EGOS tracks with history

Next year, the Standing Working Group 8: History in Organization Studies, will no longer run at the European Group for Organization Studies Annual Conference. But since Copenhagen Business School is celebrating its centenary (please see the final call for sub-theme 44), there are in fact three tracks that mention history in their call. Hopefully see you next year at one of these tracks!

Sub-theme 04: (SWG) Long-shots and Close-ups: Organizational Ethnography, Process and History

… Ethnography – or, to emphasize its processual nature: ethnographying (Tota, 2004) – typically means, first, having a prolonged and intensive engagement with the research setting, following actors, issues, materials as they move through time and space (fieldwork). Second, ethnography embraces a sensibility towards overt, tacit and/or concealed processes of meaning-making (sensework). Third, ethnographic analyses are commonly presented through a written text, which places both author and reader at the scene, in the midst of a process, while also placing the day-to-day happenings within a social, political, and historical context (textwork). This allows organizational ethnographers to capture the unfolding of organizational life and its dynamism in at least two different ways (van Hulst et al., forthcoming; Ybema et al., 2009): taking ‘long shots’ that follow developments over an extended period of time (long-term dynamics) and making ‘close-ups’ of the dynamics of day-to-day organizational life (short-term dynamics). Some ethnographic researchers stretch their fieldwork over many months or years of present-time work; others include historical analysis and archival data. Both of these allow researchers to follow slow-paced developments or sudden transformations over long periods of time. These longitudinal ethnographies offer in-depth accounts of organizational life across time. A second potential strength of ethnography for studying organizational processes lies in its quality of eyeing the moment-to-moment details of everyday organizing. Having a shorter term focus, these studies bring into view, for instance, situational dynamics or organizational bricolage. …

For more details, please see the EGOS website.

Sub-theme 43: Theorizing the Past, Present and Future in Organization Theory

We have already posted the full call, but here just a quick introduction:

“Many organizational outcomes are the result of processes that occur over long periods of time. In spite of this, within much macro-level research the passage of time tends to be assumed or ignored, rather than theorized rigorously (Bluedorn & Denhardt, 1988; Goodman et al., 2001; Lee & Liebenau, 1999). One way in which we exclude time from our theories is by studying climactic moments of change. Although these “moments of institutional choice” are inherently interesting, focusing on them risks privileging the instance of change at the expense of the essential groundwork that generated the conditions under which the opportunity for change emerged (Pierson, 2004, p. 136). That is, our preference for studying dramatic instances of revolutionary change means that we know relatively little about processes of evolutionary change.”

For more details, please see the EGOS website.

Sub-theme 44: Rethinking History, Rethinking Business Schools

The EGOS Colloquium in 2017 coincides with the 100th anniversary of Copenhagen Business School (CBS), which will be commemorated in part by the publication of a history of the Business School written by members of the Centre for Business History at CBS. This coincidence provides an opportunity to rethink both the role of history in business schools, as well as the history of business schools themselves, along with the part played by management and organization studies within that history.

Both business schools and organization studies have sought to legitimate themselves through history in relation to older disciplines in the university. Textbooks regularly claim Max Weber as a founder for the so-called “Classical School” of management and organization studies even though Weber himself could never have been an adherent of such a school because it was only invented, along with organization studies, long after he died (Cummings & Bridgman, 2011). When Harvard Business School was facing criticism in the 1930s for the banality of management research, one response from the Dean, Wallace B. Donham, was to hire a historian to study management and to use a donation from the retailer Gordon Selfridge to buy historical business documents from Italy relating to the Medici family during the Renaissance (O’Connor, 2012, p. 58). …

For more details, please see the EGOS website.

EGOS SWG8 Final Program

Sub-theme 08: (SWG) History and Organization Studies: The Ways Forward

Convenors:

Daniel Wadhwani, University of the Pacific, USA, and Copenhagen Business School, Denmark; dwadhwani@pacific.edu

Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada; mkipping@schulich.yorku.ca

Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School, UK; s.decker@aston.ac.uk

Session I: Thursday, July 07, 11:00 to 12:30, T5

Organizational History: The Past and the Future
Chair: Matthias Kipping

Peter Miskell
Management historians and public perceptions of the past: A neglected area?
Presenter/Discussant: Talia Pfefferman

Michael Rowlinson, John Hassard and Stephanie Decker
Organizational memory, history, and forgetting
Presenter/Discussant: Mairi MacLean

 Session II: Thursday, July 07, 14:00 to 15:30
– Parallel Stream –

 Parallel Stream A: Contextualizing Sensemaking & Identity – Room: T5
Chair: Stephanie Decker

Christian Stutz
Elaborating the strategic cognition view of issue salience: A historical case study
Presenter/Discussant: Rasmus Nykvist

Lars Geschwind, Rómulo Pinheiro and Bjørn Stensaker
To be or not to be: Institutional complexity and identity formation in the organizational field of higher education
Presenter/Discussant: Ron Kerr

 Parallel Stream B: Entrepreneurial Dynamics – Room: T6
Chair: Dan Wadhwani

 Andrew Smith and Eugene Choi
A Constitutive Historicism Approach Towards Understanding Sensemaking and Sensegiving in Japanese FabLabs
Presenter/Discussant: Tristan May

