AOM 2022 PDW: Digital archives search

Are you interested in learning about how to use email in your research? If so, please come to a special Professional Development Workshop (PDW) at the 2022 Academy of Management (AOM) Annual Meeting to learn how other scholars are using email and to participate in a study about knowledge discovery in large-scale, organizational email corpora.

Emails are materially different from the correspondence of the pre-digital age, but their significance as traces of the past is substantial, especially for organizations, where email is not only used as a form of correspondence but also as an informal mode of record keeping. We believe that the preservation of a meaningful, relatively complete email archive is one plausible pathway to supporting scholarly research on organizations.

The forthcoming PDW — “Introducing the ‘Digitally Curious’ to Email Archives for Organizational Research and History (session 183)” — is sponsored by the Management History (MH) division of AOM and will introduce the “digitally curious” scholar to email archives for organizational research. It will be moderated by Prof David Kirsch (University of Maryland, US), Dr Adam Nix (University of Birmingham, UK), Shubhangkar Girish Jain (University of Maryland, US) in person, and online by Prof Stephanie Decker (University of Birmingham, UK, and University of Gothenburg, Sweden) and Dr Santhilata Kuppili Venkata (independent scholars).

The PDW will take place on Friday, August 5, from 2:00-4:00pm PDT in a hybrid format with both in-person and virtual participation supported. To allow participants to access the email tools and collections, pre-registration is requested. If you would like to register or to learn more about the workshop and the project, please email Shubhangkar Girish Jain (shubhangkar.girishjain@marylandsmith.umd.edu).

Attendees at the PDW are invited to contribute to research on the use of email and will be encouraged to complete a post-workshop survey that will constitute an input to our ongoing research in this area. Completion of the survey is not required to attend and participate in the workshop.

SI CFP: Microhistory

Microhistory in Management History and Organization Theory

Management & Organizational History

Manuscript deadline: 17 February 2023

Special Issue Editors:

Liv Egholm, Copenhagen Business School
le.mpp@cbs.dk

Michael Heller, Brunel Business School
michael.heller@brunel.ac.uk

Michael Rowlinson, University of Exeter Business School
m.c.rowlinson@exeter.ac.uk

There has been a resurgence of interest in microhistory. The classic texts associated with the subject remain immensely popular: The Cheese and the Worms (Ginzburg, 1992[1976]); The Return of Martin Guerre (Zemon Davis, 1983); and The Great Cat Massacre (Darnton, 1984). These provide a reference point, which has provided the basis for increasing reflection on the theoretical significance and methodological distinctiveness of microhistory (Magnússon & Szijártó, 2013), such as the special issue of Past and Present on ‘Global History and Microhistory’ (Ghobrial, 2019). Attention has also been paid to microhistory from management and business history as well as organization studies (Bourguignon & Floquet, 2019; Decker, 2015).

Microhistory offers an opportunity to reconceptualise relationships which lie at the heart of historical research and historiography: the historical nexus between the particular and the general, agency and structure, the micro and the macro. Microhistorians are known for their methodological habit of reading sources forensically in their search for historical clues. It implies reading historical sources ‘against the grain’ (Decker & McKinlay, 2020, pp. 26-27), or as Levi (2019: 41) puts it, ‘beyond the edge of the page’, carefully looking for what Ginzburg refers to as “unintended evidence” (Ginzburg, 2016). The use of microhistory as a magnifying glass can be seen as the equivalent of a detective’s tool. Sherlock Holmes´ working methods are often used as a metaphor for microhistory’s careful readings and detection of clues (Ginzburg, 2013 (1979)), often within “exceptional normal” cases (Grendi, 1977).

For this reason, the trademark of microhistorical methodology is to trace sources and clues throughout and across archives (Ginzburg, 2013). The names of actors, places, concepts, events, or objects are used as concrete entry points to show how previously unrelated spaces, temporalities, and fields are woven together in practice. This mapping demonstrates great potential in revealing unnoticed relations between, for example, family life and entrepreneurship (Popp & Holt, 2013), religious practices and trade (Trivellato, 2019), or philanthropic gift giving and the establishment of the welfare state (Egholm, 2021).

