Paper presentation on Building Identity at the Bauhaus

I’ll be presenting a paper jointly authored with Elena Giovanonni (Royal Holloway) and Emmanuella Plakoyiannaki (Vienna) at Henley Business School on Wednesday 2nd December at 13.00 (UK time). If you’d like to join, please email me (stephanie.decker[at]bristol.ac.uk) and I pass on the Teams link.

Title:                     Building Identity: Architextual Resources in the Identity Formation of the Bauhaus

Presenter(s):     Stephanie Decker, University of Bristol

Abstract:

The Bauhaus School of Design (1919-1933) provides us with a micro-historical case study of identity formation, an area that has not been widely explored. We analyse the engagement between organizational identity and architecture as they both take form. We highlight the importance of architecture as an identity resource for the new school, and develop a framework that highlights four distinct ways in which spatial and material resources can support (or obstruct) identity formation: instrumental, by providing a space for organising; aesthetic, by visually pleasing organisational members; symbolic, by offering meaningful representation of organisational ideas; and finally temporal, by being enduring over time. We refer to the combination of these four potential elements as architextual, as they create a frame of narratives and discourses across material resources, people, practices and ideas that are inherent in the ideation, construction and interpretation of material artefacts. In our case narrative we show how these architextual identity resources not only helped the Bauhaus to overcome threats to its existence as a new organisation, but also in turn spurred on the creation of further architextual identity resources, not only helping to form and refine the school’s identity, but also facilitating multiple and shifting organizational identities over time. Finally, we show that architextual identity resources exist alongside other more commonly used resources such as discursive invocations of identity, but highlight that in particular the symbolic and temporal nature of architextual identity resources means that they remained pivotal and facilitated the emergence of a strong legacy when the Bauhaus was disbanded as an organisation after 14 years, while its influence as one of the leading design movements of the twentieth century endured.

CfP for the Business History Collective ‘Spring Webinar Series’

Deadline for submissions: Wednesday, 9th December

Following a highly successful summer webinar series, we are pleased to invite applications to contribute towards our spring webinar series, February – May 2021.

These events are primarily intended as a platform to share and discuss ongoing research, including working papers, dissertation chapters, and manuscripts under review.

Applications are not limited to a particular theme or set of topics; however, priority will be given to proposals of particular novelty, use of qualitative approaches, and historical periods preceding 1800 or subsequent to 1950.

We are also particularly interested in hearing from early career researchers, researchers from minority backgrounds (e.g., women, LGBTQ+, ethnic and racial minorities, underrepresented backgrounds/populations, etc.), as well as research and researchers located outside of Europe, North America, China and Japan.

Please write to the spring organizers, Ashton Merck (awb27@duke.edu) and Adam Nix (adam.nix@dmu.ac.uk), with any questions about the webinar series.

If you want to join as a presenter click here.

If you want to join as discussant or member of the audience click here

University of Bristol Webinar: Taylorism, generations & historical reflexivity in management scholarship

If you would like to join us for the University of Bristol School of Management Research Seminar hosted by the Strategy, International Management & Business, and Entrepreneurship (SIMBE) Academic Group, please email me (stephanie.decker[at]bristol.ac.uk) for the link.
Michael Weatherburn
(Imperial College London) 

Taylorism, generations and historical reflexivity in management scholarship
1st December, 12:30-13:30, Online Webinar (UK time)

Abstract
  

Building on increasingly confident scholarly studies (e.g. Decker, Hassard & Rowlinson, 2020; Maclean, Clegg, Suddaby, & Harvey, 2020), this project braids together history and organisation studies, and explores the historical origins and trajectory of ‘Taylorism’. As will be discussed, ‘Taylorism’ had two original meanings but mutated and expanded as part of growing scholarship on the labour process, organisation studies and political activism from the 1960s onwards. This entangled situation is still with us and indeed scholars suggest that ‘Taylorism’ presents us with a generational problem to solve (see Roper, 1999; Nyland, Bruce and Burns, 2014; Bruce et al, 2020). Addressing these points, the goal of this presentation is to both refine analysis of the historical impact of management on labour and to further demonstrate the value of historical reflexivity in management scholarship. 

Key words: Taylorism, history, organization studies, Gramsci, labour, reflexivity.

Biography 

Dr Michael Weatherburn is Field Leader of Humanities and Social Sciences and Data Science Institute Academic Fellow at Imperial College London, where he teaches history, digital studies and business ethics. He has a PhD in the history of science and technology, is Honorary Associate Professor at Hong Kong University, and History & Policy convenor at the UK Government Office for Science. He works with public and private sector clients through his consultancy, Project Hindsight (https://projecthindsight.co.uk/).  

