TOC: BH 60,2 (2018)

The new issue of Business History is out! It features the first Perspectives article, a topical review article mapping emerging and established research themes.


Thinking about industry decline: A qualitative meta-analysis and future research directions
Juha-Antti Lamberg, Jari Ojala & Mirva Peltoniemi
Pages: 127-156 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1340943

Original Articles

The drivers of firm longevity: Age, size, profitability and survivorship of Australian corporations, 1901–1930
Laura Panza, Simon Ville & David Merrett
Pages: 157-177 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1293041

Longevity challenges and leadership interventions: Strategy journeys of two Indian banks
Kamal R. Sharma & Mukund R. Dixit
Pages: 178-201 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1363735

A European role in intra-Asian commercial development: The Maclaine Watson network and the Java sugar trade c.1840–1942
Alexander Claver & G. Roger Knight
Pages: 202-230 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1295955

Accessing capital markets: Aristocrats and new share issues in the British bicycle boom of the 1890s
Shima Amini & Steven Toms
Pages: 231-256 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1310196

Trading forward: The Paris Bourse in the nineteenth century
Paul Lagneau-Ymonet & Angelo Riva
Pages: 257-280 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1316487

Book Reviews

Jean Monnet, banquier, 1914–1945. Intérêts privés et intérêt général
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 281-282 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1156220

On the origins of self-service
Emanuela Scarpellini
Pages: 282-283 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1334347

Regulating competition. Cartel registers in the twentieth-century world
Mária Hidvégi
Pages: 283-286 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1338870

Les banques et les mutations des entreprises. Le cas de Lille-Roubaix-Tourcoing aux XIXe et XXe siècles
Carlo Brambilla
Pages: 286-288 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1339960



ToC BH: Change in Referencing Style and SI on the Business of War


Change of referencing style
Stephanie Decker , Ray Stokes, Andrea Colli, Abe de Jong, Paloma Fernandez Perez & Neil Rollings
Pages: 1-3 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1386762
Special issue on: Business of war

War and economy. Rediscovering the eighteenth-century military entrepreneur |
Rafael Torres-Sánchez, Pepijn Brandon & Marjolein ‘t Hart
Pages: 4-22 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1379507


The impact of war: New business networks and small-scale contractors in Britain, 1739–1770
Gordon Bannerman
Pages: 23-40 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1312687


The French navy and war entrepreneurs: Identity, business relations, conflicts, and cooperation in the eighteenth century
David Plouviez
Pages: 41-56 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1366986


Military entrepreneurs and the development of the French economy in the eighteenth century
Pierrick Pourchasse
Pages: 57-71 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1351952


The Spanish monarchy as a contractor state in the eighteenth century: Interaction of political power with the market
Sergio Solbes Ferri
Pages: 72-86 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1349107


War contracting and artillery production in Spain
Agustín González Enciso
Pages: 87-104 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1379508


Shipbuilding administration under the Spanish Habsburg and Bourbon regimes (1590‒1834): A comparative perspective
Ivan Valdez-Bubnov
Pages: 105-125 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1391219

Change of BH referencing style

On behalf of the Business History editorial team, I am happy to announce that for submissions from January 2018 onwards, Business History has changed the referencing style to Taylor & Francis’ version of APA – i.e. in-text author-date citations. The aim is to bring our referencing practice in line with the social science community after analysing the institutional background of our authors in the last few years. This means that from 2019, all articles will be published in author-date format.

To read the editorial explaining our decision, please go here:


CfP Imagining new markets

CFP: Imagining New Markets

by Erika Vause


Risk, Honor & Innovation: Imagining New Markets

3rd Biennial Richard Robinson Workshop on Business History

Portland State University

May 24-26, 2018 Portland OR

How did “innovation” become something to strive for, an end in itself? And how did “the market” come to be thought of as the space of innovation? The modern economy, according to Joseph Schumpeter, is based on “creative destruction”: the expectation of acceleration, expansion, and growth. As evoked by this term, novelty and dynamism are not only viewed as inevitable, but also generally beneficial. The market, market-relations, and the marketplace, have become key markers of what is forward-looking and progress-oriented in modern societies. These markers delineated an impersonal sphere of scientific, technical and agentless activities whose workings seemingly lay outside the realm of desires and emotions. Our workshop seeks to break down the divide between the impersonal (effects of technical limits and aggregations of large numbers) and the subjective (articulations of perceptions, fears, and self-regard) in the ways “the market” and “the economy” are conceived. We aim to reconsider market and business activities in light of both the techniques and the emotional vectors that infuse them.

