalgia, love, or the longing of distance and separation, affect businesses and, in turn, how businesses affect the emotional lives of individuals and communities. In terms of framing, therefore, we emphasize the work that emotions do and recognize the performative nature of emotions.

Scope:
We do not wish to impose any restrictions in terms of geographic or temporal scope and would strongly welcome proposals from or on the Global South. Existing work in this area has often focused on emotions in family firms, but we welcome proposals across the full range of potential business settings and contexts. Likewise, much work in the history of emotions has adopted micro-historical perspectives and methodologies; we would particularly welcome work exploring emotions in large or macro-scale business contexts or phenomena, market crashes (or booms) being only the most obvious possibility. Similarly, we are open to studies utilizing the full range of historical sources and methodologies. Studies exploring change in the relationships between emotions and business over time will be warmly welcomed, as will studies exploring the relationship between race, gender, and business. Proposals may well be themed around a specific emotion, but that is not the only approach imaginable. Naturally, proposals from across a wide range of cognate disciplines – economic history, the history of capitalism, cultural and social history, material history and more – are most welcome.

A far from exhaustive list of possible themes might include:

  • Gendered and/or racialized emotion and business
  • Boredom/ennui
  • Love
  • Fear and anxiety
  • Rationality as an emotion
  • Subjugation
  • Satisfaction/fulfilment
  • Disappointment
  • Identity formation/the self/authenticity
  • Contagion, risk, and panic
  • Solidarity
  • Business as drama
  • The forms of expression of business emotions: language, sites, rites, rituals, symbols
  • Cultural representations of business emotions
  • Commemoration and history as emotions
  • Emotions as commodities
  • Alienation and estrangement

Logistics:

Please send proposals of no more than 500 words to emotionsandbusiness@gmail.com by July 31st 2020. Please include a brief biography of all authors, as well as contact details. Proposals should seek to present setting, theme, perspective or framing, and sources and methods. Please use the same email address to approach us with any questions or queries.

Mandy Cooper
Lecturer, Department of History UNC-Greensboro

Andrew Popp
Professor of history, Department of Management, Politics, and Philosophy Copenhagen Business School

[1] See, for example, the special issue on “Emotions et Enterprises Familiales,” Enterprises et Histoire, No. 91 (2018)

BH ToC 62,2

I have gotten a little behind as I said before, so here are some updates on recent issues in Business History. Enjoy your Bank Holiday if you are in the UK, otherwise TGIF!

Original Articles

Multinational mining companies, employment and knowledge transfer: Chile and Norway from ca. 1870 to 1940
Kristin Ranestad
Pages: 197-221 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1407313

Managing policy lapse risk in Sweden’s life insurance market between 1915 and 1947
Mike Adams, Lars-Fredrik Andersson, Magnus Lindmark, Liselotte Eriksson & Elena Veprauskaite
Pages: 222-239 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1418331

Business failure in an age of globalisation: Interpreting the rise and fall of the LG project in Wales, 1995–2006
Leon Gooberman
Pages: 240-260 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1426748

The professionalisation of selling and the transformation of a family business: Kenrick & Jefferson, 1878–1940
David Paulson
Pages: 261-291 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1426749

Corporate social responsibility before CSR: Practices at Aluminium du Cameroun (Alucam) from the 1950s to the 1980s
Marie-Claire Loison, Celine Berrier-Lucas & Anne Pezet
Pages: 292-342 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1427070

Extending William Baumol’s theory on entrepreneurship and institutions: lessons from post-Second World War Greece
Zoi Pittaki
Pages: 343-363 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1451515

Book Review

Indochine années vingt. L’âge d’or de l’affairisme colonial (1918–1928). Banquiers, hommes d’affaires et patrons en réseaux
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 364-366 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1269524

Equity capital. From ancient partnerships to modern exchange traded funds
Tim Kooijmans
Pages: 367-368 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1480132

Baking powder wars: the cutthroat food fight that revolutionized cooking
Marco Marigliano
Pages: 369-370 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1480575

The rise of the global company: multinationals and the making of the modern world
Julian Faust
Pages: 371-372 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1482822

Green capitalism? Business and the environment in the twentieth century
Mattias Näsman
Pages: 373-374 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1483301

OHN returns & CfP “Entrepreneurship and Transformations”

Hello everyone and apologies for the long pause between posts, which was partly due to illness, but also, as you can imagine, due to the extraordinary times we find ourselves in. Many of us had to prepare online teaching at short notice, and many of the events we blog about have been cancelled due to the ongoing pandemic. Going forward, we will only run one blog per week on Fridays, as there simply not as many events and updates as there would usually be.

