ACCOUNTING HISTORY WORKSHOP

The workshop is being held by the Accounting History Special Interest Group (AH SIG) at Southampton University on Monday, 30 March 2020 10:30–17:00, before the main BAFA Annual Conference.

Accounting history research involves investigating the development and role of accounting in the past. The stories of history are gleaned from several sources, including documents in archives, libraries, private collections, and oral recollections. They are illuminated by knowledge of context, including, social, economic, commercial, legal, educational, financial, and religious factors identified in the literature. And they are interpreted and explained using those factors, often in combination with a selection of theories.

The aim of this workshop is to demonstrate the relevance of accounting history; to encourage participation in this genre of research; to describe various methods for carrying out accounting history research; to focus on how to publish historical research; and to provide an opportunity to establish networks and identify mentors and co-authors. Attendees will also have the opportunity to receive feedback on their research ideas and projects.

Workshop Programme

The one-day workshop will begin with an overview of accounting history methods and practice and an introduction to the Accounting History Special Interest group, followed by sessions on:

·       Carrying out accounting history research.

·       How to find primary sources.

·       How to find secondary sources.

·       Writing-up historical research: what should you include?

·       How to publish accounting history in leading journals.

·       Feedback on your ideas and projects (small group session)

Target Audience

The workshop is suitable for anyone considering beginning historical accounting research and anyone currently working in this area.

Registration

Full Ticket: £55
Reduced Rate for PhD Students Only: £25

The fee includes lunch. 

Buying a workshop ticket registers you for this event. Tickets to BAFA conferences are only available to members. To purchase a ticket, log in to your account on the BAFA Membership Portal (https://members.bafa.ac.uk/) and click the ‘Purchase Tickets’ button. Select the appropriate ticket for the event you want to attend, and follow instructions.

If you are not already a member of BAFA, please sign up for membership at https://members.bafa.ac.uk/signup. Further information on how to register for BAFA events can be found here: http://www.bafa.ac.uk/assets/uploads/conference-workshop-registration.pdf.

BAFA Annual Membership rates: Academic Staff: £30 
Unsalaried PhD/MPhil Student or Retired Academic: £15

Look forward to seeing you there!

Jobs: Research Associate in Business History at University of Glasgow

The Adam Smith Business School is looking for a Research Associate to make a leading contribution to the project: The Making of a Lopsided Union: Economic Integration in the European Economic Community, 1957-1992 (EURECON) led by Professor Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol (See http://e-mourlon-druol.com/eurecon/ and Explanatory Document for more details). Specifically, the job requires expert knowledge in the area of post-war international/European economic and business history. Contribute to the formulation and submission of research publications and research proposals and help manage and direct complex and challenging project(s) as opportunities allow.

This post is full time with funding up to 18 months in the first instance.

For more information and to apply online: Click here

New database of company archives

The University of Florida’s History Department program in the History of Capitalism has created a curated and searchable database of corporate archives and is proud to announce that this new digital resource is now available. The name and virtual location of the database are Inquire Capitalism at https://inquirecapitalism.omeka.net/

https://inquirecapitalism.omeka.net/

Inquire Capitalism seeks to both unify information about corporate archives and also to connect scholars, archivists, and businesses by making information about company archives more discoverable. In addition, the researchers collecting the information about company archives have focused on finding out what is the digital presence of companies’ history, whether through digital archives or by having heritage sites and chronologies as part of the company’s website. The database contains information mostly about the United States, but the team at the University of Florida plans to continue expanding the list by including information from other parts of the world. Inquire Capitalism has counted with the partnership of the German Historical Institute in Washington D.C. and the Hagley Museum and Library to start the project and wishes to create new partners to make this list global and even more useful. Comments and new contributions are most appreciated and welcomed. Please contact the team by emailing to inquirecapitalism@history.ufl.edu.


I would be thrilled to know what you think of the project. I am also writing to find out if you would be willing to hear more about how we created it and how we intend to make it permanent. It would be great if we can find a way to maybe integrate it as part of one of your working projects, or possibly discuss a way to (once again) pursue research grants opportunities so that this resource can become even more useful and internationally generated and powered.