The purpose is not to argue for the universal value of the exceptional; it is to show, rather, how discrete historical events challenge our conceptualisations of the universal, and provide essential clues to what can be considered as normal (Ginzburg, 1979; Peltonen, 2001). Accordingly, the reduction of scale is not the study of the “microness” of a phenomenon (Levi, 2019, p. 38). The reduction of scale, rather, provides the historian with a heuristic tool to craft new theories by distorting or amending metanarratives and reformulating historical concepts and relations. Without explicitly mentioning microhistory, a series of organizational phenomena have been reconceptualized from a close reading of sources, with notable examples being the career (McKinlay, 2002), and entrepreneurship (Popp & Holt, 2013. Thus, microhistory shows how, “history is a discipline of general questions and ‘local’ answers” (Levi, 2019, p. 45).

The historic turn (Rowlinson, Hassard, & Decker, 2014) has pushed for a revised understanding of past context as offering more than simply temporal variables for universal theorising (Van Lent & Durepos, 2019). Historical phenomena often remain, however, reduced to consequences or affectations of particular contexts. In contrast, microhistory calls out for a grounding and explanation of the past through analyses of how actors, places, concepts, events or objects interact and are woven together in contradictory and often different fields and interests. In so doing, microhistory exposes how both individuals and social structures of all kinds are produced simultaneously through relationships and processes.

This special issue’s scope is to explore the methodological, ontological, and empirical strengths of microhistory to advance management history and organization studies. Therefore, we invite both theoretical, and theoretically informed empirical submissions that will further the contribution of microhistory in business history, management, and organizational history, as well as management and organization theory.

Questions and topics of interest for the special issue may include:

  1. How does the use of microhistory question, elaborate, or develop macro theories or broader conceptualisations from within the confines of discrete and particular historical studies
  2. How do microhistorical methodologies of reading “beyond the edges of the paper” contradict and undermine broader historical narratives in business and management and organizational history such as Marxism, functionalism, institutionalism, neo-liberalism, the resource-based view of the firm, and economic path dependency?
  3. What are the advantages and concerns for the use of historical archival research, source criticism, triangulation, and historical interpretivism when innovative microhistorical methodologies work with “dissonant sources” and “unintended evidence”?
  4. What is the impact of microhistory in relation to archival ethnography and the employment of micro historical sources (e.g., letters, diaries, postcards, travel accounts, scrapbooks, and memoirs)?
  5. What is the way in which local knowledge and local environment historically create organizational, business, and entrepreneurial opportunities?
  6. How does a microhistorical approach reconceptualise the relationship between agency and structure in business and management and organizational history?
  7. What is the relationship between the different scales of history? In particular, to what extent do microhistories develop historical accounts that reflect on a granular scale broader organizational and business historical environments and trends?
  8. How can we account for generalisation by using a microhistorical approach? How can local answers reply to general questions by showing complex and often ambiguous connections in historical archives?

CfP: Enterprising York

Call for Papers

Enterprising York: Histories of Business, Management and Society in a City of Heritage

York, England

15-16 September 2023

Deadline for submission: 30 November 2022

More than eight million tourists flock to the city of York each year to celebrate its heritage, gaining brief glimpses into the city’s long history as an important centre of private trade and public enterprise. From bustling mediaeval markets to industrial railways, chocolate manufacturers, and luxurious teahouses, the history of enterprise in the city of York is widely recognized as a valuable resource of particular significance to small businesses and public organisations. Yet unlike larger cities in northern England, York’s business and management history has received very little scholarly attention. Despite being recognized since the Roman conquest of Britain as an important and well-connected commercial city and site of public administration, an important mediaeval and early-modern trading centre, and a pioneering hub at the forefront of 19th-century industrialisation in transport and manufacturing, the city of York is now largely overlooked as a site critical to the development of the British economy. This conference seeks to address the apparent paradox of a city that, economically, always seems simultaneously behind and ahead of its times.