But today we have some good news, as one of our great editors, Christina Lubinski, is looking for submissions for an exciting new special issue in Business History on historical entrepreneurship.

Stay safe & healthy

Stephanie

Business History Special Issue

Entrepreneurship and Transformations

Special Issue Editor(s)

Deadline: 30 September 2020

Entrepreneurship and Transformations

Research on entrepreneurship has flourished in recent years, and the public interest in it has arguably never been greater. Few would disagree that entrepreneurship is one of the primary drivers of industry dynamics, economic and societal change, and innovation. However, the rapidly growing field of entrepreneurship studies has not displayed great strength in capturing dynamics and evolutions over time, partly due to a lack of historical empirical work of the sort that Schumpeter (1939) has already called for several decades ago. This special issue sets out to bring together an interdisciplinary group of scholars analyzing the links between entrepreneurship and (societal and market) transformations.

The Special Issue “Entrepreneurship and Transformations” takes its starting point in the critique that the field of entrepreneurship studies suffers from a fixation on the micro-processes governing the interaction of individuals and opportunities (Shane 2003), while largely ignoring the macro-dynamics of which entrepreneurship is part. It builds on the growing interdisciplinary dialogue between history and entrepreneurship studies (Wadhwani and Jones 2014, Perchard, MacKenzie et al. 2017, Wadhwani, Kirsch et al. 2020 pre-published online) that has triggered much needed methodological and theoretical reflections on historical entrepreneurship research.

The editors of this SI give an overview of this field of study in their annotated bibliography and encourage authors to engage with (a sub-set of) this literature. In particular, they welcome contributions that build on these insights to empirically explore the links between entrepreneurship and (societal and market) transformations over time. We see a research opportunity for scholars who use historical methods and sources to explore

  1. opportunity recognition and opportunity exploitation as a long-term process. Artur Cole (1959), for example, introduced the idea of an “entrepreneurial stream”—a metaphor highlighting that entrepreneurial opportunities often unfold over long period of time, with one opportunity building on previous ones. These long-term developments easily become hidden if we focus too closely on one individual or one company; however, the question how new opportunities emerge from existing ones, and how (experiential and codified) knowledge travels between individuals and institutions is of great importance for understanding the entrepreneurial process in and between companies (Galambos and Amatori 2016).
  2. the interactions between entrepreneurship and the cultural and socioeconomic environment they are embedded in (Welter and Gartner 2016, Baker and Welter 2018). So far, scholarly approaches to contextualizing entrepreneurship have varied widely. One set of work, drawing on institutional theory and following Baumol (1990), have interpreted contexts as a source of constraints and incentives on entrepreneurial behavior. A second approach, drawing on social movement and social group research, have approached contextualization as a matter of “embedding” entrepreneurial processes within social groups, movements, and networks (Hiatt, Sine et al. 2009). A third approach, drawing on a social constructivist view of contexts, examines how entrepreneurial actors shape and even create the contexts for their actions (Jones and Pitelis 2015). Historical research, particularly work that takes a comparative or international perspective, has long emphasized the role of context in shaping the very definition of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial processes. But how exactly does historical work lead us to reconsider and rethink the conceptualization of context? How can context be operationalized and studied using a historical lens? We believe that non-Western contexts and “deep histories”, in particular, can help us question and revise some of the taken-for-granted assumptions around entrepreneurship and context.
  3. Finally, we specifically encourage interdisciplinary collaborations between historians and scholars from other disciplines that significantly advance our understanding of entrepreneurship and market transformations and develop approaches that are useful to scholars exploring entrepreneurship historically. 

