BH SI CfP: Gender, Feminism, and Business History

Business History Special Issue Call for Papers

Gender, Feminism, and Business History: From periphery to centre

 

Guest editors:

Hannah Dean, University of St Andrews, UK

Linda Perriton, University of Stirling, UK

Scott Taylor, University of Birmingham, UK

Mary Yeager, University of California Los Angeles, USA

 

Submission deadline: 15 January 2020.

 

Gender relations represent one of the most significant social issues of modernity, profoundly affecting both women and men’s educational, economic, and political lives. Feminist theory and activism during the last two centuries is the highest profile marker of this, shaping our understanding of gender relations by focusing on equality, social justice, discrmination, inclusion/exclusion, and latterly the intersection of gender with race and ethnicity. The established territory of business history is the global north, after the mid-19th century, focusing on industrial production companies. Despite the changes provoked by feminism and greater recognition of the material and symbolic importance of gender relations, business history as a field maintains a largely gender-free and feminism-free centre. This special issue is designed to change that, by bringing both gender and feminism from the periphery of business history to its centre.

 

Gendered analysis of business history is a considerable field, but perhaps the most prominent challenge it has mounted to date is to the straightforward narratives of great men founding and building large organizations. The simple ‘great man’ narrative may still be a significant staple of the research undertaken in the field, but it is only one possible approach among many. There is empirical and conceptual space for other, very different, narratives of business history and the history of business.

 

This special issue is the first in this field for almost a decade to be dedicated to gender and business and/or organizational history. With it, we want to create a space for research that brings gender and feminism to business history’s centre, to provoke further dialogue and debate about alternative frameworks for research within and beyond the issue itself. We expect contributions to accomplish either or both of the following  aims:

 

  1. To explore the significance of feminist theories and gender in advancing the analysis and understanding of women in particular as business owners, entrepreneurs, or as funders, silent partners, and designers supporting more visible business activity by men;
  2. To advance understanding of women and men working or living on the margins of the established territory of business history – i.e. outside of the global north, before the mid-19th century, outside of established industries, and as critics of masculinised ways of doing business.

 

In order to develop these broad aims, and in keeping with the aims of Business History, contributions to the Special Issue might explore (but is not limited to) the following topics:

 

  • What source materials and archives might offer a more complete understanding of women and feminism in business history?
  • What are the implications of changes occuring in the archive profession, and other developments such as the increase in feminist archiving?
  • How can gender and feminist perspecitves shed new light on the historical analysis of social strucutures inlcuding social, economic and politics systems as well as power?
  • How can gender and feminist perspectives inform business history not only from a Western perspectives but also from other perspectives inlcuding outside of the Anglo-American bubble i,e, Latin America, Africa and Asia?
  • How can gender and feminist perspectives inform business history before the 19th century?
  • How should the corporate archive and the firm in particular be interpreted when thinking about gender, feminism, and business history?
  • What changes to research questions, methods, or narratives, are necessary to enable women and feminism to be more effectively written into business histories as full participants?
  • How can we account for the role that women played in creating the opportunities e.g. as funders, silent partners, or as designers for ‘great men’ to dominate business histories?
  • How can business history contribute to the conceptual development of key feminist analytics such as sexism, patriarchy, or misogyny?
  • How would a gendered analysis of business history classics contribute to our understanding of them? For example, what would a feminist re-reading of Alfred Chandler’s work tell us?

 

Contributions are expected to build on the rich empirical, analytical, and methodological traditions in this journal and in the field more generally. We would very much welcome contributions from scholars located beyond business and management Schools, interdisciplinary work, and from scholars geographically located outside the global north.

 

Submission Instructions

  • This call is open and competitive. All submissions will be peer reviewed following the standard practice of the journal.
  • To be considered for this special issue, submissions must fit with the Aims and Scope of Business History, as well as this call for papers.
  • The guest editors will select a limited number of papers to be included in the special issue. Other papers submitted to the special issue may be considered for publication in other issues of the journal at the discretion of the Editor-in-Chief.
  • This special issue welcomes all contributions that address the broad themes described above. All submissions should be based on original research and innovative analysis.
  • For empirical papers based on sources or data sets from which multiple papers have been generated, authors must provide the Guest Editors with copies of all other papers based on the same data or sources.
  • The maximum submission length is 10,000 words (including graphs and tables).
  • Submissions must not be under consideration with another journal.
  • The submission deadline is 15 January 2020 via ScholarOne, using the drop-down menu to indicate that the submission is to the Special Issue on Gender, Feminism, and Business History.
  • Please ensure that your manuscript fully complies with the publishing style of formatting regulation of Business Historyas per their ‘Instructions for authors’
  • Authors may be asked to use an English language copyeditor before final acceptance.

 

Please direct questions about the submission process, or any administrative matter, to the Editorial Office: [email address].

 

The guest editors of this special issue would be happy to be contacted directly with queries relating to potential submissions:

 

Hannah Dean hd48@st-andrews.ac.uk

Linda Perriton linda.perriton@stir.ac.uk

Scott Taylor s.taylor@bham.ac.uk

Mary Yeager yeager@ucla.edu

 

 

SMJ CfP: History & Strategy Research

Call for Papers for a Special Issue – Strategic Management Journal

 

History and Strategy Research: Opening Up the Black Box

Submission Deadline: September 30, 2017

 

Guest Editors

Nicholas S. Argyres, Washington University in St. Louis

Alfredo De Massis, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano and Lancaster University

Nicolai J. Foss, Bocconi University

Federico Frattini, Politecnico di Milano

Geoffrey Jones, Harvard University

Brian S. Silverman, University of Toronto

SMJ Advising Editors

Sendil Ethiraj and Constance Helfat

  

Background

Business history and strategy research have traditionally had a close relationship. Thus, Chandler’s seminal research is often seen as key input into the development of strategy as an academic research field. Historical research methods and historical data are used to study a diverse set of strategic issues including industry evolution, technology strategy, dynamic capabilities and diffusion of innovation. More recently, interest has been growing with respect to exploring the nexus between history and strategy.

