EiCs for Scandinavian Economic History Reivew

The Scandinavian economic history review

Call for two positions as editor-in-chief

The Scandinavian Economic History Review is the leading economic history journal in Scandinavia. It has been published by the Scandinavian Society for Economic and Social History since 1953. The journal publishes articles and reviews in the fields of economic, business, and social history with a particular focus on the Nordic countries and the Baltic region. The journal also publishes contributions from closely related fields, such as demographic and labor history, as well as articles dealing with theoretical and methodological issues. The editors in chief, and the editorial office, rotate between Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Denmark by every three years. By 2023, it is time for the Swedish community to host the editorial office.

The Scandinavian Society for Economic and Social History is now looking for two new editors-in-chief for the journal. As editor-in-chief, you are responsible for the content and direction of the journal and for the contact with the publishing house Taylor and Francis. You also have the mandate to delegate the responsibility of manuscripts to the three associate editors. The position equals about ten percent of full-time, which should be financed by the editor’s home department.
To be eligible for the position of editor-in-chief you have to have a doctoral degree in economic history and be based at a Swedish University. You should have documented knowledge about Scandinavian economic history and extensive experience in publishing articles in high-quality academic journals and documented experience in peer-reviewing papers for academic journals. Capacity to collaborate with others and organizational skills are required to be considered for the position. Over the years, the majority of editors-in-chief have been male. The Scandinavian Society for Economic and Social History therefore especially welcomes women to apply for the position.

The application should be sent to erik.green@ekh.lu.se, and include the following:

Complete academic CV

List of publication

Motivation letter (max 1 page)

Deadline for submissions: 30 September 2022, 15:00hrs

If you have any questions, please email erik.green@ekh.lu.se

Archives & Artificial Intelligence

We are very pleased to be part of the AURA special issue in AI & Society 37,3. The special issue explores how modern data analytics affect archival practice, through conceptual and applied articles as well as elaborated case studies. Contributions consider a variety of issues, from new and exciting opportunities for exploration to continuing exclusion of communities, and provide food for thought for anyone interested in the future of history in a world increasingly captivated by AI.

CfP JMH SI: Latin America and the Caribbean Management History

Latin America and the Caribbean Management History

The evolution of management thought in Europe has its roots in the books of classic economists like Smith, Jevons, Marshall, Mills, Say, and Babbage (George & Álvarez, 2005). In the United States, the mainstream ideas that appeared at the beginning of managerial thought belong to mechanical engineering, especially in the books of Metcalfe, Towne, Taylor, Emerson, Gantt, Moller, and Gilbreth (Wren & Bedeian, 2018).

In Latin America and the Caribbean – LAC, the origin was different. The law and political sciences were the cornerstones of developing managerial ideas (Dávila, 1991a; Wahrlich, 1978). While Simón Bolívar was fighting for liberty, the general Francisco de Paula Santander considered that administration was part of the knowledge that the new nation needed to create itself. Santander, governing Great Colombia (today Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador and Panama), signed the Decree of March 18, 1826, to include ‘administrative sciences’ in the lawyer’s curriculum in Caracas, Quito, and Bogota (Orozco, 2015).

To further support the formation of a federal state, Florentino González went beyond the ideas about public administration available at that time: the Prussian concept of Policey Wissenschaft and the proposal of Charles-Jean Bonnin in the Principes d’Administration Publique to create an original proposal called ‘Elementos de Ciencia Administrativa’ in 1840 (Guerrero, 1997; Orozco, 2015). In the prologue González (1840, p. 1) pointed out that it is “a book that deals with an unknown science in the Americas, a science that we need to foster if we want to be happy some day” (Guerrero, 1997, p. 52, free translation from the guest editors).

The commerce schools appeared in México and Colombia to teach grammatical, accounting, law, languages, geography, and commercial techniques. The first one was the Escuela Superior de Comercio y Administración in Mexico in 1845, followed by the School of Commerce of Barranquilla in 1881 (Orozco, 2015). In Medellín, the National School of Mining was founded in 1886, seeking to create a new entrepreneurial elite in Colombia, led by Alejandro López (Orozco & Anzola, 2018).