As the institutional home to one of the largest concentrations of business and management historians in the UK, the University of York’s School for Business and Society invites proposals for original research presentations that reconsider the history of York’s private and public enterprise. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • The conflicted legacies of colonialism, slavery and philanthropy in York’s chocolate industries
  • Papers drawing on the rich archival materials of the Borthwick Institute for Archives at the University of York
  • York’s pioneering role in public administration of government, religious, military, and nonprofit enterprises
  • Histories of retailing, hospitality, tourism and consumer culture in York
  • Transportation and trade from the Roman and Viking eras through mediaeval and early-modern commerce, industrialization and to the post-industrial present
  • Gender, race, diversity and inequality in work and employment, labour-management relations, and corporate governance 
  • Entrepreneurship in a local context, including the successes and challenges faced by women, ethnic and religious minorities, and LGBT+ communities
  • The role of rural enterprise and rural development in the North Yorkshire economy
  • The historical relationship between the University of York and local and regional private and public enterprises

Please submit proposals of no more than 500 words and a one-page C.V. to Shane Hamilton (shane.hamilton@york.ac.uk) by 30 November 2022. Conference presenters will be asked to submit complete versions of their papers by 15 August 2023. Presenters will receive accommodation, meals, and compensation for their travel costs. The conference organisers are planning an edited publication based on a selection of revised conference papers. The program committee is composed of Shane Hamilton, Matthew Hollow, Stephen Linstead, Simon Mollan, and Kevin Tennent.

CfP: Capitalism and Informality

Submission deadline: 15 September 2022

Conference dates: 14–15 April 2023

The Menard Family George Washington Forum (GWF), which has its home at Ohio University, invites paper proposals for a conference and subsequent special journal issue on the capitalism and informality. The conference will be held at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, on 14 and 15 April 2022. Plenary lectures will be delivered by Kellee Tsai (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology), Friederike Welter (Institut für Mittelstandsforschung (IfM) Bonn), and Justin Webb (University of North Carolina at Charlotte).

More than a half-century of developmental discourse has portrayed informality as a signal of economic “backwardness”. From the writings of Max Weber to those of Clifford Geertz, Keith Hart, and Alfred Chandler, social scientific theories have suggested that as economies modernize, hierarchical and rationalized forms of economic organization will displace the “unorganized, unincorporated enterprises” and anomic agents of the informal economy. However, contrary to such predictions, informality remains the global norm. The informal economy continues to comprise at least half of all enterprises, a sizable majority of all jobs, and as much as 20 percent of gross domestic product in developed economies and 60 percent in emerging markets.

A recent generation of scholarship has begun to challenge the idea of the informal economy as a “little people’s alternative” — a static realm of simple, disorganized activity that exists outside of history. Studies have shown that, across different societal contexts, participation in the informal economy is driven by opportunity as well as by necessity, informal organizations can also structured and hierarchical, and informal entrepreneurship can play a powerful role in the reshaping of institutions. Scholars have also highlighted the interdependency of formal and informal economies. Informal enterprises and workers continue to supply critical labor, goods, and services that are used across the formal economy and most are intrinsically linked to formal firms. The informal economy is even facilitating the rise of new industries and new economic forms: artificial intelligence systems depend on “ghost laborers” to code the big data from which AI learns; offshore financial centers rely upon informal networks to arrive at understandings of acceptable practices; and sharing economies operate efficiently because of the services of informal middlemen. The informal thus remains inextricably interwoven with even the most modern elements of economies.

This conference will examine the persistence of informal economies and their relationship with economic transformation. It will explore how informal economies have developed complex organizational structures, have co-evolved in tandem with new industries and modes of production, and have shaped the broader economic and social contexts in which they are embedded.

The conference explicitly aims to bring together a diverse group of scholars from different disciplinary backgrounds who work on a range of societal contexts. We especially welcome contributions from anthropological, sociological, historical, and managerial perspectives. Examples of relevant topics include:

  • The socio-cultural construction of formal/informal boundaries and their evolution over time
  • The structure of organizations and enterprises in the informal economy, both contemporary and historical
  • Processes of informal economic organization
  • Informal innovation (i.e. the novel recombination of labor, capital, and knowledge in the informal economy)
  • Interactions between informal enterprises and the formal economy
  • Informal economies in post-socialist and post-colonial contexts and their relationship to economic transition
  • The role informal organizations play in the rise of new industries and sectors (e.g. digital economy) as well as the functioning of old ones (e.g. finance, real estate, manufacturing)
  • Governance and policymaking related to informal economy

Limited funds will be made available to participants to offset the costs of travel and lodgings.

