BH 61.6 September issue now out

Business History

Business History, Volume 61, Issue 6, September 2019 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

Table of contents

Research articles

Open Access

Prospects for a transparency revolution in the field of business history |
Andrew Smith & Maki Umemura
Pages: 919-941 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1439019

What’s in a price? The American raw cotton market in Liverpool and the Anglo-American War
Sheryllynne Haggerty
Pages: 942-970 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1434146

Restructuring of the Danish pork industry: The role of mergers and takeovers, 1960–2010
Jesper Strandskov
Pages: 971-1004 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1439020

Failure to learn from failure: The 2008 mortgage crisis as a déjà vu of the mortgage meltdown of 1994
Natalya Vinokurova
Pages: 1005-1050 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1440548

The early emergence of European commercial education in the nineteenth century: Insights from higher engineering schools
Adrien Jean-Guy Passant
Pages: 1051-1082 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1448063

Book reviews

Les Gillet de Lyon. Fortunes d’une grande dynastie industrielle (1838-2015)
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 1083-1085 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1216506

La sfida internazionale della Comit
Giuseppe Telesca
Pages: 1086-1087 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1443784

Aluminiumville: Government, global business, and the Scottish Highlands
Lachlan MacKinnon
Pages: 1088-1089 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1446769

ToC: BH 61(5) July 2019 is now out!

The new issue of Business History is a guest edited special issue on Rhenish Capitalism

Abstract of introduction

This article examines the emergence and development of the comparative analysis of capitalism and recent debates about Varieties of Capitalism (VoC). We argue that the VoC-approach should pay more attention to change over time, and only claim to put the firm in the centre of analysis. Hence, we propose another, more historical, analytic framework, which is based on the VoC-approach and historical institutionalism, and which fits better to an analysis of Rhenish Capitalism, i.e. the German case, from a business history perspective. Keeping in mind this research agenda, we outline the history of the German economy in the second half of the 20th century.

The introduction is freely available from the publishers – please follow the link for your copy.

Introduction: Rhenish capitalism and business history
Christian Marx & Morten Reitmayer
Pages: 745-784 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1583211


Articles

The concept of social fields and the productive models: Two examples from the European automobile industry
Morten Reitmayer
Pages: 785-809 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1379504

Corporate law and corporate control in West Germany after 1945
Boris Gehlen
Pages: 810-832 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1319939

Between national governance and the internationalisation of business. The case of four major West German producers of chemicals, pharmaceuticals and fibres, 1945–2000
Christian Marx
Pages: 833-862 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1284201

Financing Rhenish capitalism: ‘bank power’ and the business of crisis management in the 1960s and 1970s
Ralf Ahrens
Pages: 863-878 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1259313

Supplier relations within the German automobile industry. The case of Daimler-Benz, 1950–1980
Stephanie Tilly
Pages: 879-897 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1267143

Confrontational coordination: The rearrangement of public relations in the automotive industry during the 1970s
Ingo Köhler
Pages: 898-917 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1257001

ToC: BH 61, 4

Business History

The June issue of Business History is out!

Original Articles

The virtues of dialogue between academics and businessmen
Lise Arena & Leonard Minkes
Pages: 581-602 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1382473

Directors and syndics in corporate networks: Argentina and Italy compared (1913–1990)
Andrea Lluch, Alberto Rinaldi, Erica Salvaj & Michelangelo Vasta
Pages: 603-628 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1382474

A French migrant business network in the period of export-led growth (ELG) in Mexico: The case of the Barcelonnettes
José Galindo
Pages: 629-658 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1394666

Cadbury and the rise of the supermarket: innovation in marketing 1953–1975
Adrian R. Bailey & Andrew Alexander
Pages: 659-680 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1400012

Technical self-sufficiency, pricing independence: a Penrosean perspective on China’s emergence as a major oil refiner since the 1960s
Damian Tobin
Pages: 681-702 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1413095

History of microfinance in Bangladesh: A life cycle theory approach
Md Aslam Mia, Hwok-Aun Lee, VGR Chandran, Rajah Rasiah & Mahfuzur Rahman
Pages: 703-733 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1413096


