Call for Applications – Beaming the British Empire: the Imperial Wireless Chain, c. 1900-1940: AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Award

Reblogged from the Imperial and Global Forum:

Imperial & Global Forum

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AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Award with the University of Exeter and BT Archives

Beaming the British empire: the Imperial Wireless Chain, circa 1900-1940

Ref: 2583

About the award

Applications are invited for an AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Award with the University of Exeter and BT Archives to research and study the origins, development and impact of the Imperial Wireless Chain, the global network of shortwave radio stations that reputedly played a critical role in British colonial integrity from the 1920s to the 1940s.

This project focuses on one of the most extraordinary milestones in the history of global telecommunications and represents an exciting opportunity for students with backgrounds in the history of science, technology, and modern British and imperial history.  First conceived by Guglielmo Marconi in 1906 to use long-wave transmitters, the Imperial Wireless Chain (IWC) was postponed following a political scandal and the outbreak of the First World War.    In the…

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Reminder! Deadline for Summer School approaching

Summer School
Responsible Capitalism:
Micro and Macroinstitutional Conditions of Transformation

May 29 – June 1, 2017

Deadline to apply:
February 28, 2017

In its second edition, the Summer School on Responsible Capitalism is an initiative of VIU in cooperation with the two member universities Ca’ Foscari University of Venice and University of Lausanne.

It aims at the development of ideas that promote a more sustainable future by bringing together young scholars from all over the world to discuss their ideas on the future of Capitalism from the microlevel of individual decision-making to the organizational and the societal level. It gives participants the opportunity to discuss with eminent scholars in management theory and to test their ideas and present their work. Participants will be made familiar with recent research from a broad set of disciplines. They will work on their ability to engage in the transdisciplinary discourse which is required for the development of innovative answers to grand sustainability challenges.

Who is it for?
Applications are welcome from current PhD students, post-doc researchers in Management, Strategy, Organization Theory, Finance, Economic Sociology, and related disciplines from universities worldwide.

Faculty
Guido Palazzo – University of Lausanne (Coordinator)
Francesco Zirpoli – Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia
Giovanni Favero – Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia
Marie-Laure Djelic – Sciences Po
Juliane Reinecke – University of Warwick
Fabrizio Ferraro – IESE Business School

Application procedure and costs
The Program will admit 15 student participants.
Fees: € 180 incl. VAT
The fees will cover tuition, course materials, accommodation in multiple rooms at the VIU campus, meals in the VIU cafeteria and Social events.

Deadlines
Application via the VIU website: January 16 – February 28, 2017
Admitted candidates will be notified by March 7.

Venue
Venice International University
Island of San Servolo, Venice

For further information visit the Summer School website
Contacts and info: summerschools@univiu.org

Brochure
Application form

Venice International University
Isola di San Servolo
30133 Venice, Italy
T. +39 041 2719511
F. +39 041 2719510
www.univiu.org

ESRC final seminar: Organizations as heritage and history as a useful resource

Final event in the ESRC research seminar series “Historicising the theory and practice of organization analysis”

Seminar 6

Organizations as heritage and history as a useful resource

Wednesday 5th April 2017
University of Exeter Business School
Building One: Constantine Leventis Teaching Room
Reception: Xfi Building
Programme:

10:15-10.30 Refreshments and welcome by seminar series organizers Michael Rowlinson, Stephanie Decker and John Hassard

10.30-11.30 Albert J. Mills (Saint Mary University and University of Eastern Finland), “Insights and Research on the study of Gender and Intersectionality in International Airline Cultures Over Time.”

11:30-11:45 Coffee and biscuits 11:45-12:30 Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University) “Mobilizing Critical Management History: the example of ANTi-History”

12:30-13:15 Michael Rowlinson & David Boughey (University of Exeter) “Suncor’s Corporate History: Strategic Rhetoric or Cultural Imperative?”

13.15-14:00 Buffet lunch

14:00-14.45 Sara Kinsey (Head of Historical Archives, Nationwide Building Society) “Lights, camera, action: reflections on organizational remembering in practice.”

14:45-15.30 Michael Weatherburn (Imperial College London) “The emerging corporate knowledge gap: why we need our dark archives and ghost data more than we realize.”

15:30-15:45 Tea and biscuits 

15:45-16:30 Alan Booth and Morgen Witzel (University of Exeter) “The Rowntree business ‘archives’: uncovering British management in the inter -war period”

16:30-17:15 RoundtableSpeakers: Charles Booth (University of the West of England) Peter Miskell (University of Reading) Anna Soulsby (University of Nottingham)

17:15-19:00 Reception

Please contact Kate Henderson (r.henderson2@exeter.ac.uk) if you plan on attending. 

