PhD & Post-Doc event: Crisis, Resilience & Risk

The Centre for Business History in Scotland (CBHS), at the University of Glasgow are holding a three-day event aimed at PhD students and early career Post-Docs on 26-28 August 2019.  The event is being organised by CBHS, Glasgow, with assistance from the department of Modern History at the University of Tuebingen, Germany.  The theme of the Summer School is, “Business beyond the Business Cycle:  Crises, Resilience and Risk Management, c.1850-2000.

Please circulate the attached Call for Papers to any PhD students or Post Docs you think might be interested in presenting a paper at the Summer School.  The deadline for applications is Monday, 10 June 2019.

Also, if you wish to attend and/or participate, please email the organisers, Dr Christopher Miller, Christopher.Miller@glasgow.ac.uk or Dr Daniel Menning, Daniel.Menning@uni-tuebingen.de.

 

Theorizing from Qualitative Case Study Research

We would like to invite you to the upcoming event ‘Theorising from Qualitative Case Study Research’ run by BAM International Business and International Management SIG & Academy of International Business, UK & Ireland

Date and Time: Thursday 25th April 2019, 12:30pm-15:00pm
Location: University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9RH
Event fee: Free

The aim of this workshop is to unpack the theorising potential of Qualitative Case Study Research. Emphasis will be placed on conducting Qualitative Case study Research under different philosophical orientations and its implications for theorising. In particular, the workshop with address the following questions:
• What is Qualitative Case Study Research?
• How do our paradigmatic assumptions shape Qualitative Case Study Research?
• How do we theorise from Qualitative Case Study Research?
We will critically reflect on these questions by bringing in Philosophy of Science and Methodological literatures. We will discuss the limitations of inductive theory-building, and explore the utilisation of alternative approaches to theorising that can enhance the Case Study’s explanatory power and potential for contextualisation

Speakers
Emmanuella Plakoyiannaki is Professor of International Business at Leeds University Business School. She is also the Co-Chair for the IB/IM SIG of the British Academy of Management (BAM). Emmanuella is committed to raising awareness about qualitative research and has delivered relevant seminars in various Universities throughout the world. Her research interests refer to qualitative research, language (in an IB context) as well as consumer behaviour. She has published in various academic journals including the Academy of Management Review, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of World Business and Journal of Management Studies among others.

For more information and register your place, please go to: https://www.bam.ac.uk/civicrm/event/info?reset=1&id=357

Kind regards,

Linh

Linh Dang | Events Officer
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British Academy of Management, 137 Euston Road London, NW1 2AA, UK
T: +44 (0)2073 837 770 | eventsofficer@bam.ac.uk
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Using Historical Methods in Management and Organization Research

For the first time, Aston’s summer programme is offering this course on historical methods in management & organization research.

Course information:

Aston Business School

9 July 2018

 

Management and organizational researchers are increasingly interested in the opportunities for historical research. Even though history as a discipline does not have a similar understanding of methodology to the management and organization studies, in recent years there have been a number of publications and workshops demystifying historical approaches and analytical techniques. This one-day workshop will introduce participants to basic techniques and recent developments, as well as providing worked examples and on-hand advice for ongoing research projects.

Course outline

9.45 – 10.00        Welcome and introduction

10.00 – 12.00      Introduction to basic research techniques

12.00 – 13.00      Focus on participants’ projects

13.00 – 14.00      Lunch  break

14.00 – 15.00      Recent developments in organization history, introduction to key debates

15.00 – 16.00      Worked example: researching organizational corruption at Enron

16.00 – 17.00      How to publish organizational history: journals, rationales and strategies

17.00 – 17.15      Summary and end of seminar

 

Presenters:

 Stephanie Decker, Professor in History and Organization Studies

Adam Nix, Researcher in Organization History and Organizational Corruption

More information on: http://www.aston.ac.uk/international/aston-summer-programme-2018/why-choose-using-historical-methods-in-management-and-organization-research/

 

Fees: One day workshop: £125. This includes University-wide wifi access; lunch and refreshments.

 

 

CfP: Alternative organizational forms in the economy

Call for Papers:
International PhD Workshop

“Alternative Organizational Forms in the Economy”


June 21-22, 2017

Hertie School of Governance Berlin


We invite PhD students from universities worldwide to participate in a workshop to be hosted at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin on June 21-22. The event is supported by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) and funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) as part of the IPID4all programme. Financial support is available for students from universities abroad.

The workshop is organized in cooperation with Prof. Johanna Mair, the Knowledge Initiative on Organizations and Society (KIOS, https://www.hertie-school.org/kios) and the research cluster “Organisation, Management and Leadership”.

Economic crises and complex social problems such as inequality and poverty are calling into question the sustainability of traditional models of organizing the economy and providing public goods in both advanced and developing economies. Alternative organizational forms include social entrepreneurship, public-private partnerships, impact investing, and corporate social responsibility and innovation, among others.

Associated with these organizational forms are practices such as governing with stakeholders, evaluating impact, and measuring progress that defy established ways of doing things following a more sectorial approach that distinguishes between the private, public and social sector. We are interested in why and how these organizations and their practices emerge and take root in different institutional contexts. We therefore invite papers studying the drivers, challenges, and outcomes of these organizational forms drawing on different perspectives from organization studies, sociology, public administration, management, and comparative political economy. Papers should focus on one or more of the following aspects:

  • Social enterprises and entrepreneurship
  • Public-private partnerships and governance implications
  • Provision of public goods through private partners
  • Institutions and alternative forms of organizing from a comparative perspective: field-level dynamics, varieties of capitalism, institutional legacies, welfare state implications
  • Corporate social responsibility
  • Nonprofit sector activity and new forms of philanthropy
  • The constitution and role of social problems in motivating and legitimizing social change organizations
  • Configurations of hybrid organizing

In the workshop, we will discuss these issues and invite PhD students to submit papers speaking to any of the aspects mentioned. We are open to different theoretical and methodological approaches.