Giovanni Favero, Vladi Finotto and Anna Moretti
Resisting entrepreneurs: A conceptual framework of entrepreneurial imprinting
Presenter/Discussant: Charles Harvey

Mirko Ernkvist and Rasmus Nykvist
History in the regulatory legitimation of novel organizational forms by new organization
Presenter/Discussant: Fanny Simon

 Session III: Thursday, July 07, 16:00 to 17:30, T5
Corporate Uses of History

Chair: Stephanie Decker

 Mairi Maclean, Charles Harvey, John Sillince and Benjamin Golant
Intertextuality in organizational transition
Presenter/Discussant: Joeri Mol

Jan Frederik de Groot and Nachoem Wijnberg
Corporate art collections and organizational history
Presenter/Discussant: Elena Giovannoni

Ihar Sahakiants, Marion Festing and Thomas Steger
Organizational continuity and founder narrative: The role of primary stakeholders in sustaining a socially responsible corporate culture
Presenter/Discussant: Diego Coraiola

 Session IV: Friday, July 08, 09:00 to 10:30
– Parallel Stream –

 Parallel Stream A: Historical Construction of Cultural Goods – Room: T5
Chair: Stephanie Decker

Shiona Chillas, Melinda A. Grewar and Barbara Townley
Capitalising on history: The case of Scottish textiles
Presenter/Discussant: Jan Frederik de Groot

Tristan May
If 6 was 9: Rhetorical history and the multimodal reissuing of a glorious past
Presenter/Discussant: Michelle Mielly

Michelle Mielly, Gazi Islam and Maria Laura Toraldo
Alliance française in India & rhetorical uses of history
Presenter/Discussant: Mirko Ernkvist

 Parallel Stream B: New Methods, New Frontiers – Room: T6
Chair: Matthias Kipping

Zoi Pittaki
Walking a tightrope: business, the tax system and tax conscience in Greece, 1955-1989
Presenter/Discussant: Christian Stutz

Diego M. Coraiola, William M. Foster and Roy Suddaby
What is a historical case study?
Presenter/Discussant: Giovanni Favero

Wim van Lent and Matthijs den Besten
The Multiple Faces of the Span of Control: a Multilevel Analysis of the Dutch East India Company
Presenter/Discussant: Stephan Leixnering

Session V: Friday, July 08, 14:00 to 15:30, T5
The Sociohistorical Construction of Value
Chair: Dan Wadhwani

Michal Frenkel and Talia Pfefferman
On gendered justifications: Resource acquisition and worlds of worth in establishing small enterprises in Palestine, 1930–1947
Presenter/Discussant: Liv Egholm

Elena Giovannoni and Christopher Napier
The making of material objects through accounting re-presentations: The Founder’s Building at Royal Holloway, 1887-1897
Presenter/Discussant: Karim Ben Slimane

Joeri Mol, Graham Sewell, Miya Tokumitsu and Gerhard Wiesenfeldt
The institutionalization of signs of value: Icons, indexes and symbols in art markets
Presenter/Discussant: Pamela A. Popielarz

Session VI: Saturday, July 09, 09:00 to 10:30
– Parallel Stream –

Parallel Stream A: Industry Dynamics – Room: T5
Chair: Dan Wadhwani

Karim Ben Slimane, Damien Chaney, Eero Vaara and Tao Wang
Between memories and market. Relegitimation of absinthe in France since 1980s
Presenter/Discussant: Shilo Hills

Fanny Simon and Albéric Tellier
Imitation game: How coopetition can lead to standardization
Presenter/Discussant: Wim Van Lent

Shilo Hills, Maxim Ganzin, Roy Suddaby and William M. Foster
Strategic deployment of history and myth in identity construction: A story of the global wine industry
Presenter/Discussant: Shiona Chillas

Parallel Stream B: Constructing & Crossing Sectoral Divides – Room: T6
Chair: Stephanie Decker

Stephan Leixnering and Renate E. Meyer
Re-discovering an organizational form: Public interest-orientation as corner stone of the modern corporation
Presenter/Discussant: Zoi Pittaki

Pamela A. Popielarz
Moral dividends: Transpositions between business and Freemasonry in nineteenth century America
Presenter/Discussant: Lars Geschwind

Liv Egholm
The messiness of common good. Translation of concepts and practices between non-civil and civil spheres: the Egmont Foundation 1920–2014
Presenter/Discussant: Ihar Sahakiants

Session VII: Saturday, July 09, 11:00 to 12:30, T5
New Directions
Chair: Stephanie Decker

Ron Kerr and Sarah Robinson
Women leaders in the political field in Scotland: Extending the ‘historical turn’ to leadership studies
Presenter/Discussant: Andrew Smith

Rasmus Nykvist, Robin Gustafsson, Mirko Ernkvist, Christian Sandström, Erik Lakomaa and Zeerim Cheung
Towards an integrative digital history approach in organization studies
Presenter/Discussant: Peter Miskell

EGOS SWG8 program

Please see below for the program for our standing working group on organizational history at EGOS in Naples in July! If you are already at EGOS, we welcome guests.

