AOM PDW on Historical methods

*** Apologies for cross-posting ***

 

PDW on “Historical Methods for Management and Organizational Research”

 

Coordinators

Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School

Diego M. Coraiola, U. of Alberta

 

Participants

William Foster, U. of Alberta

JoAnne Yates, MIT Sloan School of Management

Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Bus, York U.

Michael Rowlinson, U. of Exeter

Christina Lubinski, Copenhagen Business School

 

Program Information

Session Type: PDW Workshop

Program Session: 107 | Submission: 12154 | Sponsor(s): (MH, CMS)

Scheduled: Friday, Aug 4 2017 12:15PM – 2:45PM at Hyatt Regency Atlanta in Embassy Hall E

 

 

Description

The PDW will be divided in two parts.

  1. In the first part the participants will present on topics related to the use of historical methods in management and organizational research. After the presentations we will have time for questions and answers from the audience.
  2. In the second part the participants will be distributed in roundtables and the audience will be invited to join them to discuss specific topics of the practice and publishing of historical research in management journals and receive feedback on their research projects.

 

Registration

***No registration required.

 

We do not require a formal registration. However, if you are planning to join us, we strongly encourage you to prepare a brief summary of a research project you are working on together with any doubts or puzzling issues you have been facing that you might want to discuss and get feedback on during the roundtables.

 

Abstract

Historical approaches to management and organizations have seen many promising developments in recent years, with several articles, special issues and edited books highlighting the important contribution that historical research can make to our understanding of contemporary organizations. Theoretical debates on the status of historical approaches within management and organization studies have dominated so far. These are important as they determine what kind of historical methods align with scholars’ epistemological and theoretical approach. Hence this PDW has two aims: to introduce scholars interested in the more practical questions of how we can use historical methods for organizational research to a range of option, and by highlighting the methodological implications of using specific historical approaches. This PDW will bring together several scholars who have used historical methodologies in their research. Their presentations will introduce participants to a range of methodologies and offer them the opportunity to subsequently discuss the relevance of these approaches for participants’ research projects in small groups in the second half of the session.

 

 

 

BH 59,7 October 2017 issue is now out!

Business History, Volume 59, Issue 7, October 2017 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

Business and Global Environmental History

This new issue contains the following articles:

Special Issue Articles

Uniting business history and global environmental history
Andrew Smith & Kirsten Greer
Pages: 987-1009 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1338688
Knowing nature in the business records of the Hudson’s Bay Company, 1670–1840
George Colpitts
Pages: 1054-1080 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1304914

Original Articles

Making the global local? Overseas goods in English rural shops, c.1600–1760
Jon Stobart
Pages: 1136-1153 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1293040

Workshop report: Pop Nostalgia

The German Historical Institute published a workshop report on an interesting event on pop nostalgia & uses of the past that took place last year here: https://www.ghil.ac.uk/pop_nostalgia.html

Pop Nostalgia: The Uses of the Past in Popular Culture

 

Pop nostalgia, we are told, is everywhere. Our current golden age of television—from Mad Men to Vinyl, Downton Abbey to Call the Midwife—lovingly recreates earlier periods of the twentieth century, while club nights devoted to the 1980s or 1990s allow us to return to our youth. What is more, popular culture is, in the words of music journalist Simon Reynolds, addicted to its own past. It not only reminisces, it revives, reissues, remixes earlier forms and styles instead of coming up with genuinely new. Finally, our most modern technologies are always also time machines: producing sepia-coloured images of the present for an anticipated nostalgic recollection in the future.

These very different cultural phenomena, which are often subsumed under the term nostalgia, raise a number of still under-explored questions. How new is this development, given that period films are as old as the cinema and that popular culture and music has drawn on earlier periods as long as it exists? Can the recycling of old styles and forms not also be highly creative and result in innovations? Are period settings and costumes, retro and vintage styles as such indicative and synonymous with nostalgia? Is it really nostalgia that drives our interest in and our engagement with the past? And if not what other motivations are at play? What role, for example, have media technologies such as film and the internet played in preserving the culture of the past in the present?

These are some of the questions the workshop Pop Nostalgia addresses. It explores the uses of the past in popular culture across all media and genre, from literature, cinema, television, and video games to theme park, club nights and sports events. It is interested not only in representations of the past but also in their production and circulation as well as in audiences and reception. The workshop is particularly interested in the historical dimension of pop nostalgia.