My best, Paula
Paula A. de la Cruz-Fernández, Ph.D.
Historiadora, Administradora de Patrimonio || Historian, Heritage Manager

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3535-7195
Editora || Editor The Exchange, the BHC blog
Redes sociales || Contact@cruzmosu or LinkedIn

New historical article in JMS

The January issue of JMS features a really interesting piece by Andrew Smith and Miriam Kaminishi about the historical origins of the concept of the ‘Confucian entrepreneur’. As anyone who has taught on the basis of international business textbooks can attest, the way in which Confucianism in drawn upon to explain phenomena in China’s political economy is often quite odd and uncomfortable. Below is the reference and abstract. Happy reading!

Confucian Entrepreneurship: Towards a Genealogy of a Conceptual Tool

Andrew Smith

Miriam Kaminishi

First published: 16 February 2019 

https://doi.org/10.1111/joms.12439

Abstract

The concept of the ‘Confucian Entrepreneur’ is now used by many scholars to understand entrepreneurship in China and other East Asian countries. This paper traces the development of this concept from its roots in the writings of nineteenth‐century Western authors to its use in modern management journals. We show that while this conceptual tool has been adapted over time, the claims associated with it have remained largely similar. Use of the term Confucian entrepreneur implies belief that Confucian ideas induce Chinese entrepreneurs to behave differently than their Western counterparts, a claim for which the empirical foundations are weak. We do not go so far as to say that those who research Chinese entrepreneurship should discard the concept of the Confucian entrepreneur simply because of its historical origins in colonialism. However, we do call on researchers to reflect on the historical origins of their conceptual tools. By historicising our theories of entrepreneurship, this paper should encourage greater scholarly reflexivity and thus the development of entrepreneurship and management theory with greater predictive power.

ToCs: MOH 14,3

A new issue of Management & Organizational History is out:

Articles

Symbolism in bank marketing and architecture: the headquarters of National Provincial Bank of England |
Victoria Barnes & Lucy Newton
Pages: 213-244 | DOI: 10.1080/17449359.2019.1683038

Organizational structure, public policy, and technological change: the origins of the dominion steel industries
Malcolm Abbott
Pages: 245-265 | DOI: 10.1080/17449359.2019.1683039

Divestment cycles in the Portuguese electrical and electronics industry – an historical, multilevel analysis (1975–2015)
Pedro Silva & Antonio Moreira
Pages: 266-293 | DOI: 10.1080/17449359.2019.1698438


Original ArticlesSpeaking frankly – parrhesia and public service
Edward Barratt
Pages: 294-310 | DOI: 10.1080/17449359.2019.1698439

Merry Christmas & a happy new year

And this is it for another year! We leave you with an interesting read from the BBC which draws on some local business history (well local to me at least!)

Is it possible to make some clients pay a premium for goods and sell them cheaply to a mass market? Josiah Wedgwood pioneered marketing practices that still annoy customers today:

Can you charge different customers different amounts?

In the meantime, from all of us at OHN,

Happy holidays & see you again in the new year!

We are taking a well-deserved break until January, and look forward to receiving any notices from you about your interesting initiatives and news.

The OHN Team

CFP: Uses of the Past – Perspectives, Forms and Concepts in Business History

CBS Paper Development Workshop

Business History Conference, Charlotte, NC, March 12, 2020

Submission deadline: January 10, 2020

In thepast years, uses of the past hasbecome a prominent research theme for business historians and organizationscholars alike. Studies on the usefulness and appropriation of the past haveappeared across diverse fields such as business history, organization studies,marketing, learning & education, and CSR. Uses of history is fashionable. Butwhere will the field go in the future?

In the CBSPDW we seek to focus on questions that have yet to asked, and we would like toexplore the theories and methods that might take the field forward.

The workshop offers an opportunity to getfeedback and generate ideas of how to develop concrete paper drafts that deal,one way or the other, with uses of the past. In addition, the PDW will serve asa forum where we can discuss future directions and opportunities (and potentialdead ends) going forward with a ‘uses-of-the-past’ agenda. What are thequestions and research that are yet to be explored, and what are the role forbusiness historians in shaping a ‘uses-of the past’ research agenda?