Sub-theme 08: (SWG) History and Organization Studies: The Ways Forward

Convenors:

  1. Daniel Wadhwani, University of the Pacific, USA, and Copenhagen Business School, Denmark, dwadhwani@pacific.edu
  2. Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada, mkipping@schulich.yorku.ca
  3. Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School, UK, s.decker@aston.ac.uk

 

Session I: Thursday, July 07, 11:00 to 12:30, T5

Organizational History: The Past and the Future
Chair: Matthias Kipping

Peter Miskell
Management historians and public perceptions of the past: A neglected area?
Presenter/Discussant: Andrew Smith

Michael Rowlinson, John Hassard and Stephanie Decker
Organizational memory, history, and forgetting
Presenter/Discussant: Mairi MacLean

 Session II: Thursday, July 07, 14:00 to 15:30

– Parallel Stream –

 Parallel Stream A: Contextualizing Sensemaking & Identity – Room: T5
Chair: Stephanie Decker

Christian Stutz
Elaborating the strategic cognition view of issue salience: A historical case study
Presenter/Discussant: Rasmus Nykvist

Anna Linda Musacchio Adorisio and Asgeir Torfason
Historicizing narratives: Rhetoric and storytelling of the Icelandic financial boom
Presenter/Discussant: Michelle Mielly

Lars Geschwind, Rómulo Pinheiro and Bjørn Stensaker
To be or not to be: Institutional complexity and identity formation in the organizational field of higher education
Presenter/Discussant: Ron Kerr

 Parallel Stream B: Entrepreneurial Dynamics – Room: T6
Chair: Dan Wadhwani

Andrew Smith and Eugene Choi
A Constitutive Historicism Approach Towards Understanding Sensemaking and Sensegiving in Japanese FabLabs
Presenter/Discussant: Tristan May

Giovanni Favero, Vladi Finotto and Anna Moretti
Resisting entrepreneurs: A conceptual framework of entrepreneurial imprinting
Presenter/Discussant: Charles Harvey

Mirko Ernkvist and Rasmus Nykvist
History in the regulatory legitimation of novel organizational forms by new organization
Presenter/Discussant: Fanny Simon

 Session III: Thursday, July 07, 16:00 to 17:30, T5

Corporate Uses of History
Chair: Stephanie Decker

 Mairi Maclean, Charles Harvey, John Sillince and Benjamin Golant
Intertextuality in organizational transition
Presenter/Discussant: Joeri Mol

Jan Frederik de Groot and Nachoem Wijnberg
Corporate art collections and organizational history
Presenter/Discussant: Elena Giovanni

Ihar Sahakiants, Marion Festing and Thomas Steger
Organizational continuity and founder narrative: The role of primary stakeholders in sustaining a socially responsible corporate culture
Presenter/Discussant: Diego Coraiola

 Session IV: Friday, July 08, 09:00 to 10:30

– Parallel Stream –

 Parallel Stream A: Historical Construction of Cultural Goods – Room: T5
Chair: Stephanie Decker

Shiona Chillas, Melinda A. Grewar and Barbara Townley
Capitalising on history: The case of Scottish textiles
Presenter/Discussant: Jan Frederik de Groot

Tristan May
If 6 was 9: Rhetorical history and the multimodal reissuing of a glorious past
Presenter/Discussant: Anna Linda Musacchio Adorisio

Michelle Mielly, Gazi Islam and Maria Laura Toraldo
Alliance française in India & rhetorical uses of history
Presenter/Discussant: Mirko Ernkvist

 Parallel Stream B: New Methods, New Frontiers – Room: T6
Chair: Matthias Kipping

Zoi Pittaki
Walking a tightrope: business, the tax system and tax conscience in Greece, 1955-1989
Presenter/Discussant: Christian Stutz

Diego M. Coraiola, William M. Foster and Roy Suddaby
What is a historical case study?
Presenter/Discussant: Giovanni Favero

Wim van Lent and Matthijs den Besten
The Multiple Faces of the Span of Control: a Multilevel Analysis of the Dutch East India Company
Presenter/Discussant: Stephan Leixnering

 Session V: Friday, July 08, 14:00 to 15:30, T5

The Sociohistorical Construction of Value
Chair: Dan Wadhwani

Michal Frenkel and Talia Pfefferman
On gendered justifications: Resource acquisition and worlds of worth in establishing small enterprises in Palestine, 1930–1947
Presenter/Discussant: Liv Egholm

Elena Giovannoni and Christopher Napier
The making of material objects through accounting re-presentations: The Founder’s Building at Royal Holloway, 1887-1897
Presenter/Discussant: Karim Ben Slimane

 Joeri Mol, Graham Sewell, Miya Tokumitsu and Gerhard Wiesenfeldt
The institutionalization of signs of value: Icons, indexes and symbols in art markets
Presenter/Discussant: Pamela A. Popielarz

