Applications are invited for one Co-Editor to join the Editorial Team for Business History

Business History
Searching for a new Co-Editor for Business History

The position is for a term of three years starting in January 2021, renewable by mutual consent for further terms at Routledge’s discretion.

About the Journal

Business History is an international journal concerned with the long-run evolution and contemporary operation of business systems and enterprises. Its primary purpose is to make available the findings of advanced research, empirical and conceptual, into matters of global significance, such as corporate organization and growth, multinational enterprise, business efficiency, entrepreneurship, technological change, finance, marketing, human resource management, professionalization and business culture.

The Journal has won a reputation for academic excellence and has a wide readership amongst management specialists, economists and other social scientists and economic, social, labour and business historians.

Business History: The emerging agenda

The core strategy of Business History is to promote business history as a sui generis scholarly discipline, engaging on an equal footing with mainstream history and the wider social sciences. To achieve this, the Journal will continue to be international, comparative, thematic and theoretically informed. In the post-Chandler world, the agenda for business history is to extend its scale and scope specifically to:

  • widen its international scope: business activities in underrepresented regions, for example Latin America, Africa and Asia
  • go back beyond the 19th and 20th centuries to include ancient, medieval and early modern eras
  • inform the policy agenda; historical examples of regulatory success and failure, nationalisations and privatisations
  • engage with the business and management agendas; entrepreneurship, competitive advantage, corporate governance
  • theoretical development; independent theory or theories of business history

All research articles in this journal are rigorously peer reviewed, based on initial editor screening and anonymized reviewing by at least two referees.

The Journal is indexed in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus and numerous business journal quality lists, such as the CABS and ABDC lists. Please visit www.tandfonline.com/fbsh for additional information about the Journal and Publisher.

Job Description

We are seeking one Co-Editor to join the Editorial Team to drive the strategy for Business History, working to enhance the impact and reputation of the Journal. The Co-Editor will manage the peer-review process for papers assigned to them, recommending high quality papers to publish.

Routledge provide an annual contribution to expenses incurred by the Editorial team.

Key Tasks

The tasks to be undertaken will include but will not be limited to:

  • Working with the Editorial Team, Routledge and the Editorial Board to develop the editorial strategy and direction of Business History and acting as an ambassador for the Journal;
  • Attendance and networking at international conferences, which may be online or in person, and events to promote Business History and solicit submissions, invited contributions, and special issue proposals;
  • Responsibility for enhancing the quality and reputation of Business History, particularly in relation to the quantity, quality and timeliness of published research;
  • Commissioning topical special issues with active, well-respected Guest Editors;
  • Day-to-day manuscript and peer review management including selecting and managing peer reviewers and making recommendations for the final decision on papers assigned to you;
  • Ensuring that all reviewers and authors uphold the Journal’s code of publishing ethics;
  • Working with the Editorial Team to refresh the Editorial Board and pool of reviewers as necessary in terms of subject specialisms and geographical representation;
  • Attending Editorial Team / Editorial Board meetings annually.

Candidate Experience

We are seeking an outstanding and professional academic who is actively involved in the disciplines covered by Business History, with an international reputation for research excellence, and a passion for communication. Prior experience of editing an established journal is preferred, but not essential.

Applicants should be actively involved in networks within the field. Key qualities sought for the positions include energy, enthusiasm, managerial skills to oversee the editorial cycle, an understanding of research and publishing ethics, and the ability to meet deadlines and work effectively with Editorial Team members and a major publisher.

Application Procedure

Applications must include a letter of interest, specifically referring to why you believe you are particularly qualified for the role of Co-Editor as part of an Editorial Team for Business History, and how you see your role in the future development and direction of the Journal (maximum of 1 side of A4). CVs should also be submitted.

To submit your application, or for further details, please contact:

Anyone who wishes to discuss these positions informally with the Editors-in-Chief are welcome to contact Neil Rollings or Stephanie Decker at the email addresses given above.

The deadline for applications is Monday 16th November 2020.

Candidates who pass the initial screening stage will be invited for an interview with the Editors-in-Chief, which will be over video link.

All applications will be treated as strictly confidential. Routledge and the Editors-in-Chief will judge each on its merits without regard to the race, religion, nationality, sex, seniority, or institutional affiliation of the candidate.

