CFP: New Histories of Business Schools and How They May Inspire New Futures

Academy of Management Learning and Education

New Histories of Business Schools and How They May Inspire New Futures

Initial submissions should be received by: March 31, 2020

Scheduled for Publication: June 2021

Guest Editors:

  • Patricia Genoe McLaren, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • JC Spender, Kozminski University
  • Stephen Cummings, Victoria University of Wellington
  • Todd Bridgman, Victoria University of Wellington
  • Ellen O’Connor, Dominican University of California
  • Christina Lubinski, Copenhagen Business School
  • Gabrielle Durepos, Mount Saint Vincent University (Canada)

 

We might do well to re-examine what we are doing and show the executive judgment and courage necessary to implement radical change (Khurana & Spender 2012: 636).

Business schools are the institutional locus of management learning and education. In recent years, we have gained a greater understanding of how their structures, processes, and power dynamics influence pedagogy and curricula, management theory and research, faculty, students, graduates, and society more broadly. We are also witnessing growing research into, and discussion about, the relative lack of innovation in management theory development, research, pedagogy, and curricula (Alvesson & Sandberg, 2012). While there have been a small number of inspirational works that have sought to push us towards changing business schools and business education (Augier and March, 2011; Hassard, 2012; Khurana 2007; Spender, 2016), they have not yet spurred the change we might have hoped for.
One under-explored route to encourage innovation in this regard is examining how our historical understanding of all aspects of business schools – including curriculum, pedagogy, research, structure, processes, stakeholders, power, and politics – may be limiting change. Histories highlight particular characters and plots but what we do not include – what we write out of history – is just as important as what is written in (Jenkins, 2003). History is constitutive, in that our own interpretations of the past define and shape our present and our future (Wadhwani & Bucheli, 2014). Compared with other stochastic fields of study, histories of management and business are simplistically linear and mono-cultural. This constrains how we see business schools in the present, and can subsequently limit their future development (Cummings & Bridgman, 2016).
The conventional history of business education tends to follow the emergence of American business schools: from the founding of the Wharton School in 1881, to the rapid growth of business school enrollment within American universities leading up to the 1950s, to the standardization of the schools after the publication of the Gordon-Howell and Pierson reports in 1959 (Hommel & Thomas, 2014). This history has been crafted over many years and now goes largely unchallenged. But it begs the questions: why is this the story we tell, who gains and who loses from its telling, and what events and people are missing from a narrative that should be inspirational for a broad range of people?
North American business education has been studied at various points in a straightforward assessment style – what are business schools doing, how could they
“improve” (Bossard & Dewhurst, 1931; Gordon & Howell, 1959; Pierson, 1959; Porter & McKibbin, 1988), and also with a more complex analysis of context, history, power, and influence (Engwall, Kipping, Usdiken, 2016; Khurana, 2007; Pettigrew, Corneul, & Hommel, 2014). Work has been done on the history of European management education (cf. Engwall, 2004; Harker, Caemmerer, & Hynes, 2016; Kieser, 2004; Kipping, Usdiken, & Puig, 2004; Tiratsoo, 2004; Usdiken, 2004), and some have looked at the global South (Cooke & Alcadipani, 2015). We are beginning to see alternative histories of the development of management theory and education (Bridgman, Cummings, & McLaughlin, 2016; Dye, Mills, & Weatherbee, 2005; Hassard, 2012; Peltonen, 2015). However, what about histories of schools of business and commerce from other parts of the world (Asia, Africa, Australasia, South America) in more detail? Or from earlier centuries? Or different examples from North America or Europe that did not survive or later morphed toward the standard form?
This special issue seeks to move things forward by looking differently when we look back. It encourages submissions that explore emerging interests, historical barriers to change, and their interrelationships by focusing on the emergence and development of business schools as complex entities that are interwoven with universities, the business community, government, and civil society. It also seeks submissions that explore how these broader understandings may stimulate innovation in the way we configure business schools and, consequently, how we teach, conduct research, view our profession, and relate to our stakeholders.
In this call for papers, we – professors/educators, researchers/inquirers, sufferers/critics, and aspirational as well as actual change agents – are the organizational actors, and business schools are our reflective historical setting; more importantly, they are our actual environment. We have a unique opportunity to push management theory, research methods, and interdisciplinarity to better understand and, more importantly, to reinvent business school(s) in light of what is socially or personally meaningful. We have contextual richness, personal and professional stakes, and a sense of crisis. Being able to change our practices from within, we are uniquely situated to bring scholarship, formal positioning, and inhabited experience to bear.
Better historical scholarship could, therefore, help us to change ourselves. To engage historical sensibilities and methods, and empirical richness, to push theory and change institutions. As a call for spurring this process we welcome contributions that address the following questions:
  1. What people, events, curriculum, pedagogy, form, and research of business schools’ past have been overlooked by conventional historical narratives?
  2. What role could new histories play in debates about how business schools should develop? Can new understandings of the past inspire us to think differently for the future?
  3. How can we write reflexive or critical histories of business schools that expose the power and politics of business education and what we teach, or do not teach, students?
  4. Are histories being used within business schools or other organizations, such as accreditation bodies, academies and societies, to perpetuate traditional structures and/or norms? Why and to what effect?
  5. What are the ‘invented traditions’ that support any or all aspects of the institution of business schools and what purpose were they invented to serve?
  6. What are the stories of the development of business education outside of North America or prior to the late 19th century? Are these different or the same as the current narrative? How, why, and what can we learn from these alternative histories?
  7. How has history traditionally been taught in business schools? What are the positive and limiting effects of this pedagogy? How could we teach history differently?
  8. Why should business school students learn more (or less) history? Or learn it differently?
  9. How might management scholars using history in their research influence business education?
Call on AMLE Website

