CfP in JHRM: Past Practices as Prologema

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing

Call for Papers

Special Issue on ‘Past Practices as Prologema: Marketing Before, During and After COVID-19’

The Journal of Historical Research in Marketing invites submissions for a special issue focused on ‘Past Practices as Prologema: Marketing Before, During and After COVID-19.’  The global reaction to mitigate the COVID-19 pandemic is having a significant impact on people and organizations around the globe.  Whether it is loss of revenue due to closures of retail and service workplaces as mandated by public health organizations; disruptions to manufacturing of goods and product distribution due to the interruption of previously synchronized cross-border flows in supply chains; the almost complete cessation of demand for international travel, tourism and hospitality; or the uncertainties reverberating through commodity and futures markets; few, if any, sectors remain untouched.  Despite a long history of pandemics, COVID-19 is the first in modern times that has both been global in nature – and has been seen to be global in nature.  Pandemics are treated as unusual events because of the gaps in time between them; or as disasters/crises that overwhelm our ability to respond.  Consequently, their apparent rarity has meant little engagement with pandemics from a marketing perspective.  What little research there is, focuses on the AIDS pandemic or can be found in the tourism and destination marketing literatures.  Paradoxically, while marketing academics have paid little if any attention to past pandemics and their effects on the practices of marketing, the current COVID-19 crisis has spurred the American Marketing Association to provide education and issue guidance to its membership – a sign of the looming importance of understanding the relationship between pandemics, their effects and impacts, and the general practice of marketing.  The intent of the special issue is to seek ‘lessons’ from the past that will help inform practitioners and researchers in the present/future.  We are soliciting submissions that explore the general themes of marketing activities during pandemics and of marketing’s contribution to the creation of post-pandemic ‘normalities.’  Papers may investigate these from either positive (e.g., retooling on a voluntary basis to produce needed medical protective equipment) or negative perspectives (e.g., the sale of ‘miracle’ cures). 

For this special issue of JHRM, specific themes and topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Advertising and Communications
    • Social Marketing/Public Relations (in)effective enterprise or organizational response to stakeholder communications during a pandemic
    • How do organizations orient themselves as actors in relation to their stakeholders (with regard to pricing, public relations, etc.)
  • Products
    • Repositioning/rebranding of products/services to meet pandemic needs
    • New product/service development
    • Repurposing or alternative uses of existing product offerings
  • Marketing Ethics in a Pandemic
    • Anti-Marketing or Propaganda
    • Marketing/Selling of miracle cures
    • Price gouging
  • Changes in Marketing Practices
    • Changes to distribution/value proposition
    • Marketing changes introduced during crisis that have persisted
    • Demarketing
  • Tourism and Event Marketing
    • Destination Marketing in Pandemics
    • Sports and Event Marketing in Pandemics
  • Pandemic Marketing in Other Organizations
    • Higher Education Marketing
    • Public Health Marketing


The submission window for this special issue is May 1, 2021 to June 30, 2021
with an expected publication date in Volume 14, 2022.  If you are unsure of the suitability of your topic, or have questions regarding a submission, please contact the special issue guest editors Donna Sears, Associate Professor of Marketing, F.C. Manning School of Business, Acadia University, at donna.sears@acadiau.ca or Terrance Weatherbee, Professor of Management, F.C. Manning School of Business, Acadia University, at terrance.weatherbee@acadiau.ca.  

How to submit to the Journal of Historical Research in Marketing

Submissions for this special issue of JHRM should be made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system. Registration and access is available on the journal’s ScholarOne site: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jhrm. Full information and guidance on using ScholarOne Manuscripts is available at the Emerald ScholarOne Manuscripts Support Centre: http://msc.emeraldinsight.com/.

CfP Imagining new markets

CFP: Imagining New Markets

by Erika Vause

CALL FOR PAPERS

Risk, Honor & Innovation: Imagining New Markets

3rd Biennial Richard Robinson Workshop on Business History

Portland State University

May 24-26, 2018 Portland OR

How did “innovation” become something to strive for, an end in itself? And how did “the market” come to be thought of as the space of innovation? The modern economy, according to Joseph Schumpeter, is based on “creative destruction”: the expectation of acceleration, expansion, and growth. As evoked by this term, novelty and dynamism are not only viewed as inevitable, but also generally beneficial. The market, market-relations, and the marketplace, have become key markers of what is forward-looking and progress-oriented in modern societies. These markers delineated an impersonal sphere of scientific, technical and agentless activities whose workings seemingly lay outside the realm of desires and emotions. Our workshop seeks to break down the divide between the impersonal (effects of technical limits and aggregations of large numbers) and the subjective (articulations of perceptions, fears, and self-regard) in the ways “the market” and “the economy” are conceived. We aim to reconsider market and business activities in light of both the techniques and the emotional vectors that infuse them.