New article on History Reframing Institutional Logics

 And we are happy to announce another great contribution to the ongoing debate on organizational history:

PRACTICE, SUBSTANCE AND HISTORY: REFRAMING INSTITUTIONAL LOGICS

  1. Alistair Mutch
    Nottingham Business School, Nottingham trent University, Nottingham, NG1 4BU, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
  1. Correspondence: Alistair Mutch, Email: alistair.mutch@ntu.ac.uk

Abstract

The characterization by Roger Friedland of institutional logics as a combination of substance and practices opens the door to a more complex reading of their influence on organizational life. His focus suggests attention to feelings and belief as much as cognition and choice. This article uses history to develop these ideas by paying attention to the perennial features of our embodied relations with the world and other persons. Historical work draws our attention to neglected domains of social life, such as play, which can have profound impacts on organizations. The study of history suggests that such institutions have a long run conditioning influence that calls into question accounts that stress individual agential choice and action in bringing about change. Analytical narratives of the emergence of practices can provide the means to combine the conceptual apparatus of organization theory with the attention to temporality of history.

  • Received September 10, 2015.
  • Revision received May 9, 2017.
  • Accepted May 12, 2017.

New article in Organizational History

On the back of recent and significant new debates on the use of history within business and management studies, we consider the perception of historians as being anti-theory and of having methodological shortcomings; and business and management scholars displaying insufficient attention to historical context and privileging of certain social science methods over others. These are explored through an examination of three subjects: strategy, international business and entrepreneurship. We propose a framework for advancing the use of history within business and management studies more generally through greater understanding of historical perspectives and methodologies.

New article on MOH

History Research in Management and Organization Studies

Editors’ Picks: History Research in Management and Organization Studies

Edited by Gabrielle Durepos and Albert J Mills

Introduction

This Editors’ Picks provides an occasion to celebrate the momentum that doing history research in management and organization studies (MOS) has gained since the calls for more history in the early 1990s (Zald, 1993, 1996; Kieser, 1994; Üsdiken and Kieser, 2004). Organization is an especially appropriate venue to do so given the dedication of the journal to disseminating critically oriented scholarship. The initial calls for more history work in MOS suggested, in varying ways (empirical, epistemological) and degrees, that doing history could act as a vehicle for critique. Indeed the articles selected for this Editors’ Picks are not only evidence of the growing momentum for more history in MOS but each in its own vein engenders history as a vehicle for critique. The theme is exemplified well by Cooke (1999) who provides a critical reconstruction of the Management of Change literature with a focus on redressing the silences surrounding the role of the ideological left in the disciplines’ own accounts of its past. In his assertion that all management and organization theory is shaped by past processes and are nonetheless viewed through a political lens formed by contemporary concerns, Cooke calls for greater awareness in the historical construction of representations of management and organization theory. Though Cooke (1999) does not use the terms ‘critical history,’ his article teaches us that a ‘critical history’ (as envisioned today) might imply acknowledging the historicity of management theory as a precondition for taking responsibility to change its (self- )representations that are uncontested, naturalized and un-reflexive.

To read the full introduction, please click here.

TOC BH July 2017 issue (59,1)

Original Articles

Managing political imperatives in war time: strategic responses of Philips in Australia, 1939–1945
Pierre van der Eng
Pages: 645-666 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1259311

The genesis of the electricity supply industry in Britain: A case study of NESCo from 1889 to 1914
Tom McGovern & Tom McLean
Pages: 667-689 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1261827

‘A fraud, a drunkard, and a worthless scamp’: estate agents, regulation, and Realtors in the interwar period
Mark Latham
Pages: 690-709 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1261828

Bring in the brewers: business entry in the Swedish brewing industry from 1830 to 2012
Marcus Box
Pages: 710-743 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1269751

Pioneering strategies in the digital world. Insights from the Axel Springer case
Gianvito Lanzolla & Alessandro Giudici
Pages: 744-777 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1269752

The making of the modern retail market: economic theory, business interests and economic policy in the passage of the 1964 Resale Prices Act
Helen Mercer
Pages: 778-801 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1270267
Comment

The decline in the British bank population since 1810 obeys a law of negative compound interest
J. J. Bissell
Pages: 802-813 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1301430