Historical analysis may be broadly defined as “empirical research that uses remote sensing and a contextualist approach to explanation.” Such analysis can be highly useful in strategy research that seeks to analyze path dependence or understand the origins/evolution of contemporary phenomena, identify sources of exogenous variation, develop and test historically informed theory, and add more detail to existing theories. Historical analysis allows strategy scholars to historically embed the study of how organizations learn, innovate and make strategic decisions over time. Equally important, such analysis enables scholars to understand how actors strategically develop interpretations of historical facts that shape their present behavior and set expectations for the future, and use artifacts from the past to create the basis for strategies in the present.

Aims and Scope

This Special Issue will push forward research at the intersection between history and strategy, to further integrate these two disciplines. We welcome empirical papers that apply established and innovative research methodologies to strategy questions by using historical data and records. In particular, we encourage research that uses novel datasets that support tracing over time how organizations, groups and individuals—by acting in a particular historically embedded context, and by mutually interacting—built, implemented and modified strategies. We also call for theoretical modeling that builds on history and provides new insights into the historical implica­tions of strategy.

Below we suggest two research themes that  illustrate the intersection of strategy and historical analysis. However, many other such themes can be envisaged and would be welcome as submissions to the Special Issue.

  1.  How do firms, groups and individuals use the past to give meaning to the present, inform their expectations about the future, and make strategic decisions? Within this research theme we encourage scholars to develop a more fine-grained understanding of the way in which the past influences how organizational goals are set, how future technology and market trends are forecast, and how new business opportunities are identified, evaluated and exploited. Path dependence suggests that the decisions an organization makes are influenced and limited by the decisions it has made in the past. However, we need more precise explanations of how specific and non-recurrent facts (or actions taken) in the past have led to particular strategic behaviors and to the development of organiza­tional capabilities. Such explanations of how the past somehow acquires cognitive salience and normative force can only be developed in close interplay with actual historical inquiry.
  1. How do firms, groups and individuals use knowledge and resources stemming from the past to trigger and realize acts of organizational change and innovation? Current research tends to portray the past as a constraining force that reduces flexibility and produces resistance to change, thus leading to organizational inertia, competence lock-ins, and escalating commitments to past actions. However, research suggests that firms can create competitive advantage through acts of innovation and organizational renewal by searching for, accessing, and using knowledge created at different points in the past, i.e., through “temporal search.” This opens up a set of timely and relevant research questions. What are the firm-, individual- and group-level capabilities required to successfully search, identify and recombine knowledge resources acquired in the past? How do firms learn to make innovations in their products, services, business models, procedures and strategies from the past? How do innovation processes and practices evolve over time, and how are they shaped by the interactions between firms and the past?

Submission Process

Submitted papers must be in accordance with the requirements of the Strategic Management Journal. Original manuscripts are due by the Submission Deadline of September 30, 2017, and must be submitted using the SMJ Submission system at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/smj. Authors should indicate that they would like the submission to be considered for the special issue “History and Strategy Research: Opening Up the Black Box”. Authors of papers invited to be revised and resubmitted will be expected to work within a tight timeframe for revisions.

Further Information

Questions concerning pertaining to this special issue may be directed to:

For questions about submitting to the special issue contact the SMJ Managing Editor, Sara DiBari (smjeditorial@wiley.com) or visit http://smj.strategicmanagement.net/.

 

 

ToC: BH 58,5 Beer, Brewing and Business History

As a topic, this seems an area in which business historians are well equipped to do research 😉 Alas, finally, the long awaited special issue on… Beer is out, just in time for the weekend!

Business History, Volume 58, Issue 5, July 2016 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

Special Issue: Beer, Brewing, and Business History

This new issue contains the following articles:

Original Articles
Beer, brewing, and business history
Ignazio Cabras & David M. Higgins
Pages: 609-624 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1122713
Articles
From reviving tradition to fostering innovation and changing marketing: the evolution of micro-brewing in the UK and US, 1980–2012
Ignazio Cabras & Charles Bamforth
Pages: 625-646 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1027692

 
Vertical and financial ownership: Competition policy and the evolution of the UK pub market
Julie Bower
Pages: 647-666 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1041380

 
Vertical monopoly power, profit and risk: The British beer industry, c.1970–c.2004
David Higgins, Steven Toms & Moshfique Uddin
Pages: 667-693 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1041381

 
How beer created Belgium (and the Netherlands): the contribution of beer taxes to war finance during the Dutch Revolt
Koen Deconinck, Eline Poelmans & Johan Swinnen
Pages: 694-724 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1024231

 
Happy hour followed by hangover: financing the UK brewery industry, 1880–1913
Graeme G. Acheson, Christopher Coyle & John D. Turner
Pages: 725-751 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1027693

 
A taste for temperance: how American beer got to be so bland
Ranjit S. Dighe
Pages: 752-784 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1027691

 
Death and re-birth of Alabama beer
Richard White
Pages: 785-795 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1024230
Original Articles
New identities from remnants of the past: an examination of the history of beer brewing in Ontario and the recent emergence of craft breweries
Kai Lamertz, William M. Foster, Diego M. Coraiola & Jochem Kroezen
Pages: 796-828 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1065819