Brexit Bonanza 2

My Exeter colleague Prof Richard Toye has done a series of interviews about Brexit for the Imperial and Global Forum that I thought I’d share:

 

 

Advertisements

Annc: Reframing Institutional Logics by Alistair Mutch

Alistair Mutch asked us to send this message to our network:

Dear friends

Apologies for this marketing message but I hope you will be interested to know that my new book on institutional logics is now published by Routledge. Building on my recent article in Academy of Management Review, it seeks to offer a new perspective on institutional logics by drawing on the resources of critical realism.

Reframing Institutional Logics: History, Substance and Practices, Routledge 2019 – available at https://www.routledge.com/Reframing-Institutional-Logics-Substance-Practice-and-History/Mutch/p/book/9781138482357  

From the blurb:

How are we to characterise the context in which organisations operate? The notion that organisational activity is shaped by institutional logics has been influential but it presents a number of problems. The criteria by which institutions are identified, the conflation of institutions with organisations, the enduring nature of those institutions and an exaggerated focus on change are all concerns that existing perspectives do not tackle adequately. This book uses the resources of historical work to suggest new ways of looking at institutional logics. It builds on the work of Roger Friedland who has conceived of institutional logics being animated by adherence to a core substance that is immanent in practices. Development of this idea in the context of organisation theory is supported by ideas drawn from the work of the social theorist Margaret Archer and the broader resources of the philosophical tradition of critical realism. Institutions are seen to emerge over time from the embodied relations of humans to each other and to the natural world on which they depend for material existence. Once emergent, institutions develop their own logics and endure to form the context in which agents are involuntarily placed and that conditions their activity. The approach adopted offers resources to ‘bring society back in’ to the study of organisations.

The book will appeal to graduate students who are engaging with institutional theory in their research. It will also be of interest to scholars of institutional theory, of the history of organisations and those seeking to apply ideas from critical realism to their research.

I hope you would be able to recommend purchase to your library.

Many thanks

Alistair

 

The problem with Harvard Business School case studies

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The discipline of business history has long been linked to the case-study method of teaching. It will therefore interest many readers of this blog to learn of a new article in the business press that talks about the historical origins of the case study method, which began at Harvard Business School and which was later adopted in management schools around the world. The article in Quartz disseminates some of the key findings presented in A New History of Management, an important new book by John Hassard, Michael Rowlinson, Stephen Cummings, and Todd Bridgman. Regardless of whether you are a friend or a foe of the use of case studies, I would encourage you to check out the piece in Quartz and the underlying scholarly works.

Personally, I’m glad to see that the life and ideas of HBS Dean Wallace Donham (1877-1954) is being investigated. In the 1920s, Donham was one of the most influential critics of shareholder primacy and the related idea that the maximization of shareholder value is the best criterion for judging the performance of managers. At a time when the idea of shareholder primacy is being scrutinized once again, it is encouraging to know that people are paying attention to Donham.

Pan Am research grant

The Dave Abrams and Gene Banning Pan Am Research Grant

by Jay Sylvestre

The Pan Am Historical Foundation announces the ninth annual Dave Abrams and Gene Banning Pan Am Research Grant competition. Up to $1,500 will be awarded to support scholarly research using the Pan American World Airways, Inc. Records held by the University of Miami Libraries’ Special Collections. The grant honors two of Pan Am’s most avid historians, Dave Abrams and Gene Banning.

Since its first international flight in 1927, Pan Am positioned itself as a world leader in American commercial aviation. The Pan Am records date from 1927 to the 1990s and include administrative and financial files; technical and research reports; public relations and promotional materials; internal publications including newsletters, journals, and press releases; and thousands of photographs.

The grant is open to advanced graduate students, independent scholars, and faculty. Priority will be given to research proposals that will result in publication in any media.

Application Procedures

Applicants must submit a proposal of no more than two pages describing their research project, a curriculum vitae or résumé, and two letters of recommendation.

Application deadline is November 30, 2018.

Please send inquiries and applications to:

The Dave Abrams & Gene Banning Pan Am Research Grant
c/o Jay Sylvestre
University of Miami Libraries
1300 Memorial Drive
Coral Gables, FL 33146-0320
j.sylvestre@miami.edu

About Dave Abrams and Gene Banning

After graduating from the University of Miami, Dave Abrams (1919-2005) joined Pan American Airways and worked for 42 years as a meteorologist, navigator and Director of Flight Operations for Latin America. Abrams was instrumental in the formation of The Pan Am Historical Foundation after the company shut its doors in 1991 and in finding a home for Pan Am’s archives and memorabilia.

Gene Banning (1918-2006) was one of the longest serving pilots for Pan Am. His aviation days started with the infamous flying boats in 1941 and ended with Boeing 747s in 1978. An avid researcher, Banning was a guiding member of The Pan Am Historical Foundation from its inception and the author of Airlines of Pan American since 1927 (McLean, Va.: Paladwr, 2001).