 Session VI: Saturday, July 09, 09:00 to 10:30

– Parallel Stream –

 Parallel Stream A: Industry Dynamics – Room: T5
Chair: Dan Wadhwani

Karim Ben Slimane, Damien Chaney, Eero Vaara and Tao Wang
Between memories and market. Relegitimation of absinthe in France since 1980s
Presenter/Discussant: Lars Geschwind

Fanny Simon and Albéric Tellier
Imitation game: How coopetition can lead to standardization
Presenter/Discussant: Wim Van Lent

Shilo Hills, Maxim Ganzin, Roy Suddaby and William M. Foster
Strategic deployment of history and myth in identity construction: A story of the global wine industry
Presenter/Discussant: Shiona Chillas

 Parallel Stream B: Constructing & Crossing Sectoral Divides – Room: T6
Chair: Stephanie Decker

Stephan Leixnering and Renate E. Meyer
Re-discovering an organizational form: Public interest-orientation as corner stone of the modern corporation
Presenter/Discussant: Zoi Pittaki

Pamela A. Popielarz
Moral dividends: Transpositions between business and Freemasonry in nineteenth century America
Presenter/Discussant: Lars Geschwind

Liv Egholm
The messiness of common good. Translation of concepts and practices between non-civil and civil spheres: the Egmont Foundation 1920–2014
Presenter/Discussant: Ihar Sahakiants

 Session VII: Saturday, July 09, 11:00 to 12:30, T5

 New Directions
Chair: Stephanie Decker

Ron Kerr and Sarah Robinson
Women leaders in the political field in Scotland: Extending the ‘historical turn’ to leadership studies
Presenter/Discussant: Talia Pfefferman

Rasmus Nykvist, Robin Gustafsson, Mirko Ernkvist, Christian Sandström, Erik Lakomaa and Zeerim Cheung
Towards an integrative digital history approach in organization studies
Presenter/Discussant: Peter Miskell

 

New article: Routines & History

At OHN we are very pleased to announce that Alistair Mutch, one of our long time EGOS Standing Working Group 8 participants, has published an insightful piece in Organization Studies recently (now available via Advance Online). In the acknowledgements he particularly credits this stream as having helped him develop the ideas presented in his article. It’s great to see research from the track getting published. Personally I can only agree with Alistair’s sentiment that SWG8 has been very influential and supportive for me in developing my research, and it is truly a shame that 2016 will be last year of the Standing Working Group. Nevertheless, hopefully we will be seeing a series of single year tracks on history, starting at Copenhagen 2017!

Bringing History into the Study of Routines: Contextualizing Performance

Alistair Mutch

Abstract

The focus on routines as ‘generative systems’ often portrays them as patterns of action relatively divorced from their context. History can help to supply a deeper and richer context, showing how routines are connected to broader structural and cultural factors. But it also shows that routines themselves have a history. This is explored using the illustration of the history of one particular organizational routine, that of the visitation of local organizational units by central church bodies, in three times and places: 15th century Italy, 18th century England and 18th century Scotland. This illustration shows that similar routines can be found but these are given very different inflections by the broader social, cultural and political context. Attention is drawn in particular to the differential involvement of lay actors and the implications for broader impacts. The case is made for analytical narratives of emergence of routines which can reconnect organizational routines both with their own history and with their broader context.

4 days left to submit your EGOS short paper!

There are 4 days left to submit your EGOS short paper to SWG8!

If you have never been to EGOS – the system does not accept any late submissions, so please make sure that you have paid your EGOS membership and submitted your paper by Monday 11 January 2016!

Sub-theme 08: (SWG) History and Organization Studies: The Ways Forward

Convenors:

Daniel Wadhwani, University of the Pacific, USA, and Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

dwadhwani@pacific.edu

Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada

mkipping@schulich.yorku.ca

Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School, UK

s.decker@aston.ac.uk

Call for Papers

Historical sources, methods, and theoretical constructs have gained considerable attention in management and organizational studies in recent years (Üsdiken & Kipping, 2014). Researchers have mades a range of notable conceptual (Bucheli & Wadhwani, 2014; Rowlinson et al., 2014) and empirical contributions (O’Sullivan & Graham, 2010; Rowlinson et al., 2014; Kipping & Üsdiken, 2014) that have laid the foundations for a diverse array of approaches to historical research and reasoning in organization studies. Moreover leading journals, such as Organization Studies and Academy of Management Review, have supported these developments by announcing special issues devoted to historical research and theory. Indeed, one could fairly state that the nature and value of historical research has come to be more broadly understood and accepted than when the EGOS Standing Working Group (SWG) on “Historical Perspectives in Organization Studies” was formed.

In this, the final year of the SWG 08, we seek a broad range of empirical papers that explicitly build on the foundations that have been established but move the conversation between history and organization studies forward in interesting and novel ways. We also welcome innovative conceptual papers based on previous research. Some of the ways in which this might be done includes:

  • Building new bridges between history and other approaches to the study of organizations that are sensitive to time and context, such as process research, institutional theory, and evolutionary theory.
  • Extending the work that has been done on history and organization theory to related domains, including strategy and entrepreneurship.
  • Introducing new or underused methods for interpreting historical sources related to organizations and organizing.
  • Exploring novel types of historical source material.
  • Examining new and understudied historical periods or regions.
  • Considering new ways in which the past is used in organizations and organizing

Short paper submissions should not only describe the empirical research conducted and elaborate on theoretical claims, but should also explicitly engage the extant work on historical approaches to management and organization studies and point to promising new theoretical, methodological, and empirical directions.

