PHD IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS AND STRATEGY

HENLEY BUSINESS SCHOOL (UNIVERSITY OF READING)

International Business and Strategy (IBS) at Henley Business School offers 3 fully-funded PhD scholarships for September 2022 entry. Join high calibre doctoral candidates from more than 25 countries in the world and study at a triple-accredited global business school. Henley Business School is ideally located, set on a beautiful campus, just 25 minutes by train from London. During your studies you will benefit from dedicated supervision, impressive facilities and high-quality support.

For over 50 years we have stood at the forefront of teaching and research in International Business (IB) and we continue to help define the research agenda in the field as well as in Business History and International Human Resource Management (IHRM). As a part of our program, we offer the International Business Masterclasses, which allow to engage in key IB and IHRM topics taught by notable intellectual figures in the field and provide networking opportunities with PhD students from all over the world. Our research is driven through leading centres, such as the John H. Dunning Centre for International Business and the Centre for Economic Institutions and Business History.

Alongside the PhD in International Business and Strategy, we offer a Double PhD with the Department of Management, Economics and Industrial Engineering at Politecnico di Milano (Italy). The Department of Management, Economics and Industrial Engineering at Politecnico di Milano has a strong commitment to the excellence, distinctiveness and relevance of its teaching and research activities. Their PhD is highly international and graduates are held in high esteem – not only in academia – but also in public institutions and companies where their research qualifications are increasingly demanded. This 4-year Double PhD programme allows PhD students enrolled at the Henley Business School to spend a period of normally 12 months at Politecnico di Milano and benefit from joint supervision by one member of faculty from each institution throughout their career. There shall be one oral examination (“Viva”) and one thesis to be submitted by the student for the Double PhD Programme. Prospective candidates for this programme should clearly mention it in their PhD application at Henley Business School.

The PhD in International Business and Strategy and the Double PhD emphasise:

  • Formal research training (PhD/Masters level courses in year 1)
  • Flexibility to meet individual needs
  • Student-staff interaction
  • Timely completion of the degree

As part of your personal development, you will be encouraged to engage in teaching (formal training also provided), research activities, conferences and events within the Business School and around the world.

RESEARCH AREAS

We welcome applicants seeking to conduct postgraduate research in the following fields:

  • Business History,
  • International Business,
  • International Human Resource Management,
  • Strategy.

To help identify your fit with the departmental research agenda, a summary of the research interests of our faculty members and links to their academic profiles are available at http://hly.ac/ibs-phd.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

You should have obtained a Master degree at distinction or merit level in a relevant area from an internationally recognised university. Relevant research and/or industry experience may be considered for those with exceptional strengths.

As part of the application process, you will also be asked to submit a research proposal. Prior to your submission, you may wish to discuss your proposal with an individual faculty member working in the area. Please avoid contacting multiple faculty members.

HOW TO APPLY FOR A PhD

The application process normally consists of three main steps:

1. Formal application (incl. research proposal, CV, transcripts and reference letters)

2. Shortlisting based on the submitted documents

3. Formal interview

For fees (covered if fully funded), please visit the Graduate School website.

PhD FUNDING

The 3 fully funded PhD scholarships are awarded based on the quality of your research proposal, outstanding academic merit and two reference letters (preferably from academics). The closing date for funding applications is 15 June 2022.

CONTACT US

Please visit our website at http://hly.ac/ibs-phd. for full details on our PhD program and tips for a successful application. If you have any further questions, please contact us by email at phd.ibs@reading.ac.uk.

EIBA History track

The forthcoming EIBA annual conference (European International Business Academy) in Oslo, December 2022, will include a track on “Using History in International Business”? Here is the link to the conference:

http://www.bi.edu/about-bi/events/2022/december/eiba-2022/

Here is the link to the track description:

http://www.bi.edu/about-bi/events/2022/december/eiba-2022/using-history-in-international-business/

Launching the Dotcom-Archive website!

Our AHRC-funded project, Contextualizing Email Archives has recently finished and we are proud to share with you one of our major outputs: the Dotcom-Archive website!