Fully-Funded PhD in International Business in Vienna

Fully-Funded PhD in International Business at the Faculty of Business, Economics and Statistics University of Vienna, Austria
Reference number: 11518

The Department of Marketing and International Business at the University of Vienna invites applications for University Assistant (praedoc) at its International Business research group (Professor Emmanuella Plakoyiannaki).

Duration of employment: 4 years

Extent of Employment: 30 hours/week

Job grading in accordance with collective bargaining agreement: §48 VwGr. B1 Grundstufe (praedoc) with relevant work experience determining the assignment to a particular salary grade.

Job Description:

The successful candidate will:

1. Contribute to the teaching (to the extent regulated by the collective agreement) and research activities of the International Business research group with a focus on SMEs Internationalisation, Family Firm Internationalisation, International Entrepreneurship.

2. Participate in publications, academic articles and presentations.

3. Write the doctoral thesis: We expect the successful candidate to sign a doctoral thesis agreement within 12-18 month.

4. Additional tasks: supervision of students; involvement in the organisation of meetings; conferences, symposiums; involvement in the department administration as well as in teaching and research administration.

Profile:

MA or MSc in the study field of Business Administration or a comparable degree; interest in qualitative and quantitative methods; excellent command of written and spoken English; IT user skills; ability to work in a team.

Applications including a letter of motivation (English or German) should be submitted via the Job Center to the University of Vienna

(http://jobcenter.univie.ac.at) no later than 10.12.2020, mentioning reference number 11518.

For further information please contact Ladenstein, Judith

+43-1-4277-38012, Plakoyiannaki, Emmanuella +43-1-4277-38010.

The University pursues a non-discriminatory employment policy and values equal opportunities, as well as diversity (http://diversity.univie.ac.at/). The University lays special emphasis on increasing the number of women in senior and in academic positions.

Given equal qualifications, preference will be given to female applicants.

Human Resources and Gender Equality of the University of Vienna Reference number: 11518

E-Mail: jobcenter@univie.ac.at

Privacy Policy of the University of Vienna

For further details on the post, please see link below:

https://univis.univie.ac.at/ausschreibungstellensuche/flow/bew_ausschreibung-flow?_flowExecutionKey=_cDD7508A0-C8E1-EEF1-7D44-7B69DCE7F098_k48BB6E72-EE0A-4149-DBB3-CC9565C62B87&tid=82843.28

Video abstract for “Tangled Roots of African Entrepreneurship”

What can I say, with the second lockdown in the UK comes more up-skilling…

Our piece combines historical and fsQCA analysis.

If you’d like to read the full article, it is available open access here:

Decker, S., Estrin, S., & Mickiewicz, T. (2020). The tangled historical roots of entrepreneurial growth aspirations. Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal. https://doi.org/10.1002/sej.1348

If you are preparing video or visual abstract of management & organization history books, articles, chapters or presentations, let us know and we can post them via OHN for you!

Distinguished lecture: “The Structural Reshaping of Globalization” by Peter Buckley

I am pleased to share details on the forthcoming distinguished lecture with Peter Buckley, Professor of International Business at Leeds University Business School, who will talk on The Structural Reshaping of Globalization. Alain Verbeke, Professor of International Business Strategy at the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary will serve as a discussant. 

This talk examines the role of theory, specifically internalization theory, in examining the structural reshaping of globalization. Four empirical changes in the global economy are identified.

  • (1) The fracture in the global economy between the USA and China, including “the splinternet”. 
  • (2) “Systemic Competition” and its consequences. 
  • (3) Rising VUCA (Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity) and corporate responses. 
  • (4) Innovation. The theoretical response is presented by nested theories of internalization, relying on common principles and concepts.

Details of the online talk through Zoom are listed as follows. You are welcome to join this online lecture and hope to meet you online soon!

  • Topic: The Structural Reshaping of Globalization
  • Date and Time: Nov 20, 2020; 10:00 AM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

https://westernuniversity.zoom.us/j/95450147539

  • Meeting ID: 954 5014 7539
  • Passcode: 361691

For more information about Professor Peter Buckley, you can refer to

https://business.leeds.ac.uk/divisions-international-business/staff/248/peter-j-buckley-

For more information about Professor Alain Verbeke, you can refer to

https://www.ucalgary.ca/verbeke/

New editors for BJM and IJMR

Our two journals – the British Journal of Management (BJM) and International Journal of Management Reviews (IJMR) – continue to go from strength to strength, rising in impact factors and rankings as well as in the number of submissions being received. We are investing further in our journals to provide additional support for the wonderful teams of Editors that work so hard to provide high quality outlets for research. So we are seeking to recruit the following roles:

  1. An additional Co-Editor in Chief for IJMR, to work with the current Editors in Chief, Dr Dermot Breslin and Professor Katie Bailey. 
  2. An additional Associate Editor, ideally with a specialism in information systems and perhaps based in North America, to join the team on IJMR.
  3. Four additional Associate Editors for BJM.