This conference brings together scholars interested in querying this view of innovation and in exploring the emotional life of this phenomenon—scholars who seek to understand how markets have been created and expanded, as well as what was destroyed in the process. How did the introduction and promotion of new commodities and desires—as well as the lifestyles with which they were associated—affect the norms of acceptable market practices? While “supply” and “demand” are often presumed to be fixed categories, this interrogates how demands are created and sources of supply substituted (as in import substitution). What makes people want or even need something, particularly something they have never possessed before? How did expanded supplies of new commodities change prevailing views of what constituted personhood—how did soap, for example, become a requisite of civilization, curtains of domesticity, leisure of civility, and stock shares of sociality? Our workshop is in particular interested in the interplay of risk and honor in shaping new markets. Risk, refracted as perceptions of danger or opportunity, frequently worked to push the boundaries of acceptable market/business behavior. Honor, by contrast, could function to proscribe risk-taking to maintain a society’s status quo. But honor, as indicator of social standing and model for emulation, could also encourage entrepreneurship and expand the marketization of consumption. How did new markets emerge and old marketplaces become transformed amid these multivalent pulls?

We are looking for business histories (broadly construed) that tackle this intersection of desire, norms and markets in a variety of ways from all time periods and places, and we particularly encourage proposals on global, transnational, and non-Western topics and on developments before the twentieth century. Possible themes include, but are not limited to:

  • Advertising, marketing, branding, and promotion of new products
  • Counterfeiting, generic goods, and knock-offs
  • Hucksterism, frauds, forgeries and deceit
  • Honor and dishonor
  • New forms of consumption/distribution and new lifestyles
  • Fashion and fads
  • Black markets and gray economies
  • Changing ethics of markets and changing boundaries of marketplace
  • Hedging, insurance, gambling, and speculation
  • Public debts and private assets
  • Banking, usury, and money supply
  • Exoticism, empire/emporium, and trade routes
  • The introduction and international migration of new products, services, sales techniques, and business models
  • Entrepreneurs, individual agency, and the invisible hand

The keynote address of the third biennial Richard Robinson Workshop will be given by Professor François R. Velde, Senior Economist and Research Advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, on the evening of Thursday, May 24. Papers selected for the workshop will be pre-circulated and discussed in plenary sessions on Friday, May 25, and Saturday, May 26.

Paper proposals, consisting of a one-page CV and a 500-word abstract, should be sent to the workshop organizers, Thomas Luckett (Portland State University), Chia Yin Hsu (Portland State University), and Erika Vause (Florida Southern College), at by November 15, 2017. Accepted proposals will be notified by January 5, 2018.

Presenters will receive lodging for three nights and meals. There will be no charge for conference registration. We are likely to provide some reimbursement of travel expenses depending on the availability of funds.


SI on Narratives & Business History now out!

I am very pleased to announce that the final issue of the year for Business History is the excellent special issue on narratives in Business History, edited by Mads Mordhorst & Stefan Schwarzkopf.

Business History, Volume 59, Issue 8, November 2017 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

Narrative Turn and Business History

This new issue contains the following articles:

Original Articles

Theorising narrative in business history
Mads Mordhorst & Stefan Schwarzkopf
Pages: 1155-1175 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1357697

The strategic use of historical narratives: a theoretical framework
William M. Foster, Diego M. Coraiola, Roy Suddaby, Jochem Kroezen & David Chandler
Pages: 1176-1200 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1224234

How business historians can save the world – from the fallacy of self-made success
Pamela Walker Laird
Pages: 1201-1217 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1251904

Narrative, metaphor and the subjective understanding of historic identity transition
Mairi Maclean , Charles Harvey & Lindsay Stringfellow
Pages: 1218-1241 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1223048

Writing business history: Creating narratives
Andrew Popp & Susanna Fellman
Pages: 1242-1260 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1250742

Narrating histories of women at work: Archives, stories, and the promise of feminism
Gabrielle Durepos, Alan McKinlay & Scott Taylor
Pages: 1261-1279 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1276900

Histories of leadership in the Copenhagen Phil – A cultural view of narrativity in studies of leadership in symphony orchestras
Søren Friis Møller
Pages: 1280-1302 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1335306
Book Reviews

La place financière de Paris au xxe siècle. Des ambitions contrariées
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 1303-1305 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1156219