Book Reviews

Les Européens dans les ports en situation coloniale, xixe-xxe siècles: Espaces portuaires. L’Europe du Nord à l’interface des économies et des cultures, xixe-xxe siècles: Gouverner les ports de commerce à l’heure libérale. Regards sur les pays d’Europe du Sud
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 734-736 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1191840

Geschichte und Gewinn. Der Umgang deutscher Konzerne mit ihrer NS-Vergangenheit
Simon Gogl
Pages: 737-738 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1403082

The Golden Passport: Harvard Business School, the Limits of Capitalism, and the Moral Failure of the MBA Elite
Jason Russell
Pages: 739-740 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1426531

Foundations of managing sporting events: organising the 1966 FIFA World Cup
Alan Tomlinson
Pages: 741-742 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1429087

Trade and technology networks in the Chinese textile industry. Opening up before the reforms
Valeria Zanier
Pages: 743-744 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1430106

ToC: BH 61(3) – SI on Health Industries

Business History, Volume 61, Issue 3, April 2019 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

Health Industries in the 20th century

This new issue contains the following articles:

Introduction

Health Industries in the Twentieth Century
Pierre-Yves Donzé & Paloma Fernández Pérez
Pages: 385-403 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1572116
Special issue on: Health industries in the 20th century

Learning from giants: Early exposure to advance markets in the growth and internationalisation of Spanish health care corporations in the twentieth century
Paloma Fernández Pérez, Nuria Puig, Esteban García-Canal & Mauro F. Guillén
Pages: 404-428 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1369528
Special issue in: Health industries in the 20th century

Thriving in the shadow of giants: The success of the Japanese surgical needle producer MANI, 1956–2016
Ken Sakai
Pages: 429-455 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1424833
Special issue paper in: Health industries in the 20th century

Challenging the Problem of ‘Fit’: Advancing the Regenerative Medicine Industries in the United States, Britain and Japan
Maki Umemura
Pages: 456-480 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1476496
Special issue in: Health industries in the 20th century

‘Importance of Germany to Countries around and to World Economy makes it impossible to ignore’ – The Rockefeller Foundation and Public Health in Germany after WWII
Sabine Schleiermacher
Pages: 481-497 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1432597

 

Socialisation of healthcare demand and development of the French health system (1890–1938)
Jean-Paul Domin
Pages: 498-517 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1454433
Special issue paper in: Health industries in the 20th century

China: The development of the health system during the Maoist period (1949–76)
Roser Alvarez-Klee
Pages: 518-537 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1480611
Special issue on: Health industries in the 20th century

Architects and knowledge transfer in hospital systems: The introduction of Western hospital designs in Japan (1918–1970)
Pierre-Yves Donzé
Pages: 538-557 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1418859

 

The genesis, growth and organisational changes of private health insurance companies in Spain (1915–2015)
Jerònia Pons-Pons & Margarita Vilar-Rodríguez
Pages: 558-579 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1374371

 

New book: Engineering Rules

Dear all

this post is on behalf of JoAnne Yates:

I’m happy to announce that Engineering Rules: Global Standard Setting Since 1880, by JoAnne Yates and Craig N. Murphy, is now available through Johns Hopkins University Press (it will be available on Amazon in early June). This book chronicles the engineers and organizations who have created the voluntary standards we depend on to make our world work. For a 20% discount, go to https://jhupbooks.press.jhu.edu/title/engineering-rules and use the code HTWN at checkout.

Best,

JoAnne

CfP on History and Business Storytelling

Call for Papers on History and Business Storytelling

Volume Editor: Albert J. Mills (albert.mills@smu.ca)

  As part of the series “A World Scientific Encyclopedia of Business Storytelling” (edited by David Boje and Regents Professor), contributions are sought for a proposed volume on History and Business Storytelling (with a submissions delivery date of January 15, 2021).

