Postdoc Position: Entrepreneurial Studies

The University of Southern California’s Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies seeks applicants for a one-year post-doctoral fellowship with the possibility of renewal for a second year. Scholars with interests in founder perspectives and decision-making encouraged to apply, as are those with more specialized interests in the ethics, sociology, or history of entrepreneurship. Successful candidates will be expected to be in residence during the fellowship and to participate actively in the Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies. During their term, fellows will actively collaborate with Greif Center faculty and contribute to the Center’s fellowship program in addition to conducting and publishing their own research. The postdoctoral researcher will work under the supervision of Professor Dan Wadhwani. Interested candidates are welcome to contact Professor Wadhwani at dwadhwani@marshall.usc.edu with questions.

For more information and to apply please click here.

History of the WWW and the ‘digital tsunami’

If you are interested in how our research practices are likely to shift as a result of the ‘digital tsunami’ that is facing archives, digital history is the place to go. But business and organizational historians have not really been part of these debates so far. We are starting a series of occasional posts about some of the resources that are out there on digital tools and debates.

For a bit of reading, a good place to start is Ian Milligan’s History in the age of abundance? How the web is transforming historical research (2019). We have a review in Business History by Adam Nix, and he has kindly agreed to make the code for 50 free offprints available – just click here. (FYI – when they are gone, they are gone.)

Here’s the opening to get you started:

“The late twentieth century and early millennium are fast becoming focal periods for historians; as Milligan notes, we are now further from the 1990s than we were from the 1960s when substantive historical work began on that pivotal decade. Given the tendency towards comparatively recent historical contexts, business historians are likely to be among the first to start exploring these periods. However, to do so, they will need to engage with a new and challenging set of sources: sources that were created digitally; sources like those deriving from the World Wide Web. Ultimately, it is this engagement that Milligan’s latest book seeks to encourage and enable, and in doing so, he provides readers with a comprehensive and well-articulated view into the web as a focus for historical research. …”

Ian Milligan has posted about the review here in case you are interested.

CfP Emotions and History of Business

Emotions and the History of Business

Mandy Cooper (UNC-Greensboro) and Andrew Popp (Copenhagen Business School)

We are developing a proposal for an edited volume on emotions and the history of business and seek further contributions. In the first instance, the proposal will be submitted to a series on the history of emotions edited by Peter Stearns and Susan Matt and published Bloomsbury.

Why emotions and the history of business?
A small but growing body of work has already begun to demonstrate the potential in bringing the histories of emotions and of business into greater dialogue.[1] We aim to more fully and systematically explore that potential through this proposed volume. What does bringing emotions in add to the history of business? Does business not inhabit a world of rationality? We firmly believe that from individual entrepreneurs to family firms to massive corporations, businesses have in many ways relied on, leveraged, generated, and been shaped by emotions for centuries. Examining business in all its facets through the lens of the history of emotion allows us to recognize the emotional structures behind business decisions and relationships and to question them. The very presence—or absence—of emotions and emotional language have the power to alter the structure and content of relationships between individuals and between businesses and communities. This collection asks what happens when emotions and emotional situations, whether fear/anxiety, nostalgia, love, or the longing of distance and separation, affect businesses and, in turn, how businesses affect the emotional lives of individuals and communities. In terms of framing, therefore, we emphasize the work that emotions do and recognize the performative nature of emotions.

Scope:
We do not wish to impose any restrictions in terms of geographic or temporal scope and would strongly welcome proposals from or on the Global South. Existing work in this area has often focused on emotions in family firms, but we welcome proposals across the full range of potential business settings and contexts. Likewise, much work in the history of emotions has adopted micro-historical perspectives and methodologies; we would particularly welcome work exploring emotions in large or macro-scale business contexts or phenomena, market crashes (or booms) being only the most obvious possibility. Similarly, we are open to studies utilizing the full range of historical sources and methodologies. Studies exploring change in the relationships between emotions and business over time will be warmly welcomed, as will studies exploring the relationship between race, gender, and business. Proposals may well be themed around a specific emotion, but that is not the only approach imaginable. Naturally, proposals from across a wide range of cognate disciplines – economic history, the history of capitalism, cultural and social history, material history and more – are most welcome.

A far from exhaustive list of possible themes might include:

  • Gendered and/or racialized emotion and business
  • Boredom/ennui
  • Love
  • Fear and anxiety
  • Rationality as an emotion
  • Subjugation
  • Satisfaction/fulfilment
  • Disappointment
  • Identity formation/the self/authenticity
  • Contagion, risk, and panic
  • Solidarity
  • Business as drama
  • The forms of expression of business emotions: language, sites, rites, rituals, symbols
  • Cultural representations of business emotions
  • Commemoration and history as emotions
  • Emotions as commodities
  • Alienation and estrangement

Logistics:

Please send proposals of no more than 500 words to emotionsandbusiness@gmail.com by July 31st 2020. Please include a brief biography of all authors, as well as contact details. Proposals should seek to present setting, theme, perspective or framing, and sources and methods. Please use the same email address to approach us with any questions or queries.