Our new website tells the history of a Dotcom start-up company through its emails, opening a window into the first digital revolution. Our very own desktop assistant, Mr Gummy, guides you through four vignettes giving background information and directions. The vignettes deal with claims of the end of strategy in the Dotcom-era, burning through investor cash, trying to figure out how to make money from software and platform business models, and how to take a digital venture into international markets. These stories can be read on their own or used for teaching. 

The website is part of our wider AHRC-funded project. We believe emails are a valuable source of historical record, particularly for those wishing to understand the organizations of the digital era. Our project delivers two distinct outputs – the Dotcom-Archive website, and the EMCODIST search prototype that we used to create it.  

Stay tuned for updates, as we’re looking forward to announcing some more exciting plans on here soon. Until then, you can read more about our project in our open access publications: 

AI & Society

IEEE Big Data conference paper  

“Contextualising Email Archives” is a UK/US collaboration funded by UK Research and Innovation and led by the University of Bristol. Other partners are the National Archives (UK), Hagley Museum and Library (US), University of Maryland, and De Montfort University. The Dotcom-Archive website was developed by GreenHat Bristol and realised by ResearchIT Bristol.

4th Workshop on Business History in Central and Eastern Europe 

Call for papers: Firms, Wars, and Ethics in the Business History of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia 

Place: Università Ca’ Foscari, Venice 

Date: October 21-22, 2022 

Organizers: Ulf Brunnbauer (Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS), Regensburg), Valentina Fava (Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia), Alfred Reckendrees (Copenhagen Business School), Thomasz Olejniczak (Kozminski University, Warsaw), Volodymyr Kulikov (The Ukrainian Catholic University).

The workshop series is supported by the European Business History Association.

For this 4th Workshop on Business History in Central and Eastern Europe, the organizers invite scholars, including Ph.D. students of any relevant discipline to submit paper proposals on a broad range of topics related to business actors & corporate behavior in (and after) armed conflicts during the 20th century. 

The workshop will particularly draw on historical research on the two World Wars and their aftermaths to provide tentative answers to several questions evoked by the Russia-Ukraine war of 2022. 

The aim is to explore the relationship between business and geopolitics from a long-term historical perspective focusing on the economic and social consequences of the war, including (de)globalization processes. 

On February 24, 2022, Russia invaded Ukraine, causing thousands of deaths among civilians, colossal damage in the infrastructure, and forcing over 10 million people to leave their homes. In response, democratic states have demonstrated unprecedented unity and imposed extensive economic sanctions on Russia. The combination of military conflict, economic warfare, and humanitarian crisis has had an enormous impact on the economic environment, including the disruption of global supply chains, commodity price shock, increased market volatility, and making the world’s economic development, already hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, even more unpredictable. 

As a result, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has affected both the multinational companies as well as the domestic firms operating in Central-Eastern Europe. Within just a few weeks, companies running in CEE faced challenges rarely dealt with at business schools. Companies face ethical dilemmas and feel strong pressure from their shareholders and stakeholders, forcing them to make decisions that go well beyond usual business thinking and strategizing. Thousands of companies have decided to divest, withdraw, or scale down their operations in Russia. In contrast, others justify their decision to stay with their responsibility towards their employees in Russia and their unwillingness to deprive Russia’s population of essential goods such as food and medical supplies. The events unfolding in the last weeks in Ukraine and CEE have presented business historians with serious questions: 

The role of business in military conflicts and post-war development.

What are the various roles firms play in armed conflicts? 

How is the role of companies decided in conflicts? 

How and why can some companies benefit from war while others suffer disruption and destruction in their production and distribution networks? 

Why do some companies embrace the role of humanitarian actors providing welfare and assistance, while others that of political actors using their activities to build bridges for peace? 

Which role can business enterprises play in post-war development? 

How fast do companies return to the countries affected by war, and how do their previous decisions impact the post-war future? 

How does organizational resilience manifest itself in the aftermath of war? 

What can we learn from the experience of the First and the Second World Wars? 

Business ethics vs. unethical corporate behavior.

What does (business) history teach us about ethical behavior in times of war? 

How does public pressure affect corporate behavior and reputation? 

To what extent can ethical leadership and corporate social responsibility contribute to solving the humanitarian crisis? 

How do firms/managers decide what they perceive (un)ethical? 

Who are the main actors in this process? 

Corporate lessons from uncomfortable pasts.