About the Pan Am Historical Foundation and the University of Miami Libraries

The Pan Am Historical Foundation is a group dedicated to preserving the heritage of Pan American World Airways. For more information about the Foundation, visit http://www.panam.org/. The Special Collections of the University of Miami Libraries preserves and provides access to research materials focusing on the history and culture of Florida, the Caribbean, and Latin America. The Pan American World Airways, Inc. records consist of hundreds of boxes of materials and reigns as the most frequently consulted single resource in Special Collections. For more information about the Special Collections of the University of Miami Libraries, visit https://www.library.miami.edu/specialcollections/index.html.

Past Winners

  • 2017: Bryce Evans: Pan Am: A Gastronomic History
  • 2016: Sean Seyer, “Independent Internationalism in the Air: Pan American Airlines, the Pan American Union, and the 1928 Havana Convention”
  • 2015: Josue Sakata, Boston Public School Primary Source Sets
  • 2014: Hadassah St. Hubert, “Visions of a Modern Nation: Haiti at the World’s Fairs”
  • 2013: Ken Fortenberry & Gregg Herken, “Point of No Return: Solving the Mystery of the Lost Clipper”
  • 2012: Felipe F. Cruz, “Flight of the Toucans: Technology and Culture in the Brazilian Airspace”
  • 2012: Gordon H Pirie examined Pan Am’s role in civil aviation to, and from, in post-colonial Africa
  • 2011: Jonathan Ruano, “Pan American Airways, the South Atlantic Route and Rise of the American Empire”
  • 2010: Houston Johnson, “Taking Off: The Politics and Culture of American Aviation, 1927-1929”
  • 2009: Augustine Meaher “Pan Am Arrives Down Under: A Diplomatic and Aeronautical Accomplishment”
  • 2009: Roger Turner, “Pan-Am’s Contribution to the Development of Aeronautical Meteorology”
  • 2007: Jennifer Van Vleck “No Distant Places: Aviation and American Globalism, 1924-1968”

Aston Inaugural: A History of Business in 9 Archives

After many years as a Prof at Aston, I am having my inaugural this October. Please join me if you can, free drinks and nibbles after!

A history of business in nine archives

Professor Stephanie Decker

 

Date
Tuesday 30 October 2018

Time
18:30 to 20:00

Location
G11, Aston University

Remarkable stories and insights linger in archives like half-written novels. Many well-known companies maintain extensive collections of their international ventures that contain rich materials about business and society. In nine archives across three continents, we’ll discover the history of international firms investing in West Africa and elsewhere, from precursors of today’s microfinance to how firms make use of their history to inspire confidence after a crisis.

18:00 – Tea and coffee in G8, Main Building
18:30 – Lecture in G11, Main Building
19:30 – Drinks, nibbles and networking in G8

Please email events@aston.ac.uk with any questions or queries.

Book your free space here.

Hyper-prolific authors

From THE:

‘Hyperprolific’ academics ‘don’t meet author criteria’ – study

Analysis shows thousands of researchers publish the equivalent of one paper every five days, but their involvement is often limited

September 14, 2018

Narratives in family business

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The Strategic Use of Historical Narratives in Family Business

I’m sharing a link to a fascinating new paper on how family firms use historical narratives strategically. The paper is doubly interesting to me as it intersects with my own research interests and is consistent with my observations about how the entrepreneurs in my extended family have used historical narratives in their ventures. Congratulations to Rania Labaki Ludovic Cailluet and Fabian Bernhard on this paper.

Labaki R., Bernhard F., Cailluet L. (2019) The Strategic Use of Historical Narratives in the Family Business. In: Memili E., Dibrell C. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Heterogeneity among Family Firms. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham

Nominations for Gomory and Hagley Book Prize

Ralph Gomory Prize of the Business History Conference/Deadline/November 30, 2018

by Carol Ressler Lockman

The 2018 Ralph Gomory Prize of the Business History Conference has been awarded to Edward J. Balleisen of Duke University for his book, Fraud:  An American History from Barnum to Madoff (Princeton University Press, 2017) at the Business History Conference annual meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, April 7, 2018.

 

The Ralph Gomory Prize for Business History (made possible by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation) recognizes historical work on the effect business enterprises have on the economic conditions of a country in which they operate.   A $5,000 prize is awarded annually.  Eligible books are written In English and published two years (2017 or 2018 copyright) prior to the award.   The 2019 Prize will be presented at the annual meeting of the Business History Conference to be held in Cartagena, Colombia, March 14-16, 2019.

Four copies of a book must accompany a nomination and be submitted to the Prize Coordinator, Carol Ressler Lockman, Business History Conference, PO Box 3630, 298 Buck Road, Wilmington, DE 19807-0630 USA.  Email:  clockman@hagley.orgThe deadline for submission is November 30, 2018.

