VIU Responsible Capitalism Workshop

CfP: Corley PDW for ECRs

Call for Papers

Corley Paper Development Workshop for Early Career Researchers Sheffield, 6th July 2019

In memory of the business historian Tony Corley who died last year, the Association of Business Historians have decided to inaugurate a new venture in the form of a Paper Development Workshop for Early Career Researchers (ECRs). This will take place on Saturday 6th July and be linked to the Association’s annual conference at Sheffield. Spaces have been reserved in the conference programme should any of those selected wish to present there as well.

Applications are welcome from any ECR working on a paper in the broad field of business history which they would like to develop with a view to publication. Up to five papers will be selected and will be developed at the workshop with leading business history scholars, including journal editors. The Association will cover the expenses of the presenters up to a maximum of £150 each. Those selected would be expected to join the Association if not already members.

Those interested should submit a 2-page application setting out an abstract of the proposed paper, a brief CV and an explanation of why they would benefit from the workshop. Applications should be sent to Professor Neil Rollings (Neil.Rollings@glasgow.ac.uk) by Monday 8th April.

PDW report on Gender & History as an Analytical Lens

Gender and History as an Analytical Lens for Management and Entrepreneurship Research and Practice: Some thoughts from a PDW at the 2018 BAM conference

 

On the 4th September representatives from the Feminist Library (FL) in London, Gail Chester and Magda Oldziejewska, alongside Feminist Archive North’s (FAN) Jalna Hanmer, and academics from St Andrews, Aston, Birmingham and Stirling Universities, participated in a refreshingly non-strictly-academic workshop as part of the BAM 2018 conference at Bristol’s University of the West of England. The Library, along with FAN, introduced feminist libraries and archives (FLA) in the UK and talked about some of the unique practices of these organisations.

 

The FL, having been around since 1975, the height of the Women’s Liberation Movement, has since accumulated over 7,000 books, 1,500 periodical titles and countless items of archival material and ephemera, among them innumerable titles on women in education, feminist educational practices, women in management and business. FAN archive contains a wealth of contemporary material in local, regional, national and international collections donated by individuals and organisations, including conference papers, pamphlets, journals, newsletters, dissertations, oral history interviews, audio tapes, films, posters, badges, t-shirts and banners. However, far from these being like regular libraries and archives, the importance of understanding the FLA resources in the context of where they come from was highlighted, i.e. the feminist theories and practices key to the management and survival of these resources: collective working, intersectionality, diversity, and a focus on accessibility.

 

Alongside this compelling account of the construction and maintenance of the Feminist Library, including the contemporary challenges of archiving social media and of course the eternal funding challenges of this kind of work, workshop participants also addressed questions of how and why we conduct historical research with women and feminism at its centre. Organizer Hannah Dean (St Andrews) framed the workshop with an explanation of her British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship. Dr. Dean collected and archived women’s life history accounts of business ownership, creating an invaluable resource for her own research and for future scholars. Dr. Linda Perriton (Stirling) made clear why business historians need to ‘pick up the gauntlet’ that feminist historians have thrown down, and engage fully with the messy, marginal practices that are so fundamental to mainstream/malestream accounts of most business history.

 

Professor Stephanie Decker (Aston) followed this with a clear-sighted explanation of how archives can be approached as a site for fieldwork, as well as a source repository. Participants were encouraged again to take account of the nexus of power/knowledge that all history/History is embedded within. Finally, Dr. Scott Taylor (Birmingham) talked around the possibility of feminist methodologies for history, and what they mean for how we bear witness to the lives and activities of women in business history.

 

The stimulating resulting discussion focused on the importance of preserving/uncovering the lesser known/hidden voices of women, and at least one attendee was inspired to conduct her own research into this under-explored area, focusing on women’s work in Turkey in the middle ages.

 

All in all, it was heartening to be part of such an inspiring event that brought together historians, feminists, feminist allies, social scientists, archivists, and activists. Contemporary feminist activism and archivist practices have much to say to business and management research; historical analysis of women’s experiences and feminism even more so!

AOM PDW on Historic CSR

Please register for the AOM PDW!

Special Issue Paper Development Workshops

Historic Corporate Responsibility:

Its Extent, Limits, and Consequences

The guest editors of the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue on Historic Corporate Social Responsibility will arrange paper development workshops at the following conferences:

  • Academy of Management (10-14 August in Chicago),
  • International Association for Business & Society (7-10 June in Hong Kong), and
  • European Business History Association (6-8 September in Ancona, Italy)[1]

During the workshops, authors will present and discuss their papers and receive feedback from discussants and peers.

Attendance at these workshops is NOT a precondition for submission to the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue.