Most historians do not embrace the naïve view of “learning from history” as history does not repeat itself. However, is there something that we can learn from corporate entanglement in wars and corporate strategies after armed conflicts? 

Are there implications after the war for companies operating in belligerent countries who perceive their activities as neutral? 

What are the advantages of staying or leaving for firms trying to rebuild their business abroad after a war? 

What role, if any, does corporate memory and corporal forgetting play in facilitating conflicts? 

Who decides and who should decide what to remember and forget, especially in the case of uncomfortable or dark heritage? 

We invite fellow scholars to discuss corporate behavior during past wars and humanitarian crises to contribute to our understanding of the Russia-Ukraine war and its possible consequences for business in Central and Eastern Europe from a historical perspective. The workshop is aimed to engage in a debate about the behavior of business actors and to understand whether and how firms’ behavior during and after wars has changed over time and across regions. The call is open to all topics that fit the general scope of the workshop. Although our focus is Central Eastern Europe, we welcome studies concerning other regions if they contribute to deepening our understanding of the topic. 

To apply, please, send an abstract of 500 words presenting the subject, the conceptual framework, the analytical approach, and the controversial issue(s) to tackle within the discussion, along with a maximum two-page-long CV by April 28, 2022, to Valentina Fava valentina.fava@unive.it

Papers for presentation will be selected following a peer-review procedure. The format of the workshops is designed to support a comprehensive discussion on selected topics. We welcome both panel proposals dealing with conceptual and methodological questions and brief contributions. 

Participants are invited to submit a written paper (not exceeding 6,000 words) three weeks before the workshop. We will distribute these texts among the workshop participants prior to the workshop. 

The organizers are currently applying to foundations for financial support to cover the costs of workshop participants. Colleagues from Central and Eastern Europe will be prioritized.

CfP Business History Summer School

Call for Papers: University of Tübingen & University of Glasgow PhD Summer School

Business Beyond the Brink: Crisis Management, Government Responses and Institutional Memory and Learning in the Modern World.

1-3 August 2022, Tübingen, Germany.

The University of Tübingen’s Collaborative Research Center 923 – “Threatened Orders: Societies under Stress” (Germany) – provides funding for an intensive three-day event aimed at PhD students in business history or economic history working on any topic that overlaps with the theme of the school (for more details, see “Further Notes for Applicants” below). Students will, the pandemic permitting, be hosted in the historic town of Tübingen and will present, debate and discuss their works-in-progress with leading international scholars within a world-class university.

The school aims to provide doctoral students with an overview of relevant research and innovative tools and methodologies in the fields of business and economic history. It is the third event in this series organised jointly by the Seminar für Neuere Geschichte (University of Tübingen) and the Centre for Business History in Scotland (University of Glasgow).

The school will take the form of presentations from students (c.25 minutes) and workshops hosted by established experts in the field. The aims of the school are:

1) to deepen students’ understanding of current themes in historical research (and how this can inform their own work);
2) to enhance research skills through masterclasses on methods for researching and writing history;  
3) to explore the main theoretical underpinnings particular to business and economic history; and
4) to provide a welcoming and convivial environment in which students can discuss their research with leading scholars and peers.

Students will benefit from the experience of academics from Tübingen and beyond. Confirmed speakers include Prof. Dr. Boris Gehlen (Stuttgart), Professor Patrick Fridenson (EHESS), Dr Daniel Menning (Tübingen) and Dr Christopher Miller (Glasgow). We hope to confirm additional speakers in the coming weeks and months.

Funding will cover flights and/or trains (up to an agreed limit, to be reimbursed after the school), accommodation, lunches, and the conference meal for up to fourteen students. There may also be limited space for applicants who wish to self-fund or who have received funding from their own institution.

Those interested in attending the summer school should e-mail the following documents to the organisers, Dr Daniel Menning (Daniel.Menning@uni-tuebingen.de) and Dr Christopher Miller (Christopher.Miller@glasgow.ac.uk).

1) a brief CV (two pages maximum);
2) a summary of their PhD (two pages maximum); and 
3) a title and abstract for their desired presentation topic, which should incorporate one or more major themes of the student’s PhD (one page maximum).