In Argentina, the Universidad de Buenos Aires began to teach issues in management in 1913 under the influence of the railroad and British economists (Fernández & Gantman, 2011). Finally, the Jesuits established the first schools of administration at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile in 1924 and Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul in Brasil, in 1931 (Orozco, 2015).

The development of management thinking in LAC has been neglected in the annals of management history. Well-known books that are part of normal science, like Wren and Bedeian, George, or Witzel, lack chapters or presentations about LAC management thinking. The process, cultural and cognitive contexts, the tensions between the political and industrial organization, the relationships between schools, practitioners, and entrepreneurs, and the public and private forms of managing business are some of the knowledge gaps about LAC that we currently have. This special issue tries to begin filling this gap and proposes a landscape to include LAC in management history.

List of topic areas

  • Regional contributions to administrative and organizational theory,
  • specificities in management and business development in LAC,
  • epistemologies and ontologies in management thinking and research in LAC,
  • the role of the school of management (including globalization and international accreditations, epistemic independence, convergences, and distances between global North and global South)
  • the role (or lack thereof) of gender and multiple / mixed ethnicities in shaping the managerial organization and thinking in LAC countries
  • other forms of organizing present in LAC contexts (e.g., organizaciones otras in Mexico)
  • cultural studies of managerial practices and thinking in LAC, strategy and long-term thinking of nations and large corporations in LAC,
  • impact of the business organization on the communities in LAC, trans-disciplinary phenomena approached by management and social sciences in LAC

Guest Editors

Luis Antonio Orozco | University Externado de Colombia; Colombia

Olga Lucía Anzola Morales | University Externado de Colombia, Colombia

Fredy Vargas Lama | University Externado de Colombia, Colombia

Submissions Information

Submissions are made using ScholarOne Manuscripts. Registration and access are available at: mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jmh

Author guidelines must be strictly followed. Please see: www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/…

Authors should select (from the drop-down menu) the special issue title at the appropriate step in the submission process, i.e. in response to “”Please select the issue you are submitting to”.

Submitted articles must not have been previously published, nor should they be under consideration for publication anywhere else, while under review for this journal.

Key deadlines

Opening date for manuscripts submissions: 2 February 2023

Closing date for manuscripts submission: 30 October 2023

Closing date for abstract submission: 3 February 2023

Email for abstract submissions: luis.orozco@uexternado.edu.co

For the original call see: https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/calls-for-papers/latin-america-and-caribbean-management-history

Assistant Professor post at University of Maryland

University of Maryland College Park 
Robert H. Smith School of Business

Assistant Professor Faculty Posting
Management and Organization Department
Position Number:127566
Tenure Track

The Department of Management and Organizations at the Robert H. Smith School of Business, University of Maryland, College Park invites applications for faculty positions in Organizational Behavior/Human Resources, Strategy or Entrepreneurship at the rank of Assistant Professor. Position openings are subject to budgetary approval. Candidates must have a Ph.D., or equivalent degree and a track record of high-impact and creative research. Successful applicants will be expected to conduct top-level scholarly research, deliver high-quality teaching to undergraduate, MBA, MS, and PhD students and perform service.

The Robert H. Smith School of Business, one of 12 schools and colleges located on the University of Maryland, College Park campus, is a recognized leader in management research and education for the global economy. A comprehensive business school, Smith offers undergraduate, full-time and part-time MBA, M.S., Executive MBA, PhD, and non-degree executive education programs as well as outreach services to the corporate community. The school is consistently ranked among the top business schools by leading business publications such as Bloomberg Business Week, Financial Times, U.S. News & World Report, and The Wall Street Journal.

Minimum Qualifications: Candidates should have a Ph.D. already in hand or expected by Fall 2023 and a record of research excellence. All applicants are also expected to possess excellent teaching skills, including the ability to incorporate the latest insights from research and practice into existing and new courses.

