BizHisCol Webinar – Advertising, business, and neoliberalism under Pinochet in Chile

Presenters: Pablo Pryluka (Princeton University)
Chair: Ashton Merck (Duke University)

02/03/2021 16.00 UK

Register here

In July of 1974, the J. Walter Thompson advertising company signed a contract with the Chilean Junta in order to organize a global campaign to improve the international image of the dictatorship. Around two months later the agreement was made public, first in the United States and then around the world. The reaction was immediate—over the next few days, European and American JWT managers began to complain about the agreement. By the end of September, 1974, it was clear that the collaboration would have to be severed, which finally happened in October. The existence of such an agreement had some impact at the time, but afterwards remained almost unnoticed. So far, two approaches have hegemonized the history of the so-called neoliberal turn of the 1970s and 1980s. On the one hand, approaches coming from political economy and other social sciences underlined the impact of structural reforms on economic growth and inequality. On the other hand, the new histories of neoliberalism delved into the intellectual debates that preceded and supported the new economic policies, interested in tracing how these ideas traveled from the pen of Friedrich Hayek to global institutions and policymakers. This paper takes a different approach by returning a forgotten actor to the story: private companies. As the case of the J. Walter Thompson and its connection with the Chilean Military Junta illustrates, this methodological shift challenges the current narratives about the transformations of the 1970s and 1980s.

Business History Collective Spring Webinar series

We at the Business History Collective (Global) are pleased to announce our program for the spring webinar series, which will take place between March and June.These events are intended primarily as a platform to share and discuss ongoing research, including working papers, dissertation chapters, and manuscripts under review. As such, the series does not follow a particular theme or set of topics; however, we have tried to prioritize proposals of particular novelty, use of qualitative approaches, and historical periods preceding 1800 or subsequent to 1950.For this series, we have decided to include some ‘double features’ in the program. These longer sessions will host presentations from two speakers, allowing us to include as many papers as possible, while maintaining a manageable schedule.All events will be hosted on Zoom and bookable via Eventbrite. Sign-up links will be published on our various social media profiles and sent directly to our mailing list (sign-up here).We look forward to seeing you at our events.Program: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1RTSNN8qtUyDWSHDMAZ31BlJjyXOfLnH9/view?usp=sharing

Ashton Merck (Duke University) and Adam Nix (De Montfort University)
Conveners Spring 2021
Business History Collective | Colectivo de Historia Empresarial

Follow us | Siguenos @bizhiscol

Reminder! BizHisCol Webinar – Manuel Bautista with Boatloads of Mexican Silver

Boatloads of Mexican Silver. The Political Economy of Specie Imports in New Orleans, 1839-1861

Date/Time: 16/02/2021 @ 16.00hrs UK
Presenter: Manuel Bautista (Columbia University)
Register here.

This paper reconstructs the monetary geography of antebellum New Orleans from the economic crisis of 1839 to the US. Navy’s blockade of the port in 1861 through a quantitative and geographic examination of specie imports (gold and silver coins) flowing into the port. It also sheds light into the commercial and financial actors, networks, and circuits involved in the intermediation of specie in New Orleans before the U.S. Civil War. Drawing on a novel dataset assembled from the semi-weekly economic newspaper New Orleans Price-Current (the first of its kind in the scholarly literature on specie in the early U.S. economy), the paper explores the amounts, the provenance, the types of vessels for maritime transportation, and the top-tier consignees of specie imports flowing into antebellum New Orleans. Specie (primarily Mexican silver dollars) helped accommodate the Crescent City’s cross-border flows of goods and capital, mirroring its commercial and financial ties with the rest of the world. New Orleans was central for the antebellum U.S. specie market and money supply, as it imported vast specie flows (primarily Mexican silver dollars) from ports such as Brazos Santiago (Texas), Veracruz, Tampico (both in Mexico), and Havana (Cuba). Specie consignees relied on high-powered money flows to fund their business ventures as commission merchants, commodity factors, real estate investors, and agents of European and U.S. Northern merchant banking houses.

This is a webinar is jointly hosted by the Business History Collective Global and Iberoamérica.

BHC Mentoring for Emerging Scholars

This year, the Business History Conference will be held virtually for the first time.  

This new format presents us with both challenges and opportunities.  The Emerging Scholars Committee usually runs networking events, such as a drinks reception and a breakfast.  While we will miss seeing all of you in person this year, we hope to maintain some of these traditions in the new virtual format and to continue to provide a supportive space to network and meet other scholars.