References
Alvesson, M,. & Sandberg, J. 2012. Has management studies lost its way? Ideas for more imaginative and innovative research. Journal of Management Studies, 50(1): 128-152.

Augier, M. and March, J. 2011. The roots, rituals, and rhetorics of change: North
American business schools after the second World War. Stanford University Press.

Bossard, J. H. S., & Dewhurst, J. F. 1931. University education for business: A study of
existing needs and practices. Philadelphia. PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Bridgman, T., Cummings, S., & McLaughlin, C. 2016. Restating the case: How revisiting the development of the case method can help us think differently about the future of the business school. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 15(4): 724-741.

Cooke, B., & Alcadipani, R. 2015. Toward a global history of management education: The case of the Ford Foundation and the São Paulo School of Business Administration, Brazil. Academy of Management Learning & Education,14(4): 482-499.

Cummings, S. & Bridgman, T. 2016. The limits and possibilities of history: How a wider,
deeper and more engaged understanding of business history can foster innovative thinking. Academy of Management Learning and Education, 15(2): 250-267.

Dye, K., Mills, A. J., & Weatherbee, T. 2005. Maslow: Man interrupted: Reading
management theory in context. Management Decision, 43(10): 1375-1395.

Engwall, L. 2004. The Americanization of Nordic management education. Journal of
Management Inquiry, 13(2): 109-117.

Engwall, L., Kipping, M., & Usdiken, B. 2016. Defining management: Business
schools, consultants, media. New York: Routledge.

Gordon, R. A., & Howell, J. E. 1959. Higher education for business. New York:
Columbia University Press.

Harker, M. J., Caemmerer, B., & Hynes, N. 2016. Management education by the French
Grandes Ecoles de Commerce: Past, present, and an uncertain future. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 15(3): 549-568.

Hassard, J. 2012. Rethinking the Hawthorne Studies: The Western Electric research in its
social, political and historical context. Human Relations, 65(11): 1431-1461.

Hommel, U., & Thomas, H. 2014. Research on business schools. In A. M. Pettigrew, E.
Corneul, & U. Hommel (Eds.), The institutional development of business
schools: 8-36. Oxford: Oxford University PRess.

Jenkins, K. 2003. Refiguring history: New thoughts on an old discipline. London, U.K.:
Routledge.