Confirmed discussants at the Academy of Management in Chicago include Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School), Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University), Paul C. Godfrey (Brigham Young University), Stefan Hielscher (University of Bath), Michael Rowlinson (University of Exeter), Sébastien Mena (Cass Business School), and Roy R. Suddaby (University of Victoria and Newcastle University).

 

Submission Information and Deadlines

Scholars interested in one of the workshops are asked to contact the guest editors according to requirements for each conference. Please see the following table for the key dates and contact information.

  IABS conference AoM conference EBHA conference
Require-ments Elevator pitch format. Interested authors might wish to contact Rob Phillips prior to the conference. To be considered for a PDW at either AoM or EBHA, an abstract (no more than 2’000 words or 8 pages all in) should be submitted to the responsible guest editor. The guest editors will then select promising abstracts and notify the authors. After acceptance, the authors are asked to submit a full paper (8’000-10’000 words).
Submission of abstracts none May 15, 2018 June 17, 2018
Submission of full paper July 1, 2018 August 1, 2018
Date and location of workshop June 7-10, 2018

Hong Kong

August 10-14, 2018

Chicago, IL

September 6-8, 2018

Ancona, Italy

Contact Rob Phillips

rphillips@schulich.yorku.ca

Judith Schrempf-Stirling

judith.schrempf-stirling@unige.ch

Christian Stutz

Christian.stutz@fh-hwz.ch

 

[1] The workshop proposal at the EBHA is currently under evaluation—to be confirmed.

AOM PDW on Historic CSR

AOM accepted a great PDW for this year’s conference on the role of history and corporate social responsibility – come along if you are attending this year!

Call for Papers

Historic Corporate Responsibility: Its Extent, Limits, and Consequences

The guest editors of the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue on Historic Corporate Social Responsibility will arrange a paper development workshop at the Academy of Management Conference in Chicago.

There is a growing awareness of the critical but understudied role of time and history in the challenges we face in the present and the future. Businesses, universities, governments, and organizations in myriad industries and of all sizes are increasingly held to account for the actions of prior generations of leaders. The lingering effects of Monsanto’s Agent Orange, Yale University’s decision to change the name of Calhoun College, and controversies around the world concerning commemorations of leaders with complicated pasts (e.g., indigenous peoples, slavery) barely scratch the surface of this global phenomenon.

Scholars in management theory have become aware of an important  “historical turn” in organizational theory (Bucheli & Wadhwani, 2014; Maclean, Harvey, & Clegg, 2016; Mills, Suddaby, Foster & Durepos, 2016; Rowlinson, Hassard, & Decker, 2014). A recent issue of Academy of Management Review (Godfrey, Hassard, O’Connor, Rowlinson, & Ruef, 2016) included two articles addressing corporate (ir-)responsibility for long ago actions (Mena, Rintamäki, Fleming, & Spicer, 2016; Schrempf-Stirling, Palazzo, & Phillips, 2016). Though this work focuses largely on legacies of bad behavior, it may also be interesting to consider organizations with a history of being first movers on historically controversial issues. Similarly, recent work on the role of time and temporality in encouraging sustainable management practices (i.e. Slawinski & Bansal, 2015) and the observation that our implicit models of history affect our capacity to effect social change (Suddaby & Foster, 2017) reaffirms the importance of adopting a historical consciousness (Suddaby, 2016) when analyzing sustainability and corporate social responsibility (Stutz & Sachs, 2018). These contributions represent the beginning of a deeper and broader conversation about historic corporate responsibility.

PDW Overview

Each selected participant will present a brief summary of their work and include research appetizers (questions) for five minutes.

After the research appetizers have been presented, there will be roundtable discussions. The roundtables will provide the opportunity for further elaboration and in-depth discussion of the presented research topics. The discussions will be facilitated by mentors who read the submitted papers in advance. Confirmed discussants include Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School), Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University), Paul C. Godfrey (Brigham Young University), Stefan Hielscher (University of Bath), Michael Rowlinson (University of Exeter), Sébastien Mena (Cass Business School), and Roy R. Suddaby (University of Victoria and Newcastle University).

The roundtable discussions will last about 20 minutes. After the discussion, the workshop participants will reconvene into a larger group to report their findings.

Submission Information and Deadlines

Scholars interested in presenting their work are asked to submit an abstract (no more than 2’000 words or 8 pages all in) to the PDW organizers at judith.schrempf-stirling@unige.ch by April 15, 2018 (please use AOM PDW in the subject line).

Accepted authors will be asked to submit a full paper (8,000-10,000 words) by July 1, 2018.