We are launching a new mentoring scheme, which will provide participants at the virtual BHC with a valuable opportunity to gain advice and insight from more advanced scholars in the field on everything from completing a dissertation to finding research funding, navigating the academic job market to exploring possibilities for business historians beyond the academy. 

If you would like to participate, please contact Victoria Barnes <barnes@rg.mpg.de>

We aim to begin the process of introducing mentors with mentees on the 17th February.

With best wishes,

Grace Ballor, Victoria Barnes, Jessica Burch, Valeria Giacomin, Sven Kube and Andrew McGee

The Emerging Scholar Committee

AOM SIM event on “RACIAL JUSTICE AT THE INTERSECTION OF BUSINESS AND SOCIETY”

The Social Issues in Management Division at the Academy of Management are running an online event this week, which is part of a series. In one of the next events (26 March) they are specifically considering “Racial Justice, History, and Business Ethics“. Details for these can be found under the Eventbrite booking page.

RACIAL JUSTICE AT THE INTERSECTION OF BUSINESS AND SOCIETY

February 12, 2021, 11:00am-12:30pm EST – Racial Justice and Social Theory

Hosts: Paul T. Harper (Pittsburgh) & Cristina Neesham (Newcastle)

REGISTRATION: www.eventbrite.com/e/…

Rabbi Gideon Pogrund (Univ. of Pretoria)

Smriti Sharma (Newcastle)

Paul T. Harper (Pittsburgh)

Panel will challenge and extend dominant social and political theories operating within business scholarship through a critical engagement with Black studies, post-colonial studies, and global feminism. Diversity professionals will articulate strategies for building communities of trust across identity boundaries.

Event Sponsor: Viragh Institute for Ethics in Business

Upcoming series events:

March 5, 2021, 11:00am-12:30 EST – Racial Justice and Business Technologies

Hosts: Paul T. Harper (Pittsburgh) & Kirsten Martin (Notre Dame)

REGISTRATION: www.eventbrite.com/e/…

March 26, 2021, 11:00am-12:30pm EST – Racial Justice, History, and Business Ethics

Hosts: Paul T. Harper (Pittsburgh) & David Wasieleski (Duquesne)

REGISTRATION: www.eventbrite.com/e/…

May 7, 2021, 11:00am-12:30 EST – Racial Justice and Sustainability

Hosts: Robbin Derry (Lethbridge) & Jeffrey York (Colorado)

REGISTRATION: www.eventbrite.com/e/…

Visit SIM Website for full series details: sim.aom.org/new-item7

JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS – Special Issue on “Racial Justice and Business Ethics”

Guest Editors: Paul T. Harper (Pittsburgh), Robbin Derry (Lethbridge), and Gregory Fairchild (Virginia)

Submission Deadline: October 1, 2021

Visit JBE website for full details: www.springer.com/journal/10551/updates/18290364

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Vincenzo Vastola
SIM AOM Connect Manager
Montpellier Business School
Montpellier, France
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Biz Hist Coll: “Boatloads of Mexican Silver” – presentation by Manuel Bautista

Boatloads of Mexican Silver. The Political Economy of Specie Imports in New Orleans, 1839-1861

Date: 16/02/2021 @11.00hrs Colombia, 16.00hrs UK
Presenter: Manuel Bautista (Columbia University)
Chair: TBC

Register here.

This paper reconstructs the monetary geography of antebellum New Orleans from the economic crisis of 1839 to the US. Navy’s blockade of the port in 1861 through a quantitative and geographic examination of specie imports (gold and silver coins) flowing into the port. It also sheds light into the commercial and financial actors, networks, and circuits involved in the intermediation of specie in New Orleans before the U.S. Civil War. Drawing on a novel dataset assembled from the semi-weekly economic newspaper New Orleans Price-Current (the first of its kind in the scholarly literature on specie in the early U.S. economy), the paper explores the amounts, the provenance, the types of vessels for maritime transportation, and the top-tier consignees of specie imports flowing into antebellum New Orleans. Specie (primarily Mexican silver dollars) helped accommodate the Crescent City’s cross-border flows of goods and capital, mirroring its commercial and financial ties with the rest of the world. New Orleans was central for the antebellum U.S. specie market and money supply, as it imported vast specie flows (primarily Mexican silver dollars) from ports such as Brazos Santiago (Texas), Veracruz, Tampico (both in Mexico), and Havana (Cuba). Specie consignees relied on high-powered money flows to fund their business ventures as commission merchants, commodity factors, real estate investors, and agents of European and U.S. Northern merchant banking houses.