While not required, applicants are strongly encouraged to submit with their materials an example of a work-in-progress (e.g., a draft chapter, article, or working paper), preferably in English, German, or French. Please note, however, that all presentations and discussions will be in English.

The deadline for applications is 20 April 2022.  A maximum of 14 funded applicants will be selected and notified shortly afterwards. 

Further Notes for Applicants:

Overview of Scope and Aims of the School:

(This overview is only a guide. Students working on similar topics to those listed below are encouraged to speak to Daniel Menning and/or Christopher Miller in the first instance.)

With the COVID-19 virus spreading across the globe and many major economic countries shutting down social life and significant parts of the economy, we have recently witnessed an economic contraction which has proceeded at an astonishing pace as well as an equally swift, though rather more varied, rebound. Though it is too early yet to estimate the effects and predict the duration of the economic difficulties (including, for example, current shortages of raw materials and increased inflation) – particularly with the war in the Ukraine compounding such difficulties – , it is clear that many businesses suffered and many others were dislocated and/or remain in trouble. A significant number most likely will not survive in their pre-pandemic form, governmental bailout packages notwithstanding.

While interest in economic crises and their effects on businesses has increased over the past few years, starting with the Global Financial Crisis, the current conditions will likely give a new boost to research and result in a new thoughtfulness and a recalibration of research methods. This summer school therefore aims to better understand the linkages between businesses, government responses, and learning from crises through a combination of training masterclasses and a varied range of papers from PhDs and early career researchers working on the cutting edge of history and cognate disciplines.

Research Background:

Business and economic history has been at the forefront of explaining some of the major changes in economies and societies – starting with the work of Alfred Chandler in the 1960s. (Chandler 1962, 1977). Nevertheless, with regards to the business history of crises and crisis management specifically, the literature is far less well developed. There are three reasons for this neglect. First, the tradition of business history for several decades, until comparatively recently, was to study the history of individual firms, or less frequently sectors. Indeed, business history was once considered an applied branch of economic history for scholars wishing to move beyond macroeconomic trends. The net effect has been that the literature on firms has been dominated by commissioned histories where the historian is paid by the (surviving) company and given use of its archives. While often extremely valuable, these studies can tend towards “rise and fall” narratives.

Second, where business histories have studied crises specifically, commissioned works can potentially have some further methodological problems. Most obviously, many of the firms survived until at least the point the history was commissioned. Thus, it is perhaps a case of selection bias towards success – or at the very least towards the largest and most important companies (Berghoff 2006). Related to this, the nature of commissioned studies has also drawn criticism: namely, that success is often attributed to management rather than luck, while episodes of failure are attributed to external or unpredictable factors outside of management control.

Third, the causes and aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) of 2008 have generated many millions of pages of scholarship and commentary in the last decade, with the effect of prompting historians to draw comparisons with the Wall Street Crash and Great Depression. For instance, Werner Abelshauser (2009) is one of many interested in learning from economic crises explicitly through using the examples of 1931 and 2008. While not every crisis was like 2008 in cause, scale or scope, it is not necessarily a new phenomenon: the 2000 dot-com bubble was compared in much the same way. (Ojala and Uskali 2006). As a result, the stock market crash in 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression have become by far the most studied economic crisis in history, with renewed interest from 2008 (Tooze 2019), while the effect of the more regular, smaller scale, economic crises suffered by businesses before and after 1929 is largely neglected.

The current economic conditions promise to bring new momentum to the study of businesses in times of larger and smaller economic difficulties, and we are therefore inviting PhD students and ECRs (PhD awarded no earlier than 2019) working on these topics in history departments, management schools, or other cognate disciplines to submit proposals for the summer school.

Business History Initiative

Upcoming Event: “Forms of Capitalism”

The Business History Initiative invites you to a two-day virtual conference, organized by Sophus Reinert, Robert Fredona, and Teresa da Silva Lopes. The conference will take place on Friday, May 6, and Friday, May 13, 2022, from 12:00 PM – 4:00 PM (East Coast US Time). The schedule is listed below.

Over the past two decades scholars in the fields of economics, management, and comparative political theory have addressed and explored the wide range of existing varieties of capitalism. Taking their insights as a launching point, “Forms of Capitalism” seeks to understand the forms that capitalism has taken historically, from those it took as early as the seventeenth century, to those it currently takes and that are likely to persist into the future.