Recording of Business History Collective Roundtable on Slavery and Business History now available

To view this week’s recorded roundtable event by the Business History Colllective on Slavery and Business History, go to https://bizhiscollective.wordpress.com/2020/09/11/global0008/ .

Also note that the Business History Collective is changing its homepage to: www.jiscmail.ac.uk/bizhiscollective and email to  bizhiscollective@JISCMAIL.AC.UK .

Happy Friday everyone!

The Microhistory Network

For those of us interested in microhistory as an approach, there is an interested resource online that I only recently discovered: The Microhistory Network:

“The Microhistory Network was created as a loose group in January 2007 to bring together historians interested in the theory and practice of microhistory through a homepage with a bibliography, links to the members’ homepages and other relevant webpages that would give information about conferences, events, the publication of books and articles. The founding members of the Microhistory Network are Mihail Boytsov, Carlo Ginzburg, Marion Gray, Ingar Kaldal, Giovanni Levi, David M. Luebke, Sigurdur Gylfi Magnússon, Sarah Maza, Edward Muir, Matti Peltonen, Guido Ruggiero, David Sabean and István Szijártó. The coordinator of the Microhistory Network is Kristóf Kovács and István Szijártó (Eötvös University, Budapest).”

I have read the work of several of these scholars with great interest, and they have just announced an online course:

ONLINE COURSE
From September 2020, Eötvös University (Budapest) offers the online course Introduction into microhistory for a limited number of students. Attending the classes is free of charge. For details see the course homepage.

New Digital Humanities journal

As part of our little series of resources in digital history, I wanted to make you aware of a new journal: Digital Humanities in the BeNeLux, which is open access here. The first issue has an interesting introduction on “Integrating Digital Humanities”, but many of the examples are obviously not in our area of expertise. Nevertheless, the introduction by Julie Birkholz and Gerben Zaagsma, is useful in outlining important features of the field that are not necessarily obvious to anyone not engaged directly with these questions:

“Much ink has been spent, and occasionally spilled, trying to define the Digital Humanities and its place among the academic disciplines. Yet whether it is seen as a field of its own, a sub- or inter-discipline, or a set of practices, most proponents agree on some basic characteristics, with interdisciplinarity probably topping the list. As early as two decades ago, Willard McCarty was among the first to assert that DH constituted an interdiscipline, due to its “common ground of method [which] makes it possible to teach applied computing to a class of humanists from widely varying disciplines” (McCarty 1999). At the same time, DH challenges existing and ingrained research practices (perhaps sometimes more imagined than real), according to which humanities research questions must always derive from domain knowledge, by proposing new data- and method-driven approaches to research in the humanities. [my emphasis]

In practice, Digital Humanities projects typically involve, and bring together, a variety of practitioners from different backgrounds: academics from various fields and disciplines, librarians, archivists and museum experts. [my emphasis] All of this could easily be construed as providing evidence of the existence of some sort of shared field; yet the influence of the digital on the various phases of our research practice (whether information gathering, processing, analysis and dissemination) comes in many forms: sometimes it is obvious, sometimes it is tacit and implicit, and sometimes aspirational. …”

For organizational history, this raises a number of questions, for example, what new data- and method-driven approaches could be relevant for us, and how we could collaborate more with organizational archivists going forward. So far these debates are very much in their infancy in our field, but are likely to become more important in the years to come.

Crowdsourcing digitisation in archives

In another instalment of our digital history series, I wanted to highlight that there is increasingly work being done involving crowdsourcing. Many of you may have read the media reports that during the lock down, a crowdsourcing project to digitise rainfall records has barrelled ahead as people enthusiastically engaged. The project is now complete. Does make you wonder what other archival resources may benefit from such an approach.

The National Archives UK has been exploring this recently as well and the potential for expanding this is really not something that was on my radar at all until recently. An interesting insight into what is happening is provided by a chapter by Alexandra Everleigh, ‘Crowding out the Archivist?’ in an edited volume on Crowdsourcing our Heritage. I am not aware that there are any organization or business-focused crowdsourcing projects underway, but may just be my ignorance. Do let us know if this is something that is being explored or ongoing in an archive near you!