We welcome submissions on the following topics and questions amongst others:

  1. Contours and Extent of Historic Corporate Responsibility
  • What, if anything, can current leaders do to recognize or mitigate responsibility today for past actions?
  • What is the role of forgetting and selective remembering?
  • Can the past be a strategic advantage for the organization? Is this an ethical aim given our limits on knowing the truth about the past?
  1. Boundaries and Limits of Historic Corporate Responsibility
  • How do different legal, political, economic, social, or cultural contexts of the past pose problems to current organizations that face historic corporate responsibility?
  • How does the changing nature of the corporation influence our working understanding of historic corporate responsibility?
  • When has a corporation done enough in regards to its historic responsibilities?
  1. Consequences of Historic Corporate Responsibility
  • Can an organization apologize and who can accept it? Could an apology benefit current and future societies?
  • Should stigma attach to individuals who were participants in past transgressions? How do we define participants and to what extent did they have choices in their past actions?
  • If there is no “single truth” about the past, then why should organizations engage in historic corporate responsibility?
  1. Historical inquiry into the “history” of CSR, the transformation of business-society relationships and the evolution CSR practices
  • How have CSR practices changed over time? How are they shaped by their particular historical contexts?
  • Does the examination of socially responsible business practices in particular historical settings shed new light on contemporary CSR scholarship?
  • What can we learn from historical contextualization of past academic insights?

References

Bucheli, M., & Wadhwani, R. D. (Eds.). (2014). Organizations in time: History, theory, methods. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Godfrey, P. C., Hassard, J., O’Connor, E. S. O., Rowlinson, M., & Ruef, M. (2016). What is organizational history? Toward a creative synthesis of history and organization studies. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 590–608.

Maclean, M., Harvey, C., & Clegg, S. R. (2016). Conceptualizing historical organization studies. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 609–632.

Mena, S., Rintamäki, J., Fleming, P., & Spicer, A. (2016). On the forgetting of corporate irresponsibility. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 720–738.

Mills, A. J., Suddaby, R., Foster, W. M., & Durepos, G. (2016). Re-visiting the historic turn 10 years later: Current debates in management and organizational history – an introduction. Management & Organizational History, 11(2), 67–76.

Rowlinson, M., Hassard, J., & Decker, S. (2014). Research strategies for organizational history: A dialogue between historical theory and organization theory. Academy of Management Review, 39(3), 250–274.

Schrempf-Stirling, J., Palazzo, G., & Phillips, R. A. (2016). Historic corporate social responsibility. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 700–719.

Slawinski, N., & Bansal, P. (2015). Short on Time: Intertemporal Tensions in Business Sustainability. Organization Science, 26(2), 531–549.

Stutz, C., & Sachs, S. (2018). Facing the normative challenges: The potential of reflexive historical research. Business & Society, 57(1), 98–130.

Suddaby, R., & Foster, W. M. (2017). History and Organizational Change. Journal of Management, 43(1), 19–38.

Suddaby, R. (2016). Toward a historical consciousness: Following the historic turn in management thought. M@n@gement, 19(1), 46–60.

 

AOM PDW: Frontiers of Digital History Methods

Academy of Management Meeting, Atlanta

PDW Workshop

Frontiers of Digital History Methods and Tools for Management, Organization, and History Scholars

Friday, Aug 4 2017 2:00PM – 4:00PM
Session Type: PDW Workshop
Submission: 16488
Sponsor: MH
Scheduled: Friday, Aug 4 2017 2:00PM – 4:00PM at Hyatt Regency Atlanta in Hanover Hall E

Organizer: Robin Gustafsson, Aalto U.
Organizer: Mirko Ernkvist, Ratio Institute
Presenter: Charles Edward Harvey, Newcastle U.
Presenter: Mirko Ernkvist, Ratio Institute
Presenter: Mairi Maclean, U. of Bath
Presenter: Johann Peter Murmann, U. of New South Wales
Presenter: Michael Rowlinson, U. of Exeter
Presenter: David A. Kirsch, U. of Maryland

This PDW This PDW sets out to provide a broad overview and insights to management, organization, and history scholars at large on the current research forefront in how digital databases, methods and tools could contribute to the integration of management, organization, and history research. Overall the PDW centers on the idea for outlining opportunities and current frontier work with digital methods and tools for systematic digital reconstruction of historical sources, rigor and transparency of analysis and inference from evidence. These methodological advances enable new forms of scholarship and research groups collaborations. This PDW will: (1) introduce the participants to the historical developments of digital databases, tools and methods; (2) provide perspectives by forerunner management, organization, and business history researchers on methodological advantages, challenges and opportunities with digital history methods and tools for the integration of management, organization, and historical research; (3) present leading recent research work with digital methods and tools using large-scale digitized historical sources and evidence; (4) provide ample of time for Q&As and open discussions.