In the words of David Boje, the overall series seeks “to extend new theories of prospective sensemaking, quantum storytelling (how humans are connected to the environment, not separate), and the relation of narrative-counter narrative dialectics to dialogic webs of multiplicity.” To that end, the series seeks “new business story paradigms that go beyond mere social constructivism, short-term shareholder wealth maximization, and disembodied textual narratives to the work in embodiment, critical accounts for the voiceless and marginalized, socioeconomic storytelling for socially responsible capitalism, and true storytelling principles as an alternative to fake news and fake leadership that infects the old business storytelling paradigm.” Boje and Rosile (in press) are attempting to bring together a critical ‘Storytelling Science’ paradigm.

At first sight it may appear that business and storytelling are two very different endevours; one involving a series of activities to produce services, products, profits, etc., and the other involving the use of tales to explain and make sense of innumerable social activities (Weick, 1995). More often than not, the two are aligned as those involved in business activities seek to explain and support those activities. Examples at the individual level include stories of the `self-made’ man (sic), the characteristics of the successful entrepreneur (Weber, 1967), the transformational leader (Mittal & Dhar, 2015), etc. At the company level examples include corporate histories of successful activities that explain how the company has remained in business over time and the use of artefacts of the past to lend a sense of history to the company’s operations (Corke, 1986; Gunn, 1985). At the industry (or field) level there are accounts that serve to explain such things as the link between strategy (Chandler, 1977), other practices (Pugh & Hickson, 1976; Woodward, 1958) and organizational survival, legitimacy, efficiencies, etc., (DiMaggio & Powell, 1983). And at the overall socio-economic level there are numerous accounts valuing the economic, political, and philosophical outcomes of capitalism (Burnham, 1941; Chandler, 1984; Drucker, 1939, 1942; Fukuyama, 2006).

Although not uncontested, these various tales of business have collectively served over time to privilege for-profit organizations (Donaldson, 1985; McQuaid, 1994) as the model of economic organization, philosophy, and politics (Drucker, 1947); as the primary and favoured form of organizing economic life (Drucker, 1939); as the main or only legitimate form of organization control and management (Hayek, 1944). In the process business and capitalism became interwoven in ways that cast owner (Marx, 1999), manager (Burnham, 1941), employee (Jacques, 1996) and the market (Burns & Stalker, 1961) as central forms of organizational activity and thought (Bendix, 1974). It has not also shaped the character of business activity but the characters at the heart of those activities, namely, white, upper-class, Western men (Acker, 1990; Jacques, 1997; Prasad, 2012).

Beneath, in tandem with, and/or a reflection on, tales from the field of business there has been another formidable set of stories that has helped to shape the notion of business; namely, the field of business studies (Khurana, 2007). Arguably, the development of business studies as a field of enquiry not only reproduced tales from the field but drew on it to define business studies as a specific area of scientific enquiry; one linked to the professionalization of the business manager (Khurana, 2007). In the process, the field of business studies largely excluded alternative modes of organizing (Foster, Mills, & Weatherbee, 2014; Parker, 2002; Weick, 1995).  Paradoxically, in the quest for scientific legitimacy (Khurana, 2007), one of the most successful attempts to teach business studies has been the advent of the Harvard University case study method (Copeland, 1958; McDonald, 2017). Here we have an essentially fictional account of a business problem written in a way that is presented to the reader (the potential manager) as a `real life’ situation with scientifically established behavioural outcomes. Regardless of how it was intended, the central character is more-often-than-not presented as a white male who is primarily interested in profitability, efficiency and the bottom line. In other words, it is not only scenarios that are constructed but people who are privileged, ignored and/or marginalized.

In much of these accounts of business, history – either implicitly or explicitly – is drawn on for support and legitimacy (Rowlinson & Hassard, 1993). This ranges from corporate histories of selected businesses (Smith, 1986) or classes of business (Wilkins, 1974) through to histories of the field (George, 1968; Khurana, 2007; Urwick, 1956; Wren, 1972). Over recent years there have been calls not only for more historical analyses in management and organization studies (Clark & Rowlinson, 2004) but also for greater discussion of historical methods (Booth & Rowlinson, 2006; Bowden, 2016, 2018), opening up possibilities for new narratives of business (Cummings, Bridgman, Hassard, & Rowlinson, 2017; Durepos & Mills, 2012; Williams & Mills, 2017).