Khurana, R. 2007. From higher aims to hired hands: The social transformation of
American business schools and the unfulfilled promise of management as a profession. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Khurana, R., & Spender, J. C. 2012. Herbert A. Simon on What Ails Business Schools: More than ‘A Problem in Organizational Design’. Journal of Management Studies, 49: 619–639.

Kieser, A. 2004. The Americanization of academic management education in Germany.
Journal of Management Inquiry, 13(2): 90-97.

Kipping, M., Usdiken, B., & Puig, N. 2004. Imitation, tension, and hybridization:
Multiple “Americanizations” of management education in Mediterranean Europe. Journal of Management Inquiry, 13(2): 98-108.

Peltonen, T. 2015. History of management thought in context: The case of Elton Mayo in Australia. In P. G. McLaren, A. J. Mills, & T. G. Weatherbee (Eds.), The Routledge Companion to Management and Organizational History. Abindon, UK: Sage.

Pettigrew, A. M., Corneul, E., & Hommel, U. 2014. The institutional development of
business schools. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Pierson, F. C. 1959. The education of American business men: A study in university-
college programs in business administration. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Porter, L. W., & McKibbin, L. E. 1988. Management education and development: Drift
or thrust into the 21st century? New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Spender, J.C. 2016. How management education’s past shapes its present. BizEd.

Tiratsoo, N. 2004. The “Americanization” of management education in Britain. Journal of Management Inquiry, 13(2): 118-126.

Usdiken, B. 2004. Americanization of European management education in historical and
comparative perspective. Journal of Management Inquiry, 13(2): 87-89.

Wadhwani, D., & Bucheli, M. 2014. The future of the past in management and organization studies. In D. Wadhwani, & M. Bucheli (Eds.), Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods. New York: Oxford University Press.

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Postdoctoral Position in Entrepreneurial History at University of Southern California

The Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies at the Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California, seeks applicants for a postdoctoral scholar interested in entrepreneurial history.

The postdoctoral researcher will work under the supervision of Professors Noam Wasserman and Christina Lubinski of the Greif Center and in conjunction with Professor Dan Wadhwani of the University of the Pacific. Professor Wasserman is the founding director of the Greif Center’s Founder Central initiative and Professor Lubinski leads its entrepreneurial-history activities.  Founder Central’s new course on Entrepreneurial History will debut in the Spring of 2019.

The position is for 1 year, with the potential of extending this to 2 years. In addition to research, the postdoc will teach one entrepreneurship or general business course per year if qualified, and will receive mentoring in this teaching role.

The Greif Center is among the nation’s leaders in entrepreneurship education and research. Its faculty includes a diverse mix of researchers and practitioners. This year, our undergraduate entrepreneurship program was ranked #4 and our graduate program #8 by US News and World Report. The Greif Center is one of the organizers of the West Coast Entrepreneurship Research Symposium and the sponsor of the Greif Entrepreneurship Research Impact Award — given annually at the Academy of Management conference. In addition to offering courses in the school’s undergraduate and MBA programs, we offer specialized graduate degrees in social entrepreneurship (MSSE) and innovation (MSEI).

Requirements: You should have a Ph.D. (or expect to complete your Ph.D. by September 2018) in history or should have engaged in historically-oriented work in a related discipline (e.g., management, sociology, anthropology, law, economics). Candidates should be interested in historical perspectives on entrepreneurship and its role in socio-economic change. Experience with archival and primary source research is preferred. You will be expected to participate in at least one existing research project while also having time to continue developing your own research.

Qualified candidates should email the following documents to entrepreneur@marshall.usc.edu:

  • Cover letter
  • Curriculum vitae, specifying research, teaching, and work experience
  • Research statement
  • Teaching statement
  • Two letters of recommendation

Timing: Review of applications will begin immediately, and continue until the position is filled. The position is expected to start September 2018, although the start date is flexible.