CfP: PDW on International Business and Civilizations

PDW Call for Papers

International Business and Civilizations

Deadline: Friday, January 15, 2017 for abstracts

Thursday, March 30, 2017
Embassy Suites Denver Downtown
1420 Stout Street, Denver, Colorado, 80202, USA

Organized under the auspice of the BHC workshop committee Contact: Teresa da Silva Lopes (teresa.lopes@york.ac.uk), Heidi Tworek (heidi.tworek@ubc.ca) and Christina Lubinski (cl.mpp@cbs.dk) 

In recent years, both business historians and international business scholars have grown increasingly interested in the promise of using historical sources, methods and reasoning in international business research. History, it has been argued, can be valuable in addressing a number of limitations in traditional approaches, including in accounting for contexts and institutions, in understanding the relationship between international entrepreneurship and economic change, in providing multi-­‐‑ level perspectives on international business and in showing connections between business and regional ways of life. Business historians have for long engaged with business behavior across borders and international opportunity recognition and are increasingly making their work pertinent to new audiences, in international business scholarship and at business schools.

With the Business History Conference devoting the 2017 annual conference to the theme of “civilizations,” the preceding one-­‐‑day Paper Development Workshop offers developmental feedback to papers explicitly targeting the double audience of international business and history scholars. The purpose of the workshop is to support the development of historical research on international business for publication in high-­‐‑quality outlets, including “The Routledge Companion to the Makers of Global Business.” In addition, workshop participants will discuss how to address the common challenge of writing for a dual audience of historians and international business scholars, including more explicitly presenting the engagement with theory and demonstrating the contribution historical methods and sources make to studying international business phenomena.

We invite papers that explore broad connections between international business and society, the mutual influences of business and culture, the impact of international business activities on home and host countries, the emergence of standards for moral and legitimate international business behavior, and the positive and negative effects of business activities across borders and over time. Authors are encouraged to address what “global” means in the context of their respective work, how the global nature of business changed over time and which actors contributed to this change. All papers should expand current thinking on international business by addressing long-­‐‑term developments based on historical sources and methodologies and by exploring arguments and methods capable of explaining change over time.

We welcome work-­‐‑in-­‐‑progress at all stages of development. Interested scholars may submit two types of submissions for discussion: full research papers (8,000 words) or paper ideas (1,000 to 3,000 words). The workshop will take place immediately before the BHC meeting and at the same location. Paper selection and registration is separate from the annual meeting; participation in both BHC meeting and workshop is possible. There will be a modest registration fee to recover catering costs.

If you are interested in participating, please submit an initial abstract of max. 300 words and a one-­‐‑page CV before Friday, January 15, 2017 to Teresa da Silva Lopes (teresa.lopes@york.ac.uk), Heidi Tworek (heidi.tworek@ubc.ca) and Christina Lubinski (cl.mpp@cbs.dk). Invitations to the PDW will be sent out before February 15, 2017. Full paper (8,000 to 12,000 words) or paper idea (1,000 to 3,000 words) submissions will be expected by Friday, March 3, 2017. Please feel free to contact the organizers with your paper ideas if you are interested in early feedback or want to inquire about the fit of your idea with this PDW.

BAM PDW: ANALYSING THE PAST AND ITS TRACES IN MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Colleagues, if you’re attending the British Academy of Management conference in Newcastle in September, this workshop may be of interest:

ANALYSING THE PAST AND ITS TRACES IN MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION RESEARCH AND TEACHING

BAM 2016 Newcastle

6 September 2-3.30p, Room B29, Barbara Strang Teaching Centre

Presenters

Bill Cooke, University of York, UK: histories of managerialism in global context

Stephanie Decker, Aston University, UK: post- and neo-colonial histories of international business

Ron Kerr, University of Edinburgh, UK: historically informed examinations of the banking crisis in management education

Linda Perriton, University of Stirling, Scotland: business and management history in the service of criticality in the curriculum

Michael Rowlinson, University of Exeter, UK: constructing management histories within and beyond organizations

Kevin Tennent, University of York, UK: business history and strategy.

Organizers

Sarah Robinson, University of Glasgow, UK

Scott Taylor, University of Birmingham, UK

There are regular workshops at conferences that call for greater acknowledgement of the role of history in management research and education. There is also a developing literature in management & organization studies that argues for organization analysts to seek rapprochement with historians and vice versa, often underpinned by critical perspectives. This workshop responds to these frequent calls and this developing literature by bringing together presenters with expertise in historical methods, organization analysis and critical management education to provide a space to contribute to making histories and developing historically-informed teaching. The workshop consists of 30 minutes of presentation, followed by 30 minutes of small group research and teaching development work facilitated by the presenters and organizers. We then conclude with a 30 minute plenary and panel discussion on a) publishing historical work and b) on using history and historical research in critical management education.

Scott Taylor (Dr) – Director of Undergraduate Programmes

Reader in Leadership & Organization Studies, Birmingham Business School, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK

s.taylor@bham.ac.uk (+44) 0121 414 6703