Coleman Prize presentations

Unfortunately this year’s Association of Business Historians (ABH) conference in Nottingham did not take place due to the ongoing pandemic. One session that was launched virtually was the Coleman Prize session, via Zoom. It was a strong year with three excellent presentations, which all three candidates on the shortlist agreed to share (see below).

First up, the Coleman Prize winner, Dr Akram Benjamin (University of Reading), who talked about his fascinating research on business networks and the financing of cotton in Egypt.

This was followed by a presentation on organizational corruption at Enron in the California Energy Crisis, by Dr Adam Nix (Aston University, now at De Montfort University).

Finally, the talk by David Paulson (University of Cambridge, now Queens University Belfast) compares SMEs in Britain and West Germany in 1950s, ’60s and ’70s, on the basis of painstaking work in multiple archives.

Virtual AOM symposium: Temporality of entrepreneurial opportunities

Entrepreneurial opportunities—as situations (e.g., Shane & Venkataraman, 2000), social constructs (e.g., Alvarez & Barney, 2007) and/or objects of entrepreneurial discourse (e.g., Cornelissen and Clarke, 2010)—may have something to do with a contrast between the status quo (i.e. the past) and the imagined future which may be realized through action in the present. But we’ve noticed that the entrepreneurship literature rarely deals explicitly or directly with the relationship between entrepreneurial opportunities and the passage of time. 

Join us on July 24, 2020 at 8 AM Pacific Time for a panel discussion and dialogue on the question—how does an explicit focus on time, temporality or history shape the way you conceptualize and study entrepreneurial opportunity? 

Panelists include Dimo Dimov, David Kirsch, Jacqueline Kirtley, Tanja Leppäaho, Rob Mitchell, Dan Raff, Andrew Smith, Dan Wadhwani and Matt Wood.

Here the link to participate in the session. The meeting ID is 986 4484 7268. The password for the meeting will be ENT&Time. Upon joining the meeting, you will be prompted to provide your consent to participating in a recorded meeting. We will be posting a video recording of this meeting for further discussion and engagement as an asynchronous event of the Academy of Management annual meeting co-hosted by the entrepreneurship and management history divisions.Best regards,Trevor 

Coleman Prize session is going digital this year

Unfortunately, the ABH conference is not taking place due to COVID-19, but the Coleman Prize session will now be held virtually on Thursday, 25 June, 14:00-15:00 (UK time).

What is the Coleman Prize

Named in honour of the British Business Historian Donald Coleman, this prize is awarded annually by the Association of Business Historians to recognise excellence in new research in Britain. It is open to PhD dissertations in Business History either having a British subject or completed at a British University. All dissertations completed in the previous two calendar years to that of their submission are eligible (with the exception of previous submissions). It is a condition of eligibility for the Prize that shortlisted finalists will present their findings at the Association’s annual conference.

Sponsors

The value of the prize is £500 and it is sponsored by Taylor & Francis Group. It is a scholarly publisher, which makes available original manuscript collections, rare printed books and other primary source materials in microform and electronic format.

On the shortlist this year are:

  • Akram Beniamin, “Cotton, Finance and Business Networks in a Globalised World: The Case of Egypt during the first half of the Twentieth century “.
  • Adam Nix, “The Social Foundations of Organisational Corruption”.
  • David Paulson, “Small and medium sized Enterprises in Britain and West Germany c.1949-1979”.

If you would like to attend, please email Professor Neil Rollings (Neil.Rollings[at]Glasgow.Ac.Uk) for the joining details.

List of former Coleman Prize winners.

Online seminars in Business History

In a mix up of our normal publishing schedule, I am running our weekly blog tonight to make you all aware of the start of a great initiative tomorrow afternoon: A new series of online seminars in Business History, facilitated by the GUG.

The aims of this series of online seminars is to help ECRs/PHDs to disseminate work in the absence of physical conferences. You can find the current schedule of events here: https://unternehmensgeschichte.de/Online-Seminare

If you have any questions about the event, please get in touch with Nicholas Wong (nicholas.d.wong@northumbria.ac.uk), who has disseminated the event on behalf of a group colleagues, who put this great initiative together.

ACCOUNTING HISTORY WORKSHOP

The workshop is being held by the Accounting History Special Interest Group (AH SIG) at Southampton University on Monday, 30 March 2020 10:30–17:00, before the main BAFA Annual Conference.

Accounting history research involves investigating the development and role of accounting in the past. The stories of history are gleaned from several sources, including documents in archives, libraries, private collections, and oral recollections. They are illuminated by knowledge of context, including, social, economic, commercial, legal, educational, financial, and religious factors identified in the literature. And they are interpreted and explained using those factors, often in combination with a selection of theories.