Application Process and Deadlines. Application materials should be uploaded at: https://ejobs.umd.edu [Refer to position #127566 in the faculty listing]. When applying, please include a PDF version of your cover letter, personal statement, curriculum vitae, and 2 or 3 recent publications or job market paper. Three reference letters from scholars who know the applicant’s work well should be emailed to Tina Marie Rollason at trollaso@umd.edu. Applicants are encouraged to apply by October 1, 2022 or as soon as possible for best consideration. Consideration of candidates will begin upon receipt of applications and will continue until suitable candidates are identified. Questions regarding the positions can be directed to Gilad Chen at gchen3@umd.edu (applicants for the Organizational Behavior/Human Resources areas) or David Kirsch at dkirsch@umd.edu (applicants for the Strategy or Entrepreneurship areas).

About Us: For more information about the University of Maryland, please visit: http://www.umd.edu. For information about the Robert H. Smith School of Business, visit our Web site at: http://www.rhsmith.umd.edu. For more information about the Department of Management and Organizations visit our website at: www.rhsmith.umd.edu/faculty-research/…

Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of Maryland, College Park, an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations regarding nondiscrimination and affirmative action; all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment. The University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, physical or mental disability, protected veteran status, age, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, creed, marital status, political affiliation, personal appearance, or on the basis of rights secured by the First Amendment, in all aspects of employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions.

——————————
David Kirsch
University of Maryland

And this year’s winner of the ABH Coleman Prize is …

On the 1st of July, the Association of Business Historians (ABH) held the Coleman Prize session which featured four excellent presenters: Ian Jones, Nicolaas Strydom, Jeannette Strickland, and Gaurav Pratap Sud. The eventual winner was Ian Jones with his thesis titled Using the past: Authenticity, reliability, and the role of archives in Barclays plc’s use of the past strategies. Ian’s thesis was completed at the University of Liverpool and he was supervised by Dr Margaret Procter and Dr Andrew Smith and Barclays Group Archivists Maria Sienkiewicz. Ian’s thesis analyses the role of Barclays Group Archives (BGA) in the delivery of Barclays’ strategic objectives, abstract below:

Recent scholarship in organisation studies has begun to address how organisations perceive and use their history. However, how organisations preserve and access their history, and how this affects how they are able to use their history is less researched. This thesis investigates how Barclays Group Archives (BGA) contribute to Barclays plc delivering its strategic objectives. It asks, how does BGA, as a specific unit of the organisation, facilitate the delivery of Barclays plc’s strategic objectives? The researcher was embedded in the archives, enabling the gathering of observational data on how BGA operate as well as a unique level of access to archival organisational records. These were used to target and gain access to Barclays plc employees to conduct interviews to ascertain how they used BGA’s resources and what benefits they felt BGA brought. Using interviews, observation, and other qualitative research methods, this thesis introduces archival science theory to the study of how organisations can benefit from using their history, introducing the archival science ideas of authenticity, reliability, usability, and integrity to inform the research on organisational memory and use of the past strategies. 

Program of the Management & Business History Track at BAM

Management and Business History 

Track Chairs: James Fowler and Roy Edwards 

WEDNESDAY 31ST AUGUST 

SESSION 1 14.15 – 15.45 SYMPOSIUM (In Person) 

Session Chair: John Wilson ‘Whither business history?’ (177) John Wilson, Anna Tilba, Steven Toms, Nicholas Wong 

WEDNESDAY 31ST AUGUST 

SESSION 2 17.00 – 18.30 FULL PAPER SESSION (In Person) 

Session Chair: James Fowler The revolutionary aspects of the Managerial Revolution: its theory, historiography, and influence (865) Simon Mollan, Beverly Geesin, Bejamin Richards 

‘Organising Behaviour Towards Sound’: The mutual influences of management theory and music in the work of Stafford Beer and Brian Eno (964) Beverly Geesin 

Strategic Re-alignment – Rediscovering the interdisciplinary origins of Strategic Management (1107) Kevin Tennent 

THURSDAY 1ST SEPTEMBER 

SESSION 3 08:00 – 09.30 FULL PAPER SESSION (In Person) 

Session Chair: James Fowler Tenants of time and context: localised Discourses as a constraint on culture change as a management lever (77) Marian Iszatt-White 

Rhetorical history, temporal narratives and links in time: the case of pension fund investment short-termism (662) John Wilson, Anna Tilba 

Exploring the Role of the Referee in the Emergence of Soccer as an Entertainment Product during its First Hundred Years (273) Kevin Tennent, Alex Gillett, Alan Tomlinson 

THURSDAY 1ST SEPTEMBER 

SESSION 4 14:05 – 15.35 DEVELOPMENTAL PAPER SESSION (In Person) 

Session Chair: Kevin Tennent 

From Reds to Roads: The Clydeside Car Revolution 1950-70 (13) James Fowler 

Institutional Change in the Swiss Financial Industry 1992-2022: A Social Movement Perspective on ESG (894) Anastasia Naranova-Nassauer 

The Bennie Railplane: The Railway (Dis?)-Connection (135) James Wilson, Niall McKenzie 

THURSDAY 1ST SEPTEMBER 

SESSION 5 17:05 – 18.35 DEVELOPMENTAL PAPER SESSION (In Person) 

Session Chair: Kevin Tennent 

Modes of colonial administration and subsidiary organisation in the postcolonial period: A longitudinal study of two multinational banking subsidiaries (235) Paul Caussat 

Re/assessing James MacGregor Burns’ interpretation of Kennedy leadership (861) Simon Mollan, Leo McCann 

Alexei Stakhanov, Stakhanovism, and Human Resource Management: An investigation into the cultural history of ideal workers (695) Bogdan Costea, Peter Watt 

FRIDAY 2ND SEPTEMBER 

SESSION 6 08:30 – 10.00 FULL PAPER SESSION (In Person) 

Session Chair: James Fowler Knowledge flows and industrial clusters: assessing the sources of competitive advantage in two English regions (717) John Wilson, Chris Corker, Joe Lane 

Key Research Themes in African Business History: A structured literature review (811) Stephanie Decker, Nicolaas Strydom, Julia Fernando 

Mechanization and craft: Insights from a historical study on engineering (780) Mirva Peltoniemi, Antti Sihvonen 

FRIDAY 2ND SEPTEMBER 

SESSION 7 15:15 – 16.45 FULL PAPER SESSION (In Person) 

Session Chair: Alex Gillett 

British interwar management: a response to Maclean et al (176) John Wilson, John Quail 

Exploring the role of history in the institutional maintenance process: Case of the Godzilla movie in Japan (466) Shunsuke Furuta, Yun Jeong Kim, Otsuki Hiroshi 

Writing Collective History: Analyzing Traditional and Regional Cluster in Actor-network Theory (467) Yusuke Inoue, Takehisa Yamada, Hiroshi Togo 

2022 BHC Mid-Year Conference (online)

The Business History Conference (BHC) will host a one-day virtual conference on September 30, 2022. The 2022 BHC Mid-Year Conference enables members from around the world to easily and cost-effectively participate in the BHC during a turbulent time and also launches the BHC’s activities for the 2022-2023 academic year. The 2023 BHC Annual meeting will take place in person in Detroit on March 9-11, 2023. 

The theme for the 2022 BHC Mid-Year Conference is “Method and Madness: Reinventing Business History in a New Age of Extremes.” The one-day conference will be organized around three sets of 1.5 hour workshops. The first set of workshops will examine new sources and new uses of old sources in business history research. Sessions will include the uses of visual materials, legal records, account books, and big data, among other sources. The second set of workshops will cover interpretive and analytical techniques, including the interpretation of senses, network analysis, and the rhetorical uses of history. The third set of workshops will cover changes in the representation and dissemination of business history, including both conventional formats (books, scholarly articles) and newer formats (podcasts, social media, etc). 

Given that the conference is organized around short workshops rather than presentations, we will request participants to only fill out a registration form. The registration website will go live August 22 and participants will be notified of their acceptance by September 1. BHC members who are students and emerging scholars can register for free; fees for regular BHC members and nonmembers will be modest. In the meantime, please save the date.

If you have any questions or suggestions please don’t hesitate to reach out to BHC president Dan Wadhwani: dwadhwani@marshall.usc.edu. Interested people may also follow/tag @TheBHCNewsBHC’s Facebook, and BHC’s LinkedIn, and the hashtag #BHCMidYear. 

