New issue of Business History 64-3, 2022

The latest Business History (64)3: 2022 was launched as complete issue on May 10 2022

TOC

[BOOK REVIEW] Bonin, Hubert. 2022. “La Politique Pétrolière de La France de 1861 à 1974 à Travers Le Rôle de La Compagnie Privée Desmarais Frères.” Business History 64 (3): 629–30. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1763039.

[BOOK REVIEW] Burnard, Trevor. 2022. “The Overseers of Early American Slavery: Supervisors, Enslaved Labourers and the Plantation Enterprise.” Business History 64 (3): 631–32. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1823026.

Carmona-Zabala, Juan. 2022. “German Economic Power in Southeastern Europe: The Case of Reemtsma and the Greek Tobacco Merchants (1923-1939).” Business History 64 (3): 537–57. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1717472.

Chirosa-Cañavate, Luis, Juan A. Rubio-Mondéjar, and Josean Garrués-Irurzun. 2022. “Business Schools and the Spanish Business Elite since the Mid-Twentieth Century.” Business History 64 (3): 457–74. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1726893.

Declercq, Robrecht. 2022. “A Return Ticket to the World Market? The Leipzig Fur Industry, Internationalism and the Case of the International Fur Exhibition (IPA) in 1930.” Business History 64 (3): 610–25. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1736045.

[BOOK REVIEW] Fernández Pérez, Paloma. 2022. “X-Ray Contrast Agent Technology. A Revolutionary History, by Christoph de Haën,” Business History 64 (3): 628–628. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1821940.

Game, Chantal S., Lisa M. Cullen, and Alistair M. Brown. 2022. “Origins Resting behind Banking Financial Accountability of Paragraphs 78 to 82 of the First Schedule of the Companies Act 1862 (UK).” Business History 64 (3): 558–82. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1718109.

[BOOK REVIEW] Garavito, Martha Elizabeth. 2022. “La Industrialización En Bogotá Entre 1830 y 1930: Un Proceso Lento y Difícil.” Business History 64 (3): 626–27. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1812800.

Miranda, José Antonio, and Felipe Ruiz-Moreno. 2022. “Selling the Past. The Use of History as a Marketing Strategy in Spain, 1900-1980.” Business History 64 (3): 491–510. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1717473.

Nazer, Juan Ricardo, and Manuel Llorca-Jaña. 2022. “Succession in Large Nineteenth-Century Chilean Family Businesses.” Business History 64 (3): 511–36. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1717471.

Ocampo Suárez-Valdés, Joaquín, and Patricia Suárez Cano. 2022. “Between the Market and the State: Ibáñez, the Marquis of Sargadelos (1749–1809), a Spanish Businessman Sailing against the Tide.” Business History 64 (3): 475–90. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1726892.

[COMMENT] Pearson, Robin. 2022. “The Indigenous Origins of UK Corporate Financial Accountability: A Comment.” Business History 64 (3): 583–86. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1769606.

Pouillard, Véronique, and Waleria Dorogova. 2022. “Couture Ltd: French Fashion’s Debut in London’s West End.” Business History 64 (3): 587–609. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1724286.

CFP: 2023 Business History Conference Annual Meeting

2023 Business History Conference

Call For Papers

Detroit, Michigan

March 9th – March 11th, 2023

Reinvention

Reinvention has long been a central theme in our field. Business historians have examined how entrepreneurs introduce new products and services that replace old ones, considered how businesses recreate themselves, and explored how markets are transformed over time.

But this coming year – as we prepare for Detroit and forge plans for what an association like ours should look like in an era marked by pandemic, war, and climate change – the theme of reinvention takes on a variety of new and pressing meanings. How do places and people reinvent themselves? What should a scholarly association look like in the twenty-first century? What questions, methods, and forms should a field like business history embrace in order to grapple with the big questions we face today?

Reinvention, as these questions suggest, may be understood as very different from invention. Whereas invention focuses on the new, reinvention demands that we take into account the past to understand the future. It suggests that rethinking historiography is essential to effectively raising new questions and new methods. It insists on the capacity of history to be creative as well as analytical. Reinvention, one might say, raises fundamental questions about how we know something historically.