The aim of this workshop is to demonstrate the relevance of accounting history; to encourage participation in this genre of research; to describe various methods for carrying out accounting history research; to focus on how to publish historical research; and to provide an opportunity to establish networks and identify mentors and co-authors. Attendees will also have the opportunity to receive feedback on their research ideas and projects.

Workshop Programme

The one-day workshop will begin with an overview of accounting history methods and practice and an introduction to the Accounting History Special Interest group, followed by sessions on:

·       Carrying out accounting history research.

·       How to find primary sources.

·       How to find secondary sources.

·       Writing-up historical research: what should you include?

·       How to publish accounting history in leading journals.

·       Feedback on your ideas and projects (small group session)

Target Audience

The workshop is suitable for anyone considering beginning historical accounting research and anyone currently working in this area.

Registration

Full Ticket: £55
Reduced Rate for PhD Students Only: £25

The fee includes lunch. 

Buying a workshop ticket registers you for this event. Tickets to BAFA conferences are only available to members. To purchase a ticket, log in to your account on the BAFA Membership Portal (https://members.bafa.ac.uk/) and click the ‘Purchase Tickets’ button. Select the appropriate ticket for the event you want to attend, and follow instructions.

If you are not already a member of BAFA, please sign up for membership at https://members.bafa.ac.uk/signup. Further information on how to register for BAFA events can be found here: http://www.bafa.ac.uk/assets/uploads/conference-workshop-registration.pdf.

BAFA Annual Membership rates: Academic Staff: £30 
Unsalaried PhD/MPhil Student or Retired Academic: £15

Look forward to seeing you there!

Workshop on the History of Industrial Clusters in the UK

The British Academy of Management Management and Business History SIG and the Henley Business School, University of Reading, Centre for International Business History, are running an event on ‘A History of Industrial Clusters: Knowledge, Innovation Systems and Sustainability in the UK’ .

This workshop brings together some of the leading researchers across the field of business and economic history showcasing the breadth and depth of current work. At its core are the themes of innovation, knowledge and sustainability and a framework developed by David Charles bringing these together. This will allow new questions to be asked and provide a historical dimension to regional economic development in the UK. The research presented will also offer some contemporary insights into policy-making and industrial strategy.

The core research output arising from the workshop will be a new edited collection on industrial clusters (under the same title as the workshop and edited by Chris Corker, Joe Lane and John Wilson). This is currently under contract with Routledge for publication in 2021 and will form part of their ‘International Studies in Business History’ series.

Date:  4th and 5th of March 2020 (full day on the 4th and half day on the 5th of March)

Location: Henley Business School, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus

Speakers: 

  • Professor John Wilson
  • Dr Joe Lane
  • Dr Chris Corker
  • Dr Harry Smith
  • Professor David Charles
  • Dr Emily Buchnea

Registration deadline: 28 February 2020

For more information on this event and to register, please access the following link:  event link

Call for EBHA doctoral summer school

At Business History, we are very proud to be one of the sponsors of this year’s EBHA doctoral summer school!

Keynote Speaker: Albert Carreras (Pompeu Fabra University).

Faculty Members: Adoración Álvaro Moya (CUNEF), Veronica Binda (Bocconi University), Andrea Colli (Bocconi University), Christina Lubinski (Copenhagen Business School) and Jari Ojala (University of Jyvaskyla).

Local organizers: Paloma Fernández and Miquel Gutiérrez (University of Barcelona).

The 10th edition of the EBHA (European Business History Association) Summer School will take place at Barcelona, from Wednesday, July 8th to Friday, July 10th, 2020. The school, titled Challenges for Business History in a Changing World, aims to encourage a fresh and rigorous exchange of thoughts, ideas, and new research being done by doctoral students in early stages of their doctoral work, in fields closely related to Business History. It is organised jointly by the European Business History Association (EBHA) and the University of Barcelona (UB) in cooperation with the Spanish Association of Economic History (AEHE).

The school will focus on theoretical, methodological and practical issues which are of relevance for advanced research in business history. The main aims of the school are to provide students with a full understanding of the newest trends in research in the field and to provide a friendly atmosphere in which to discuss their preliminary findings with leading scholars as well as among their peers. In this respect, the program features both lectures and seminars given by faculty and student presentations of their research projects. Each student will have 20 minutes maximum to present her/his project, stressing especially: research questions and goals, methodology, sources, challenges and provisional outcomes. After her/his presentation, each student will receive questions and comments from other students and from faculty members.

Students will be accommodated in the beautiful and lively city of Barcelona. The organisers will cover all local costs (accommodation in double room and food), but participants are expected to pay their own travel expenses.

Those interested in attending the summer school should send the following documents by e-mail to Paloma Fernández (palomafernandez@ub.edu):

1) a brief CV (not exceeding one page);

2) a summary of their dissertation project (not exceeding three pages);

3) (if possible) an example of their work in progress, e.g. a draft chapter or a working paper (in any language).