Les concessions hydroélectriques dans le grand sud-ouest, Histoire et débats 1902/2015
Alain Beltran
Pages: 1305-1306 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1321165

Wall streeters: The creators and corruptors of American finance
C. Edoardo Altamura
Pages: 1306-1308 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1326434

America’s bank: The epic struggle to create the Federal Reserve
Linda Arch
Pages: 1308-1309 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1326435

Start with the future and work back: a heritage management manifesto
Daniele Pozzi
Pages: 1310-1311 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1328995

The international aluminium cartel, 1886–1978: The business and politics of a cooperative industrial institution
Valerio Cerretano
Pages: 1311-1313 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1331544



BH 59,7 October 2017 issue is now out!

Business History, Volume 59, Issue 7, October 2017 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

Business and Global Environmental History

This new issue contains the following articles:

Special Issue Articles

Uniting business history and global environmental history
Andrew Smith & Kirsten Greer
Pages: 987-1009 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1338688
Knowing nature in the business records of the Hudson’s Bay Company, 1670–1840
George Colpitts
Pages: 1054-1080 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1304914

Original Articles

Making the global local? Overseas goods in English rural shops, c.1600–1760
Jon Stobart
Pages: 1136-1153 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1293040

ToCs: BH 59,6

Business History, Volume 59, Issue 6, September 2017 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

Original Articles

Corporations as agents of social change: A case study of diversity at Cummins Inc.
Heidi Reed
Pages: 821-843 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1255196

‘A highly successful model’? The rail franchising business in Britain
Robert Jupe & Warwick Funnell
Pages: 844-876 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1270268

Reaching for global in the Japanese cosmetics industry, 1951 to 2015: the case of Shiseido
Maki Umemura & Stephanie Slater
Pages: 877-903 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1274735

Clio in the business school: Historical approaches in strategy, international business and entrepreneurship
Andrew Perchard, Niall G. MacKenzie, Stephanie Decker & Giovanni Favero
Pages: 904-927 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1280025

Business success and the architectural practice of Sir George Gilbert Scott, c.1845–1878: a study in hard work, sound management and networks of trust
Sam McKinstry & Ying Yong Ding
Pages: 928-950 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1288216

Religious minority in business history: The case of Old Believers
Danila Raskov & Vadim Kufenko
Pages: 951-974 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1288217
Book review

Histoire de l’emballage en France, du xviiie siècle à nos jours
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 975-976 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1129777

La doyenne des «Sénégalaises» de Bordeaux: Maurel et H. Prom de 1831 à 1919, tome I. De l’édification à la période africaine; tome II. Maurel & H.Prom en Afrique
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 977-979 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1130252

El Banco de Barcelona, 1874–1920. Decadencia y quiebra
José L. García-Ruiz
Pages: 979-981 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1276676

Family multinationals. Entrepreneurship, governance, and pathways to internationalization
Hans Sjögren
Pages: 981-983 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1306349

Innovation and creativity in late medieval and early modern European Cities
Pamela H. Smith
Pages: 983-985 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1307166


TOC BH July 2017 issue (59,1)

Original Articles

Managing political imperatives in war time: strategic responses of Philips in Australia, 1939–1945
Pierre van der Eng
Pages: 645-666 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1259311

The genesis of the electricity supply industry in Britain: A case study of NESCo from 1889 to 1914
Tom McGovern & Tom McLean
Pages: 667-689 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1261827

‘A fraud, a drunkard, and a worthless scamp’: estate agents, regulation, and Realtors in the interwar period
Mark Latham
Pages: 690-709 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1261828

Bring in the brewers: business entry in the Swedish brewing industry from 1830 to 2012
Marcus Box
Pages: 710-743 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1269751

Pioneering strategies in the digital world. Insights from the Axel Springer case
Gianvito Lanzolla & Alessandro Giudici
Pages: 744-777 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1269752

The making of the modern retail market: economic theory, business interests and economic policy in the passage of the 1964 Resale Prices Act
Helen Mercer
Pages: 778-801 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1270267

The decline in the British bank population since 1810 obeys a law of negative compound interest
J. J. Bissell
Pages: 802-813 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1301430

Banks, births, and tipping points in the historical demography of British banking: A response to J.J. Bissell
Philip Garnett, Simon Mollan & R. Alexander Bentley
Pages: 814-820 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1301429