SEJ Special Issue: Historical Approaches to Entrepreneurship Research

Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal has published a special issue devoted to historical approaches to entrepreneurship research.  The contributions highlight the value of a range of methods — socioeconomic history, cultural history, microhistory, comparative history, and historical case studies — in entrepreneurship research. The introduction discusses how these approaches advance theoretical views of the nature of entrepreneurial opportunities and action. The full, open-access special issue can be found here.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Context, Time, and Change: Historical Approaches to Entrepreneurship Research 
R. Daniel Wadhwani, David Kirsch, Friederike Welter, William B. Gartner, Geoffrey Jones

The Household as a Source of Labor for Entrepreneurs: Evidence from New York City During Industrialization
Martin Ruef

Reintroducing Public Actors in Entrepreneurial Dynamics: A Co-evolutionary Approach to Categorization
Benoit Demil

Historicizing Entrepreneurial Networks
Matthew Hollow

Different Expectations: A Comparative History of Structure, Experience and Strategic Alliances in the U.S. and U.K. Poultry Sectors, 1920-1990
Andrew C. Godley, Shane Hamilton

Innovation, Intermediation, and the Nature of Entrepreneurship: A Historical Perspective
Steven Toms, Nick Wilson, Mike Wright

Postdoc Position: Entrepreneurial Studies

The University of Southern California’s Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies seeks applicants for a one-year post-doctoral fellowship with the possibility of renewal for a second year. Scholars with interests in founder perspectives and decision-making encouraged to apply, as are those with more specialized interests in the ethics, sociology, or history of entrepreneurship. Successful candidates will be expected to be in residence during the fellowship and to participate actively in the Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies. During their term, fellows will actively collaborate with Greif Center faculty and contribute to the Center’s fellowship program in addition to conducting and publishing their own research. The postdoctoral researcher will work under the supervision of Professor Dan Wadhwani. Interested candidates are welcome to contact Professor Wadhwani at dwadhwani@marshall.usc.edu with questions.

For more information and to apply please click here.

History of the WWW and the ‘digital tsunami’

If you are interested in how our research practices are likely to shift as a result of the ‘digital tsunami’ that is facing archives, digital history is the place to go. But business and organizational historians have not really been part of these debates so far. We are starting a series of occasional posts about some of the resources that are out there on digital tools and debates.

For a bit of reading, a good place to start is Ian Milligan’s History in the age of abundance? How the web is transforming historical research (2019). We have a review in Business History by Adam Nix, and he has kindly agreed to make the code for 50 free offprints available – just click here. (FYI – when they are gone, they are gone.)

Here’s the opening to get you started:

“The late twentieth century and early millennium are fast becoming focal periods for historians; as Milligan notes, we are now further from the 1990s than we were from the 1960s when substantive historical work began on that pivotal decade. Given the tendency towards comparatively recent historical contexts, business historians are likely to be among the first to start exploring these periods. However, to do so, they will need to engage with a new and challenging set of sources: sources that were created digitally; sources like those deriving from the World Wide Web. Ultimately, it is this engagement that Milligan’s latest book seeks to encourage and enable, and in doing so, he provides readers with a comprehensive and well-articulated view into the web as a focus for historical research. …”

Ian Milligan has posted about the review here in case you are interested.

OHN returns & CfP “Entrepreneurship and Transformations”

Hello everyone and apologies for the long pause between posts, which was partly due to illness, but also, as you can imagine, due to the extraordinary times we find ourselves in. Many of us had to prepare online teaching at short notice, and many of the events we blog about have been cancelled due to the ongoing pandemic. Going forward, we will only run one blog per week on Fridays, as there simply not as many events and updates as there would usually be.

But today we have some good news, as one of our great editors, Christina Lubinski, is looking for submissions for an exciting new special issue in Business History on historical entrepreneurship.