References

  • Bucheli, M., & Wadhwani, R.D. (eds.) (2014): Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Kipping, M., & Üsdiken, B. (2014): “History in organization and management theory: more than meets the eye.” Academy of Management Annals, 8 (1), 535–588.
  • O’Sullivan, M., & Graham, M.B.W. (2010): “Moving Forward by Looking Backward: Business History and Management Studies.” Journal of Management Studies, 47 (5), 775–790.
  • Rowlinson, M., Hassard, J., & Decker, S. (2013): “Strategies for organizational history: A dialogue between historical theory and organization theory.” Academy of Management Review, 39 (3), 250–274.
  • Rowlinson, M., Casey, A., Hansen, P.H., & Mills, A.J. (2014): “Narratives and Memory in Organizations.”Organization, 21 (4), 441–446.
  • Üsdiken, B., & Kipping, M. (2014): “History and organization studies: A long-term view.” In: M. Bucheli & R.D. Wadhwani (eds.): Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 33–55.
  1. Daniel Wadhwaniis Fletcher Jones Associate Professor of Management at University of the Pacific, USA, and Visiting Professor at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark. His research has used historical approaches to study a range of organizational issues, including the emergence of new markets, the nature of entrepreneurial agency, and the processes of categorization and value determination in organizational fields. He is co-editor (with Marcelo Bucheli) of “Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods” (Oxford University Press, 2014), which examines the role of historical research and reasoning in organization studies.

Matthias Kipping is Professor of Policy and Chair in Business History at the Schulich School of Business, York University in Toronto, Canada. His research has focused on the development and role of the different institutions of management knowledge, namely management consulting and business education. In his publications, as well as in his teaching, he has been trying to link historical research with organizational theory. He is active in a variety of scholarly associations in both business history and management and organization studies.

Stephanie Decker is Professor of Organization Studies and History at Aston Business School, UK. As a historian working at a business school, most of her work is concerned with the relation between organization theory and history. She is co-editor of ‘Business History’ and is the recipient of the prestigious Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship 2014–15, as well as the principal organizer of a seminar series on organizational history funded by the Economic and Social Science Research Council (UK). She co-authored “Research Strategies for Organizational History” (Academy of Management Review, 2014) with Michael Rowlinson and John Hassard.

To upload your short paper, please log in to the Member Area.

Reminder: EGOS submission SWG8

There are 4 days left to submit your EGOS short paper to SWG8!

If you have never been to EGOS – the system does not accept any late submissions, so please make sure that you have paid your EGOS membership and submitted your paper by Monday 11 January 2016!

Sub-theme 08: (SWG) History and Organization Studies: The Ways Forward

Convenors:
R. Daniel Wadhwani, University of the Pacific, USA, and Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada
Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School, UK

Call for Papers


Historical sources, methods, and theoretical constructs have gained considerable attention in management and organizational studies in recent years (Üsdiken & Kipping, 2014). Researchers have mades a range of notable conceptual (Bucheli & Wadhwani, 2014; Rowlinson et al., 2014) and empirical contributions (O’Sullivan & Graham, 2010; Rowlinson et al., 2014; Kipping & Üsdiken, 2014) that have laid the foundations for a diverse array of approaches to historical research and reasoning in organization studies. Moreover leading journals, such as Organization Studies and Academy of Management Review, have supported these developments by announcing special issues devoted to historical research and theory. Indeed, one could fairly state that the nature and value of historical research has come to be more broadly understood and accepted than when the EGOS Standing Working Group (SWG) on “Historical Perspectives in Organization Studies” was formed.

In this, the final year of the SWG 08, we seek a broad range of empirical papers that explicitly build on the foundations that have been established but move the conversation between history and organization studies forward in interesting and novel ways. We also welcome innovative conceptual papers based on previous research. Some of the ways in which this might be done includes:

  • Building new bridges between history and other approaches to the study of organizations that are sensitive to time and context, such as process research, institutional theory, and evolutionary theory.
  • Extending the work that has been done on history and organization theory to related domains, including strategy and entrepreneurship.
  • Introducing new or underused methods for interpreting historical sources related to organizations and organizing.
  • Exploring novel types of historical source material.
  • Examining new and understudied historical periods or regions.
  • Considering new ways in which the past is used in organizations and organizing

Short paper submissions should not only describe the empirical research conducted and elaborate on theoretical claims, but should also explicitly engage the extant work on historical approaches to management and organization studies and point to promising new theoretical, methodological, and empirical directions.