EBHA doctoral summer school


Keynote Speakers
: Franco Amatori (Bocconi University), Harold James (Princeton
University), Grietjie Verhoef (University of Johannesburg)

Faculty Members: Marten Boon (Norwegian University of Science and Technology),
Ludovic Cailluet (EDHEC Business School), Andrea Colli (Bocconi University), Abe de
Jong (Rotterdam School of Management), Jeffrey Fear (University of Glasgow), Andrea
Schneider (Gesellschaft für Unternehmensgeschichte), Ben Wubs (Erasmus University)

The 9th edition of the EBHA (European Business History Association) Summer
School will take place in Ancona (Italy) from Monday, September 4th to Saturday,
September 9th, 2017. The school aims at providing doctoral students with an overview of
relevant research results and of innovative tools and methodologies in the field of Business History. It is organised jointly by the European Business History Association (EBHA), the Università Politecnica delle Marche and the Italian Association for Business History (ASSI). Students will be accommodated in the beautiful town of Ancona debating and discussing their research with leading international scholars. The title of the school will be Business History: Debates, challenges and opportunities. The school will focus on theoretical, methodological and practical issues which are of relevance for advanced research in business history. The main aim of the school is to provide students with a full understanding of the newest trends in research in the field and to provide a friendly atmosphere in which to discuss their preliminary findings with leading scholars as well as among their peers. In this respect, the program features both lectures and seminars given by faculty and student presentations of their research projects. Each student will have 20 minutes maximum to present her/his project, stressing especially: research questions and goals, methodology, sources, challenges and provisional outcomes. After her/his presentation, each student will receive questions and comments from other students and from faculty members (approx 15-20 minutes).

The organisers will cover all local costs (accommodation in a double or triple room
and food), but participants are expected to pay their own travel expenses. Participation
will be limited to 15-20 PhD students.
Those interested in attending the summer school should send the following
documents by e-mail to the academic organiser Dr. Veronica Binda

1) a brief CV (not exceeding one page);
2) a summary of their dissertation project (not exceeding three pages);
3) (if possible) an example of their work in progress, e.g. a draft chapter or a working paper (in any language).

The deadline for applications is May 14th , 2017. A maximum of 20 participants will be selected from these applications and will be notified by June 4th, 2017.


PhD Scholarships in “Time and Societal Challenges in a Changing Global Economy”

PhD Scholarships in “Time and Societal Challenges in a Changing Global Economy”

PhD Scholarships in “Time and Societal Challenges in a Changing Global Economy”

Copenhagen Business School invites applications for 6 vacant PhD scholarships within the field of “Time and Societal Challenges in a Changing Global Economy”. The successful applicants will be organized as a cross-departmental cohort with a number of common PhD courses and other activities such as workshops. The positions will be based in the four Departments associated with the OMS Doctoral School: Department of Business and Politics (DBP), Department of Organisation (IOA), Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy (MPP) and Department of Management, Society and Communication (MSC).

Theme of the Cohort

The notions of time and temporality have increasingly become the object of study across the social sciences. Temporality refers to the linear progression of time, historicity, the perception of time, processes of sequencing and order and rates of change as well as the social organization of time. In sociology, for instance, it is becoming increasingly recognized that existing theoretical frameworks, largely rooted in traditional approaches, do not adequately explain the active role of time in a globalizing economy. In the political sciences, the historicity of practices, norms and political ideas and the concept of “political time” have received increased attention particularly in association with questions about the character of continuity and change. Furthermore, analyses of the ways in which political, institutional and ideational processes unfold over time are central to the study of political economy and the shaping of policy processes. Also, in the area of Business Studies, there is an increasing turn of attention to the strategic use of historical narratives in corporate action.

The work of the cohort will challenge prevailing chronological, linear and sequential theories of time in politics and the study of organizations to embrace an active and dynamic view of time. Using innovative theories and methods, it will seek to explain how and why temporal dynamics shape and impact contemporary challenges. These challenges include, for example, globalizing and de-globalizing processes, state capacities in an era of limited economic growth, and the changing relationships between actors, organizations and the institutional frameworks. A particular focus will be put on how temporal structures and processes of sequencing constrain, but at times also empower individual and collective actors (e.g. business, workers, policy makers, civil society representatives), and the ways in which, within that context, those actors seek to reconfigure past, present and future. The work of the cohort will furthermore explore how processes of temporal construction affect the interactions between different actors and institutions in the context of these challenges.