For questions about the position, please contact Christina Lubinski (cl.mpp@cbs.dk) or Noam Wasserman (nwasserm@marshall.usc.edu)

USC Marshall is renowned for its high-ranking undergraduate, graduate, international and executive education programs, an exceptional faculty engaged in leading-edge research, a diverse and creative student body, and a commitment to technological advancement. The research productivity of Marshall’s 200 full-time faculty ranks among the top 15 business schools in the world. For more information about the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California, please go to: http://www.marshall.usc.edu.

The University of Southern California (USC), founded in 1880, is located in the heart of downtown L.A. and is the largest private employer in the City of Los Angeles. USC is an equal-opportunity educator and employer, proudly pluralistic and firmly committed to providing equal opportunity for outstanding persons of every race, gender, creed and background. The University particularly encourages women, members of underrepresented groups, veterans and individuals with disabilities to apply. USC will make reasonable accommodations for qualified individuals with known disabilities unless doing so would result in an undue hardship. Further information is available by contacting uschr@usc.edu.

 

Program Classroom Frontiers: Business History Course Development Workshop

The Copenhagen Business School PDW Series

Classroom Frontiers: Business History Course Development Workshop

 

Time: Thursday, April 5, 2018, c.9am-1:30pm

Place: Baltimore Embassy Suites Inner Harbor, 222 St Paul Pl, Baltimore, MD 21202

To register for this workshop, use the BHC annual meeting registration form.

 

9:00am-9:30am                    Welcome – Christina Lubinski (CBS)

Classroom Frontiers: Introduction and Three Pilots: Entrepreneurial History, Public History, Financial History

9:30am-10:00am                 Entrepreneurial History – Dan Wadhwani (Univ. of the Pacific)

Dan Wadhwani (in collaboration with Noam Wasserman) is currently in the process of developing a course in “Entrepreneurial History.” The plan is to offer it as a general education course at the Greif Center of Entrepreneurship, University of Southern California. The course is structured in three modules: (i) Origins of entrepreneurial capitalism (examining the big macro entrepreneurial opportunities that have transformed capitalism); (ii) From Organization Man to Entrepreneurial History (focusing on changes in technology, policy, financing, careers, and corporate strategy, which have unleashed entrepreneurial endeavors; (iii) Making History (examining techniques by which entrepreneurs use the past to make and legitimize the future.)

10:00am-10:20am              Commentator: Bill Gartner (Babson College)

10:20am-10:30am             Coffee Break

10:30am-11:00am              Public History – Ken Lipartito (Florida International University)

Ken Lipartito teaches courses on public history, where he works with students in applying history skills to a variety of non-academic spaces—museums, historic sites, government agencies, public policy organizations.  Several of his graduates have found employment outside of academia—in the Library of Congress, for the military.  In 2016-17 he was the recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities Next Generation Ph.D Grant, to expand opportunities for history graduate students seeking employment beyond the academy.  He also runs a number of community based projects in Miami, working with institutions in creating digital archives and historical exhibits.  As a principal in the Business History Group, LLC (http://www.businesshistorygroup.com) he consults with business, government and non-profit entities to write organizational histories and provide historical expertise for legal, strategic and policy matters.

11:00am-11:20am              Commentator: Mads Mordhorst (Copenhagen Business School)

11:20am-11:30am              Coffee Break

11:30am-12:30pm           Financial History: The Great Depression in Real Time – Mary O’Sullivan (University of Geneva)

Mary O’Sullivan is teaching a course on international economic history, in which she includes a module titled “The Great Depression in Real Time” based on her latest research on economic history and economic policy. She uses a variety of different primary sources to discuss the way in which policymakers tried to understand and react to the crisis as it emerged. She is focusing in particular on policy makers at the Fed who were grappling with policy challenges related to the country’s domestic financial system.