References

  • Baker, T. and F. Welter (2018). “Contextual Entrepreneurship: An Interdisciplinary Perspective.” Foundations and Trends®in Entrepreneurship 14(4): 357-426.
  • Baumol, W. J. (1990). “Entrepreneurship: Productive, Unproductive, and Destructive.” Journal of Political Economy 98(5): 893-921.
  • Cole, A. (1959). Business Enterprise in its Social Setting. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.
  • Galambos, L. and F. Amatori (2016). “The Entrepreneurial Multiplier.” Enterprise & Society 17(4): 763-808.
  • Hiatt, S. R., W. D. Sine and P. S. Tolbert (2009). “From Pabst to Pepsi: The Deinstitutionalization of Social Practices and the Creation of Entrepreneurial Opportunities.” Administrative Science Quarterly 54(4): 635-667.
  • Jones, G. and C. Pitelis (2015). “Entrepreneurial Imagination and a Demand and Supply-Side Perspective on MNE and Cross-Border Organisation.” Journal of International Management 21(4): 309-321.
  • Perchard, A., N. G. MacKenzie, S. Decker and G. Favero (2017). “Clio in the Business School: Historical Approaches in Strategy, International Business and Entrepreneurship.” Business History: 1-24.
  • Schumpeter, J. A. (1939). Business Cycles: A Theoretical, Historical and Statistical Analysis of the Capitalist Process, Vol. I. New York and London, McGraw-Hill.
  • Shane, S. (2003). A General Theory of Entrepreneurship:The Individual–Opportunity Nexus. Cheltenham, Edward Elgar.
  • Wadhwani, D. R., D. Kirsch, F. Welter, W. B. Gartner and G. Jones (2020 pre-published online). “Context, Time, and Change: Historical Approaches to Entrepreneurship Research.” Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal.
  • Wadhwani, R. D. and G. Jones (2014). Schumpeter’s Plea: Historical Reasoning in Entrepreneurship Theory and Research. Organizations in Time: History, Theory and Methods. M. Bucheli and R. D. Wadhwani. Oxford, Oxford University Press: 192-216.
  • Welter, F. and W. B. Gartner, Eds. (2016). A Research Agenda for Entrepreneurship and Context. Cheltenham, UK, Edward Elgar Publishing.

 

Submission instructions

We welcome contributions to the outlined research agenda that are based on original research and innovative analysis. We particularly encourage contributions by interdisciplinary teams of authors and those that combine source-based historical analysis with insights, concepts or data from other disciplines.

Papers should not exceed 8,000 words, inclusive of tables and footnotes, and use US spelling. By submitting to the SI, authors confirm that their contributions are not under consideration elsewhere. All proposals should be submitted via ScholarOne, indicating that they are contributions to this Special Issue “Entrepreneurship and Transformations”. All articles will go through a peer-review process. It is the responsibility of the author(s) to ensure that the manuscript fully complies with the publishing guidelines of Business History.

Instructions for authors

Submit an article

For questions about this Special Issue, please contact Christina Lubinski, cl.mpp@cbs.dk

Workshop on the History of Industrial Clusters in the UK

The British Academy of Management Management and Business History SIG and the Henley Business School, University of Reading, Centre for International Business History, are running an event on ‘A History of Industrial Clusters: Knowledge, Innovation Systems and Sustainability in the UK’ .

This workshop brings together some of the leading researchers across the field of business and economic history showcasing the breadth and depth of current work. At its core are the themes of innovation, knowledge and sustainability and a framework developed by David Charles bringing these together. This will allow new questions to be asked and provide a historical dimension to regional economic development in the UK. The research presented will also offer some contemporary insights into policy-making and industrial strategy.

The core research output arising from the workshop will be a new edited collection on industrial clusters (under the same title as the workshop and edited by Chris Corker, Joe Lane and John Wilson). This is currently under contract with Routledge for publication in 2021 and will form part of their ‘International Studies in Business History’ series.

Date:  4th and 5th of March 2020 (full day on the 4th and half day on the 5th of March)

Location: Henley Business School, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus

Speakers: 

  • Professor John Wilson
  • Dr Joe Lane
  • Dr Chris Corker
  • Dr Harry Smith
  • Professor David Charles
  • Dr Emily Buchnea

Registration deadline: 28 February 2020

For more information on this event and to register, please access the following link:  event link

TOCs BH 62,1 „The Brand & its history“

Business History, Volume 62, Issue 1, January 2020 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

The Brand and its History, Part II: Branding, Culture, and National Identity

Introduction

Cross-cultural factors in international branding
Rafael Castro & Patricio Sáiz
Pages: 1-25 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1592157

Articles

The transformation of global luxury brands: The case of the Swiss watch company Longines, 1880–2010
Pierre-Yves Donzé
Pages: 26-41 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1291632

Making Italian fashion global: Brand building and management at Gruppo Finanziario Tessile (1950s‒1990s)
Elisabetta Merlo & Mario Perugini
Pages: 42-69 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1329299