The very word “Capitalism” emerged originally out of languages of both critique and analysis, and capitalisms—past, present, and future—remain protean, elusive, and politically-contested phenomena. This event will encourage thinking with the past about the range and forms of capitalism that are now possible, especially as the need for a more sustainable, equitable, and ethical capitalism continues to become increasingly urgent.  

Please join us on May 6 and May 13. To receive a link to the conference meeting, please RSVP by email to bhi@hbs.edu.

May 6, 12:00 to 4:00 (East Coast US Time) 

Geoff Jones (HBS), Introduction
 
Mattias Fibiger (HBS), Chair 
Rebecca Henderson (HBS), “Reimagining Capitalism” 
Peter Hall (Harvard), “Growth Regimes” 
Quinn Slobodian (Wellesley), Comment 
 
Jeremy Friedman (HBS), Chair 
Mary O’Sullivan (University of Geneva), “The Ruin of Britain’s Manufactures: Capitalism and Colonialism through the Lens of Pitt’s 1785 Irish Proposals” 
D’Maris Coffman (UCL), “The First Crisis Economists: Lescure, Aftalion and the Theorization of Periodic and General Crises in Industrial Capitalism” 
Carolyn Biltoft (Graduate Institute, Geneva), Comment 
 
May 13, 12:00 to 4:00 (East Coast US Time) 

Sophus Reinert (HBS), Introduction 

Marlous van Waijenburg (HBS), Chair 
Sebouh Aslanian (UCLA), “‘Taking Risks Beyond the Bounds of Common Sense’? An Indo-Armenian ‘Bill of Exchange’ from Isfahan, c. 1730, and Trust Relations between Julfan Armenians and Marwari Indians” 
Joel Bakan (British Columbia, Law), “The Corporate Form of Capitalism” 
Francesca Trivellato (IAS), Comment 
 
Charlotte Robertson (HBS), Chair 
Mary Hicks (Chicago), “Captivity’s Commerce: The Theory and Methodology of Slaving and Capitalism” 
Bernard Harcourt (Columbia, Law), “The Kraken, perhaps, but what about the Behemoth?” 
Carl Wennerlind (Barnard), Comment 
 

BHC event on publishing in business historical journals

The BHC Emerging Scholars Committee will host a workshop on academic publishing for early-career scholars (see the Emerging Scholars interest group site here) as part of the “Mentoring Week 2022.”

“Joining the Scholarly Discourse: How to Publish in the Business History Field” will feature workshop speakers:

  • Walter Friedman, Co-Editor-in-Chief Business History Review
  • Stephanie Decker, Co-Editor-in-Chief Business History
  • Andrew Popp, Editor-in-Chief Enterprise & Society

In part, the #BHC2022 pre-conference event has been organized to provide information and support for the #BHC2022online hosted on Zoom Events. The link to the #BHC2022 pre-conference will be sent out to everyone who has registered for the #BHC2022 by March 21st. 

If you have not registered yet to attend #BHC2022, please do so here
https://thebhc.org/annual-meeting-registration

The full program of the pre-conference event is now available here: https://thebhc.org/pre-conference-event

Business history panel at the German Studies Association Annual Conference

You are invited to submit a proposal to the seminar “Made in Germany: Myths and Materiality of an Exporting Nation”, which takes place as part of the GSA annual conference 15-18 September in Houston, TX. Details of the seminar follow below:

Made in Germany: Myths and Materiality of an Exporting Nation

GSA Seminar Proposal (Houston, Sept. 16-18, 2022)

a-b. Conveners

William Glenn Gray, Associate Professor, Purdue University (wggray@purdue.edu)

Katrin Schreiter, Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in German and History, King’s College London (katrin.schreiter@kcl.ac.uk)


c. Seminar Description

This seminar invites participants to consider the centrality of export activity to society, culture, and politics in the German-speaking lands. Long before the “Made in Germany” label was affixed to the products of imperial Germany, international trade fairs were a central feature of German economic life; and the 19th and 20th centuries brought an even greater concentration on production for export. How did an orientation toward distant markets inflect business innovation, product design, foreign relations, and political priorities? How did concerns about market share shape currency alignments, labor practices, and the domestic economy? What histories can be told about the lives of German commercial agents abroad, and what narratives did Germans craft about their most iconic exports? And how did German products impact societies abroad? The conveners welcome contributions from design history, material culture, literary studies, business history, labor history, and international relations, as well as contemporary social sciences. Perspectives featuring Austria or Switzerland as exporting nations are also welcome.