Mandy Cooper
Lecturer, Department of History UNC-Greensboro

Andrew Popp
Professor of history, Department of Management, Politics, and Philosophy Copenhagen Business School

[1] See, for example, the special issue on “Emotions et Enterprises Familiales,” Enterprises et Histoire, No. 91 (2018)

BH ToC 62,2

I have gotten a little behind as I said before, so here are some updates on recent issues in Business History. Enjoy your Bank Holiday if you are in the UK, otherwise TGIF!

Original Articles

Multinational mining companies, employment and knowledge transfer: Chile and Norway from ca. 1870 to 1940
Kristin Ranestad
Pages: 197-221 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1407313

Managing policy lapse risk in Sweden’s life insurance market between 1915 and 1947
Mike Adams, Lars-Fredrik Andersson, Magnus Lindmark, Liselotte Eriksson & Elena Veprauskaite
Pages: 222-239 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1418331

Business failure in an age of globalisation: Interpreting the rise and fall of the LG project in Wales, 1995–2006
Leon Gooberman
Pages: 240-260 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1426748

The professionalisation of selling and the transformation of a family business: Kenrick & Jefferson, 1878–1940
David Paulson
Pages: 261-291 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1426749

Corporate social responsibility before CSR: Practices at Aluminium du Cameroun (Alucam) from the 1950s to the 1980s
Marie-Claire Loison, Celine Berrier-Lucas & Anne Pezet
Pages: 292-342 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1427070

Extending William Baumol’s theory on entrepreneurship and institutions: lessons from post-Second World War Greece
Zoi Pittaki
Pages: 343-363 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1451515

Book Review

Indochine années vingt. L’âge d’or de l’affairisme colonial (1918–1928). Banquiers, hommes d’affaires et patrons en réseaux
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 364-366 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1269524

Equity capital. From ancient partnerships to modern exchange traded funds
Tim Kooijmans
Pages: 367-368 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1480132

Baking powder wars: the cutthroat food fight that revolutionized cooking
Marco Marigliano
Pages: 369-370 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1480575

The rise of the global company: multinationals and the making of the modern world
Julian Faust
Pages: 371-372 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1482822

Green capitalism? Business and the environment in the twentieth century
Mattias Näsman
Pages: 373-374 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1483301

OHN returns & CfP “Entrepreneurship and Transformations”

Hello everyone and apologies for the long pause between posts, which was partly due to illness, but also, as you can imagine, due to the extraordinary times we find ourselves in. Many of us had to prepare online teaching at short notice, and many of the events we blog about have been cancelled due to the ongoing pandemic. Going forward, we will only run one blog per week on Fridays, as there simply not as many events and updates as there would usually be.

But today we have some good news, as one of our great editors, Christina Lubinski, is looking for submissions for an exciting new special issue in Business History on historical entrepreneurship.

Stay safe & healthy

Stephanie

Business History Special Issue

Entrepreneurship and Transformations

Special Issue Editor(s)

Deadline: 30 September 2020

Entrepreneurship and Transformations

Research on entrepreneurship has flourished in recent years, and the public interest in it has arguably never been greater. Few would disagree that entrepreneurship is one of the primary drivers of industry dynamics, economic and societal change, and innovation. However, the rapidly growing field of entrepreneurship studies has not displayed great strength in capturing dynamics and evolutions over time, partly due to a lack of historical empirical work of the sort that Schumpeter (1939) has already called for several decades ago. This special issue sets out to bring together an interdisciplinary group of scholars analyzing the links between entrepreneurship and (societal and market) transformations.

The Special Issue “Entrepreneurship and Transformations” takes its starting point in the critique that the field of entrepreneurship studies suffers from a fixation on the micro-processes governing the interaction of individuals and opportunities (Shane 2003), while largely ignoring the macro-dynamics of which entrepreneurship is part. It builds on the growing interdisciplinary dialogue between history and entrepreneurship studies (Wadhwani and Jones 2014, Perchard, MacKenzie et al. 2017, Wadhwani, Kirsch et al. 2020 pre-published online) that has triggered much needed methodological and theoretical reflections on historical entrepreneurship research.