 

Hagley Prize for Business History/Deadline November 30, 2018

by Carol Ressler Lockman

Hagley Museum and Library and the Business History Conference are pleased to announce the 2018 winner of the Hagley Prize:  Matatu:  A History of Popular Transportation in Nairobi (The University of Chicago Press, 2017) by Kenda Mutongi of Williams College.   Hagley Museum and Library and the Business History Conference jointly offer the Hagley Prize awarded to the best book in Business History (broadly defined) and consists of a medallion and $2,500.  The prize was awarded at the Business History Conference annual meeting held in Baltimore, Maryland, April 7th, 2018.

The prize committee encourages the submission of books from all methodological perspectives.  It is particularly interested in innovation studies that have the potential to expand the boundaries of the discipline.   Scholars, publishers, and other interested parties may submit nominations.  Eligible books can have either an American or an international focus.   They must be written in English and be published during the two years (2017 or 2018 copyright) prior to the award.

Four copies of a book must accompany a nomination and be submitted to the prize coordinator, Carol Ressler Lockman, Hagley Museum and Library, PO Box 3630, 298 Buck Road, Wilmington DE  19807-0630,  The deadline for nominations is November 30, 2018.   The 2019 Hagley Prize will be presented at the annual meeting of the Business History Conference in Cartagena, Colombia, March 16th, 2019.

BAM council elections

In case you are member of the British Academy of Management, please remember to vote!

From January 2019 there will be vacant places on the BAM Council. 32 candidates have been nominated, representing a diverse range of research backgrounds and interests.

These elections are important as they will decide who will serve as members of Council for the next three years (Jan 2019 – Dec 2021) and will help to shape the academy going into the future.

The closing date for votes to be returned is 12.00 on Friday 24th August

The Candidates (In Alpabetical Order)

  • Dr Tony Abdoush
  • Dr Ijeoma Ogochukwu Anaso
  • Dr Norin Arshed
  • Professor Thankom Arun
  • Professor Charles Baden-Fuller
  • Dr Brendan Canavan
  • Dr Fariba Darabi
  • Professor Stephanie Decker
  • Dr Alison J. Glaister
  • Dr Russ Glennon
  • Dr Dieu Hack-Polay
  • Dr Qile He
  • Dr Inge Hill
  • Dr Emmanuel Idowu
  • Mr James Johnston
  • Dr Susan Kirk
  • Dr Smirti Kutaula
  • Professor Jonathan Liu
  • Dr Mark Loon
  • Dr Nnamdi Madichie
  • Dr Maktoba Omar
  • Kingsley Omeihe
  • Professor Emma Parry
  • Professor Emmanuella Plakoyiannaki
  • Dr Ijaz A. Qureshi
  • Dr Stefanie Reissner
  • Dr Ashley Roberts
  • Dr Sukanlaya Sawang
  • Dr Usha Sundaram
  • Dr Wen Wang
  • Dr Svetlana Warhurst
  • Dr Kemi Yekini

BAM Members – Cast Your Vote

To read statements from each of the nominees and for information on how to vote, please click here:

View Candidate Profiles (Available to Active BAM Members Only)

Please click here to vote in the BAM2019-2021 Council Elections

The closing date for votes to be returned is 12.00 Friday 24th August.

Kind regards,

Lewis

Lewis Johnson | Membership and Communications Administrator
—————————————————————————————–
British Academy of Management, 137 Euston Road London, NW1 2AA, UK
T: +44 (0)2073 839 794 | F: +44 (0) 2073 830 377 | ljohnson@bam.ac.uk
—————————————————————————————–
Join BAM | Conference | LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter | bam.ac.uk

Reconstructing the B-School

Reblogged from NEP-HIS:

Mitch Larson very kindly reviewed our article in Business History: “Clio in the Business School: Historical Approaches in Strategy, International Business and Entrepreneurship”, which the publishers have made available for free for a time: Business History, 59(6): 904-27

Review by Mitchell J. Larson (University of Central Lancashire)

Recently Martin Parker (Bristol) has taken to the airwaves promoting the idea of bulldozing the business school. In sharp contrast, Andrew Perchard, Niall MacKenzie, Stephanie Decker, and Giovanni Favero make a compelling case for certain disciplines in the management sciences to open themselves to alternative methodological and epistemological approaches. They argue that the fields of strategy, international business, and entrepreneurship have not embraced historically-oriented research to the same extent as other fields within business and management studies. The authors also admit that many scholars conducting historical business research have not made a sufficiently solid case about the robustness of their historical methodology(s) or data to convince other social scientists about the validity of their claims. Drawing upon an impressive range of previous works to develop their discussion, the paper attempts to reconcile these discrepancies to highlight how a more explicit articulation of the historian’s process could overcome the concerns of ‘mainstream’ management scholars regarding theorization and methodology in these three fields specifically and in management studies generally.

To continue reading, click here: https://nephist.wordpress.com/2018/07/24/reconstructing-the-b-school/