Stay safe & healthy

Stephanie

Business History Special Issue

Entrepreneurship and Transformations

Special Issue Editor(s)

Deadline: 30 September 2020

Entrepreneurship and Transformations

Research on entrepreneurship has flourished in recent years, and the public interest in it has arguably never been greater. Few would disagree that entrepreneurship is one of the primary drivers of industry dynamics, economic and societal change, and innovation. However, the rapidly growing field of entrepreneurship studies has not displayed great strength in capturing dynamics and evolutions over time, partly due to a lack of historical empirical work of the sort that Schumpeter (1939) has already called for several decades ago. This special issue sets out to bring together an interdisciplinary group of scholars analyzing the links between entrepreneurship and (societal and market) transformations.

The Special Issue “Entrepreneurship and Transformations” takes its starting point in the critique that the field of entrepreneurship studies suffers from a fixation on the micro-processes governing the interaction of individuals and opportunities (Shane 2003), while largely ignoring the macro-dynamics of which entrepreneurship is part. It builds on the growing interdisciplinary dialogue between history and entrepreneurship studies (Wadhwani and Jones 2014, Perchard, MacKenzie et al. 2017, Wadhwani, Kirsch et al. 2020 pre-published online) that has triggered much needed methodological and theoretical reflections on historical entrepreneurship research.

The editors of this SI give an overview of this field of study in their annotated bibliography and encourage authors to engage with (a sub-set of) this literature. In particular, they welcome contributions that build on these insights to empirically explore the links between entrepreneurship and (societal and market) transformations over time. We see a research opportunity for scholars who use historical methods and sources to explore

  1. opportunity recognition and opportunity exploitation as a long-term process. Artur Cole (1959), for example, introduced the idea of an “entrepreneurial stream”—a metaphor highlighting that entrepreneurial opportunities often unfold over long period of time, with one opportunity building on previous ones. These long-term developments easily become hidden if we focus too closely on one individual or one company; however, the question how new opportunities emerge from existing ones, and how (experiential and codified) knowledge travels between individuals and institutions is of great importance for understanding the entrepreneurial process in and between companies (Galambos and Amatori 2016).
  2. the interactions between entrepreneurship and the cultural and socioeconomic environment they are embedded in (Welter and Gartner 2016, Baker and Welter 2018). So far, scholarly approaches to contextualizing entrepreneurship have varied widely. One set of work, drawing on institutional theory and following Baumol (1990), have interpreted contexts as a source of constraints and incentives on entrepreneurial behavior. A second approach, drawing on social movement and social group research, have approached contextualization as a matter of “embedding” entrepreneurial processes within social groups, movements, and networks (Hiatt, Sine et al. 2009). A third approach, drawing on a social constructivist view of contexts, examines how entrepreneurial actors shape and even create the contexts for their actions (Jones and Pitelis 2015). Historical research, particularly work that takes a comparative or international perspective, has long emphasized the role of context in shaping the very definition of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial processes. But how exactly does historical work lead us to reconsider and rethink the conceptualization of context? How can context be operationalized and studied using a historical lens? We believe that non-Western contexts and “deep histories”, in particular, can help us question and revise some of the taken-for-granted assumptions around entrepreneurship and context.
  3. Finally, we specifically encourage interdisciplinary collaborations between historians and scholars from other disciplines that significantly advance our understanding of entrepreneurship and market transformations and develop approaches that are useful to scholars exploring entrepreneurship historically. 