Banks, births, and tipping points in the historical demography of British banking: A response to J.J. Bissell
Philip Garnett, Simon Mollan & R. Alexander Bentley
Pages: 814-820 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1301429

BH ToC 59.4

The new issue of Business History (June 2017) is now available:

Business History

Original Articles

Keynes, Trouton and the Hector Whaling Company. A personal and professional relationship
Bjørn L. Basberg
Pages: 471-496 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1214129

 

Strategic transformations in large Irish-owned businesses
Colm O’Gorman & Declan Curran
Pages: 497-524 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1220938

 

Rehabilitating the intermediary: brokers and auctioneers in the nineteenth-century Anglo-Indian trade
Michael Aldous
Pages: 525-553 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1220939

 

The obsolescing bargain model and oil: the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company 1933–1951
Neveen Abdelrehim & Steven Toms
Pages: 554-571 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1232397

 

United we stand, divided we fall: historical trajectory of strategic renewal activities at the Scandinavian Airlines System, 1946–2012
Joseph Amankwah-Amoah, Jan Ottosson & Hans Sjögren
Pages: 572-606 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1250743

 

Who financed the expansion of the equity market? Shareholder clienteles in Victorian Britain
Graeme G. Acheson, Gareth Campbell & John D. Turner
Pages: 607-637 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1250744
Book Review

Le crédit à la consommation en France, 1947-1965. De la stigmatisation à la réglementation
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 638-639 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1068515

 

Early Victorian railway excursions: ‘The million go forth’
Mark Learmonth
Pages: 639-640 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1253638

 

Du Capitalisme familiale au Capitalisme financier? Le Cas de l’Industrie Suisse des Machines, de l’Electrotechnique et de la Métallurgie au XXe Siècle
Margrit Müller
Pages: 641-642 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1269526

 

Handbook of cliometrics
Anna Missiaia
Pages: 642-643 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1272895

Resource on management history

I have just come across this new YouTube channel (thanks to Scott Taylor) about the History of Management.

New History of Management channel is a repository for videos that look at the history of management in new and interesting ways in order to encourage thinking differently about management and management education today. It is named after the book A New History of Management, written by Stephen Cummings, Todd Bridgman, John Hassard & Michael Rowlinson, which will be published by Cambridge University Press later in 2017.

 

Thinking Historically

A big thank you to our readers from the editorial team at OHN. Have a merry christmas and a happy new year. We leave you with an interesting and curious read, cross-posted from “War on the Rocks” – Enjoy!

THINKING HISTORICALLY: A GUIDE FOR STRATEGY AND STATECRAFT

NOVEMBER 17, 2016

Editor’s Note: This is adapted from the 12th Annual Alvin H Bernstein Lecture at the Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, delivered by the author on November 10.

 On November 22nd, 2011, The New York Times published a short Errol Morris op-doc, “Umbrella Man,” to mark the 48thanniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas. In the six and a half minute video, Morris employs his Interrotron camera to create his trademark intimacy while interviewing Josiah “Tink” Thompson, author of a book on the famous Zapruder film titled Six Seconds in Dallas. Backed by a haunting score arranged by minimalist composer Arvo Part and spliced with snippets of video from the fateful day, Thompson tells the mysterious story of a shadowy figure called the “umbrella man.”

Who was the umbrella man? During the Zapruder and other films and photographs from that fateful day in Dallas, an upright figure can be seen standing on the so-called grassy knoll, holding an open black umbrella, moments before the assassin’s bullets are fired into the president’s motorcade. The image is arresting: The weather in Dallas was sunny and warm.

The sight of a lone man under the umbrella would have been disconcerting even if Kennedy’s murder had not taken place right in front of the man seconds later. As Thompson says: “In all of Dallas, there appears to be exactly one person standing under an open black umbrella …. Can anyone come up with a non-sinister explanation for this?”

Writing in The New Yorker’s “Talk of the Town” series in December 1967, writer John Updike suggested the mystery surrounding who the umbrella man was and what he was doing on the grassy knoll “dangles around history’s neck like a fetish.” None of the authorities — the Dallas police, the Secret Service, the FBI, or the Warren Commission — ever located or even identified him or could explain his baffling appearance…

 

More on this: http://warontherocks.com/2016/11/thinking-historically-a-guide-for-strategy-and-statecraft/