12:30pm-12:50pm             Commentator: Per Hansen (Copenhagen Business School)

12:50pm-1:30pm               Concluding discussion

Classroom Frontiers: Business History Course Development Workshop

The Copenhagen Business School PDW Series at the Business History Conference (BHC) Annual Meeting 2018, Baltimore , MD21202, USA

Thursday, April 5, 2018, c.9am-1:30pm

Business historians excel in the classroom. They do so by applying history to a variety of different topics and using a set of different approaches. While in recent years, business historians have started sharing collections of course syllabi,[1] there are very few opportunities to engage in discussion about how and in which contexts business history is being taught.

The workshop provides a platform for business historians to learn and share the content and techniques of what they are teaching and to discuss ways to collaborate more effectively about pedagogy. This includes not only sharing content and methods but also discussing opportunities for joint case development and staff exchanges between schools.

To allow for a focused debate, we have invited presenters with three concrete examples of courses rooted in business history but pushing its frontiers in new directions and targeting new audiences. They will present innovative new course and teaching initiatives in (i) Public History, (ii) Financial History and (iii) Entrepreneurial History. We seek to sample their concrete examples of course design, module structure and session planning as well as discuss new experimental ideas in each of these areas. All three topics can be understood as pilots when it comes to successfully introducing business history to history departments and business schools as well as engaging a broader public.

Participants will come away with usable ideas about both content and pedagogical practice for introduction in their classroom and public outreach activities. Participants are explicitly encouraged to bring their own case ideas, session plans, or module concepts for common discussion.

The workshop will take place immediately before the BHC meeting and at the same location. Participation in BHC meeting and workshop is possible. If you have any questions, please contact Christina Lubinski (cl.mpp@cbs.dk) or Dan Wadhwani (dwadhwani@pacific.edu). We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the “Rethinking History in Business Schools” Initiative at Copenhagen Business School’s Centre for Business History.

[1] For example, the Business History Conference website on course syllabi: http://www.thebhc.org/syllabi or the Harvard Business School Guide to Business History Courses Worldwide: http://www.hbs.edu/businesshistory/courses/resources/Pages/default.aspx.

 

For workshop details see, http://thebhc.org/classroom-frontiers.To register for this workshop, use the BHC annual meeting registration form. For general information on the BHS annual meeting, see http://thebhc.org/2018-bhc-meeting.

BHC Doctoral Colloquium in Business History

The BHC Doctoral Colloquium in Business History will be held once again in conjunction with the 2018 BHC annual meeting. This prestigious workshop, funded by Cambridge University Press, will take place in Baltimore on Wednesday April 4th and Thursday April 5th. Typically limited to ten students, the colloquium is open to doctoral candidates who are pursuing dissertation research within the broad field of business history, from any relevant discipline (e.g., from economic sociology, political science, cultural anthropology, or management, as well as history). Most participants are in year 3 or 4 or their degree program, though in some instances applicants at a later stage make a compelling case that their thesis research has evolved in ways that have led them to see the value of an intensive engagement with business history.

Topics (see link for past examples) may range from the early modern era to the present, and explore societies across the globe. Participants work intensively with a distinguished group of BHC-affiliated scholars (including the incoming BHC president), discussing dissertation proposals, relevant literatures and research strategies, and career trajectories.

Applications are due by 15 November 2017 via email to BHC@Hagley.org and should include: a statement of interest; CV; preliminary or final dissertation prospectus (10-15 pages); and a letter of support from your dissertation supervisor (or prospective supervisor). All participants receive a stipend that partially defrays travel costs to the annual meeting. Applicants will receive notification of the selection committee’s decisions by 20 December 2017.

Questions about the colloquium should be sent to its director, Duke Professor of History Edward Balleisen, eballeis@duke.edu, and/or this year’s graduate student liaison, Alexi Garrett, asg4c@virginia.edu (who participated last year).

Between Past and Present: Sub-Plenary at EGOS 2017

Today’s sub-plenary “Between Past and Present – History in Organization and Organizing” at EGOS 2017 in Copenhagen brought together leading scholars in History and Organization Studies to discuss recent research on time and history.

The three keynote speakers Stephanie Decker, Roy Suddaby and Anders Ravn Sorensen illustrated the plurality in both the conceptualization of organizational time and in how history is researched. The talks triggered a lively debate on how history matters, to whom it matters, and which (often implicit) theories of history shape organizational research.

