CfP: FRESH meeting – Colonialism & natural resources

Gothenburg FRESH meeting, call for papers
Topic: Colonialism and natural resources Date: 20-21 October 2022
Place: Gothenburg, Sweden

On 20-21 October 2022 the Unit for Economic History of the Department of Economy and Society of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, will host a Frontier Research in Economics and Social History (FRESH) 2-day meeting on the theme Colonialism and natural resources.


The goal of FRESH meetings is to gather researchers to present ongoing research, with a focus on early- stage research, in an environment especially focused on constructive feedback and support.
The keynote speaker for this meeting will be Tirthankar Roy, Professor of Economic History at the London School of Economics and Political Science, who specializes in global history, history and development of South Asia, and empires and environmental history.


We welcome papers from a broad range of methodologies, and especially welcome papers which are connected to the broad theme of ‘Colonialism and natural resources’ and deal with topics such as:
• trade
• agricultural development
• natural resource exploitation
• environmental history
• slavery
• colonial institutions
• business history
• inequality
but we will also consider papers on any topic relating to economic and social history, broadly defined.

Logistics

The FRESH meeting organisers strive to accommodate as many speakers as possible. Accepted papers will receive 30 minutes each (approx. 20 minutes for presentation and 10 minutes for discussion). There will also be a conference dinner for further discussions. There will be no registration fee for this meeting while accommodation for presenters will be covered by the event organizers.

Please submit your paper abstract (max. 500 words) and a CV (maximum two pages) to:
dimitrios.theodoridis[at]gu.se. Please mark your email with “Fresh 2022” in the subject line.

Submission deadline: Friday 2 September 2022
Notification of acceptance will be sent by 16 September 2022.

For further inquiries please contact:

  • Local organizer Dimitrios Theodoridis, University of Gothenburg, dimitrios.theodoridis[at]gu.se
  • FRESH organizer Anna Missiaia, University of Gothenburg, anna.missiaia[at]gu.se


Please visit the FRESH website for more information: https://www.quceh.org.uk/gothenburg-2022.html

CfP BH SI: Business & Finance in LA

Business and Finance in Latin America: From the Oil Shock to the Debt Crisis

Editors: Dr Carlo Edoardo Altamura (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies Geneva) and Dr Sebastian Alvarez (Graduate Intitute Geneva/University of Oxford)

Submissions due 31 August 2022

Since the 2008-9 financial crisis, Latin America has experienced a period of sluggish economic activity and increasing levels of external debt. In a world of low interest rates, the liquidity injected into the US and European banking systems flew over into Latin American economies as global demand dropped and commodities prices crashed downwards. The boom of private and public indebtedness over the past decade has increased the economic and financial vulnerabilities of a region that has historically been dependent on international trade and exposed to external shocks such as the current pandemic. In a context where governments have stepped in to offset the impact of the coronavirus crisis, debt levels are now approaching the peak seen during the international debt crisis of the 1980s, raising fears amongst policymakers and business leaders of new defaults and another “lost decade”.

This proposed special issue titled “Business and Finance in Latin America: From the Oil Shock to the Debt Crisis” aims to bring new insights into the current debates by looking at how local and foreign entrepreneurs, financiers and state actors reacted to the unstable economic and political context that preceded and followed the outbreak of the international debt crisis of 1982.

The scholarship on the business history of Latin America has expanded markedly over the last three decades. With the development and consolidation of the discipline since the mid-1980s, the number of historical studies of firms and entrepreneurship in the region grew considerably and covered a large variety of topics and sectors. This includes the foreign investment and diversification strategies of multinational enterprises (MNEs) in Latin America, the origin and evolution of local family-based economic groups and their connections with the social elites and the political ruling class. It encompasses regional and sectoral research on trade, banking, mining, transport, agricultural and manufacturing industries from a historical perspective that engages with the economic, social and organizational theories and other approaches to the study of the firm emerging in industrial countries. In so doing, this research has contributed to improving our understanding of the ways and conditions under which entrepreneurs and companies have succeeded or failed to develop their business activities in the region, as well as the specificities and distinctive character of Latin American capitalism.