This volume on ‘History and Business Storytelling’ will provide insights into stories fostering the idea of business, including, but not limited to:

  • the relationship between historical methods and business storytelling (Cummings et al., 2017)
  • the processes through which certain business stories are developed  (Durepos, 2015)
  • revisiting classic tales (Hassard, 2012)
  • re-envisioning the field through alternative narratives (Foster et al., 2014)
  • uses and abuses of storytelling in business (Suddaby, Foster, & Trank, 2010)
  • business narratives and voices from the South (Prasad, 2003)
  • Historical methods as business narratives (White, 1987)
  • Antenarratives  (Boje, 2010)
  • Case studies as narratives of business (Raufflet & Mills, 2009)
  • Business studies as tales of the field (Van Maanen, 1988)
  • Business storytelling and gendered narration (Calás & Smircich, 1996)
  • Business storytelling and intersectional characterization (Brah & Phoenix, 2004)
  • Narratives as organization (Czarniawska & Gagliardi, 2003)
  • Business archives as storytelling cache’s (Decker, 2013)

 

Chapters should explore stories/narratives used in the process of producing the idea of business. There is no methodological preference for this chapter and authors may use any forms of method ranging from positivist (Bowden, 2018)  to postmodernist (Boje, 1995).      

Submissions should be no more than thirty pages, double spaced, times new roman 12 font, with one-inch margins.  All questions regarding chapters should be directed to Albert J. Mills, volume editor (albert.mills@smu.ca). 

Proposals for chapters should be no more than three double spaced pages and are due on May 22, 2019.   

 

Acker, J. (1990). Hierarchies, jobs, bodies: A theory of gendered organizations. Gender & Society, 4(2), 139-158.

Bendix, R. (1974). Work and Authority in Industry. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Boje, D. M. (1995). Stories of the Storytelling Organization: A Postmodern Analysis of Disney as “Tamara-Land”. The Academy of Management Journal, 38(4), 997-1035.

Boje, D. M. (2010). Narrative Analysis. In A. J. Mills, G. Durepos, & E. Wiebe (Eds.), Sage Encyclopedia of Case Study Research (Vol. II, pp. 591-594). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Boje, D. M.; Rosile, G. A. (in press). Download at https://www.dropbox.com/sh/bd297r9f6lhgjeh/AAChF7KdZH7hvz3aGIySrTJwa?dl=0

Booth, C., & Rowlinson, M. (2006). Management and organizational history: Prospects. Management & Organizational History, 1(1), 5-30.

Bowden, B. (2016). Editorial and note on the writing of management history. Journal of Management History, 22(2), 118-129. doi:10.1108/jmh-02-2016-0009

Bowden, B. (2018). Work, Wealth, & Postmodernism. The intellectual conflict at the heart of business endeavour. London: Palgrave.

Brah, A., & Phoenix, A. (2004). Ain’t I a woman? Revisiting intersectionality. Journal of International Women’s Studies, 5(3), 75-86.

Burnham, J. (1941). The Managerial Revolution. New York: Putnam.

Burns, T., & Stalker, G. (1961). The Management of Innovation. London.: Tavistock.

Calás, M. B., & Smircich, L. (1996). Not Ahead of her Time: Reflections on Mary Parker Follett as Prophet of Management. Organization, 3(1), 147-152. doi:10.1177/135050849631008

Chandler, A. D. (1977). The Visible Hand. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Chandler, A. D. (1984). The emergence of managerial capitalism. Business History Review, 58(Winter), 473-503.

Clark, P., & Rowlinson, M. (2004). The Treatment of History in Organization Studies: Toward an “Historic Turn”? Business History, 46(3), pp.331-352.

Copeland, M. T. (1958). And Mark An Era. The Story of the Harvard Business School. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.

Corke, A. (1986). British Airways. The Path to Profitability. London: Frances Pinter.

Cummings, S., Bridgman, T., Hassard, J., & Rowlinson, M. (2017). A New History of Managment. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Czarniawska, B., & Gagliardi, P. (Eds.). (2003). Narratives We Organize By. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Decker, S. (2013). The silence of the archives: business history, post-colonialism and archival ethnography. Management & Organizational  History, 8(2), 155-173.