Chair: Mads Mordhorst

Stephanie Decker – Making sense of the Past: History vs. memory

Roy Suddaby – Institutional Memory as a Dynamic Capability

Anders Ravn Sorensen – Uses of history in action: CBS’ anniversary

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PhD Scholarships in “Time and Societal Challenges in a Changing Global Economy”

PhD Scholarships in “Time and Societal Challenges in a Changing Global Economy”

PhD Scholarships in “Time and Societal Challenges in a Changing Global Economy”

Copenhagen Business School invites applications for 6 vacant PhD scholarships within the field of “Time and Societal Challenges in a Changing Global Economy”. The successful applicants will be organized as a cross-departmental cohort with a number of common PhD courses and other activities such as workshops. The positions will be based in the four Departments associated with the OMS Doctoral School: Department of Business and Politics (DBP), Department of Organisation (IOA), Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy (MPP) and Department of Management, Society and Communication (MSC).

Theme of the Cohort

The notions of time and temporality have increasingly become the object of study across the social sciences. Temporality refers to the linear progression of time, historicity, the perception of time, processes of sequencing and order and rates of change as well as the social organization of time. In sociology, for instance, it is becoming increasingly recognized that existing theoretical frameworks, largely rooted in traditional approaches, do not adequately explain the active role of time in a globalizing economy. In the political sciences, the historicity of practices, norms and political ideas and the concept of “political time” have received increased attention particularly in association with questions about the character of continuity and change. Furthermore, analyses of the ways in which political, institutional and ideational processes unfold over time are central to the study of political economy and the shaping of policy processes. Also, in the area of Business Studies, there is an increasing turn of attention to the strategic use of historical narratives in corporate action.

The work of the cohort will challenge prevailing chronological, linear and sequential theories of time in politics and the study of organizations to embrace an active and dynamic view of time. Using innovative theories and methods, it will seek to explain how and why temporal dynamics shape and impact contemporary challenges. These challenges include, for example, globalizing and de-globalizing processes, state capacities in an era of limited economic growth, and the changing relationships between actors, organizations and the institutional frameworks. A particular focus will be put on how temporal structures and processes of sequencing constrain, but at times also empower individual and collective actors (e.g. business, workers, policy makers, civil society representatives), and the ways in which, within that context, those actors seek to reconfigure past, present and future. The work of the cohort will furthermore explore how processes of temporal construction affect the interactions between different actors and institutions in the context of these challenges.

The proposed PhD cohort will draw upon central ideas in philosophy, sociology, political science, history, cultural studies and organization theory. Although students may choose to write a PhD within a particular disciplinary perspective they will be encouraged to draw upon some of the other disciplines that will be utilized and explored within the cohort. We see this interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary cohort which is expected to use a range of innovative theoretical frameworks and sound research designs (including qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods alongside experimental approaches) as the only viable way forward in new research endeavors. There will be a shared understanding that differences in temporalities constituted by factors such as past and future time horizons, mechanisms of connecting past and future in the present, pace and acceleration of change, lead to increased temporal complexity.

Pool of possible topics within the overall theme

Department of Business and Politics (DBP)

• The politics and history of social challenges in a comparative perspective (such as sustainability, inequality, 4th industrial revolution)

• The political economy of European crises: politics, polity and policy
Department of Organization (IOA)

• The role of time in organizing for societal challenges

• Organizational time, learning and innovation

• Organizing time, routines and change
Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy (MPP)

• Time, history and entrepreneurship in a globalized world

• Time and transformations in private-public relations

• The philosophy of time and chronology
Department of Management, Society and Communication (MSC)

• Temporality and talk-action dynamics in CSR

• Varieties of time perceptions attached to multi-stakeholder initiatives

• Colliding temporal orders and new forms of organizing

 

The PhD programme

The PhD programme at CBS is highly international. It allows you to conduct research under the supervision of CBS professors, supported by research training courses (30 ECTS points). You are expected to participate in international research conferences and spend time abroad as a visiting PhD student. For further information on the CBS PhD programme please consult this page: http://www.cbs.dk/en/research/phd-programmes/phd-skoler
It is also required that the applicant shows an interest in joining the respective Department’s research environment. You find information on the departments here: http://www.cbs.dk/en/research/departments-and-centres
CBS PhD graduates are held in high esteem not only in academia and research institutions but also in government and business where their research qualifications are increasingly demanded. One third of CBS PhD graduates go on to employment outside universities and public research institutions.