Registration: A limited number of ESRC sponsored free places (including refreshments, buffet lunch and evening reception) will be allocated on a “first come first served” basis to those who contact Kate Henderson asking to attend. A fee of £35.00 will be charged on additional places. 

Travel & accommodation: Exeter St. Davids is the nearest train station and is a 5min drive from the university. If needed, Kate Henderson can help with your travel and accommodation arrangements, but cost will need to be covered by participants.   

For further enquiries please contact: Professor Mick Rowlinson (University of Exeter Business School) or Kate Henderson.  

Extended deadline: ESRC PhD opportunity

Female entrepreneurship in West Africa

ESRC DTP Joint Studentship in the Midlands Graduate School

 Aston University and University of Birmingham

The Midlands Graduate School is an accredited Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP), with the first intake of students to begin in October 2017.

One of 14 such partnerships in the UK, the Midlands Graduate School is a collaboration between the University of Warwick, Aston University, University of Birmingham, University of Leicester, Loughborough University and the University of Nottingham.

Midlands Graduate School is now inviting applications for an ESRC Doctoral Joint Studentship between Aston University (where the student will be registered) and theUniversity of Birmingham to commence in October 2017.

Contemporary research such as the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM)[1]shows that female entrepreneurship is more common in Africa than in the rest of the world. This is particularly true of West Africa, which has higher rates of female entrepreneurship than the rest of Africa. Historical research shows that this has a long tradition, with women having been perhaps even more dominant as entrepreneurs before colonialism.

This doctoral research project aims to establish both historical and contemporary reasons for the greater prevalence of female entrepreneurship in West Africa. It is important to understand this because a) entrepreneurship is an important driver of economic growth and job creation, and b) gender has been recognized as an important factor in driving social development, inclusive growth and intergenerational progress. However, high levels of entrepreneurial activity can also be an indicator of poverty and inequality. This doctoral research project should identify the complex reasons behind the predominance of women in West African entrepreneurship.

Research questions:

– Why do women in West Africa chose to become entrepreneurs more commonly than in other areas of the world?

– What drives these choices: necessity, cultural attitudes, lack of alternative opportunities, historical tradition, gender stereotypes?

The student to be recruited to this project would develop these research questions further in line with her/his expertise and interest. The exact choice of case context (country / region) would be a matter of negotiation with the student researcher. Applicants who are invited for interview will be ask to indicate the direction in which they would like to take this project, and how they would develop the topic.

Application Process

 To be considered for this PhD, please complete the Joint Studentship application form available online here, together with a cover letter and a CV (form available here) and along with two references email this to e.bridges@aston.ac.uk.

 Extended Application deadline: Monday 27 February 2017

Interviews will be held Tuesday 7 March 2017 at Aston Business School

 

Midlands Graduate School ESRC DTP

 Our ESRC studentships cover fees and maintenance stipend and extensive support for research training, as well as research activity support grants. Support is available only to successful applicants who fulfil eligibility criteria. To check your eligibility, visit:http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/cross_fac/mgsdtp/studentships/eligibilty/

Informal enquiries about the research or Aston Business School prior to application can be directed to Professor Stephanie Decker.

 For more information on how to apply, please go to the Midlands Graduate School:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/cross_fac/mgsdtp/collaborativeandjoint/#joint

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/cross_fac/mgsdtp/collaborativeandjoint/au_joint_advert_s_decker_-_female_entreperneurship.pdf

[1] E.g., Global Entrepreneurship 2014 Women’s Report (2015).http://gemconsortium.org/report/49281 GEM Subsaharan Africa Report (2015)http://www.gemconsortium.org/report/48601

Final ESRC seminar in Organization History

The final ESRC seminar will take place at Exeter University, Wednesday 5 April 2017.

Speakers will include Albert Mills (Saint Mary’s University, Canada), Gabie Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University, Canada), and Sarah Kinsey (Corporate Archivist, Nationwide Building Society), among others.

The programme and joining instructions will follow shortly. Any inquiries should go to Mick Rowlinson (m.c.rowlinson@exeter.ac.uk).

ERC project “History of EU” (PhDs)

Two 3-year fully funded PhD Scholarships to be held at the University of Glasgow from September 2017

Applications are invited for two 3-year PhD scholarships (with a possibility of a one-year extension) in Economic and Social History at the University of Glasgow.

The successful candidates will be part of the ERC-funded project The Making of a Lopsided Union: Economic Integration in the European Economic Community, 1957-1992 (EURECON) led by Dr Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol. They are expected to begin on 1 September 2017, or as soon as possible thereafter.