This conference brings together scholars interested in querying this view of innovation and in exploring the emotional life of this phenomenon—scholars who seek to understand how markets have been created and expanded, as well as what was destroyed in the process. How did the introduction and promotion of new commodities and desires—as well as the lifestyles with which they were associated—affect the norms of acceptable market practices? While “supply” and “demand” are often presumed to be fixed categories, this interrogates how demands are created and sources of supply substituted (as in import substitution). What makes people want or even need something, particularly something they have never possessed before? How did expanded supplies of new commodities change prevailing views of what constituted personhood—how did soap, for example, become a requisite of civilization, curtains of domesticity, leisure of civility, and stock shares of sociality? Our workshop is in particular interested in the interplay of risk and honor in shaping new markets. Risk, refracted as perceptions of danger or opportunity, frequently worked to push the boundaries of acceptable market/business behavior. Honor, by contrast, could function to proscribe risk-taking to maintain a society’s status quo. But honor, as indicator of social standing and model for emulation, could also encourage entrepreneurship and expand the marketization of consumption. How did new markets emerge and old marketplaces become transformed amid these multivalent pulls?

We are looking for business histories (broadly construed) that tackle this intersection of desire, norms and markets in a variety of ways from all time periods and places, and we particularly encourage proposals on global, transnational, and non-Western topics and on developments before the twentieth century. Possible themes include, but are not limited to:

  • Advertising, marketing, branding, and promotion of new products
  • Counterfeiting, generic goods, and knock-offs
  • Hucksterism, frauds, forgeries and deceit
  • Honor and dishonor
  • New forms of consumption/distribution and new lifestyles
  • Fashion and fads
  • Black markets and gray economies
  • Changing ethics of markets and changing boundaries of marketplace
  • Hedging, insurance, gambling, and speculation
  • Public debts and private assets
  • Banking, usury, and money supply
  • Exoticism, empire/emporium, and trade routes
  • The introduction and international migration of new products, services, sales techniques, and business models
  • Entrepreneurs, individual agency, and the invisible hand

The keynote address of the third biennial Richard Robinson Workshop will be given by Professor François R. Velde, Senior Economist and Research Advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, on the evening of Thursday, May 24. Papers selected for the workshop will be pre-circulated and discussed in plenary sessions on Friday, May 25, and Saturday, May 26.

Paper proposals, consisting of a one-page CV and a 500-word abstract, should be sent to the workshop organizers, Thomas Luckett (Portland State University), Chia Yin Hsu (Portland State University), and Erika Vause (Florida Southern College), at psu.business.history.workshop@gmail.com by November 15, 2017. Accepted proposals will be notified by January 5, 2018.

Presenters will receive lodging for three nights and meals. There will be no charge for conference registration. We are likely to provide some reimbursement of travel expenses depending on the availability of funds.

New Editor for Journal of Historical Research in Marketing

Emerald is seeking a new Editor for Journal of Historical Research in Marketing to take over from the outgoing Editor, Professor Brian Jones, in January 2017.

JHRM publishes 4 issues per year and features many world class authors such as Shelby Hunt, Russell Belk, William Wilkie, Mark Tadajewski, Nick Alexander, and Jon Stobart. Full details of the journal are provided on the home page at www.emeraldinsight.com/jhrm.htm The journal was launched in 2009, is included in Scopus and registers over 25,000 article downloads per year.

Please send expressions of interest in this role to the Publisher, Richard Whitfield, rwhitfield@emeraldinsight.com including a brief outline of your vision for development of the journal, your suitability for the role including any experience in Editing/Guest Editing. Please also include a copy of your CV. Don’t hesitate to ask any questions you may have and do forward this to anyone who you feel may be particularly interested in this opportunity.

The journal uses the ScholarOne submission system for which full training would be provided.

The closing date for expressions of interest is 22 August 2016.

New Editor for Journal of Historical Research in Marketing

With apologies for cross-posting:

Emerald is seeking a new Editor for Journal of Historical Research in Marketing to take over from the outgoing Editor, Professor Brian Jones, in January 2017.

JHRM publishes 4 issues per year and features many world class authors such as Shelby Hunt, Russell Belk, William Wilkie, Mark Tadajewski, Nick Alexander, and Jon Stobart. Full details of the journal are provided on the home page at www.emeraldinsight.com/jhrm.htm The journal was launched in 2009, is included in Scopus and registers over 25,000 article downloads per year.

Please send expressions of interest in this role to the Publisher, Richard Whitfield, rwhitfield@emeraldinsight.com including a brief outline of your vision for development of the journal, your suitability for the role including any experience in Editing/Guest Editing. Please also include a copy of your CV. Don’t hesitate to ask any questions you may have and do forward this to anyone who you feel may be particularly interested in this opportunity.

The journal uses the ScholarOne submission system for which full training would be provided.

The closing date for expressions of interest in this role is 2nd May 2016.