References

  • Baker, T. and F. Welter (2018). “Contextual Entrepreneurship: An Interdisciplinary Perspective.” Foundations and Trends®in Entrepreneurship 14(4): 357-426.
  • Baumol, W. J. (1990). “Entrepreneurship: Productive, Unproductive, and Destructive.” Journal of Political Economy 98(5): 893-921.
  • Cole, A. (1959). Business Enterprise in its Social Setting. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.
  • Galambos, L. and F. Amatori (2016). “The Entrepreneurial Multiplier.” Enterprise & Society 17(4): 763-808.
  • Hiatt, S. R., W. D. Sine and P. S. Tolbert (2009). “From Pabst to Pepsi: The Deinstitutionalization of Social Practices and the Creation of Entrepreneurial Opportunities.” Administrative Science Quarterly 54(4): 635-667.
  • Jones, G. and C. Pitelis (2015). “Entrepreneurial Imagination and a Demand and Supply-Side Perspective on MNE and Cross-Border Organisation.” Journal of International Management 21(4): 309-321.
  • Perchard, A., N. G. MacKenzie, S. Decker and G. Favero (2017). “Clio in the Business School: Historical Approaches in Strategy, International Business and Entrepreneurship.” Business History: 1-24.
  • Schumpeter, J. A. (1939). Business Cycles: A Theoretical, Historical and Statistical Analysis of the Capitalist Process, Vol. I. New York and London, McGraw-Hill.
  • Shane, S. (2003). A General Theory of Entrepreneurship:The Individual–Opportunity Nexus. Cheltenham, Edward Elgar.
  • Wadhwani, D. R., D. Kirsch, F. Welter, W. B. Gartner and G. Jones (2020 pre-published online). “Context, Time, and Change: Historical Approaches to Entrepreneurship Research.” Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal.
  • Wadhwani, R. D. and G. Jones (2014). Schumpeter’s Plea: Historical Reasoning in Entrepreneurship Theory and Research. Organizations in Time: History, Theory and Methods. M. Bucheli and R. D. Wadhwani. Oxford, Oxford University Press: 192-216.
  • Welter, F. and W. B. Gartner, Eds. (2016). A Research Agenda for Entrepreneurship and Context. Cheltenham, UK, Edward Elgar Publishing.

 

Submission instructions

We welcome contributions to the outlined research agenda that are based on original research and innovative analysis. We particularly encourage contributions by interdisciplinary teams of authors and those that combine source-based historical analysis with insights, concepts or data from other disciplines.

Papers should not exceed 8,000 words, inclusive of tables and footnotes, and use US spelling. By submitting to the SI, authors confirm that their contributions are not under consideration elsewhere. All proposals should be submitted via ScholarOne, indicating that they are contributions to this Special Issue “Entrepreneurship and Transformations”. All articles will go through a peer-review process. It is the responsibility of the author(s) to ensure that the manuscript fully complies with the publishing guidelines of Business History.

Instructions for authors

Submit an article

For questions about this Special Issue, please contact Christina Lubinski, cl.mpp@cbs.dk

ACCOUNTING HISTORY WORKSHOP

The workshop is being held by the Accounting History Special Interest Group (AH SIG) at Southampton University on Monday, 30 March 2020 10:30–17:00, before the main BAFA Annual Conference.

Accounting history research involves investigating the development and role of accounting in the past. The stories of history are gleaned from several sources, including documents in archives, libraries, private collections, and oral recollections. They are illuminated by knowledge of context, including, social, economic, commercial, legal, educational, financial, and religious factors identified in the literature. And they are interpreted and explained using those factors, often in combination with a selection of theories.

The aim of this workshop is to demonstrate the relevance of accounting history; to encourage participation in this genre of research; to describe various methods for carrying out accounting history research; to focus on how to publish historical research; and to provide an opportunity to establish networks and identify mentors and co-authors. Attendees will also have the opportunity to receive feedback on their research ideas and projects.

Workshop Programme

The one-day workshop will begin with an overview of accounting history methods and practice and an introduction to the Accounting History Special Interest group, followed by sessions on:

·       Carrying out accounting history research.

·       How to find primary sources.

·       How to find secondary sources.

·       Writing-up historical research: what should you include?

·       How to publish accounting history in leading journals.

·       Feedback on your ideas and projects (small group session)

Target Audience

The workshop is suitable for anyone considering beginning historical accounting research and anyone currently working in this area.

Registration

Full Ticket: £55
Reduced Rate for PhD Students Only: £25

The fee includes lunch. 

Buying a workshop ticket registers you for this event. Tickets to BAFA conferences are only available to members. To purchase a ticket, log in to your account on the BAFA Membership Portal (https://members.bafa.ac.uk/) and click the ‘Purchase Tickets’ button. Select the appropriate ticket for the event you want to attend, and follow instructions.

If you are not already a member of BAFA, please sign up for membership at https://members.bafa.ac.uk/signup. Further information on how to register for BAFA events can be found here: http://www.bafa.ac.uk/assets/uploads/conference-workshop-registration.pdf.

BAFA Annual Membership rates: Academic Staff: £30 
Unsalaried PhD/MPhil Student or Retired Academic: £15

Look forward to seeing you there!