Details of all these roles can be found in the documents attached or via the BAM website. The closing date for all roles is 9am on Monday 4th January 2021.

Please support our community by sharing these opportunities with your networks.

With best wishes
Madeleine Barrows FRSA

CEO, British Academy of Management

Discount on “Historical Organization Studies: Theory and Applications”

Edited by Mairi Maclean, Stewart R. Clegg, Roy Suddaby and Charles Harvey

See this flyer for a 20% discount:

https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:b54cfcf0-8be3-454c-98a1-bf5a0483ea44

Enter the code FLR40 at checkout

Book description

We are now entering a new phase in the establishment of historical organization studies as a distinctive methodological paradigm within the broad field of organization studies. This book serves both as a landmark in the development of the field and as a key reference tool for researchers and students. It evaluates the current state of play, advances it and identifies the possibilities the new emergent field offers for the future. In addition to providing an important work of reference on the subject for researchers, the book can be used to introduce management and organizational history to a student audience at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

<p value="<amp-fit-text layout="fixed-height" min-font-size="10" max-font-size="72" height="80">The book is a valuable source for wider reading, providing rich reference material in tutorials across organizational studies, or as recommended or required reading on courses with a connection to business or management history.The book is a valuable source for wider reading, providing rich reference material in tutorials across organizational studies, or as recommended or required reading on courses with a connection to business or management history.

CfP: SI Management & Political Philosophy

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Management and Political Philosophy (Philosophy of Management)

Deadline: 31 March 2021

Guest Editors: Marian Eabrasu and David Wilson

Political philosophy explores general questions about how to organize ourselves, and how to make legitimate decisions about how to organize ourselves, for the purpose of meeting our most fundamental needs of security and welfare.  Management philosophy, for its part, explores general questions about existing organizations and how they can best advance their goals. There is, thus, much overlap of subject area.  Political states themselves must engage in the management of public resources and public institutions; thus, historians of management typically start with a discussion of ancient thought about how to rule (see Witzel, 2016; Wren, 2020).  With the rise of industrialization, organizations that were independent of but hosted by the state began to proliferate, and management thought became focused on them instead.  However, not only does management continue to occur in both, but political behavior and organizational behavior strongly influence one another. Thus, inquiry in each area can be pertinent to the other. This idea joins the observation that in the past decades CSR took a political turn (Kourula et al., 2019). However, while welcoming papers discussing political CSR (Scherer et al., 2016), this call for paper opens a wider theoretical angle by inviting contributions to take a step back from the current conversations on the political roles of corporations and think more broadly on topics such as:

  • States are not exactly like corporations: some argue that it is a difference in degree, others that it is a difference in kind (Schrempf-Stirling, 2018). Among other things, this question bears on the extent to which the vast literature about ruling the state can be applied to managing the firm (Philips and Margolis, 1999; Moriarty, 2005; Taylor, 2017).
  • There are lively debates about the extent to which it is appropriate and desirable for the state to treat corporations as persons. What rights, and what responsibilities, are best accorded them? Are they more properly treated by the state (contrary to the first question) not as a different sort of state but as a different sort of citizen  (French, 1979; Ripken, 2019)?
  • Corporate management, along with state government, is an important variety of social authority. Many have argued that there is a strong case to be made for democracy in corporate management (Dahl, 1985; McMahon, 2017; Anderson, 2019). What would such democracy look like?
  • Political thought has been directed to supporting a robust notion of corporate social responsibility-owing, for example, to the deployment of the same arguments that are used to justify capitalism (Heath, 2020) or to the argument that they serve important political purposes (Singer, 2019). How can political thought support the notion of corporate social responsibility?
  • It is argued that it is appropriate and even desirable for the state to regulate managerial behavior with respect to, for example, safety, discrimination in hiring and pay, and whistleblowing. This, in other words, is the area of state-enforced worker’s rights (Werhane, 1985; Werhane, Radin, and Bowie, 2004). Should the state regulate managerial behavior – and if so, how?   
  • The increasing permeability of the boundary between public and private spheres raises the question of where the power should reside: business or politics? The struggles of influence between business and politics, often epitomized by formulas such as “big corporations” or “omnipotent government,” leaves open fundamental philosophical questions on how their relations should eventually be organized (Chomsky, 2013; Bakan, 2003; Reich, 2007; Blok, 2019).
  • Political philosophers generally make a space for civil disobedience in the case of illegitimate governments or laws (Simmons, 1979). At the same time, corporate social responsibility and business ethics literature typically assumes that businesses should obey the law.  Is there a space for civil disobedience by firms that are faced with corrupt political regimes or immoral laws? 