DiMaggio, P. J., & Powell, W. (1983). The Iron cage revisited: Institutional Isomorphism and Collective Rationality in Organizational Fields. American Sociological Review, 48, 147-160.

Donaldson, L. (1985). In Defence of Organization Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Drucker, P. F. (1939). The end of economic man : a study of the new totalitarianism. New York: The John Day Co.

Drucker, P. F. (1942). The future of industrial man. New York,: The John Day company.

Drucker, P. F. (1947). Big business : a study of the political problems of American capitalism. London , Toronto: W. Heinemann ltd.

Durepos, G. (2015). ANTi-History: toward amodern histories. In P. G. McLaren, A. J. Mills, & T. G. Weatherbee (Eds.), The Routledge Companion to Management and Organizational History (pp. 153-180). London: Routledge.

Durepos, G., & Mills, A. J. (2012). ANTi-History: Theorizing the Past, History, and Historiography in Management and Organizational Studies. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing

Foster, J., Mills, A. J., & Weatherbee, T. G. (2014). History, field definition and management studies: the case of the New Deal. Journal of Management History, 20(2), 179-199.

Fukuyama, F. (2006). The end of history and the last man (1st Free Press trade pbk. ed.). New York: Free Press ;.

George, C. S. (1968). The History of Management Thought. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Gunn, J. (1985). The defeat of distance : Qantas 1919-1939. St. Lucia, Qld.: University of Queensland Press.

Hassard, J. (2012). Rethinking the Hawthorne Studies: The Western Electric research in its social, political and historical context. Human Relations, 65(11), 1431-1461. doi:10.1177/0018726712452168

Hayek, F. (1944). The Road to Serfdom. London: Routledge.

Jacques, R. (1996). Manufacturing the Employee: Management Knowledge from the 19th to 21st Centuries. London: Sage.

Jacques, R. (1997). The Unbearable Whiteness of Being: Reflections of a Pale, Stale Male. In P. Prasad, A. J. Mills, M. Elmes, & A. Prasad (Eds.), Managing the Organizational Melting Pot: Dilemmas of Workplace Diversity (pp. 80-106). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Khurana, R. (2007). From Higher Aims To Hired Hands. The Social Transformation of American Business Schools and the Unfulfilled Promise of Management as a Profession. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Marx, K. (1999). Capital: a critical analysis of capitalist production (Abridged ed.). London: Oxford University Press.

McDonald, D. (2017). The Golden Passport. New York: Harper-Collins.

McQuaid, K. (1994). Uneasy Partners. Big Business in American Politics 1945-1990. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins.

Mittal, S., & Dhar, R. (2015). Transformational leadership and employee creativity. Management Decision, 53(5), 894-910.

Parker, M. (2002). Against management : organization in the age of managerialism. Cambridge: Polity.

Prasad, A. (Ed.) (2003). Postcolonial Theory and Organizational Analysis: A Critical Engagement. London: Palgrave.

Prasad, A. (Ed.) (2012). Against the Grain. Copenhagen: Copenhagen Business School Press.

Pugh, D. S., & Hickson, D. J. (1976). Organisational Structure in its Context: the Aston Programme I. London: Saxon House.

Raufflet, E., & Mills, A. J. (Eds.). (2009). The Dark Side: Critical Cases on the Downside of Business. Sheffield: Greenleaf Publishing.

Rowlinson, M., & Hassard, J. (1993). The invention of corporate culture – A history of the histories of Cadbury. Human Relations, 46(3), 299-326.

Smith, P. (1986). It Seems Like Only Yesterday: Air Canada –  The first 50 Years. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart Limited.

Suddaby, R., Foster, W. M., & Trank, C. Q. (2010). Rhetorical History as a Source of Competitive Advantage. Advances in Strategic Management, 27, 147-173.

Urwick, L. (Ed.) (1956). The Golden Book of Management: A Historical Record of the Life and Work of Seventy Pioneers. London: Newman Neame Limited.

Van Maanen, J. (1988). Tales of the Field. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Weber, M. (1967). The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (T. Parsons, Trans.). London: Allen & Unwin.