However, while the bulk of the scholarship concentrates on firms that dominated before 1914 and the interwar and post-World War II years, the turbulent period of the 1970s and 1980s has received much less attention as firms and public institutions have only recently disclosed their files and opened archives for researchers. Moreover, the work that analyses the evolution of firms and national industries in Latin American during the second economic globalization since the 1980s has focused mainly on the liberalization, privatization and deregulatory policies adopted. Little is known, however, about how the economic crises that the region experienced in these years affected the way firms and entrepreneurs ran their businesses and overcame their debt and financial difficulties. In fact, while the long-term effects that the Latin American debt crisis of the 1980s inflicted on the social and economic structures of the region have been extensively recognized and documented, the reasons why some companies disappeared while others survived has not yet been explored. Moreover, the policies implemented in the fifteen years between 1975 and 1990, first in Chile and Argentina, and then elsewhere following the 1982 crisis, totally changed the environment in which business in the region operated. This took the form of a wholesale shift from state-led ISI and a deepening distrust of FDI to open market economies characterised by policies emanating from the so-called ‘Washington Consensus’. Many older firms and business groups collapsed, some foreign investors withdrew while others, like Spanish MNEs, entered, and local business groups that survived and adapted to the new environment began to expand across frontiers, leading to the growth of the so-called ‘multilatinas’.

This Special Issue will contribute to filling this gap in the literature by providing a much more granular analysis of Latin American business and financial dynamics and bringing together a collection of new original historical studies from emerging and established scholars on business history in the region.

Our goal is to shed new light on how the multiple crises of the 1970s and 1980s affected industries and business organizations operating in Latin America and on the different ways in which they dealt with issues such as debt, investment and selling strategies as well as the economic and political risk assessments they undertook. It will do so by focusing on crucial but neglected actors in a region outside the Global North by drawing on material that was not previously available. To that end, the special issue focusses on contributions and interdisciplinary research from scholars who use historical methods and primary sources to explore:

  1. The behaviour and business strategies of financial and non-financial companies in the run-up to, and the aftermath of, the 1982 financial fallout.
  2. The impact of the debt crisis and the responses of MNEs and domestic firms in Latin America.
  3. The way that national and international companies managed economic and political risk in the region during the 1970s and 1980s.
  4. How business actors coped with foreign debt, inflation, and the uncertainties unleashed by changing government policies and crises during the 1970s and 1980s.
  5. The effects of the debt crisis and economic and structural reforms on state-business and domestic-foreign capital relationships.
  6. The long-term outcomes of the crisis and the reorientation of businesses in line with the neoliberal policies of Latin American politics.

In order to attract high quality papers for the special issue we will combine both strategies outlined in the guidelines for Business History special issues, i.e. invited contributions and a Call for Papers:

Three-four invited articles from the presentations at a Colloquium on the Latin American debt crisis of 1982.

Two-three articles from a Call for Papers for this Special Issue.

Business History new published issue 64-4

TOC of issue 64-4 2022

Includes 9 original articles, 2 of them are #openaccess

Key terms: #women #business #filmindustry #entrepreneurship #familybusiness #Chinesecompanyhistory #banking history #mining #State

Barnes, Victoria, and Lucy Newton. 2022. “Women, Uniforms and Brand Identity in Barclays Bank.” Business History 64 (4): 801–30. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1791823. #openaccess

Doležalová, Antonie, and Hana Moravcová. 2022. “Czechoslovak Film Industry on the Way from Private Business to Public Good (1918-1945).” Business History 64 (4): 781–800. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1751822.

Eng, Pierre van der. 2022. “Chinese Entrepreneurship in Indonesia: A Business Demography Approach.” Business History 64 (4): 682–703. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1788542.

Izawa, Ryo. 2022. “Corporate Structural Change for Tax Avoidance: British Multinational Enterprises and International Double Taxation between the First and Second World Wars.” Business History 64 (4): 704–26. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1727890.

Kong, Lingyu, and Florian Ploeckl. 2022. “Modern Chinese Banking Networks during the Republican Era.” Business History 64 (4): 655–81. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1754801.

Ranestad, Kristin. 2022. “State Reforms in Early Modern Mining: Røros Copperworks and the Role of Workers Managers, Investors and the State in Business Development.” Business History 64 (4): 831–53. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1797681. #openaccess

Soulsby, Anna. 2022. “Foreign Direct Investment and the Undertow of History: Nationhood and the Influence of History on the Czech-German Relationship.” Business History 64 (4): 727–54. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1784878.