Description of the EURECON project

The goal of EURECON is to explore European policymakers’ views about how to make the organisation of the European Economic Community (EEC) fit for the creation of a single currency, from 1957 to 1992. It is often said that the euro has faults of conception. But how did this happen? How was the euro made in such a way that it nearly completely overlooked some critical aspects of monetary unions? The assumption is that in the run-up to the 1992 Maastricht Treaty, European policymakers just did not think properly about how to make the Euro work. Was this really the case? Did European policymakers really overlook the economic foundations of European monetary union?

The project aims to examine European policymakers’ debates and proposals, understand the reasons for their success or failure, identify the dynamics of political and economic trade-offs and compromises, shifting priorities, and alternative approaches that were abandoned at the time but recycled later. The project focuses on five work packages: macroeconomic policy coordination, fiscal transfers, capital market integration, banking harmonisation/supervision and the deepening of the common/single market. The project will examine the origins of the issues that are currently bedevilling the European Union (EU) by investigating the period between the creation of the EEC in 1957 and the decision to create a European single currency in 1992.

PhD positions

The PhD projects will focus on the role and influence of non-state, non-EEC actors and factors in the above discussions. Interested applicants should focus specifically on the role of one of the following actors/factor:

  • Commercial banks: Commercial banks were central actors in the development of European economic integration, in particular with regard to capital market integration, regulation/supervision, and the development of the common/single market. Did they support the creation of a common market in banking? Did they adopt specific lobbying strategies within their respective member states and in Brussels? How did they view the possible future creation of a monetary union in Europe?
  • Big business (other than banks): The implementation of the common/single market, the issue of EEC fiscal transfers, and macroeconomic policy coordination had an impact on the conduct of business in Europe. Did big business consider that these developments would improve their environment, in creating more business opportunities, easier financing and trade? The Roundtable of Industrialists famously lobbied for the Single Market Project; did big business aim to actively support or oppose other developments at different time periods?
  • Trade unions: Macroeconomic policy coordination, EEC fiscal transfers, and the development of the common/single market had an important impact upon labour relations. How did trade unions try to influence European economic policymaking? In particular, how did they promote European social policies and how did they cope with the challenges induced by European economic integration in a globalising world? The rise of unemployment in Europe from the 1970s as well as the reflections mentioned above about the introduction of an EEC-wide unemployment benefit provided an important points of interest for trade unions.
  • The spread and influence of economic ideas on the evolution of European economic cooperation and integration: Many economic ideas have influenced and competed over the development of European economic integration, including German ordo-liberalism, French planning, and neo-liberalism. Recent studies have shed light on the rise of neo-liberal politics in the evolution of thinking about deregulation and the free movement of capital. How did economic thinking evolve in the EEC and how did these influences permeate policymaking at the European level? This topic would more specifically focus on the intellectual history dimension of the economic integration of Europe by looking at one of these schools of thought. How did these ideas spread among European policymakers? How did these ideas change over time? What was their actual influence?

The successful candidate is expected to:

  • Write a PhD thesis under the supervision of Dr Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol
  • Be an active part of the EURECON project and work in close cooperation with other team members
  • Present papers at conferences
  • Publish in international peer-reviewed journals (individual and co-authored)
  • Participate in yearly workshops organised within the scope of EURECON.

The successful candidate will register for a PhD in Economic and Social History, School of Social and Political Sciences, College of Social Sciences, University of Glasgow.

The scholarship covers the successful student’s full-time home/EU tuition fees (£4,121 p.a. for 2016/17), pays a stipend (£14,296 p.a. for 2016/17), and includes a research budget allowance to cover expenses related to archival research and conference attendance (at least £1500 p.a.). There is a possibility for an extension to a fourth year, under the same financial conditions.

PhD students at the University of Glasgow benefit from the College of Social Sciences’ Graduate School Research Training Programme, as well as an annual Thesis Review Committee and an annual Doctoral Retreat. PhD students may also have the opportunity to become Graduate Teaching Assistants and gain teaching experience.

Candidates must be fluent in English. A good command of another European language would be an advantage.

How to apply

Please include the following supporting documentation with your application:

  • Your CV
  • Your research proposal focusing on one of the actors/factors outlined above (max. 2500 words, including footnotes, references and bibliography)
  • Your degree transcripts
  • Your English language certificate
  • Two letters of reference

Interested candidates should apply on the University of Glasgow’s Online Application System http://www.gla.ac.uk/research/opportunities/howtoapplyforaresearchdegree/#/. Applicants should put ‘EURECON’ in the ‘Research Title’ field in ‘Step 6 – Course Details’ of the application form, and select ‘PhD in Economic and Social History (Research)’.