The proposed PhD cohort will draw upon central ideas in philosophy, sociology, political science, history, cultural studies and organization theory. Although students may choose to write a PhD within a particular disciplinary perspective they will be encouraged to draw upon some of the other disciplines that will be utilized and explored within the cohort. We see this interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary cohort which is expected to use a range of innovative theoretical frameworks and sound research designs (including qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods alongside experimental approaches) as the only viable way forward in new research endeavors. There will be a shared understanding that differences in temporalities constituted by factors such as past and future time horizons, mechanisms of connecting past and future in the present, pace and acceleration of change, lead to increased temporal complexity.

Pool of possible topics within the overall theme

Department of Business and Politics (DBP)

• The politics and history of social challenges in a comparative perspective (such as sustainability, inequality, 4th industrial revolution)

• The political economy of European crises: politics, polity and policy
Department of Organization (IOA)

• The role of time in organizing for societal challenges

• Organizational time, learning and innovation

• Organizing time, routines and change
Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy (MPP)

• Time, history and entrepreneurship in a globalized world

• Time and transformations in private-public relations

• The philosophy of time and chronology
Department of Management, Society and Communication (MSC)

• Temporality and talk-action dynamics in CSR

• Varieties of time perceptions attached to multi-stakeholder initiatives

• Colliding temporal orders and new forms of organizing


The PhD programme

The PhD programme at CBS is highly international. It allows you to conduct research under the supervision of CBS professors, supported by research training courses (30 ECTS points). You are expected to participate in international research conferences and spend time abroad as a visiting PhD student. For further information on the CBS PhD programme please consult this page:
It is also required that the applicant shows an interest in joining the respective Department’s research environment. You find information on the departments here:
CBS PhD graduates are held in high esteem not only in academia and research institutions but also in government and business where their research qualifications are increasingly demanded. One third of CBS PhD graduates go on to employment outside universities and public research institutions.

Copenhagen Business School has a broad commitment to the excellence, distinctiveness and relevance of its teaching and research programmes. Candidates who wish to join us should demonstrate enthusiasm for working in organization of this type (highlighting, for example, relevant business, educational and dissemination activities).

For further information please contact the head of department of the respective department:

• DBP: Prof MSO Caroline de la Porte +4538153550

• IOA: Prof MSO Signe Vikkelsø +4538152827

• MPP: Prof Lotte Jensen +4538153637

• MSC: Associate Prof Dorte Salskov-Iversen +4538153181
For administrative information please contact Henrik Hermansen +45 3815 3656,
General information

A PhD scholarship runs for a period of 3 years, and includes teaching obligations equivalent of 1⁄2 year’s work (840 work hours). The scholarships are fully salaried positions, according to the national Danish collective agreement. The scholarship includes the tuition fees, office space, travel grants plus a salary, currently starting with per month app. DKK 23.770 (app. 3,160 euro) up to DKK 28.964 (app. 3,860 euro) depending on seniority, plus a pension contribution totaling 17,1 % of 85 per cent of the base salary.
The salary level and appointment is determined by the Ministry of Finance’s collective agreement with the Central Academic Organization.
The PhD student will be enrolled at the PhD School in Organization and Management Studies (OMS). To be considered, the candidate should have a degree at the Masters level (similar to the 3 + 2 Bologna process). An educational background in philosophy, sociology, political science, history, cultural studies and organization theory or related fields is necessary. The applicant must have successfully completed the Master’s degree before commencing a PhD at CBS. The applicants must be fluent in English.
The application must include a 5 page research proposal following the guidelines available here:
In addition to the research proposal, the application must include copies of a Master’s degree certificate or other certificates of a corresponding level, brief curriculum vitae (CV), a list of papers and publications, and one copy of a selected written work (e.g. Master’s thesis). Applicants must enclose documentation for English language skills if not mother tongue.
Recruitment procedure

The Recruitment Committee will shortlist applicants. The shortlisted applicants will be assessed by the Assessment Committee. All applicants will be notified of their status in the recruitment process shortly after the application deadline.

The applicants selected for assessment will be notified about the composition of the Assessment Committee and later in the process about the result of the assessment.

Once the recruitment process is completed each applicant will be notified of the outcome of their application.

The successful applicants are expected to start their position on September 1 2017.


Closing date: June 1, 2017

Copenhagen Business School must receive all application material, including all appendices (see items above), by the application deadline.

Details about Copenhagen Business School and the departments are available at


Application Deadline
June 1, 2017
Apply online