Informed by the theme of reinvention, the BHC Program Committee invites sessions and papers that consider reinvention from a variety of different perspectives. Reflecting the ongoing evolution of the BHC itself, we are especially interested in submissions that address diverse geographic locales and time periods; analyze the different ways that race, class, and gender have affected the ability of entrepreneurs, firms, and communities to reinvent themselves in times of uncertainty and change; address the role of governments, politics, and power in in the process of reinvention; and any number of similar subjects. Finally, the organizers welcome proposals with innovative formats that promote discussion on how to conduct research and teach business history in the so-called post-pandemic era.

Proposals and Submissions

While we encourage submissions to take up these themes, papers addressing all other topics will receive equal consideration by the program committee in accordance with BHC policy. Graduate students and emerging scholars in the field are particularly encouraged to attend. Graduate students and recent PhDs whose papers are accepted for the meeting may apply for funds to partially defray their travel costs; information will be sent out once the program has been set.

Proposals may be submitted for individual papers or entire sessions. Each presentation proposal should include a one-page (300 words) abstract and one-page curriculum vitae (CV) for each participant. Individual paper submissions will be combined into new sessions defined by themes chosen at the Program Committee’s discretion.

Session proposals (unless a roundtable) should include a maximum of four individual presentations. All session proposals should have a cover letter containing a title, a one-paragraph session description, and the names and affiliations of a recruited chair, as well as the contact information for the session organizer.

To submit a proposal, go to https://thebhc.org/proposal-instructions

The deadline for receipt of all paper and session proposals is November 1, 2022. Notification of acceptance will be given by December 1st, 2022. Information on registration and fees for participation and the provisional program will be announced at the beginning of February 2023. Everyone appearing on the program must register for the meeting. 

The Program Committee

The Program Committee includes Christina Lubinski (Copenhagen Business School) (chair); Heidi Tworek (University of British Columbia); John Wong (The University of Hong Kong); Marcelo Bucheli (University of (Illinois-Champaign); Amanda Gibson (Kenyon College); along with BHC President Dan Wadhwani (University of Southern California).

Hotel Venue

The 2023 Business History Conference will take place at

The Westin Book Cadillac Detroit, March 9th – March 11th

The room rate is $174 (USD) plus tax.  The cut-off date for hotel reservations at this conference rate is February 16, 2023.

Questions

General questions regarding meeting logistics, regarding the hotel for example, may be sent to conference coordinator and BHC Treasurer, Dr. Roger Horowitz, at rh@udel.edu.  Questions involving the conference program should go to the program committee chair, Professor Christina Lubinski, at cl.mpp@cbs.dk. Other questions might be directed to the BHC Secretary, Dr. Vicki Howard at vickihowardbhc@gmail.com.

Archival research – from the coalface

As historians working business schools, the general lack of understanding of what it is like to do research in an archive can be quite frustrating. But then I read this thread about the difficulties of one US scholar in a German archive (and I am “fremdschaemen” for my home country here, I really am!) and now I can point them to an outside source that tells you in detail why it might be more time consuming than downloading a few PDFs. Really required reading for anyone who has been to an archive or who wonder what that is like…

Noblemen Entrepreneurs, Business History Special Issue 64-2 [annotated TOC]

Noblemen Entrepreneurs

This editorial introduces the 10 articles included in the special issue on ‘Noblemen-entrepreneurs in the Nineteenth Century. Investments, Innovation, Management and Networks’. The collected works focus on the business activities of noblemen in Europe and Asia, thus offering up opportunities for comparison in an age of economic expansion and globalisation. What was the contribution of the nobility to the economy? Can we consider noblemen to have been endowed with an entrepreneurial spirit? What differences or similarities can we draw between the European and Asian elites? In this introduction, we give a synthetic overview of the relevant issues in the broad topic of the collection and their importance to business history, and briefly present the accepted articles. As two of the articles deal with the Japanese case, while the others focus on Europe, we have dedicated specific sections to the European and Japanese nobilities.

For an overview of articles and research questions read guest editors’ Silvia A. Conca Messina and Takeshi Abe piece “Noblemen in Business in the Nineteenth Century: The Survival of an Economic Elite?” https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2021.1972974.