References

  • Bucheli, M., & Wadhwani, R.D. (eds.) (2014): Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Kipping, M., & Üsdiken, B. (2014): “History in organization and management theory: more than meets the eye.” Academy of Management Annals, 8 (1), 535–588.
  • O’Sullivan, M., & Graham, M.B.W. (2010): “Moving Forward by Looking Backward: Business History and Management Studies.” Journal of Management Studies, 47 (5), 775–790.
  • Rowlinson, M., Hassard, J., & Decker, S. (2013): “Strategies for organizational history: A dialogue between historical theory and organization theory.” Academy of Management Review, 39 (3), 250–274.
  • Rowlinson, M., Casey, A., Hansen, P.H., & Mills, A.J. (2014): “Narratives and Memory in Organizations.”Organization, 21 (4), 441–446.
  • Üsdiken, B., & Kipping, M. (2014): “History and organization studies: A long-term view.” In: M. Bucheli & R.D. Wadhwani (eds.): Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 33–55.
R. Daniel Wadhwani is Fletcher Jones Associate Professor of Management at University of the Pacific, USA, and Visiting Professor at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark. His research has used historical approaches to study a range of organizational issues, including the emergence of new markets, the nature of entrepreneurial agency, and the processes of categorization and value determination in organizational fields. He is co-editor (with Marcelo Bucheli) of “Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods” (Oxford University Press, 2014), which examines the role of historical research and reasoning in organization studies.
Matthias Kipping is Professor of Policy and Chair in Business History at the Schulich School of Business, York University in Toronto, Canada. His research has focused on the development and role of the different institutions of management knowledge, namely management consulting and business education. In his publications, as well as in his teaching, he has been trying to link historical research with organizational theory. He is active in a variety of scholarly associations in both business history and management and organization studies.
Stephanie Decker is Professor of Organization Studies and History at Aston Business School, UK. As a historian working at a business school, most of her work is concerned with the relation between organization theory and history. She is co-editor of ‘Business History’ and is the recipient of the prestigious Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship 2014–15, as well as the principal organizer of a seminar series on organizational history funded by the Economic and Social Science Research Council (UK). She co-authored “Research Strategies for Organizational History” (Academy of Management Review, 2014) with Michael Rowlinson and John Hassard.
To upload your short paper, please log in to the Member Area.

 

Deadline for EGOS SWG8: The future of organizational history

Sub-theme 08: (SWG) History and Organization Studies: The Ways Forward

To upload your short paper, please log in to the Member Area.
  • Please upload by:  Monday, January 11, 2016, 23:59:59 CET
Convenors:
R. Daniel Wadhwani, University of the Pacific, USA, and Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada
Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School, UK

Call for Papers


Historical sources, methods, and theoretical constructs have gained considerable attention in management and organizational studies in recent years (Üsdiken & Kipping, 2014). Researchers have mades a range of notable conceptual (Bucheli & Wadhwani, 2014; Rowlinson et al., 2014) and empirical contributions (O’Sullivan & Graham, 2010; Rowlinson et al., 2014; Kipping & Üsdiken, 2014) that have laid the foundations for a diverse array of approaches to historical research and reasoning in organization studies. Moreover leading journals, such as Organization Studies and Academy of Management Review, have supported these developments by announcing special issues devoted to historical research and theory. Indeed, one could fairly state that the nature and value of historical research has come to be more broadly understood and accepted than when the EGOS Standing Working Group (SWG) on “Historical Perspectives in Organization Studies” was formed.

In this, the final year of the SWG 08, we seek a broad range of empirical papers that explicitly build on the foundations that have been established but move the conversation between history and organization studies forward in interesting and novel ways. We also welcome innovative conceptual papers based on previous research. Some of the ways in which this might be done includes:

  • Building new bridges between history and other approaches to the study of organizations that are sensitive to time and context, such as process research, institutional theory, and evolutionary theory.
  • Extending the work that has been done on history and organization theory to related domains, including strategy and entrepreneurship.
  • Introducing new or underused methods for interpreting historical sources related to organizations and organizing.
  • Exploring novel types of historical source material.
  • Examining new and understudied historical periods or regions.
  • Considering new ways in which the past is used in organizations and organizing

Short paper submissions should not only describe the empirical research conducted and elaborate on theoretical claims, but should also explicitly engage the extant work on historical approaches to management and organization studies and point to promising new theoretical, methodological, and empirical directions.