Interested applicants are strongly advised to discuss their research proposal with Dr Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol (emmanuel.mourlon-druol@glasgow.ac.uk) before they apply.

Short-listed candidates may be invited for an interview in Glasgow.

Application deadline is 7 May 2017.

ERC project History of EU (postdocs)

Postdoctoral Research Associate in International Economic History at the University of Glasgow (2 posts)

 Project description

The successful candidates will be part of the ERC-funded project The Making of a Lopsided Union: Economic Integration in the European Economic Community, 1957-1992 (EURECON) led by Dr Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol (See http://e-mourlon-druol.com/eurecon/ for more details). They are expected to begin on 1 September 2017, or as soon as possible thereafter (a few months’ delay is negotiable if need be).

The positions will be for 2 years, starting from September 2017 (or later if so negotiated). In addition to their salary, Post-Doctoral Researchers will receive an allowance for research missions and participation to international conferences of at least £2,500 per year.

 Description of the EURECON project

The goal of EURECON is to explore European policymakers’ views about how to make the organisation of the European Economic Community (EEC) fit for the creation of a single currency, from 1957 to 1992. It is often said that the euro has faults of conception. But how did this happen? How was the euro made in such a way that it nearly completely overlooked some critical aspects of monetary unions? The assumption is that in the run-up to the 1992 Maastricht Treaty, European policymakers just did not think properly about how to make the Euro work. Was this really the case? Did European policymakers really overlook the economic foundations of European monetary union?

The project aims to examine European policymakers’ debates and proposals, understand the reasons for their success or failure, identify the dynamics of political and economic trade-offs and compromises, shifting priorities, and alternative approaches that were abandoned at the time but recycled later. The project focuses on five work packages: macroeconomic policy coordination, fiscal transfers, capital market integration, banking harmonisation/supervision and the deepening of the common/single market. The project will examine the origins of the issues that are currently bedevilling the European Union (EU) by investigating the period between the creation of the EEC in 1957 and the decision to create a European single currency in 1992.

 The Postdoctoral Research Projects will focus on the role and influence of non-state, non-EEC actors and factors in the above discussions.

Postdoctoral Research Projects

Interested applicants should focus specifically on the role of one of the following actors/factor:

  • Commercial banks: Commercial banks were central actors in the development of European economic integration, in particular with regard to capital market integration, regulation/supervision, and the development of the common/single market. Did they support the creation of a common market in banking? Did they adopt specific lobbying strategies within their respective member states and in Brussels? How did they view the possible future creation of a monetary union in Europe?
  • Big business (other than banks): The implementation of the common/single market, the issue of EEC fiscal transfers, and macroeconomic policy coordination had an impact on the conduct of business in Europe. Did big business consider that these developments would improve their environment, in creating more business opportunities, easier financing and trade? The Roundtable of Industrialists famously lobbied for the Single Market Project; did big business aim to actively support or oppose other developments at different time periods?
  • Trade unions: Macroeconomic policy coordination, EEC fiscal transfers, and the development of the common/single market had an important impact upon labour relations. How did trade unions try to influence European economic policymaking? In particular, how did they promote European social policies and how did they cope with the challenges induced by European economic integration in a globalising world? The rise of unemployment in Europe from the 1970s as well as the reflections mentioned above about the introduction of an EEC-wide unemployment benefit provided an important points of interest for trade unions.
  • The spread and influence of economic ideas on the evolution of European economic cooperation and integration: Many economic ideas have influenced and competed over the development of European economic integration, including German ordo-liberalism, French planning, and neo-liberalism. Recent studies have shed light on the rise of neo-liberal politics in the evolution of thinking about deregulation and the free movement of capital. How did economic thinking evolve in the EEC and how did these influences permeate policymaking at the European level? This topic would more specifically focus on the intellectual history dimension of the economic integration of Europe by looking at one of these schools of thought. How did these ideas spread among European policymakers? How did these ideas change over time? What was their actual influence?

 The successful candidate is expected to:

  • Engage in independent scientific research that will result in high-quality publications in international peer-reviewed journals (individual and co-authored)
  • Be an active part of the EURECON project and work in close cooperation with other team members
  • Provide some organisational and administrative support, in collaboration with other team members, to the research activities of the EURECON project
  • Present papers at conferences
  • Participate in yearly workshops organised within the scope of EURECON.