Wąsowska, Aleksandra. 2022. “Organisational Development in the Context of Radical Institutional Change: The Case Study of Poland’s Ursus.” Business History 64 (4): 755–80. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1743689.

Zheng, Victor, and Po-san Wan. 2022. “Chinese Culture and Banyan-Tree Style Family Businesses: The Enterprising Family of Lo Ying-Shek in Hong Kong.” Business History 64 (4): 633–54. https://doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2020.1727448.

CfA: AOM 2022 PDW

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: AOM 2022 PDW
Developing Management Theory from Historical Case Studies
Session # 15904 | Sponsors: MH, OMT, RM, STR, TIM
Hybrid-Interactive: Seattle + Virtual, Zoom ‘meeting’ style
Aug 5, 2022 from 2:00PM to 04:30PM. PT (UTC-7)

Organizer: Rohin Borpujari, London Business School
Submission Deadline: July 01, 2022

Who is this PDW for?
If you are:
a.) engaged in (or interested in) conducting historical research, and
b.) doing inductive (i.e. theory-building rather than hypothesis-testing) work, and
c.) hoping to publish your work in top management journals
then this is the PDW for you!


Overview
This PDW brings together a distinguished panel of scholars to stimulate an interactive and developmental exchange on conducting inductive research using historical case studies. Our core focus will be on the theory-building / theoretical contribution part of the research process – how do we understand the past to inform the present? How do we move from the case being studied to higher-level conceptualizations, while maintaining a balance between generalization and contextualization?
Importantly, our aim will be to focus on these questions from a practical standpoint, taking away useful advice that scholars can adopt in their research practices. And for those of you who have the opportunity to discuss ongoing projects with the panelists, you will also get advice tailored to your specific papers.


Panelists
• Andrew Hargadon, UC Davis, Graduate School of Management
• Roy Suddaby, University of Victoria, Gustavson School of Business and Washington State University, Carson College of Business
• Dan Wadhwani, USC, Marshall School of Business
• JoAnne Yates, MIT, Sloan School of Management (virtual panelist)

Structure

Panel Talk and Group Q&A: For the first part of the PDW, our panelists will lead exchanges around topics such as which research questions are best suited to historical case studies; how to balance the needs for contextualization vs. generalization in theorizing; how to write up a historical case study for publication in management journals, etc.

Roundtables and Individual Feedback: Pre-selected participants will have the opportunity to engage in quick, entrepreneur-style “pitches” to the experts (separated into 4 different roundtables – 3 in-person and 1 virtual; the virtual roundtable will be led by JoAnne Yates), with a view to receiving developmental feedback specific to their projects.
Each participant will have 20 minutes in total – 10 minutes to describe their project (or project idea) and what areas they would like feedback on, and 10 minutes to receive feedback / engage in discussion with the expert.

How to Apply
Part 1 is open to all attendees and does not require any application in advance.
For Part 2, in order to ensure quality interactions with panelists, we are limiting the number of “pitches” to 16 (i.e. 4 per panelist). If you are interested in receiving feedback on a project that you are currently working on, please submit your interest to the organizer at rborpujari@london.edu, by 11:59 pm Eastern Time (New York time) on July 01, 2022.
Specifically, please submit an abstract or overview of your project, including two questions that you would like to ask the panelists to receive feedback about that project. Please keep this document limited to 1 page, single-spaced, in PDF format.
In addition, in your email, please rank order your preference for which panelist roundtable you would like to be a part of (with the number “1” referring to your first choice panelist and “4” referring to your fourth choice panelist — If you are only able to attend virtually, please let me know as well).
Note: In addition to the 1-page abstract, you may, if you wish, submit a theoretical model or diagram that you are working on in case your project is at a more advanced stage and you would like comments on the model you are building.

If you have any questions about the PDW or the application process, please feel free to reach out at rborpujari[at]london.edu.

Senior Lecturer/Professor in Contemporary Economic History

University of Glasgow


The School of Social and Political Sciences is seeking to appoint a Senior Lecturer or Professor in Contemporary Economic History.