Weick, K. E. (1995). Sensemaking in Organizations. London, UK: Sage Publications Inc.

White, H. (1987). The Content of the Form: Narrative Discourse and Historical Representation. London: John Hopkins University Press.

Wilkins, M. (1974). The Maturing of Multinational Enterprise. American Business Abroad from 1914 to 1970. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Williams, K. S., & Mills, A. J. (2017). Frances Perkins: gender, context and history in the neglect of a management theorist. Journal of Management History, 23(1), 32-50. doi:10.1108/jmh-09-2016-0055

Woodward, J. (1958). Management and Technology. London: HMSO.

Wren, D. A. (1972). The Evolution of Management Thought. New York: The Ronald Press Co.

 

BH SI CfP: Gender, Feminism, and Business History

Business History Special Issue Call for Papers

Gender, Feminism, and Business History: From periphery to centre

 

Guest editors:

Hannah Dean, University of St Andrews, UK

Linda Perriton, University of Stirling, UK

Scott Taylor, University of Birmingham, UK

Mary Yeager, University of California Los Angeles, USA

 

Submission deadline: 15 January 2020.

 

Gender relations represent one of the most significant social issues of modernity, profoundly affecting both women and men’s educational, economic, and political lives. Feminist theory and activism during the last two centuries is the highest profile marker of this, shaping our understanding of gender relations by focusing on equality, social justice, discrmination, inclusion/exclusion, and latterly the intersection of gender with race and ethnicity. The established territory of business history is the global north, after the mid-19th century, focusing on industrial production companies. Despite the changes provoked by feminism and greater recognition of the material and symbolic importance of gender relations, business history as a field maintains a largely gender-free and feminism-free centre. This special issue is designed to change that, by bringing both gender and feminism from the periphery of business history to its centre.

 

Gendered analysis of business history is a considerable field, but perhaps the most prominent challenge it has mounted to date is to the straightforward narratives of great men founding and building large organizations. The simple ‘great man’ narrative may still be a significant staple of the research undertaken in the field, but it is only one possible approach among many. There is empirical and conceptual space for other, very different, narratives of business history and the history of business.

 

This special issue is the first in this field for almost a decade to be dedicated to gender and business and/or organizational history. With it, we want to create a space for research that brings gender and feminism to business history’s centre, to provoke further dialogue and debate about alternative frameworks for research within and beyond the issue itself. We expect contributions to accomplish either or both of the following  aims:

 

  1. To explore the significance of feminist theories and gender in advancing the analysis and understanding of women in particular as business owners, entrepreneurs, or as funders, silent partners, and designers supporting more visible business activity by men;
  2. To advance understanding of women and men working or living on the margins of the established territory of business history – i.e. outside of the global north, before the mid-19th century, outside of established industries, and as critics of masculinised ways of doing business.

 

In order to develop these broad aims, and in keeping with the aims of Business History, contributions to the Special Issue might explore (but is not limited to) the following topics:

 

  • What source materials and archives might offer a more complete understanding of women and feminism in business history?
  • What are the implications of changes occuring in the archive profession, and other developments such as the increase in feminist archiving?
  • How can gender and feminist perspecitves shed new light on the historical analysis of social strucutures inlcuding social, economic and politics systems as well as power?
  • How can gender and feminist perspectives inform business history not only from a Western perspectives but also from other perspectives inlcuding outside of the Anglo-American bubble i,e, Latin America, Africa and Asia?
  • How can gender and feminist perspectives inform business history before the 19th century?
  • How should the corporate archive and the firm in particular be interpreted when thinking about gender, feminism, and business history?
  • What changes to research questions, methods, or narratives, are necessary to enable women and feminism to be more effectively written into business histories as full participants?
  • How can we account for the role that women played in creating the opportunities e.g. as funders, silent partners, or as designers for ‘great men’ to dominate business histories?
  • How can business history contribute to the conceptual development of key feminist analytics such as sexism, patriarchy, or misogyny?
  • How would a gendered analysis of business history classics contribute to our understanding of them? For example, what would a feminist re-reading of Alfred Chandler’s work tell us?