The editors of this SI give an overview of this field of study in their annotated bibliography and encourage authors to engage with (a sub-set of) this literature. In particular, they welcome contributions that build on these insights to empirically explore the links between entrepreneurship and (societal and market) transformations over time. We see a research opportunity for scholars who use historical methods and sources to explore

  1. opportunity recognition and opportunity exploitation as a long-term process. Artur Cole (1959), for example, introduced the idea of an “entrepreneurial stream”—a metaphor highlighting that entrepreneurial opportunities often unfold over long period of time, with one opportunity building on previous ones. These long-term developments easily become hidden if we focus too closely on one individual or one company; however, the question how new opportunities emerge from existing ones, and how (experiential and codified) knowledge travels between individuals and institutions is of great importance for understanding the entrepreneurial process in and between companies (Galambos and Amatori 2016).
  2. the interactions between entrepreneurship and the cultural and socioeconomic environment they are embedded in (Welter and Gartner 2016, Baker and Welter 2018). So far, scholarly approaches to contextualizing entrepreneurship have varied widely. One set of work, drawing on institutional theory and following Baumol (1990), have interpreted contexts as a source of constraints and incentives on entrepreneurial behavior. A second approach, drawing on social movement and social group research, have approached contextualization as a matter of “embedding” entrepreneurial processes within social groups, movements, and networks (Hiatt, Sine et al. 2009). A third approach, drawing on a social constructivist view of contexts, examines how entrepreneurial actors shape and even create the contexts for their actions (Jones and Pitelis 2015). Historical research, particularly work that takes a comparative or international perspective, has long emphasized the role of context in shaping the very definition of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial processes. But how exactly does historical work lead us to reconsider and rethink the conceptualization of context? How can context be operationalized and studied using a historical lens? We believe that non-Western contexts and “deep histories”, in particular, can help us question and revise some of the taken-for-granted assumptions around entrepreneurship and context.
  3. Finally, we specifically encourage interdisciplinary collaborations between historians and scholars from other disciplines that significantly advance our understanding of entrepreneurship and market transformations and develop approaches that are useful to scholars exploring entrepreneurship historically. 

References

  • Baker, T. and F. Welter (2018). “Contextual Entrepreneurship: An Interdisciplinary Perspective.” Foundations and Trends®in Entrepreneurship 14(4): 357-426.
  • Baumol, W. J. (1990). “Entrepreneurship: Productive, Unproductive, and Destructive.” Journal of Political Economy 98(5): 893-921.
  • Cole, A. (1959). Business Enterprise in its Social Setting. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.
  • Galambos, L. and F. Amatori (2016). “The Entrepreneurial Multiplier.” Enterprise & Society 17(4): 763-808.
  • Hiatt, S. R., W. D. Sine and P. S. Tolbert (2009). “From Pabst to Pepsi: The Deinstitutionalization of Social Practices and the Creation of Entrepreneurial Opportunities.” Administrative Science Quarterly 54(4): 635-667.
  • Jones, G. and C. Pitelis (2015). “Entrepreneurial Imagination and a Demand and Supply-Side Perspective on MNE and Cross-Border Organisation.” Journal of International Management 21(4): 309-321.
  • Perchard, A., N. G. MacKenzie, S. Decker and G. Favero (2017). “Clio in the Business School: Historical Approaches in Strategy, International Business and Entrepreneurship.” Business History: 1-24.
  • Schumpeter, J. A. (1939). Business Cycles: A Theoretical, Historical and Statistical Analysis of the Capitalist Process, Vol. I. New York and London, McGraw-Hill.
  • Shane, S. (2003). A General Theory of Entrepreneurship:The Individual–Opportunity Nexus. Cheltenham, Edward Elgar.
  • Wadhwani, D. R., D. Kirsch, F. Welter, W. B. Gartner and G. Jones (2020 pre-published online). “Context, Time, and Change: Historical Approaches to Entrepreneurship Research.” Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal.
  • Wadhwani, R. D. and G. Jones (2014). Schumpeter’s Plea: Historical Reasoning in Entrepreneurship Theory and Research. Organizations in Time: History, Theory and Methods. M. Bucheli and R. D. Wadhwani. Oxford, Oxford University Press: 192-216.
  • Welter, F. and W. B. Gartner, Eds. (2016). A Research Agenda for Entrepreneurship and Context. Cheltenham, UK, Edward Elgar Publishing.

 

Submission instructions

We welcome contributions to the outlined research agenda that are based on original research and innovative analysis. We particularly encourage contributions by interdisciplinary teams of authors and those that combine source-based historical analysis with insights, concepts or data from other disciplines.

Papers should not exceed 8,000 words, inclusive of tables and footnotes, and use US spelling. By submitting to the SI, authors confirm that their contributions are not under consideration elsewhere. All proposals should be submitted via ScholarOne, indicating that they are contributions to this Special Issue “Entrepreneurship and Transformations”. All articles will go through a peer-review process. It is the responsibility of the author(s) to ensure that the manuscript fully complies with the publishing guidelines of Business History.

Instructions for authors

Submit an article

For questions about this Special Issue, please contact Christina Lubinski, cl.mpp@cbs.dk