The post holder will conduct research in contemporary economic history as well as deliver teaching in the Economic and Social History subject area of the School of Social and Political Sciences. We welcome applicants with expertise related to business and the global economy, industrialisation and deindustrialisation, or energy and the environment. This could focus on but need not be limited to emerging markets and developing economies. The successful post-holder will be based in the Economic and Social History subject area, which is home to the Centre for Business History in Scotland.

The post holder will undertake research of international excellence and contribute to knowledge exchange activities relative to the discipline, contribute to learning and teaching on agreed programmes and undertake administration and service activities in line with the School/College’s strategic objectives. The post-holder will be expected to seek external research funding and to engage in research-led teaching, and to strengthen links and demonstrate impact with colleagues across and beyond the University and with non-academic bodies as appropriate to their specialism. We value diversity and especially encourage applications from women, disabled and ethnic minority candidates.

This post is on a full time (35 hrs per week), open ended position.

Informal Enquiries should be directed to Dr Rosemary Elliot, rosemary.elliot@glasgow.ac.uk

Visit our website for further information on The University of Glasgow, School of Social & Political Sciences https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/socialpolitical/

Apply online at: https://my.corehr.com/pls/uogrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=086789

Closing Date: 28 June 2022

Business History now accepts Video Abstracts!

At Business History, we would like to promote your research to a wider audience. A good way of doing that is video abstracts. Thanks to the pandemic, many of us are now much more versed with video recording software and video conferencing software that facilitates recordings. Therefore, there is no reason to limit this skill set to teaching only. The video abstracts will be published on the journal’s webpage.

What we need from you:

  • The video – 3 mins or so
  • A transcript
  • A multimedia contributor agreement (we will send this when we receive the video and abstract)

Detailed information is available here.

Send the video abstract or any queries about it to the journal’s Social Media Editor, Dr. Paula de la Cruz-Fernández (businesshistorysm[at]gmail.com).

New funding for Email Archives Research Project

EMCODIST – The Next Phase

Following the publication of our Dotcom-Archive website [link to Monday’s post] we’re delighted to announce that we’ve been awarded follow-on funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation [https://mellon.org] via the Email Archives: Building Capacity and Community (EA:BCC) programme at the University of Illinois [https://emailarchivesgrant.library.illinois.edu].

 “Discovery environments for using email archives: Evaluating user needs with prototype version of EMailCOntextualisationDIScovery Tool” (or just “EMailCOntextualisationDIScovery”) is a new project that will build on Contextualizing Email Archives and the ECOMDIST discovery prototype we developed.

The award (approximately $57,000) will fund tool development, testing and user experience analysis in 2022 and 2023.

Why email?

Emails are materially different from correspondence of the pre-digital age, but their significance as traces of the past is substantial, especially for organizations, where email is not only used as a form of correspondence but also as an informal mode of record keeping. We believe that the preservation of a meaningful, relatively complete email archive is one plausible pathway to supporting scholarly research on organizations. 

Our work focuses on how researchers will engage with such resources, having previously developed an AI-based discovery tool (ECOMDIST), which we used to explore a dotcom-era email archive [https://dotcomarchive.bristol.ac.uk/]. Our new project will bring this technology to researchers in management and organization history, one of the key scholarly use cases for large-scale email corpora, and see how it can best be developed to support a context-sensitive discovery process.

Going to AoM?

One of our first activities on the project will be a Professional Development Workshop (PDW) at this year’s Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management in Seattle [https://aom.org/events/annual-meeting]. Sponsored by the Management History (MH) division, Introducing the “digitally curious” to email archives for organizational history will:

  1. introduce “digitally curious” management scholars to the use of email collections as contexts for research;
  2. orient scholars to new tools for interacting with sample email collections, including EMCODIST; and 
  3. provide a forum for scholars to share and learn from each other about emerging best practices in the use of email as a context for research. 

The PDW will take place on Friday, August 5, from 2:00-4:00p PDT in a hybrid format with in-person and virtual participation supported. To allow participants to access the email tools and collections, pre-registration is required. If you would like to register or to learn more about the workshop and the project, please email Shubhangkar Girish Jain (shubhangkar.girishjain@marylandsmith.umd.edu).​

New Post in Contemporary Economic History (University of Glasgow)

The School of Social and Political Sciences is seeking to appoint a Senior Lecturer or Professor in Contemporary Economic History.

