Online seminar: Elites, Oil, and Economic Nationalism

Presenter: Madihah Alfadhli and Bernardo Bátiz-Lazo (Northumbria)

Host/discussant: Daniel Castillo (Las Palmas)

Elites, Oil, and Economic Nationalism: The Darwish Al-Fakhro Family case in Qatar, 1935 to 1971

August 26, 2020, 10am German summer time

Abstract

Research in this paper departs from the study of imperial oil policy and the strategy of multinational companies in the Middle East, to consider how elites and nationalism intertwine with the formation of domestic reform. Specifically, how the efforts of the merchant Abdullah Al-Darwish Al-Fakhro, representative of the then ruler of Qatar (Ali bin Al-Thani, 1949 –1974), helped this oil dependent economy to gradually gain total control of its oil industry in 1971. Source material to compose this biography emerged from family papers of the Qatari commercial elites and the British National Archive. The story tells of the evolution of the Qatari oil industry from 1935 to 1971 with special attention to negotiations with multinational companies and foreign governments in the 1950s and 1960s.

Part of the Online Seminars in Business History series hosted by Gesellschaft fuer Unternehmensgeschichte

Register for this event here.

Video: Business & Management in the Age of Nationalism

And at long last, here is the video from the All Academy session on business & management in the Age of Nationalism: http://aom.org/Multi-Media/2017-Select-All-Academy-Theme-Sessions–Global-Events-and-Management-Scholarship/Business-and-Management-in-the-Age-of-Nationalism.aspx

(And as usual, they could not have found a still from the video in which I do not look terrible. I know people say this a lot but this really is a bad one…)

All Academy Event on economic nationalism

On Sunday the Management History division at the Academy of Management hosted an all academy symposium on historical perspectives on business and management in an age of rising nationalism.

The panel comprised of Dan Wadhwani as the host and moderator, Matthias Kipping (York University), Takafumi Kurosawa (Kyoto University) and myself, Stephanie Decker (Aston University).

We argued that history can provide management scholars with a unique lens for understanding the current rise of nationalism, and the choices that businesses, managers, and entrepreneurs face in response to those changes. In part, this is because both supporters and critics of the current wave of nationalism point to historical examples and their consequences in justifying their positions. But, even more so, historical waves of globalization and de-globalization allow us a mirror for reflecting on the options and consequences that both policymakers and managers face today.

For instance, on the eve of World War I, much of the world economy was economically integrated, with the relatively free mobility of firms, people, and capital across borders. This earlier wave of global integration fell apart with the rise of nationalism and nationalist policies during the interwar period, and a different kind of globally integrated economy had to be rebuilt by policymakers and businesspeople in the post-World War II world.

We discussed not only potential lessons of earlier waves of nationalism de-globalization, but also the uses of the past by politicians, and the way in which corporate strategies can be shaped in the long term by historical experiences.

Ultimately, the discussion revolved around the relevance of history for understanding managerial choices and consequences in the face of nationalism in our own time.