The article by Takeshi Abe (Special Issue guest editor), Izumi Shirai, and Takenobu Yuki (pages 405-33) focuses on the active role that daimyo (feudal lords) played in fueling business development during Japan’s early industrialization. Some important primary sources in this article are biographies and school records, showing how the elite’s investment in education was key to the country’s modernization. (“Socio-Economic Activities of Former Feudal Lords in Meiji Japan” in https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1828354).

Far from static and passive, research shows that the nobility in Lombardy was involved in pushing forward key strategies and innovations toward modernizing land ownership and management during the nineteenth century. Silvia A. Conca Messina (also guest editor of this Special Issue) and Catia Brilli explain more in “Agriculture and Nobility in Lombardy. Land, Management and Innovation (1815-1861)” https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2019.1648435.

In “Far from the Passive Property. An Entrepreneurial Landowner in the Nineteenth Century Papal State” Daniela Felisini explores how Roman Prince Alessandro Torlonia positioned himself as a wealthy landowner in a region commonly labeled as backward. This article is fundamentally based on primary documents from Archivio Torlonia and other administrative sources about agricultural management (https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2019.1597853).

Although generational transitions may create limits for family businesses to thrive, the case of the Spanish firm Trenor y Cía shows that at least for up to three generations, innovation strategies were at the core of the company, hence making longevity an asset of this family enterprise. Read the article “Family Entrepreneurial Orientation as a Driver of Longevity in Family Firms: A Historic Analysis of the Ennobled Trenor Family and Trenor y Cía” by Begoña Giner and Amparo Ruiz here https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1801645.

In “Nordic Noblemen in Business: The Ehrnrooth Family and the Modernisation of the Finnish Economy during the Late 19th Century” Niklas Jensen-Eriksen, Saara Hilpinen, and Annette Forsén explore the diversity of paths and strategies, some inherited through generations and other innovative and modern, though which Finland’s nobility participated in the country’s industrialization in the late nineteenth century (https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1828868). This article is #OpenAccess.

Maria Eugenia Mata offers new findings that demonstrate the active participation and entrepreneurial drive of Portuguese aristocrats in leading enterprises to overseas operations in the article “Exemplifying Aristocratic Cross-Border Entrepreneurship before WWI, from a Portuguese Perspective” https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1727447.

In “A Gateway to the Business World? The Analysis of Networks in Connecting the Modern Japanese Nobility to the Business Elite” Shunsuke Nakaoka shows the key role that personal connections and social networks played in business activities in 19th century Japan. This article argues that trust, at the heart of business activity and entrepreneurial opportunities, can be explored by looking at personal relationships and aristocratic marriages. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1828353.

Monika Poettinger presents new findings and documents regarding accounting practices, management of production and the implementation of inheritance norms within the Ginori Family and the manufacturing of porcelain in the eighteenth century that show how this aristocratic group pushed forward crucial financial and innovation startegies for the business to grow and modernize. The article is titled “An Aristocratic Enterprise: The Ginori Porcelain Manufactory (1735–1896)” and can be accessed herehttps://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1801643.

“The Noble Entrepreneurs Coming from the Bourgeoisie: Counts Bettoni Cazzago during the Nineteenth Century” traces the history of the Bettoni-Cazzagos family in agriculture in the region of Lombardy. Rather than thinking of the noble group’s management and distribution methods as backward, Paolo Tedeschi demonstrates that the family’s strategies sought to advance, diversify, and modernize investment. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2019.1653283.

Roberto Tolaini argues that Genoa’s modernization was the result of the collaboration between bourgeoise and aristocratic activities in finance, agricultural infrastructure, and management. “The Genoese Nobility: Land, Finance and Business from Restoration to the First World War” presents new fiscal sources and private records from aristocratic families to demonstrate the prevailing participation of the nobility throughout the nineteenth-century economic development of the region. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1801644.

Article of the Month in Human Relations

It’s typical of me that only today did I become aware that our article on “Rethinking History and Memory in Organization Studies” (with John Hassard & Mick Rowlinson) has been the Article of the Month in Human Relations for March. Still, very pleased that the journal has highlighted our piece, especially since Human Relations has a great track record for publishing innovative pieces at the intersection of organization research and history.