Copenhagen Business School has a broad commitment to the excellence, distinctiveness and relevance of its teaching and research programmes. Candidates who wish to join us should demonstrate enthusiasm for working in organization of this type (highlighting, for example, relevant business, educational and dissemination activities).

For further information please contact the head of department of the respective department:

• DBP: Prof MSO Caroline de la Porte +4538153550

• IOA: Prof MSO Signe Vikkelsø +4538152827

• MPP: Prof Lotte Jensen +4538153637

• MSC: Associate Prof Dorte Salskov-Iversen +4538153181
For administrative information please contact Henrik Hermansen +45 3815 3656, heh.mpp@cbs.dk.
General information

A PhD scholarship runs for a period of 3 years, and includes teaching obligations equivalent of 1⁄2 year’s work (840 work hours). The scholarships are fully salaried positions, according to the national Danish collective agreement. The scholarship includes the tuition fees, office space, travel grants plus a salary, currently starting with per month app. DKK 23.770 (app. 3,160 euro) up to DKK 28.964 (app. 3,860 euro) depending on seniority, plus a pension contribution totaling 17,1 % of 85 per cent of the base salary.
The salary level and appointment is determined by the Ministry of Finance’s collective agreement with the Central Academic Organization.
The PhD student will be enrolled at the PhD School in Organization and Management Studies (OMS). To be considered, the candidate should have a degree at the Masters level (similar to the 3 + 2 Bologna process). An educational background in philosophy, sociology, political science, history, cultural studies and organization theory or related fields is necessary. The applicant must have successfully completed the Master’s degree before commencing a PhD at CBS. The applicants must be fluent in English.
The application must include a 5 page research proposal following the guidelines available here: http://www.cbs.dk/en/research/phd-programmes/admission
In addition to the research proposal, the application must include copies of a Master’s degree certificate or other certificates of a corresponding level, brief curriculum vitae (CV), a list of papers and publications, and one copy of a selected written work (e.g. Master’s thesis). Applicants must enclose documentation for English language skills if not mother tongue.
Recruitment procedure

The Recruitment Committee will shortlist applicants. The shortlisted applicants will be assessed by the Assessment Committee. All applicants will be notified of their status in the recruitment process shortly after the application deadline.

The applicants selected for assessment will be notified about the composition of the Assessment Committee and later in the process about the result of the assessment.

Once the recruitment process is completed each applicant will be notified of the outcome of their application.

The successful applicants are expected to start their position on September 1 2017.

 

Closing date: June 1, 2017

Copenhagen Business School must receive all application material, including all appendices (see items above), by the application deadline.

Details about Copenhagen Business School and the departments are available at www.cbs.dk.

 

Application Deadline
June 1, 2017
Apply online

History and Intellectual Property

The recent Management and Organization Review (MOR) Volume 13, Issue 1, includes a vigorous exchange on the history and debate over intellectual property discussed in the paper by Mike W. Peng, David Ahlstrom, Shawn M. Carraher, and Weilei (Stone) Shi, followed by two commentaries by Can Huang and Martin Kenney. The issue is available for free download through April 30, 2017.

History and the Debate Over Intellectual Property

Abstract: This article responds to recent calls for organizational research to address larger, more globally relevant questions and to pay attention to history, by analyzing the crucial debate over intellectual property rights (IPR) between the United States and China. Despite the recent US position, the United States has not always been a leading IPR advocate. Rather, it was a leading IPR violator during the nineteenth century. An institution-based view of IPR history suggests that both the US refusal to protect foreign IPR in the nineteenth century and the current Chinese lack of enthusiasm to meet US IPR demands represent rational choices. However, as cost-benefit considerations change institutional transitions are possible. We predict that to the same extent the United States voluntarily agreed to strengthen IPR protection when its economy became sufficiently innovation-driven, China will similarly improve its IPR protection.