 

Contributions are expected to build on the rich empirical, analytical, and methodological traditions in this journal and in the field more generally. We would very much welcome contributions from scholars located beyond business and management Schools, interdisciplinary work, and from scholars geographically located outside the global north.

 

Submission Instructions

  • This call is open and competitive. All submissions will be peer reviewed following the standard practice of the journal.
  • To be considered for this special issue, submissions must fit with the Aims and Scope of Business History, as well as this call for papers.
  • The guest editors will select a limited number of papers to be included in the special issue. Other papers submitted to the special issue may be considered for publication in other issues of the journal at the discretion of the Editor-in-Chief.
  • This special issue welcomes all contributions that address the broad themes described above. All submissions should be based on original research and innovative analysis.
  • For empirical papers based on sources or data sets from which multiple papers have been generated, authors must provide the Guest Editors with copies of all other papers based on the same data or sources.
  • The maximum submission length is 10,000 words (including graphs and tables).
  • Submissions must not be under consideration with another journal.
  • The submission deadline is 15 January 2020 via ScholarOne, using the drop-down menu to indicate that the submission is to the Special Issue on Gender, Feminism, and Business History.
  • Please ensure that your manuscript fully complies with the publishing style of formatting regulation of Business Historyas per their ‘Instructions for authors’
  • Authors may be asked to use an English language copyeditor before final acceptance.

 

Please direct questions about the submission process, or any administrative matter, to the Editorial Office: [email address].

 

The guest editors of this special issue would be happy to be contacted directly with queries relating to potential submissions:

 

Hannah Dean hd48@st-andrews.ac.uk

Linda Perriton linda.perriton@stir.ac.uk

Scott Taylor s.taylor@bham.ac.uk

Mary Yeager yeager@ucla.edu

 

 

BH 61,1: SI Changing Secondhand Economies

Business History, Volume 61, Issue 1, January 2019 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

Special issue on Changing Secondhand Economies

Introduction

Changing Secondhand Economies
Karen Tranberg Hansen & Jennifer Le Zotte
Pages: 1-16 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1543041
Articles

Domestic textiles and country house sales in Georgian England
Jon Stobart
Pages: 17-37 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1368493

 

‘Fence-ing lessons’: child junkers and the commodification of scrap in the long nineteenth century
Wendy A. Woloson
Pages: 38-72 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1294161

 

Jews, second-hand trade and upward economic mobility: Introducing the ready-to-wear business in industrializing Helsinki, 1880–1930 |
Laura Katarina Ekholm
Pages: 73-92 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1546694

 

Shylocks to superheroes: Jewish scrap dealers in Anglo-American popular culture
Jonathan Z. S. Pollack
Pages: 93-105 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1413094

 

The mass consumption of refashioned clothes: Re-dyed kimono in post war Japan
Miki Sugiura
Pages: 106-121 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1494730

 

The work of shopping: Resellers and the informal economy at the goodwill bins
Jennifer Ayres
Pages: 122-154 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1369962

 

Valuation in action: Ethnography of an American thrift store
Frederik Larsen
Pages: 155-171 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1418330

 

History as business: Changing dynamics of retailing in Gothenburg’s second-hand market
Staffan Appelgren
Pages: 172-186 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1447563

 

Second-hand vehicle markets in West Africa: A source of regional disintegration, trade informality and welfare losses
Abel Ezeoha, Chinwe Okoyeuzu, Emmanuel Onah & Chibuike Uche
Pages: 187-204 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1459087

 

Urban prototypes: Growing local circular cloth economies
Lucy Norris
Pages: 205-224 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1389902
Corrigendum

Corrigendum
Pages: I-I | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1481912

ToC: BH 60(8) – Brand History Part 1

Business History, Volume 60, Issue 8, November 2018 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

The Brand and its History, Part I: Trademarks and Branding

Introduction

Trademarks in branding: Legal issues and commercial practices
Patricio Sáiz & Rafael Castro
Pages: 1103-1124 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1497765
Special issue on: The Brand and its History

Branding before the brand: Marks, imitations and counterfeits in pre-modern Europe
Carlo Marco Belfanti
Pages: 1125-1144 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1282946