March’s Article of the Month in Human Relations

How to publish in Business History

If you are interested in learning more about how to publish in journals, including Business History, then take a look at this video that was kindly provided by Dr Christian Harrison of the University of West of Scotland. It features a conversation with two journal editors, Prof Laura Galloway, International Journal of Entrepreneurship & Innovation, and Prof Stephanie Decker, Business History.

Business History changes Special Issue policy

Proposals for special issues are considered by the editorial team twice a year, once in June and once in December, to allow for a more systematic decision-making process. The deadline for submitting a special issue proposal is the first Friday in June and December. 

Proposals should be submitted to the Managing Editor ( businesshistoryeic@gmail.com) and copied to the Joint Editors-in-Chief, Stephanie Decker ( Stephanie.Decker@bristol.ac.uk) and Neil Rollings ( Neil.Rollings@glasgow.ac.uk). Guest editors remain free to submit proposed SIs at any point in the year but the proposals will not be considered until the next deadline. Guest editors will receive a decision shortly after the deadline. The expectation is that up to two special issues will be approved in any round averaging to three being commissioned each year, assuming that they are regarded as of suitable appeal. Decisions will be relayed to the applicants with feedback early in the New Year and the summer depending on the relevant deadline. 

Submitted proposals must be fully worked out in advance of submission. Editors remain happy to advise on proposed SIs in advance of any submission but that any revisions requested by the editorial team after submission are expected to be minor.

To this end it is important that potential guest editors acquaint themselves closely with the requirements for a SI proposal. The guidance below is a slightly amended and abridged version of the 2016 editorial on Special Issues. That editorial still forms the basis of our approach to Special Issues but the guidance below reflects our experience since 2016 on the way the process has worked. Rejected proposals can be resubmitted to the next SI competition but only if invited to do so and after significant and substantial revision in line with any feedback offered.

Special Issue Proposal Guidance

Presentation of the topic and the questions to be addressed.

  • Justification and relevance of the topic. It is important to explain why the proposed Special Issue fits within the remit of Business History, its contribution to business history as a field and why business historians would be interested in the proposed theme.
  • One to two pages providing a short synthesis of existing debates and the state of literature in the field, research gaps in that field and how the special issue will contribute to fill these gaps. This part should include references.
  • An outline of the mechanisms to be used to attract high quality articles. This could take the form of an open Call for Papers or an indication of invited contributions emerging from specialised workshops or sessions in conferences or congresses. It is important to show how this process has endeavoured to be inclusive.
  • Acknowledgment that all the articles proposed for the special issue, including the introductory essay, have not previously been published and are not under consideration elsewhere.
  • Acknowledgement that all articles will be submitted through the ScholarOne electronic platform for the journal in order to be peer-reviewed before acceptance for publication.
  • A proposed timetable with deadlines for completion of key milestones, which is to be monitored by the Guest Editors in close coordination with the member of the editorial team assigned to oversee progress on the special issue. The timetable should generally include: the date when a Call for Papers (if relevant) will be published or the dates of a workshop or session in the case of invited articles; the deadline for authors to submit the first version of their article to the ScholarOne website for peer-review evaluation (including the introductory article, which will be handled by the Associate Editor in charge of the special issue); the expected deadline for completion of the peer review process; and a suggested date for final publication. Please note that the final decision on this publication date will be in the hands of the editorial team, who need to take into account other articles accepted for publication in the journal and other special issues.
  • Guest Editor details, including names, academic affiliation, address and email, accompanied by a short biography with indication of most important research conducted by guest editors, and citations for the last two or three relevant publications related to the topic of the proposed Special Issue. 

See the journal website for further information.

#BHC2022MexicoCity and #BHC2022online program available

The #BHC2022MexicoCity and #BHC2022online program is now available. On April 6 participants will be able to attend virtual workshops and April 7 and 8 there will be concurrent sessions running from 7:30 am to 4:30 pm (all times are Mexico Daylight Time). The final day of the 2022 Business History Conference April 9 will focus on in-person activities at the Hotel Maria Isabel in the heart of Mexico City.  These include conventional events, such as the Krooss Prize Session and the Prize Ceremony. Some of these events will be hybrid and online registrants will be able to attend them from their computers.