Workshop format:
Each participant will present a 10-page paper in one of about five sessions (with 2-3 papers each). Fellow PhD students and senior scholars from the Hertie School and partner schools will be present to discuss the papers.

Please apply by submitting your proposal or extended abstract (max. 2 pages) and a CV by April 15, 2017.

Participants will be informed by May 2 and are expected to send an extended version 1-2 weeks before the workshop.

Please send your applications to: phd-team@hertie-school.org

Participants from universities outside of Germany will receive a travel lump sum depending on the country of residence and a per diem lump sum to cover accommodation costs.

Contact:
Hertie School of Governance GmbH | Graduate Programmes Hertie School of Governance GmbH | KIOS

Verena Neumann, M.A. | Associate for PhD Affairs Dr. Nikolas Rathert | Postdoctoral Researcher

Friedrichstr. 180 | 10117 Berlin |Germany Friedrichstr. 180 | 10117 Berlin |Germany

phd-team@hertie-school.org rathert@hertie-school.org

PhD Course Historical Approaches

PhD Course “Historical Approaches in Management and Organizational Research”

31 October – 2 November 2016 at Copenhagen Business School

Deadline for registration: 19 Sept. 2016

Aim

In recent years, management and organizations researchers have begun to use historical sources and approaches in their study of organizations and organizing. Building on earlier pleas for an engagement with historical reasoning about organizations (Zald, 1993; Kieser, 1994; Clark and Rowlinson, 2004), these more recent developments have included efforts to develop historical approaches to studying organizational and institutional theory (Suddaby and Greenwood, 2009), strategy (Kahl et al, 2012; Ingram et al, 2012), innovation and entrepreneurship (Forbes and Kirsch, 2010; Popp and Holt, 2013; Wadhwani and Jones, 2014), international business (Jones and Khanna, 2006) and critical management studies (Rowlinson and Proctor, 1999), among other subfields. The turn towards history, however, has also raised a number of complex questions for researchers about the nature of historical knowledge, how it might be employed to address organizational research questions, and how to analyze historical sources and data (Bucheli and Wadhwani, 2014; Rowlinson, Hassard, and Decker, 2014; Kipping and Usdiken, 2014). This seminar will introduce participants to the core theoretical and methodological issues involved in using historical approaches in organizational and management research, and discuss the variety of ways in which history is being used in organization and management studies today.  The seminar will provide participants with both a broad orientation to the theoretical and practical issues involved in the use of historical approaches, and an opportunity to apply these approaches to their own research using smaller breakout groups and discussions.

Course Content

This PhD seminar will provide an introduction to historical approaches to management and organizational research. Day 1 will be devoted to Historical Theorizing, Day 2 to Historical Methods, and Day 3 to Historical Practice.

Day 1, Historical Theorizing, will examine the advantages and limits of using historical perspective to develop theoretical concepts in management and organizational research. Students will be introduced to the unique perspective that history provides and how it can be used by management and organizational scholars. Specifically, we will examine how history provides unique perspectives for developing conceptualizations of: (a) cause and effect, (b) cognition and power, (c) alternatives and counterfactuals.

Day 2, Historical Methods, will examine the nature of historical sources and methods. We will explore basic methods, such as source criticism, triangulation, and hermeneutics, but also advanced methods, including microhistory, conceptual history, and postcolonial history. Participants will also engage in a methods workshop, designed to provide a hands-on experience with source analysis and interpretation.

Day 3, Historical Practice, will be devoted to discussion and feedback on student research. The day will be organized as a series of workshops.

Learning Objectives

The PhD seminar will be designed to allow participants to:

1. Understand the nature of historical approaches and how they compare to other types of ways of studying management and organizations

2. Understand the range of ways in which historical sources, methods, and perspectives can be engaged, including the epistemological assumptions involved in these choices and their implications for the types of research questions that can be addressed

3. Apply these methodological issues and choices to their own research interests through focused breakout groups.

ECTS and Fees

3 ECTS for participation, 4 ECTS for participation and submission of working paper

Fees: DKK 3,900 (participation) or DKK 5,200 (participation with working paper)

Course Schedule and Registration

http://www.cbs.dk/en/research/phd-programmes/phd-courses-0 and http://phdcourses.dk/Course/48516#.VzLiH7df0Ss

PhD Courses in Historical Approaches to Business and Management

Kyoto PhD Course

One of the important challenges that Management and Organizational History must face is cultivating the next generation of scholars. There are relatively few established PhD courses that train students in business and management history, and little attention to what constitutes a foundational curriculum in the field.

Last week, I had a chance to test out some ideas for a curriculum when I co-taught a one-week PhD course at Kyoto University with Professor Takafumi Kurosawa. The students included early and mid-stage PhD students from 5 countries. We took a basic introductory orientation to the field. The topics covered: 1. Historiography, 2. Advantages of Historical Conceptualization, 3. Historical Research Processes and Methods, 4. Applications.

Some basic thoughts occurred to us as we taught that I think provide lessons for such efforts in the future. 1. Business, Economic, and Management History tends to engage in relatively little historiographical reflection about the development of historical approaches, and yet it’s crucial to not only the intellectual coherence but also socialization into the field. 2. We tend to place insufficient attention to the historical research process, and particular to the question of why one turns to history at all. But a discussion of the historical research process, and a comparison to research process in other social sciences, is incredibly helpful to students in comprehending and communicating how they are going about their work. 3. Specific examples are worth their weight in gold.

We’d love to hear the experiences of others, and engage in a discussion of how to train PhD students. So, when you get a chance, share your thoughts!