Early marks: American trademarks before US trademark law
Paul Duguid
Pages: 1145-1168 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1246541

The ‘disguised’ foreign investor: Brands, trademarks and the British expatriate entrepreneur in Brazil
Teresa da Silva Lopes, Carlos Gabriel Guimarães, Alexandre Saes & Luiz Fernando Saraiva
Pages: 1169-1193 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1287174

Brands in the Basque gun making industry: The case of ASTRA-Unceta y Cía
Igor Goñi-Mendizabal
Pages: 1194-1224 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1282947

Cheese trademarks: Italian dairy firms’ practices during the 20th century
Ilaria Suffia, Andrea Maria Locatelli & Claudio Besana
Pages: 1225-1252 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1379506

The effects of producers’ trademark strategies on the structure of the cognac brandy supply chain during the second half of the 19th century. The reconfiguration of commercial trust by the use of brands
Thomas Mollanger
Pages: 1253-1274 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1357696

Disney in Spain (1930–1935)
Jose Bellido & Kathy Bowrey
Pages: 1275-1305 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1299129

CfP: ABH 2019 – Business Transformation in an Uncertain World

Deadline extended!

Call for Papers
Association of Business Historians Annual Conference
‘Business Transformation in an Uncertain World‘
Sheffield Hallam University, 4-6 July 2019

Businesses have always operated in a shifting and uncertain environment. Such
uncertainty has stemmed from a variety of factors including the surprising behaviour of rivals, the advent of new and sometimes disruptive technologies (such as steam power or electricity), changes in consumer tastes, the tightening or relaxation of regulation, macroeconomic disturbances (such as depressions), natural and industrial disasters, nationalization, political crises and war. The conference seeks to explore how businesses (and business organizations) in the past charted their way through an uncertain world, whether reactively or creatively through reorganization and the development of new strategies to secure an advantage. Failure may be as interesting as success.
Proposals for individual papers, or for full sessions, panel discussions or other session formats, are invited on this topic, broadly conceived, dealing with any historical period or region of the world, and using any relevant academic methodology. Some examples of themes that could be addressed are given below, but this list is not meant to be exhaustive.

  • The impact of disruptive technologies from the perspective of the innovator and/or the businesses threatened
  • Disruptive business models such as mail order, supermarkets, online retailing, flatpack furniture
  • The ways in which firms and industries have tried to predict and anticipate the actions of rivals: for example by developing forecasting tools
  • Moulding, identifying and responding to changes in consumer tastes and values: for example the targeting of women consumers by tobacco firms in the 1920s
  • Influencing and reacting to changes in the national and international regulatory environment: for example the tightened regulation of banking and financial services around the world after the 1930s depression
  • Reconfiguring the organizational structure of the firm or industry in order to create a new advantage, or respond to a new threat
  • The behaviour of management under stress, for example at times of financial crisis, or during a natural disaster or industrial accident (such as a mining explosion)
  • The development of management thought on how to cope with uncertainty from the early twentieth century onwards
  • Businesses and political uncertainty, including war, nationalization, and the threat of nationalization, and the collapse of existing political structures (e.g. decolonization of the British and French empires, or the break-up of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.)

As always, we also welcome proposals that are not directly related to the conference
theme.

How to submit a paper or session proposal
The programme committee will consider both individual papers and entire panels.
Individual paper proposals should include a one-page (up to 300-word) abstract and
5 line curriculum vitae (CV). Panel proposals should include a cover letter stating
the rationale for the panel and the name of its contact person; one-page (300-word)
abstract and author’s CV for each paper; and a list of preferred panel chairs and
commentators with contact information. Note that each academic session lasts 90
minutes, allowing time for 3 or at a pinch 4 papers. The deadline for submissions is
31 January 2019.

If you have any questions please contact j.singleton@shu.ac.uk.
Submissions must be made online at: https://unternehmensgeschichte.de/db/public/C7
Begin by selecting between uploading a single paper or a full panel. Have your abstract and CV ready. The software will guide you through the uploading and submission process.

Any other suggestions for the conference – workshops, poster sessions, panel
discussions – should be made to the programme committee through
j.singleton@shu.ac.uk.