References

  • Bucheli, M., & Wadhwani, R.D. (eds.) (2014): Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Kipping, M., & Üsdiken, B. (2014): “History in organization and management theory: more than meets the eye.” Academy of Management Annals, 8 (1), 535–588.
  • O’Sullivan, M., & Graham, M.B.W. (2010): “Moving Forward by Looking Backward: Business History and Management Studies.” Journal of Management Studies, 47 (5), 775–790.
  • Rowlinson, M., Hassard, J., & Decker, S. (2013): “Strategies for organizational history: A dialogue between historical theory and organization theory.” Academy of Management Review, 39 (3), 250–274.
  • Rowlinson, M., Casey, A., Hansen, P.H., & Mills, A.J. (2014): “Narratives and Memory in Organizations.”Organization, 21 (4), 441–446.
  • Üsdiken, B., & Kipping, M. (2014): “History and organization studies: A long-term view.” In: M. Bucheli & R.D. Wadhwani (eds.): Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 33–55.
R. Daniel Wadhwani is Fletcher Jones Associate Professor of Management at University of the Pacific, USA, and Visiting Professor at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark. His research has used historical approaches to study a range of organizational issues, including the emergence of new markets, the nature of entrepreneurial agency, and the processes of categorization and value determination in organizational fields. He is co-editor (with Marcelo Bucheli) of “Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods” (Oxford University Press, 2014), which examines the role of historical research and reasoning in organization studies.
Matthias Kipping is Professor of Policy and Chair in Business History at the Schulich School of Business, York University in Toronto, Canada. His research has focused on the development and role of the different institutions of management knowledge, namely management consulting and business education. In his publications, as well as in his teaching, he has been trying to link historical research with organizational theory. He is active in a variety of scholarly associations in both business history and management and organization studies.
Stephanie Decker is Professor of Organization Studies and History at Aston Business School, UK. As a historian working at a business school, most of her work is concerned with the relation between organization theory and history. She is co-editor of ‘Business History’ and is the recipient of the prestigious Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship 2014–15, as well as the principal organizer of a seminar series on organizational history funded by the Economic and Social Science Research Council (UK). She co-authored “Research Strategies for Organizational History” (Academy of Management Review, 2014) with Michael Rowlinson and John Hassard.
To upload your short paper, please log in to the Member Area.

CfP Historical Research on Institutional Change, due 31 March 2016

Business History Special Issue

Historical Research on Institutional Change

 Manuscripts should be submitted at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/fbsh before 31 March 2016.

Guest editors

Stephanie Decker, Aston University, UK, s.decker@aston.ac.uk
Lars Engwall, Uppsala University, Sweden, lars.engwall@fek.uu.se
Michael Rowlinson, Queen Mary University, London, m.rowlinson@qmul.ac.uk
Behlül Üsdiken, Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey, behlul@sabanciuniv.edu

Call for papers

The important role that institutions play for all forms of organizations has been recognized in a wide variety of disciplines. Douglass North’s (1990) book on the nature of institutional change in economic history was influential in both economics and history. Likewise has among others the article by DiMaggio and Powell’s (1983) been significant in sociology and organization studies. Nevertheless, the nature of institutional change has remained a heavily contested subject that has not seen the same degree of theoretical and empirical development.

Institutional change is by its very definition a process that unfolds over long time periods with fundamentally unpredictable outcomes that can only be properly evaluated with hindsight. Because institutional change is a fundamental feature in historical research, many historians do not necessarily define or reflect on this as a research phenomenon in its own right. On the other hand many research debates in organization studies have remained curiously a-historical when developing the antecedents, outcomes and mediating factors for processes of institutionalization, institutional maintenance, and deinstitutionalization (Dacin, Munir and Tracey, 2010).

Nevertheless, between these two extremes there are many processes of institutional change in organizations that develop over time periods that are too long to research with the standard methods of qualitative social science such as interviews or participant observations. Here some historical approaches based on archival research may create more interesting research designs (Wright and Zammuto, 2013). Historical theory also has different insights to offer organization studies (Rowlinson, Hassard and Decker, 2014). It is in these areas that management and organizational history could contribute by investigating phenomena from a more long-term perspective. Suddaby, Foster and Mills (2014) have similarly argued for a more historical institutionalism to address unresolved issues in institutional theory, such as the paradox of embedded agency.

Within business and organizational history, there is an increasing interest in questions of theory and methodology. Alternative approaches, not just those drawn from the social sciences, but also from historiography, such as oral history or microhistory, offer new ways of approaching research. Historians interpret institutional theory in different ways from organization scholars (Rowlinson and Hassard, 2013), which offers new avenues for interdisciplinary dialogue.

Submissions may address the following issues and questions, although this list is not exclusive:

  • The five C’s of historical thinking (change over time, context, contingency, causality and complexity) and the possibilities of institutional theory (Andrews and Burke, 2007).
  • New institutional theory in organizational sociology has lost the focus of old institutionalism on issues of politics and power. Would historical institutionalism offer a useful corrective?
  • Alternative methodologies for historical institutionalism: oral history, microhistory, ANTi-history.
  • Institutional transplants beyond legal and economic history.
  • Institutional entrepreneurs and institutional work – the return of historical actors and contingent decision-making.
  • Institutional logics or politically-motivated ideologies: old wine in new bottles?
  • Routines, practices and process vs. the eventful temporality of history.
  • Beyond path dependency in explaining long-term structural change in historical perspective.

We hope to attract papers with a long-term perspective focusing on institutions, organizations as well as on organizational fields. We envisage that papers will be empirically rich but also they are linked to current institutional theories. In addition we shall also consider theoretically or methodologically oriented contributions provided they address both historical and institutional theory concerns.

About the guest editors

Stephanie Decker is Professor of Organization Studies and History at Aston Business School, UK. As a historian working at a business school, most of her work is concerned with the relation between organization theory and history. She is co-editor of ‘Business History’ and is the recipient of the prestigious Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship 2014-15, as well as the principal organizer of a seminar series on organizational history funded by the Economic and Social Science Research Council (UK). She co-authored “Research Strategies for Organizational History” (Academy of Management Review, 2014) with Michael Rowlinson and John Hassard.