Expectations

The purpose of the conference is to collect and workshop a series of papers that will potentially contribute to a future special issue. The special issue call will be open and competitive.

To apply, please send an abstract (no more than 500 words) of your prospective paper to the conference organizer, Adam Frost (af.mpp@cbs.dk), and to Robert G. Ingram (ingramr@ohio.edu) by 15 September 2022.

Participants will be expected to produce a full draft of the article to be disseminated to all other participants one month prior to the conference (15 March 2023).

Call for Co-Editor-in-Chief: Business History


Deadline: 31st August 2022

Apply here

About the Role with Business History

Applications are invited for the position of Co-Editor-in-Chief for Business History. The new Editor-in-Chief will work alongside Stephanie Decker from January 2023, following Neil Rollings’ departure from the role at the end of 2022. The role is for a three-year appointment, renewable by mutual consent for a second three-year term.

We are seeking an outstanding and professional academic who is actively involved in the disciplines covered by Business History, with an international reputation for research excellence, and a passion for communication. Prior experience of editing an established journal is strongly preferred.

Applicants should be actively involved in networks within the field. Key qualities sought for the positions include energy, enthusiasm, managerial skills to oversee the editorial cycle, an understanding of research and publishing ethics, and the ability to meet deadlines and work effectively with Editorial Team members and a major publisher.

Routledge provides administrative support and an annual contribution to expenses incurred by the Editorial team.

Role Responsibilities

The tasks to be undertaken will include but will not be limited to:

  • Working with the Editorial Team, Routledge and the Editorial Board to develop the editorial strategy and direction of Business History and acting as an ambassador for the Journal;
  • Attendance and networking at international conferences and events to promote Business History and solicit submissions, invited contributions, and special issue proposals;
  • Responsibility for enhancing the quality and reputation of Business History, particularly in relation to the quantity, quality and timeliness of published research;
  • Coordinating peer review of submissions amongst the Editorial Team;
  • Commissioning topical special issues with active, well-respected Guest Editors;
  • Ensuring that all reviewers and authors uphold the Journal’s code of publishing ethics;
  • Working with the Editorial Team to refresh the Editorial Board and pool of reviewers as necessary in terms of subject specialisms and geographical representation;
  • Attending Editorial Team / Editorial Board meetings annually.

Submitting your Application to Business History

Applications shall include:

  • A CV
  • A letter of interest, specifically referring to why you believe you are particularly qualified for the role of co-Editor-in-Chief, leading the Editorial Team for Business History, and how you see your role in the future development and direction of the Journal (maximum of one side of A4).

Anyone who wishes to discuss these positions informally with the Editors-in-Chief or the Portfolio Manager are welcome to contact Zoe Sternberg, Neil Rollings or Stephanie Decker.

Candidates who pass the initial screening stage will be invited for an interview with the current Editors-in-Chief and Routledge over a video call.

Become a peer reviewer and a book reviewer in Business History

Business History welcomes expressions of interest to become a peer reviewer and a book reviewer for the journal. If your research is connected in any way to business history and you would like to be contacted to evaluate submissions to the journal or to write a book review please get in touch with us. We especially encourage emerging scholars and doctoral students to become reviewers to be more involved in publishing in the field of business history and more familiar with the academic publishing world.

The following lines explain the main roles of peer reviewers and book reviewers in Business History;

A peer reviewer is contacted once a paper has been first accepted. The main role of the peer reviewer, selected based on research specialization and experience in a certain field, is to assess and ensure that a submission is suitable for the specific journal. Generally, a journal editor selects 2 or 3 reviewers per article. Each reviewer is expected to provide a structured, succinct assessment on whether the paper should continue the peer review process or be rejected. The editor may find that the reviewers disagree about the quality and revisions that a paper should undergo. The journal editors are ultimately the ones in charge of communicating to the author/s what changes are needed. If the paper will continue towards the publishing process, the author/s might be asked to either Review and Resubmit with minor corrections or Review and Resubmit with major changes. Once the paper has been reviewed and resubmitted, along with a letter addressing the reviewers’ comments, the editor can either track the paper toward the publishing pipeline or recommend that the previous reviewers, or new ones, check and confirm that the paper.