CfP: Early encounters with coal

Early encounters with coal: Retrieving views from below

The rise of coal and steam-power in the nineteenth century is now widely recognised as an epochal historical event. It put the world-economy on a path to large-scale, climate-shattering combustion of fossil fuels. While these trajectories have been intensely studied in recent scholarship, we know far less about how coal and steam were perceived from subaltern positions. How did people react to this novel fuel and the technologies it animated when they slammed into their lives? Did they admire or fear them, wish to escape and eliminate them, or rather emulate and acquire their powers? Through what cultural filters were coal and steam viewed when each first began to take hold? While the stories of early coal and steam have been told from the perspective of inventors, manufacturers, merchants, colonial administrators and other agents of their dissemination, the voices from the other side have yet to be heard: colonised people; workers in mines and ports, on fields, boats and railroads; those who were dispossessed and displaced by the onrush of the first fossil economy. Most of these voices will inevitably be lost to the historical record. Some, however, might be retrieved by studying sources spanning a spectrum from oral traditions and folk songs via travelogues and popular science magazines to pamphlets and novels, to mention only some. We need to examine technologies of extraction as well as use, and thus set the histories of mining and supply alongside those of trade and consumption. A more focused effort to reconstruct the variety and tensions of early encounters with coal, especially as seen from below, is, we believe, not only possible but potentially valuable. It might illuminate creatively the power relations of fossil-fuelled development, potentials for resistance, tendencies of accommodation and embrace and many other aspects of the historical process.

For this workshop we invite contributions about encounters with coal anywhere in the world, up until the Second World War. Building on the recent emergence of literatures examining the development of coal technologies in radically different environments and regions – Asia, the Middle East, South America as well as Britain and Europe – we ask how the histories of those who dug, wrought, fired and laboured for coal and steam can be enriched by the perspectives of historical industrial psychology, environmental history, science and technology studies, history of technology and conceptual history of energy, folklore, religious studies, gender and sexuality in industrial history/history of technology, socioeconomic history, labour history, anthropology, ecocriticism, history of urban environment/pollution, colonial/empire history, rural change and industrialization, energy humanities, maritime history, infrastructural history.

We invite proposed contributions for a hybrid workshop to be held in Cambridge and online on 13-14 December, with 300 word abstracts due on 29 August, accepted contributors informed on 12 September and draft papers (up to 8,000 words) to be circulated by Friday 2 December.

Timeline

Proposed abstracts due: Monday 29 August 2022 (sent by email to Richard Staley <raws1@cam.ac.uk>

Programme circulated: Monday 12 September

Draft papers to be circulated: Friday 2 December

Workshop: Tuesday and Wednesday 13 and 14 December (with a meeting held in Cambridge for those able to attend in person and hybrid participation online for those more distant).

Amr Ahmed, Andreas Malm, Simon Schaffer, Richard Staley

DCDC22 presentations on digital archival research practices

#DCDC22 VIDEO | Innovative practice in search and discovery

Chaired by @paolamarchionni of @JISC

The video recording comprises three talks at DCDC that address how to search and discover born digital & reborn digital archives, and the role of AI in this process:

  1. Jacquelyn Sundberg & Carolyn Pecoskie of @McGillLib , who introduced work on Handwritten Text Recognition for the files of a Canadian trading company.
  2. Jenny Bunn of @UkNatArchives presents a critical take on the role of AI for research.
  3. Stephanie Decker @Deckersteph, Adam Nix @adamjnix, @Santhilata Kuppili Venkata, and David Kirsch @darchivist talked about how to research email archives.

Accounting History International Conference 2022

Dear all, 

Just a reminder that the 11th Accounting History International Conference (11AHIC) is being held in Portsmouth, UK from the 7 – 9 September.

During the conference we will be holding an editorial board meeting on 8 September, time and venue to be advised.

For further details and registration information about the conference, please see the website link for the 11AHIC:

https://www.port.ac.uk/news-events-and-blogs/events/the-eleventh-accounting-history-international-conference

We look forward to catching up with you in Portsmouth.

Kind regards

Carolyn, Carolyn and Laura

Joint editors – Accounting History