Lars Engwall is Professor Emeritus of Business Administration at Uppsala University. His research has been directed towards the development of industries and organizations as well as the creation and diffusion of management knowledge. Among his publications related to the sub-theme can be mentioned Mercury Meets Minerva (2009/1992), Management Consulting (2002, ed. with Matthias Kipping), The Expansion of Management Knowledge (2002, ed. with Kerstin Sahlin-Andersson), and Reconfiguring Knowledge Production (2010 with Richard Whitley and Jochen Gläser).

Michael Rowlinson is Professor of Management and Organizational History in the School of Business and Management, Queen Mary University of London. He has published widely on the relationship between history and organization theory in journals such as the Academy of Management Review, Business History, Human Relations, Organization, and Organization Studies. His research on corporate history concerns the representation of history by organizations, especially the dark side of their involvement in war, slavery, and racism. This has been published in journals such as Critical Perspectives on Accounting, Journal of Organizational Change Management, and Labour History Review. His current interests include the methodology of interpretive historical research in organization studies. He edited the Journal Management & Organizational History from 2008 to 2013 and he is now a Senior Editor for Organization Studies and a co-editor for the Special Topic Forum of the Academy of Management Review on ‘History and Organization Studies: Toward a Creative Synthesis.’

Behlül Üsdiken is Professor of Management and Organization at Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey. Previously, he was a professor at Bogazici University. He has contributed to numerous journals as well as a variety of edited collections. He has served as a Co-editor of Organization Studies in 1996–2001 and a Section Editor of the Journal of Management Inquiry in 2007–2012. His current research focuses upon family business groups, management education and universities.

References

Andrews, T. and Burke, F. (2007). What Does It Mean to Think Historically? Perspectives on History 45, 1: 32-35.

Dacin, M.T., Munir, K. and Tracey, P. (2010) Formal Dining at Cambridge colleges: Linking ritual performance and institutional maintenance. Academy of Management Journal 53, 6: 1393-1418.

DiMaggio, P.J. and Powell, W. W. (1983) The Iron Cage Revisited: Institutional Isomorphism and Collective Rationality in Organizational Fields. American Sociological Review 48,2: 147-160.

North, D.C. (1990) Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rowlinson, M. and Hassard, J. (2013). Historical Neo-institutionalism or Neo-institutionalist Jistory? Historical Research in Management and Organization Studies. Management & Organizational History 8, 2: 111-126.

Rowlinson, M., Hassard, J., and Decker, S. (2014). Research Strategies for Organizational History: A Dialogue between Historical Theory and Organization Theory. Academy of Management Review 39,3: 205-274.

Suddaby, R., Foster, W. M., and Mills, A. J. (2014). Historical Institutionalism. Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods. Ed. By M. Bucheli and R. D. Wadhwani. Oxford, Oxford University Press: 100-123.

Wright, A. L. and Zammuto, R. F. (2013). Wielding the Willow: Processes of Institutional change in Englısh County Cricket. Academy of Management Journal, 56(1), 308–330.

CfP EGOS 2017 sub-theme proposals

This week the call for sub-theme proposals for the 33rd EGOS Colloquium, in Copenhagen, Denmark, in July 2017 went out. The Standing Working Group 8, launched by Behlul Usdiken, Matthias Kipping and Lars Engwall, still has one more year to go, but EGOS 2016 in Naples will be its last year. Hence for EGOS 2017 at Copenhagen Business School there will be no standard track for organizational history anymore. But there is the opportunity to submit a proposal for a stand-alone sub-theme on a related subject. The deadline for submission is Wednesday, November 25, 2015 (23:59:59 CET), and proposals can be submitted at any time before that.

To view the Call for sub-theme proposals, please go to the EGOS “2017 Copenhagen” website: http://egosnet.org/jart/prj3/egos/main.jart?content-id=1442567999319&rel=de&reserve-mode=active

Please ensure that you also read the “Guidelines and criteria for sub-theme proposals for EGOS Colloquia”: http://egosnet.org/jart/prj3/egos/data/uploads/General%20EGOS%20descriptions/EGOS-Colloquia_Guidelines_SUB-THEME-submission-2017.pdf

Professional groups with an interest in organizational history

As an interdisciplinary field of study, there are a range of different groups interested in organizational history or historical research on organizations, but from different angles. It is not always clear which of these would be of interest to scholars.

There are some ongoing iniatives, such as the ESRC seminar series in Organizational History (2015-2016) in the UK, run by Stephanie Decker, Mick Rowlinson & John Hassard, or the CBS Initiative in Business History, based in the Centre for Business History (Denmark).

This year’s AOM in Vancouver (2015) features a significant number of well-attended sessions on management & organizational history, which highlights an increased interest in historical approaches in management and organization studies. In fact several professional organizations in management and organization studies have regular tracks on organizational history, such as:

There are several professional associations in business history, which also include some work on organizational history, such as

A fascinating EU-funded project in organizational history is the Enterprise of Culture .

The International Network for the Theory of History offers a broader perspective on generic issues for organizational history.

But this is hardly an exhaustive list, so we would be very interested in hearing about any additional initiatives or groups that we should include here.