Brand image, cultural association and marketing: ‘New Zealand’ butter and lamb exports to Britain, c. 1920–1938
Felicity Barnes & David M. Higgins
Pages: 70-97 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1344223

The expansion of branding in international marketing: The case of olive oil, 1870s–1930s
Ramon Ramon-Muñoz
Pages: 98-122 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1344224

The making of Labatt ‘Blue’: The quest for a national lager brand, 1959–1971
Matthew J. Bellamy
Pages: 123-150 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1310195

The emergence of Italy as a fashion country: Nation branding and collective meaning creation at Florence’s fashion shows (1951–1965)
Valeria Pinchera & Diego Rinallo
Pages: 151-178 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1332593

Dreaming of the West: The power of the brand in Soviet Lithuania, 1960s–1980s
Brigita Tranavičiūtė
Pages: 179-195 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1379505

CFP: Uses of the Past – Perspectives, Forms and Concepts in Business History

CBS Paper Development Workshop

Business History Conference, Charlotte, NC, March 12, 2020

Submission deadline: January 10, 2020

In thepast years, uses of the past hasbecome a prominent research theme for business historians and organizationscholars alike. Studies on the usefulness and appropriation of the past haveappeared across diverse fields such as business history, organization studies,marketing, learning & education, and CSR. Uses of history is fashionable. Butwhere will the field go in the future?

In the CBSPDW we seek to focus on questions that have yet to asked, and we would like toexplore the theories and methods that might take the field forward.

The workshop offers an opportunity to getfeedback and generate ideas of how to develop concrete paper drafts that deal,one way or the other, with uses of the past. In addition, the PDW will serve asa forum where we can discuss future directions and opportunities (and potentialdead ends) going forward with a ‘uses-of-the-past’ agenda. What are thequestions and research that are yet to be explored, and what are the role forbusiness historians in shaping a ‘uses-of the past’ research agenda?

Themes to be explored in the papers could include,amongst others:

  • Uses of the past for branding, strategy and identity purposes
  • Corporate and public museums
  • The use (andabuse?) of organizational anniversaries
  • Uses of historyin action
  • The role and practices of historical consultancies (e.g. WinthropGroup, The History Factory andothers)
  • Historical CSR
  • Theoretical andmethodological perspectives connected to uses of the past.
  • Criticalperspectives on uses of the past

Submitted texts could take form asextended abstracts or full paper drafts. The important thing is that readers canidentify the key arguments, theories and empirical material, for them toprovide useful feedback, suggestions and comments.

Depending on the submitted abstracts andfull papers, the participants and organizers could potentially explore theopportunity of a subsequent special issue on uses of the past in arelevant academic publication, such as, for example Business History. 

Participants are expected to read allcirculated papers. Please submit a paper draft or extended abstract before January10, 2020 to the workshop organizers.

Anders Ravn Sørensen, ars.mpp@cbs.dk

Morten Tinning, mti.mpp@cbs.dk

AAHANZBS Conference “Institutions and change”

The Association of Academic Historians in Australian and New Zealand Business Schools (AAHANZBS) 11th Annual Conference, 7-8 November 2019, AUT Business School, Auckland, New Zealand

Call for Papers

The Business and Labour History Group (B&LHG) of the Work Research Institute, AUT University Business School, New Zealand, will be hosting the 11th Annual Conference of AAHANZBS on 7-8 November 2019.

You are invited to submit papers addressing the conference theme, including papers relating to accounting history, business history, economic history, labour history, management history, marketing history, tourism history, transport history and other areas of interest relating to historical research in business schools. We also invite papers / panel suggestions around teaching and pedagogy relating to business and labour history.

We welcome papers from researchers outside business schools who have an interest in these fields of study.

Both abstracts and full papers may be submitted for review. Abstracts will be published, and full papers delivered at the conference potentially be reviewed for possible inclusion in journal special issues (details tbc.)

Please submit either a 1000 word abstract or a 6,000 word maximum paper for refereeing by 2 August 2019 to Simon Mowatt at simon.mowatt@aut.ac.nz

The abstract will provide:
(i) A summary of the argument of the paper
(ii) A summary of the findings of the paper
(iii) A selected list of references for the paper

Papers should follow the Labour History style guide – http://asslh.org.au/journal/style-guide/. All authors of the abstracts will be notified by 30 August 2019 at the latest whether their abstracts or papers have been accepted for the conference. Registration and other details will be circulated shortly.