PhD Course Historical Approaches

PhD Course “Historical Approaches in Management and Organizational Research”

31 October – 2 November 2016 at Copenhagen Business School

Deadline for registration: 19 Sept. 2016

Aim

In recent years, management and organizations researchers have begun to use historical sources and approaches in their study of organizations and organizing. Building on earlier pleas for an engagement with historical reasoning about organizations (Zald, 1993; Kieser, 1994; Clark and Rowlinson, 2004), these more recent developments have included efforts to develop historical approaches to studying organizational and institutional theory (Suddaby and Greenwood, 2009), strategy (Kahl et al, 2012; Ingram et al, 2012), innovation and entrepreneurship (Forbes and Kirsch, 2010; Popp and Holt, 2013; Wadhwani and Jones, 2014), international business (Jones and Khanna, 2006) and critical management studies (Rowlinson and Proctor, 1999), among other subfields. The turn towards history, however, has also raised a number of complex questions for researchers about the nature of historical knowledge, how it might be employed to address organizational research questions, and how to analyze historical sources and data (Bucheli and Wadhwani, 2014; Rowlinson, Hassard, and Decker, 2014; Kipping and Usdiken, 2014). This seminar will introduce participants to the core theoretical and methodological issues involved in using historical approaches in organizational and management research, and discuss the variety of ways in which history is being used in organization and management studies today.  The seminar will provide participants with both a broad orientation to the theoretical and practical issues involved in the use of historical approaches, and an opportunity to apply these approaches to their own research using smaller breakout groups and discussions.

Course Content

This PhD seminar will provide an introduction to historical approaches to management and organizational research. Day 1 will be devoted to Historical Theorizing, Day 2 to Historical Methods, and Day 3 to Historical Practice.

Day 1, Historical Theorizing, will examine the advantages and limits of using historical perspective to develop theoretical concepts in management and organizational research. Students will be introduced to the unique perspective that history provides and how it can be used by management and organizational scholars. Specifically, we will examine how history provides unique perspectives for developing conceptualizations of: (a) cause and effect, (b) cognition and power, (c) alternatives and counterfactuals.

Day 2, Historical Methods, will examine the nature of historical sources and methods. We will explore basic methods, such as source criticism, triangulation, and hermeneutics, but also advanced methods, including microhistory, conceptual history, and postcolonial history. Participants will also engage in a methods workshop, designed to provide a hands-on experience with source analysis and interpretation.

Day 3, Historical Practice, will be devoted to discussion and feedback on student research. The day will be organized as a series of workshops.

Learning Objectives

The PhD seminar will be designed to allow participants to:

1. Understand the nature of historical approaches and how they compare to other types of ways of studying management and organizations

2. Understand the range of ways in which historical sources, methods, and perspectives can be engaged, including the epistemological assumptions involved in these choices and their implications for the types of research questions that can be addressed

3. Apply these methodological issues and choices to their own research interests through focused breakout groups.

ECTS and Fees

3 ECTS for participation, 4 ECTS for participation and submission of working paper

Fees: DKK 3,900 (participation) or DKK 5,200 (participation with working paper)

Course Schedule and Registration

http://www.cbs.dk/en/research/phd-programmes/phd-courses-0 and http://phdcourses.dk/Course/48516#.VzLiH7df0Ss

AoM Elections Open

2016 Division and Interest Group elections are open now!

For the AoM Members among you,

the 2016 Division and Interest Group elections are open and ready for your participation. Don’t forget to cast your vote to select the future leaders of your Division or Interest Group, such as Management History.

You should have received a link to the election website via email. If you are not a member of Management History yet, please consider joining and casting your vote. Elections close by May 15, 2016.