Book reviews editors receive requests from publishers and from authors for their books to be reviewed in Business History. Next, book reviewers reach out to researchers that work in the field or in related fields. If a reviewer agrees, he/she/they will receive a copy of the book. The book reviewer and the reviewer will then agree on a deadline within the next few months. The review, once submitted, goes through the usual copyediting process.

A good book review presents the main findings of the book and evaluates whether the book is successful in demonstrating the main argument. Book reviews are also welcomed when they do not simply summarize the book, but when they point out to the contributions and significance of the manuscript within the most recent debates.

Taylor & Francis Group offers an array of resources to guide you in the process of peer review and book review:

Becoming a book reviewer

5 tips on how to become a peer reviewer

The role of early career researchers in improving peer review diversity

Peer review is fundamental to the scientific process

If you are interested in becoming a reviewer, please create an account in Manuscript Central https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/fbsh and get in touch with the editors-in-chief and book review editors of the journal:

Veronica Binda – Università Bocconi, Italy

Stephanie Decker – University of Bristol, UK

Adam NixUniversity of Birmingham, UK

Neil Rollings – University of Glasgow, UK


HHH: The Empire State building

The tallest building of its day opened as the Great Depression really began to squeeze the American economy. Was the Empire State Building a gigantic folly perpetrated by men with sky-scraping egos? Folks in the 1930s thought so, calling the monument the “Empty State Building,” because so little of its space had been rented. Yet, when viewed from the vantage of the twenty-first century through the lens of archival documents, the Empire State Building resolves into an economically and culturally successful investment made by people with enormous fortunes motivated both by egotism and broad vision. 

Economist Jason Barr, professor at Rutgers University – Newark, dug into the records of John J. Raskob and Pierre Samuel du Pont records held by the Hagley Library to uncover an insider’s story of the Empire State Building. Conceived by Raskob, and backed by du Pont, the project launched in 1929, weeks before the stock market crash, and opened for business in 1931, after a record-setting rapid construction. While the building did sit mostly empty until the 1940s, it nevertheless generated a return, especially through charging admission to the observation deck. This invitation for the public to experience the building characterized the Empire State Building legacy, which has grown to influence city builders the world over. 

The audio-only version of this program is available on our podcast.   Interview available at  https://www.hagley.org/research/history-hangout-jason-barr.

Recorded on Zoom and available anywhere once they are released, our History Hangouts include interviews with authors of books and other researchers who have use of our collections, and members of Hagley staff with their special knowledge of what we have in our stacks. We began the History Hangouts earlier this summer and now are releasing programs every two weeks on alternate Mondays. Our series is part of the Hagley from Home initiative by the Hagley Museum and Library. The schedule for upcoming episodes, as well as those already released, is available at  https://www.hagley.org/hagley-history-hangout

Invitation to join the New Books Network en español [academic podcasting project]

The New Books Network is a consortium of author-interview podcast channels dedicated to raising the level of public discourse by introducing scholars and other serious writers to a wide public via new media. Covering 90+ subjects, disciplines, and genres, we publish 55 episodes every week and serve a large, worldwide audience. We are about to celebrate the first anniversary of a parallel platform for interviews conducted entirely in Spanish.

If you speak Spanish and are interested in being a host for New Books Network en español please send us an email: newbooksnetworkes@gmail.com

FAQ

What will I be doing?

Read books and record a conversation with your favorite authors and colleagues about the books they recently published.

What are the benefits?

This is a way to disseminate new ideas while promoting new books through conversations with their authors. The host can expand their network by connecting with researchers and readers, while also having the opportunity of talking in depth with colleagues about their new books. Our mission is the dissemination of knowledge through digital technologies.

It is time-consuming to collaborate?

No: you read a book that interests you, schedule and conduct the interview, and the post-production process is in the hands of the editors. When we publish the interview on New Books Network en español you can post the URL in your social media or on your academic/work webpage.

Check out some of the latest episodes: