Conf: Transmission of Financial Knowledge in Historical Perspective

The Transmission of Financial Knowledge in Historical Perspective, 1840-1940

March 8-9, 2019

German Historical Institute, Washington, DC

Conveners: Nicholas Osborne (Ohio University) and Atiba Pertilla (GHI Washington)

Submission Deadline: August 1, 2018

(Call for Papers Stable URL: https://www.ghi-dc.org/events-conferences/event-history/2019/conferences/financial-knowledge.html?L=0)

Nicholas Osborne, PhD

Lecturer, Honors Tutorial College

Ohio University

Columbia University, GSAS ’14

Department of History

Financial History Review New Scholars workshop

New Scholars Fast-Track Workshop 

13 June 2018

Torino, Italy

Financial History Review invites submissions of research papers from advanced PhD students and recent postdoctoral researchers (with less than five years from completing their PhD) in banking, financial and monetary history for a

eabh in cooperation with Fondazione 1563 per l’Arte e la Cultura della Compagnia di San Paolo and Compagnia di San Paolo

Papers on any topic and period are welcome. Please find the Call for Papers and additional information at http://bankinghistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2018_Torino_FHR_NSW_Final.pdf

Deadline is 30 April 2018

 

Program Classroom Frontiers: Business History Course Development Workshop

The Copenhagen Business School PDW Series

Classroom Frontiers: Business History Course Development Workshop

 

Time: Thursday, April 5, 2018, c.9am-1:30pm

Place: Baltimore Embassy Suites Inner Harbor, 222 St Paul Pl, Baltimore, MD 21202

To register for this workshop, use the BHC annual meeting registration form.

 

9:00am-9:30am                    Welcome – Christina Lubinski (CBS)

Classroom Frontiers: Introduction and Three Pilots: Entrepreneurial History, Public History, Financial History

9:30am-10:00am                 Entrepreneurial History – Dan Wadhwani (Univ. of the Pacific)

Dan Wadhwani (in collaboration with Noam Wasserman) is currently in the process of developing a course in “Entrepreneurial History.” The plan is to offer it as a general education course at the Greif Center of Entrepreneurship, University of Southern California. The course is structured in three modules: (i) Origins of entrepreneurial capitalism (examining the big macro entrepreneurial opportunities that have transformed capitalism); (ii) From Organization Man to Entrepreneurial History (focusing on changes in technology, policy, financing, careers, and corporate strategy, which have unleashed entrepreneurial endeavors; (iii) Making History (examining techniques by which entrepreneurs use the past to make and legitimize the future.)

10:00am-10:20am              Commentator: Bill Gartner (Babson College)

10:20am-10:30am             Coffee Break

10:30am-11:00am              Public History – Ken Lipartito (Florida International University)

Ken Lipartito teaches courses on public history, where he works with students in applying history skills to a variety of non-academic spaces—museums, historic sites, government agencies, public policy organizations.  Several of his graduates have found employment outside of academia—in the Library of Congress, for the military.  In 2016-17 he was the recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities Next Generation Ph.D Grant, to expand opportunities for history graduate students seeking employment beyond the academy.  He also runs a number of community based projects in Miami, working with institutions in creating digital archives and historical exhibits.  As a principal in the Business History Group, LLC (http://www.businesshistorygroup.com) he consults with business, government and non-profit entities to write organizational histories and provide historical expertise for legal, strategic and policy matters.

11:00am-11:20am              Commentator: Mads Mordhorst (Copenhagen Business School)

11:20am-11:30am              Coffee Break

11:30am-12:30pm           Financial History: The Great Depression in Real Time – Mary O’Sullivan (University of Geneva)

Mary O’Sullivan is teaching a course on international economic history, in which she includes a module titled “The Great Depression in Real Time” based on her latest research on economic history and economic policy. She uses a variety of different primary sources to discuss the way in which policymakers tried to understand and react to the crisis as it emerged. She is focusing in particular on policy makers at the Fed who were grappling with policy challenges related to the country’s domestic financial system.

12:30pm-12:50pm             Commentator: Per Hansen (Copenhagen Business School)

12:50pm-1:30pm               Concluding discussion

Classroom Frontiers: Business History Course Development Workshop

The Copenhagen Business School PDW Series at the Business History Conference (BHC) Annual Meeting 2018, Baltimore , MD21202, USA

Thursday, April 5, 2018, c.9am-1:30pm

Business historians excel in the classroom. They do so by applying history to a variety of different topics and using a set of different approaches. While in recent years, business historians have started sharing collections of course syllabi,[1] there are very few opportunities to engage in discussion about how and in which contexts business history is being taught.

The workshop provides a platform for business historians to learn and share the content and techniques of what they are teaching and to discuss ways to collaborate more effectively about pedagogy. This includes not only sharing content and methods but also discussing opportunities for joint case development and staff exchanges between schools.

To allow for a focused debate, we have invited presenters with three concrete examples of courses rooted in business history but pushing its frontiers in new directions and targeting new audiences. They will present innovative new course and teaching initiatives in (i) Public History, (ii) Financial History and (iii) Entrepreneurial History. We seek to sample their concrete examples of course design, module structure and session planning as well as discuss new experimental ideas in each of these areas. All three topics can be understood as pilots when it comes to successfully introducing business history to history departments and business schools as well as engaging a broader public.

Participants will come away with usable ideas about both content and pedagogical practice for introduction in their classroom and public outreach activities. Participants are explicitly encouraged to bring their own case ideas, session plans, or module concepts for common discussion.

The workshop will take place immediately before the BHC meeting and at the same location. Participation in BHC meeting and workshop is possible. If you have any questions, please contact Christina Lubinski (cl.mpp@cbs.dk) or Dan Wadhwani (dwadhwani@pacific.edu). We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the “Rethinking History in Business Schools” Initiative at Copenhagen Business School’s Centre for Business History.

[1] For example, the Business History Conference website on course syllabi: http://www.thebhc.org/syllabi or the Harvard Business School Guide to Business History Courses Worldwide: http://www.hbs.edu/businesshistory/courses/resources/Pages/default.aspx.

 

For workshop details see, http://thebhc.org/classroom-frontiers.To register for this workshop, use the BHC annual meeting registration form. For general information on the BHS annual meeting, see http://thebhc.org/2018-bhc-meeting.

CfP: Social Aims of Finance

Social aims of finance
eabh conference

eabh in cooperation with Fondazione 1563 per l’Arte e la Cultura della Compagnia di San Paolo
15 June 2018, Torino, Italy

‘The City is too big and socially useless’ said Lord Adair Turner, former chairman of the UK Financial Services Authority in 2009. That legitimacy question has not gone away since, indeed, if anything it appears to grow stronger.  This conference explores how financial institutions have tackled it by developing alternative goals
and business forms for durable financial services. Joint-stock banks are traditionally seen as the hallmarks of capitalism, relentlessly pursuing profits. There is an alternative story, however. Some banks have a long history of devoting themselves to wider social goals rather than profit, others chose business forms which freed them from that relentless pursuit. The growing importance of durability raises the need for financial services to think beyond the bottom line, yet that raises new issues: how much profit does a business need to sustain both continuity and alternative goals, and how can alternative business forms compete in a capitalist world without losing their unique identity?

Many banks in Italy, the Netherlands, Germany and assumedly other countries had social business models in the 19th century which they gave up in the 20th century and now they seem to make a reappearance. Why is that? Can it be connected to the Great Financial Crisis and its aftermath? Businesswise there is two ways for banks setting up or acting in a social context: either as foundations with charitable aims; or otherwise, create institutions with specific organisation forms (coops, for instance) or business goas going beyond just making profits for shareholders. In Europe, several institutions were created with specific organisation forms (coops, for instance) or business goals going beyond just making profits for shareholders. In Italy for example, several contemporary banks were initiated as secular or religious institutions characterized by charitable purposes, some of them of medieval origins, others born in the 16th century to help the poor and sick, to provide fair money lending or to protect or to educate girls and women; in many cases those charities, as shareholders, contributed to maintain the social orientation of the banking activity over time. Even until today these credit institutions maintain a non-profit role through their corporate foundations (Compagnia di San Paolo, Banco di Napoli, etc.) or local mutual banks. In the NL they have, apart from the coop Rabo, two such, Triodos and ASN, which both devote their business to pursuing wider, durable social aims beyond profits; so, do some German cooperative and savings banks or at least did in the past when they were an essential contributor to small communities’ life and business. Furthermore, the microfinance movement is worth mentioning under this heading and so are the mutual insurance companies whose history deserves a closer investigation for long. Last but not least there is very recent movement of social currencies that aim at strengthening local communities within the context of globalisation, like for instance the Brixton Pound that was created when gentrification started to hit South-London communities.

In short, we look for submissions of genuine research about the history dimension of:

• non-profit banking and finance models with social or environmental goals in their statutes
• non-profit and (financial) crises
• banking foundations
• microfinance, Grameen bank
• mutual insurance
• cooperative finance, Raiffeisen banks (rural credit banks)
• saving banks
• building societies
• local currencies
• institutional investors as social financiers

The committee responsible for this content is formed by: Anna Cantaluppi (Fondazione 1563), Lilia Costabile (Naples University), Carmen Hofmann (eabh) and Joost Jonker (Amsterdam/ Utrecht University).

Selected participants will be asked to:
• submit an abstract and a short linear CV no later than 31 January 2018
• deliver a full paper 1 month prior to the conference
• give a 10 – 15 Minutes presentation in Torino in June 2018
• for submissions and questions please mailto:c.hofmann@bankinghistory.org

Academic paper givers will have the opportunity for their papers to be considered for peer reviewed publication in the Financial History Review.