Themes to be explored in the papers could include,amongst others:

  • Uses of the past for branding, strategy and identity purposes
  • Corporate and public museums
  • The use (andabuse?) of organizational anniversaries
  • Uses of historyin action
  • The role and practices of historical consultancies (e.g. WinthropGroup, The History Factory andothers)
  • Historical CSR
  • Theoretical andmethodological perspectives connected to uses of the past.
  • Criticalperspectives on uses of the past

Submitted texts could take form asextended abstracts or full paper drafts. The important thing is that readers canidentify the key arguments, theories and empirical material, for them toprovide useful feedback, suggestions and comments.

Depending on the submitted abstracts andfull papers, the participants and organizers could potentially explore theopportunity of a subsequent special issue on uses of the past in arelevant academic publication, such as, for example Business History. 

Participants are expected to read allcirculated papers. Please submit a paper draft or extended abstract before January10, 2020 to the workshop organizers.

Anders Ravn Sørensen, ars.mpp@cbs.dk

Morten Tinning, mti.mpp@cbs.dk

ToC QROM 14,4 (2019)

Just out, Volume 14, Issue 4 of Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management

Visualizing community pride: engaging community through photo- and video-voice methodsEric Ping Hung Li, Ajnesh Prasad, Cristalle Smith, Ana Gutierrez, Emily Lewis, Betty Brown

The purpose of this paper is to consider the potential of visual (i.e. non-textual) research methods in community-based participatory research.

Using template and matrix analysisNicholas Burton, Peter Galvin

The purpose of this paper is to present a qualitative research method using oral history interview data that may advance new types of methodological inquiry in management…

Challenges in accessing research sites in Ghana: a research noteTheophilus Azungah

Despite the crucial role of gaining access for successful research in social and management studies, very little has been written on issues and challenges associated with…

Sensemaking through a storytelling lensMichele Heath, Tracy Porter

Drawing from the extant literature on sensemaking theory, the purpose of this paper is to understand how physicians view health information exchange (HIE) implementation…

Positioning, conflict, and dialogue in management teamsPasi Hirvonen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dynamics of social positioning and interpersonal conflicts in management teams. This paper utilizes positioning theory to…

Empiricism, epistemology and modern postmodernism: a critiqueBradley G. Bowden

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, it seeks to trace the origins of the various strands of postmodernism within German philosophic idealism; traditions of…

Phenomenal differencesSimon Mollan

The purpose of this paper is to explore issues related to a recent article by Bradley Bowden published in QROM titled “Empiricism, and modern postmodernism: a critique”…

Jean Helms Mills & Albert J. Mills

Co-editors, Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journalhttp://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=qrom

Capri Summer School – Research Methods in Management

Aim

Capri Summer School was born on the impulse of AIDEA (the Italian Academy of Business Administration and Management). The overall aim of the summer school is to enhance participants’ research capabilities.

Capri Summer School provides a chance for doctoral students and early career researchers to develop their understanding of research methods in management studies, benefiting from an interdisciplinary setting, under the guidance of a panel of internationally renowned scholars.

The school is organized in cooperation with the British Academy of Management (BAM).

Audience and Method

The course is aimed at doctoral students and early stage researchers in the areas of management, interested in qualitative studies of accounting, management, finance, organization, etc. Candidates who are developing interesting ideas but who still have time to be influenced by participation in the summer school will receive the strongest consideration. Admission will be on a competitive basis.

About 30 participants will be admitted: in addition to overall quality of content, factors such as position within the doctoral process and institutional representation will be taken into account. Participants will be selected by the faculty together with the organizing committee. Lectures will cover epistemological issues, data collection methods and analytic techniques such as content and discourse analysis.

Venue

The summer school will be held on the Island of Capri at Villa Orlandi, a seventeenth century villa re-stored by the University of Napoli Federico II. The Villa, surrounded by a nice park, is particularly suited for study and  includes all essential facilities. Over ten desks equipped with PCs and Internet connections are available.

How to apply

Applicants are invited to submit a single PDF file consisting of:

  1. A 4-page extended abstract of their thesis project/research idea. Clearly specifying :
    1. Originality and importance of their intended topic;
    2. Contribution of the work (expected);
    3. Methodological perspectives or epistemological positions they would think as useful to discuss during the summer school.
  2. CV;
  3. motivation letter explaining the reasons behind the application.

All materials should be sent as a single PDF file by 2nd May 2020. An email receipt of the letter will be sent to acknowledge submissions.

Fees will be limited to Euro 460,00 for each participant (not including transports and accommodation).

Apply online at:  http://www.caprisummerschool.it/