The full program can be accessed here: https://thebhc.org/meeting-program/35684

You may register by selecting a full registration ticket or an online registration ticket here: https://thebhc.org/annual-meeting-registration

Please share the word, this is the most international program the Business History Conference has organized so far with participants representing more than 200 universities around the world. The broad range of topics is also impressive, from sessions on women in the world of finance to the history of business education around the world.

For questions please contact the Program Committee at ProgramCommittee@thebhc.org For technical questions please contact the Web Editor web-editor@thebhc.org.

Business History is on social media

Tag and follow us on Twitter @bh__journal

Join our Linkedin Group and follow the journal on Academia.edu.

Or contact the sm editor and businesshistory (at) gmail (dot) com. Hablamos español.

Recently released Business History 64(2)

Special Issue: Noblemen Entrepreneurs

This editorial introduces the 10 articles included in the special issue on ‘Noblemen-entrepreneurs in the Nineteenth Century. Investments, Innovation, Management and Networks’. The collected works focus on the business activities of noblemen in Europe and Asia, thus offering up opportunities for comparison in an age of economic expansion and globalisation. What was the contribution of the nobility to the economy? Can we consider noblemen to have been endowed with an entrepreneurial spirit? What differences or similarities can we draw between the European and Asian elites? In this introduction, we give a synthetic overview of the relevant issues in the broad topic of the collection and their importance to business history, and briefly present the accepted articles. As two of the articles deal with the Japanese case, while the others focus on Europe, we have dedicated specific sections to the European and Japanese nobilities.

Abe, Takeshi, Izumi Shirai, and Takenobu Yuki. 2022. “Socio-Economic Activities of Former Feudal Lords in Meiji Japan.” Business History 64 (2): 405–33. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1828354.

Conca Messina, Silvia A., and Takeshi Abe. 2022. “Noblemen in Business in the Nineteenth Century: The Survival of an Economic Elite?*.” Business History 64 (2): 207–25. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2021.1972974.

Conca Messina, Silvia A., and Catia Brilli. 2022. “Agriculture and Nobility in Lombardy. Land, Management and Innovation (1815-1861).” Business History 64 (2): 255–79. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2019.1648435.

Felisini, Daniela. 2022. “Far from the Passive Property. An Entrepreneurial Landowner in the Nineteenth Century Papal State.” Business History 64 (2): 226–38. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2019.1597853.

Giner, Begoña, and Amparo Ruiz. 2022. “Family Entrepreneurial Orientation as a Driver of Longevity in Family Firms: A Historic Analysis of the Ennobled Trenor Family and Trenor y Cía.” Business History 64 (2): 327–58. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1801645.

Jensen-Eriksen, Niklas, Saara Hilpinen, and Annette Forsén. 2022. “Nordic Noblemen in Business: The Ehrnrooth Family and the Modernisation of the Finnish Economy during the Late 19th Century.” Business History 64 (2): 385–404. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1828868.

Mata, Maria Eugenia. 2022. “Exemplifying Aristocratic Cross-Border Entrepreneurship before WWI, from a Portuguese Perspective.” Business History 64 (2): 280–96. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1727447.

Nakaoka, Shunsuke. 2022. “A Gateway to the Business World? The Analysis of Networks in Connecting the Modern Japanese Nobility to the Business Elite.” Business History 64 (2): 434–55. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1828353.

Poettinger, Monika. 2022. “An Aristocratic Enterprise: The Ginori Porcelain Manufactory (1735–1896).” Business History 64 (2): 359–84. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1801643.

Tedeschi, Paolo. 2022. “The Noble Entrepreneurs Coming from the Bourgeoisie: Counts Bettoni Cazzago during the Nineteenth Century.” Business History 64 (2): 239–54. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2019.1653283.

Tolaini, Roberto. 2022. “The Genoese Nobility: Land, Finance and Business from Restoration to the First World War.” Business History 64 (2): 297–326. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1801644.