 To apply for the position, applicants are required to submit (www.glasgow.ac.uk/jobs, Job Ref 016726):

  • Their CV,
  • The details of three referees
  • A cover letter explaining how their research experience fits the EURECON project,
  • A one to two-page description of the research they would like to undertake during their tenure, clearly mentioning: the scope of their project, the state of the literature, and the archival sources they would like to use.

 

Please upload your cover letter and one to two-page research document as ONE document.

Candidates must be fluent in English. A good command of another European language would be an advantage.

Candidates should have a PhD in History (or related discipline), or be close to completion.

Short-listed candidates will be invited for an interview to present their research proposal. It is anticipated that the interviews for these positions will take place in May/June 2017.

Interest applicants may contact Dr Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol (Emmanuel.Mourlon-Druol@glasgow.ac.uk) for informal enquiries.

Reception: Woolworths Archive, Reading

A reception to celebrate the launch of the:

Woolworths archive at the University of Reading

Friday 10th March 2017, 18.00-19.30,
Henley Business School,
University of Reading,
Whiteknights,
Reading, RG6 6UD

The Centre of International Business History (CIBH), at the University of Reading’s Henley Business School, is delighted to announce that the corporate archive of Woolworths UK has been donated to the University of Reading Archives at the University’s Museum of English Rural Life (MERL). Woolworths was one of most iconic retail brands on the British high street and, from the 1930s until 1968, Britain’s largest retailer. Following preservation work and cataloguing, this collection will soon be accessible to researchers and others with an interest in this much-loved retail institution.
To celebrate the launch of this archive, CIBH is holding a reception on Friday 10th March, from 18.00-19.30, at the Henley Business School (main Reading University campus). This will also include an exhibition of materials from the Woolworths archive collection. Those interested in attending should register beforehand via the following web-link https://www.henley.ac.uk/events/a-reception-to-celebrate-the-launch-of-the-woolworths-archive-at-the-university-of-reading. This also provides a map of the campus and travel information.
We thank Shop Direct for their help and generosity in securing the preservation of this archive.
For further information contact Professor Peter Scott, Professor of International Business History, p.m.scott@henley.ac.uk 0118 378 5435 or for questions regarding booking, Valerie Woodley, Department Administrator, v.woodley@henley.ac.uk, 0118 378 7667.

History & Ethnography conference

12th Annual International Ethnography Symposium

“Politics and Ethnography in an Age of Uncertainty”

29 August – 1 September 2017 
Alliance Manchester Business School

Stream 3: History and Ethnography

Stephanie Decker and John Hassard

History and ethnography have largely evolved in parallel, despite some significant research contributions from historical ethnography and ethnographic history (Rowlinson, Hassard, & Decker, 2014). To a large extent, organizational ethnographers research ‘literate’ settings in which social actors essentially self-document their experience through a variety of genres of anthropological and sociological writing. However, as Paul Atkinson and Amanda Coffey have pointed out, “many qualitative researchers continue to produce ethnographic accounts of complex, literate social worlds as if they were entirely without documents or text” (Atkinson & Coffey, 2011, p. 78). In this stream, we aim to bring the practices of historical research (largely but not exclusively text-based) closer to the practices of organizational ethnographers (largely focused on direct observation).

History and ethnography appear to overlap in many ways: First, there is the history of organizational ethnography that has not seen extensive exploration. Attempts to understand the disciplinary, intellectual and organizational origins of a field are made as research areas mature and become more established (Hassard, 2012; O’Connor, 1999). Such an approach to history helps to challenge present-day understanding and open up new areas for research.

Second, as indicated in the quotation above, ethnographers encounter history during their fieldwork in a variety of ways. Ethnographies of museums or symbolic sites are obvious examples, but equally important are the oral histories elicited through interviewing, the public histories that organizations or its members produce, and in some cases the academic business histories about organizations that become reference points for action and identities (Yanow, 1998). History and memory overlap closely here, but nevertheless remain conceptually distinct. Histories are mobilized for particular organizational purposes in the present (Ybema, 2014) and form part of a wider organizational rhetoric (Suddaby, Foster, & Quinn Trank, 2010).

Third, historians have frequently taken an ethnographic sensibility to their research. Italian microhistory in the 1980s was an obvious case (Ginzburg, 2012; Levi, 1991), and cultural history has focused on research questions and methodological approaches that are closely related to ethnographic debates. Archival research can be approached just as entering a research site, and historians often serendipitously encounter the everyday among more standardized organizational documentation (Decker, 2013; McKinlay, 2002).

We welcome submissions dealing with the intersection between history and ethnography. Please submit a 500 word abstract or proposal by Tuesday 28th February 2017 to s.decker@aston.ac.uk.