Details

Submissions are sought for review and publication in Philosophy of Managementwww.springer.com/journal/40926

Articles can be submitted at https://www.editorialmanager.com/phom/ by 31 March 2021.

Expected publication date: January 2022.

Word length: 6,000-10,000 words, excluding References.

Guest Editors:

David Carl Wilson, Professor of Philosophy, Webster University: wilson@webster.edu

Marian Eabrasu, Associate Professor, European Business School Paris, EM Normandie: eabrasu@yahoo.com

References

Anderson, E. (2019) Private Government (Princeton: Princeton University Press)

Bakan, J. (2005) The Corporation (New York: The Free Press)

Blok, V. (2020) ‘Politics versus Economics. Philosophical Reflections on the Nature of Corporate Governance’ Philosophy of Management 19, pp. 69–87

Chomsky, N. (2013) Making the Future (San Francisco: City Lights Open Media)

Dahl, R. A. (1985) A Preface to Economic Democracy (Berkeley: University of California Press)

French, P. (1979) ‘The Corporation as a Moral Person’ American Philosophical Quarterly 16(3), pp. 207-15

Heath, J. (2020) The Machinery of Government (New York: Oxford University Press)

Kourula, A., Moon, J., Salles-Djelic, M.-L. & Wickert, C. (2019). ‘New Roles of Government in the Governance of Business Conduct: Implications for Management and Organizational Research’ Organization Studies 40, pp. 1101-23

MacIntyre, A. (1981) After Virtue (South Bend:  University of Notre Dame Press)

McMahon, C. (2017) Authority and Democracy: A General Theory of Government and Management (Princeton: Princeton University Press)

Moriarty, J. (2005) ‘On the Relevance of Political Philosophy to Business Ethics’ Business Ethics Quarterly 15(3), pp. 455-73

Phillips, R.A. & Margolis, J. D.  (1999) ‘Towards an Ethics of Organizations’ Business Ethics Quarterly 9(3), pp. 619-38

Reich, R. (2007) Supercapitalism (New York: Vintage)

Ripken, S. K. (2019) Corporate Personhood (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)

Scherer, A. G., Rasche, A., Palazzo, G. & Spicer, A. (2016). ‘Managing for Political Corporate Social Responsibility: New Challenges and Directions for PCSR 2.0’ Journal of Management Studies 53, pp. 273-98

Schrempf-Stirling, J. (2018) ‘State Power: Rethinking the Role of the State in Political Corporate Social Responsibility’ Journal of Business Ethics 150, pp. 1-14

Simmons, J. (1979) Moral Principles and Political Obligations (Princeton:  Princeton University Press)

Singer, A. A. (2019) The Form of the Firm:  A Normative Political Theory of the Corporation (Oxford: Oxford University Press)

Taylor, R. S. (2017) Exit Left: Markets and Mobility in Republican Thought (Oxford: Oxford University Press)

Werhane, P. H. (1985) Persons, Rights, and Corporations (Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall)

Werhane, P., Radin, T., & Bowie, N. (2004) Employment and Employee Rights (London: Blackwell)

Witzel, R. (2016) A History of Management Thought, 2nd ed.  (London: Routledge)

Wren, D. & Bedeian, A. (2020) The Evolution of Management Thought, 8th ed. (New York: Wiley)

Next event of Biz Hist Collective – 18 November

Paths Taken: The Strategic Trajectories of Retail Organisations in the United States and the United Kingdom, 1950-1980

Date: 18/11/2020 @ 16.00 hrs London
Speaker: Tom Buckely (Sheffield)
Moderator: Nicholas Wong (Northumbria)

Building on recent advances in knowledge relating to the evolution and transformation of retail institutions (Howard, 2015) and specific retail organisations (Scott and Walker, 2017; Buckley, 2018) this paper examines the strategic trajectories of retail organisations operating in the United States and the United Kingdom between 1950 and 1980. Taking an international comparative approach, the question this research seeks to answers is “how did the strategy of retail organisations develop over this thirty-year period and why did retail organisations take the strategic decisions that they did?” This question is addressed through utilising archival evidence from a department operating in the United Kingdom (the John Lewis Partnership) and the United States (Strawbridge and Clothier) and mass merchandisers operating in the UK (Marks and Spencer) and the U.S. (J.C. Penney). The archival data is utilised to examine both internal methods of organisation and managerial evaluations of the external environment retailers were operating in. The assessment of archival data reveals that each retailer took a different strategic direction, and that critical for the strategic success of the company, was the extent to which each retailer managed to construct a coherent, consistent retail proposition enabling them to function as an orchestrator of supply and demand. 

Register here.

All sessions at 10.00 Bogota / 16.00 hrs London

All speakers, abstracts and registration details available at: https://bizhiscollective.wordpress.com/agenda/

Look forward to seeing you there!

On behalf of the Business History Collective