d. Format Description

Participants will prepare brief research-based contributions (approximately 10 double-spaced pages) in response to the seminar’s guiding themes and a set of assigned readings. Each morning the seminar will discuss a selection of these contributions in a roundtable format.


e. Goals & Procedures

The goal of the seminar is to develop a more focused vocabulary and research program for considering the significance of exports and trade in German history and culture. More generally, the conveners hope to reinvigorate the salience of economic themes at the annual conferences of the German Studies Association. The prospects for the publication of expanded seminar papers, whether as an edited volume or a journal special issue, will feature in the seminar’s closing discussion.

Applicants should submit a one-page (300-word) proposal by March 15, 2022. Applicants will be notified of their acceptance by April 15; the conveners will convey copies of the assigned readings. Completed 10-page seminar contributions should be submitted by August 15, 2022, one month in advance of the conference.


f. DEI Statement

With a focus on trade and export, oversea markets naturally come into view. The conveners specifically welcome proposals that employ (post)colonial perspectives to address Germany’s formal and informal imperialism as well as dependencies after decolonization across the last two centuries.

g. Audio/Visual

Given the difficulty of integrating a/v presentations into roundtable discussions, participants with visually oriented material are encouraged to attach all relevant images to their research contributions.

h. Auditors

Pending space, the conveners would welcome auditors, so long as they agree to read the pre-submitted seminar contributions and attend all three sessions.

Building Ecosystems Conference

Proposals are invited for the conference

Building Ecosystems/Selling Natures: At the Edge of Environments and Economies

Friday, October 28, 2022
Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society
Hagley Library, Wilmington, Delaware

In everyday life we are embedded in ecosystems and economic systems that interact with one another, and indeed, are mutually constitutive. For a conference, “Building Ecosystems/Selling Natures,” we invite proposals that interrogate the interaction of various dualities: commerce and nature, firms and the earth’s resources, productive activity and the built environment. Our notion of ecosystems is expansive. It includes the many interactions among water, minerals, and geophysical features; biological systems within and between animals, plants, and microorganisms; and human-made settings such as buildings, cities, and transportation networks. We welcome papers that seek to blur the binary dualism between the many forms of nature and the institutions and social relations generated by economic activity.

We hope for proposals from a range of disciplinary perspectives, inspired as we are by scholars researching agriculture, mining, energy, water, enviro-tech, the built environment, evolution, and the biosphere (to name a few). Their scholarship explores the shared spaces that we hope to interrogate through this conference. In particular, we hope to create panels that bring together scholars working in different subjects, themes, and disciplines to see how they can cross-fertilize each other’s work, including researchers engaged with concepts like “Anthropocene” and “Capitalocene” and their efficacy. 

We are interested in original, unpublished, empirical papers that are conceptually informed and historically framed addressing the above and related topics. We hope to consider proposals that may benefit from engagement with collections and experts from Hagley, an institution that has a wealth of resources from the mid-1800s to the recent past. However, we also welcome papers that span earlier time periods, use collections from other institutions, and encompass international cases. We particularly encourage proposals that consider the following questions:
• How have economies and technologies generated new capacity to alter and exploit the environment?
• How are features of nature turned into capital?
• How is nature marketed and sold?
• How do human creations, such as buildings, become ecosystems?
• How has the materiality and/or human understanding of nature framed economic behavior?
Please submit proposals of no more than 500 words and a one-page C.V. to Carol Lockman at clockman@Hagley.org by June 15, 2022. Conference presenters will be asked to submit complete versions of their conference papers by Oct. 7, 2021. The conference is planned as an in-person event but will adopt a virtual format if necessary. Presenters will receive lodging in the conference hotel and compensation for their travel costs. The conference organizers are planning an edited volume based on a selection of revised conference papers. The program committee is comprised of Tim LeCain, Nicole Welk-Joerger, Greg Hargreaves, and Roger Horowitz.