The post holder will conduct research in contemporary economic history as well as deliver teaching in the Economic and Social History subject area of the School of Social and Political Sciences. We welcome applicants with expertise related to business and the global economy, industrialisation and deindustrialisation, or energy and the environment. This could focus on but need not be limited to emerging markets and developing economies. The successful post-holder will be based in the Economic and Social History subject area, which is home to the Centre for Business History in Scotland.

The post holder will undertake research of international excellence and contribute to knowledge exchange activities relative to the discipline, contribute to learning and teaching on agreed programmes and undertake administration and service activities in line with the School/College’s strategic objectives. The post-holder will be expected to seek external research funding and to engage in research-led teaching, and to strengthen links and demonstrate impact with colleagues across and beyond the University and with non-academic bodies as appropriate to their specialism. We value diversity and especially encourage applications from women, disabled and ethnic minority candidates.

This post is on a full time (35 hrs per week), open ended position.

Informal Enquiries should be directed to Dr Rosemary Elliot, rosemary.elliot@glasgow.ac.uk

Visit our website for further information on The University of Glasgow, School of Social & Political Sciences https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/socialpolitical/

Apply online at:https://my.corehr.com/pls/uogrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=086789

Closing Date: 28 June 2022

It is the University of Glasgow’s mission to foster an inclusive climate, which ensures equality in our working, learning, research and teaching environment.

We strongly endorse the principles of Athena SWAN, including a supportive and flexible working environment, with commitment from all levels of the organisation in promoting gender equity.

The University of Glasgow, charity number SC004401.

CfP: Historical Accounting for Enterprise and Society in Africa

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce that the Call for Papers on the theme “Historical Accounting for Enterprise and Society in Africa” which is to be guest edited by Professor Grietjie Verhoef and Dr Olayinka Moses. The call can be found at https://journals.sagepub.com/home/ach, in the call for papers section.

Accounting systems and institutions significantly influence the development of enterprise and society. Our understanding of these systems often omits the subtleties of difference, complexity, and contestation in Africa. Early interaction with markets outside Africa developed dynamically from the eighth century and with subsequent expeditions from metropolitan Europe and Asia. African societies through engagement with the global systems have facilitated different trajectories for market integration, and social development in their quest for independent statehood and post-colonial control. Owing to its evolution across enterprise and society, including engagements with global markets, and institutions, Africa has gained scholarly traction. Yet, the role of accounting and accounting systems in Africa’s societies and economies, but equally so in Africa’s engagement with international markets and the wider world, remains inadequately explored. This Special Issue seeks to understand the history and legacy of accounting and accounting systems in the development of enterprise and society in Africa. It directs attention to all traditions of accounting through the long history of African indigenous economies and cultures.

Author(s) are encouraged to submit their papers for peer review, with the final date for submission of papers to the special issue being 30 September 2023. Potential contributors are welcome to contact the Guest Editors to discuss their proposed topics at: Grietjie Verhoef (gverhoef@uj.ac.za) and Olayinka Moses (yinka.moses@vuw.ac.nz)

All submissions must follow the journal’s style guidelines found on the SAGE website:https://journals.sagepub.com/author-instructions/ACH

Best wishes.

Carolyn, Carolyn and Laura

Carolyn Cordery, Carolyn Fowler and Laura Maran

Editors, Accounting History

17th Accounting History Symposium

Accounting History Special Interest Group (AFAANZ) logo

Dear Accounting History community members, 

The Accounting History Special Interest Group of AFAANZ is pleased to announce that the 17th Accounting History Symposium will be held fully online on July 2, 2022 in the morning (AEST).

The event will be free of charge for the AH-SIG members.

A fee of AUD$15 will be charged for non-members (including non-AFAANZ members).

As per our tradition, part of the event will be dedicated to research proposal presentations by accounting history scholars.

You are welcome to submit your research proposal according to the attached call for research proposals for the 17th Accounting History Symposium.

Feel also free to pass on this call to other interested colleagues and PhD students.

Further information on the event and our SIG can be found at https://www.afaanz.org/interest-group/accounting-history-special-interest-group

Registrations to the event are already open at https://www.afaanzconference.com/sigs

Thank you and best wishes

Giulia Leoni, Accounting History SIG Convenor

Maryam Safari, Accounting History SIG Deputy Convenor