The deadline for applications is February 29th, 2020. A maximum of 10 participants will be selected from these applications and will be notified by March 30th, 2020.

VIU Summer School on Responsible Capitalism

Dear Faculty,

this is to inform you that the Application form of the VIU Summer School on Responsible Capitalism: Micro and Macro-institutional Conditions of Transformation (June 16-20, 2020) is now open and available at the VIU dedicated web-page:

http://www.univiu.org/study/summer-schools/responsible-capitalism

I take the occasion to attach here the printable brochure (“booklet” option) and the draft program available at the same web-page.

The Call is open until February 28 and the participation fees are:

  • Students of VIU member universities: € 200 incl. VAT.
  • Students of other universities: € 300 incl. VAT

The costs of accommodation on campus in shared multiple rooms (triple or quadruple) with other participants is 240,00 euro for 5 nights incl. taxes (check in June 15 – check out June 20).

I take the occasion to remind you that we will open the School with a Welcome Cocktailon Monday, June 15 in the evening (around 6:30 pmtbd).

Thank you for sharing the Call for application among your students and colleagues!

Looking forward to meeting you all at VIU next June.
With Kind regards,

Elisa

PDW “New Histories of Business Schools…” AMLE Special Issue

Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California, Fertitta Hall 5th floor, room 502, 610 Childs Way, Los Angeles, CA 90089

Workshop date: Friday, January 31, 2020, 9:30am-4pm PST

Submission deadline: Friday, January 17, 2020, midnight PST

The editors of Academy of Management Learning & Education (AMLE) invite applications for a Paper Development & Reviewing Workshop (PDW) to be held at the University of Southern California on January 31, 2020. The purpose of this event is to improve papers that authors intend to submit for review at AMLE, with a special focus on the special issue “New Histories of Business Schools and How They May Inspire New Futures”. Deadline for final submissions to this special issue is March 31, 2020. For details, see the official call for papers: https://aom.org/uploadedFiles/Publications/AMLE/History_of_bus_schools_for_web.pdf and the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gO8BgNjpWw&t.

We encourage submissions from faculty members, post-doctoral researchers and doctoral students who want to develop their papers for publication in the journal. Consistent with the mission of AMLE, draft manuscripts can be submitted on all management learning and management education topics, using all types of theory, at all levels of analysis, and using all empirical methods. The main focus of the workshop will be on paper development. This part of the workshop will consist of roundtable presentations by authors followed by discussions of authors’ work led by at least one of the members of the AMLE editorial team/special issue editors. The intent is for authors to receive actionable feedback that can then be incorporated into their papers.

Submissions approved for inclusion in the workshop will be working papers with the potential to make important and novel contributions to management learning and education scholarship. Papers can be theoretical or empirical in their focus, or they can be aimed at the essays section of the AMLE journal. Workshop participants will be placed with facilitators whose work and areas of expertise are closely aligned. 

An additional focus will be on what makes a good, developmental review, as well as a discussion of some of the main problems that the editorial team encounter in papers submitted to the journal. The workshop is open to all scholars working on any topics that are relevant to management learning and education. As space is limited, preference will be given to participants who are presenting working papers.

For a registration form for the Los Angeles PDW go to: 

http://aom.org/Publications/AOM-Paper-Development-Workshops.aspx

Scroll down to AMLE and click on “Register” to be directed to the registration form.

You can click on “Learn more” to see a version of this announcement.

The deadline for submission of full working papers is Friday, January 17, 2020. We may have places available for students and scholars who wish to attend without submitting a working paper. In this instance, please submit your CV by the submission deadline (Friday, January 17, 2020). Such attendees will be accommodated if there is space on a first come, first served basis. There is no fee for attending the workshop. Participants will be responsible for their own travel and accommodation costs.

If you have any questions and inquiries, please contact: amle@aom.org.

If you have questions for the editorial team, then email the AMLE Editor, Bill Foster (wfoster@ualberta.ca); or the local host Associate Editor, Christina Lubinski (clubinsk@marshall.usc.edu).

We look forward to seeing you in Los Angeles!

EGOS 2019


I grew up in Cambridge, which isn’t exactly a dump, but even so, Edinburgh’s lovely, isn’t it? I think it’s probably the scale that does it. There are just streets and streets of the stuff: beautiful buildings, intriguing curiosities, well stocked pubs…the weather isn’t even that bad at this time of year. If you’ve not already guessed, the 35th EGOS Colloquium was held in Edinburgh last week and, in addition to the very pleasant location, it was well stocked with plenty of history-related content.

Billed under the theme of Enlightening the Future, the conference organisers juxtaposed the enlightenment heritage of their host city with the ‘post-trust’ age, which society appears to be increasingly embracing. Along these lines, they asked how ‘political shifts, technological advancements, forms of interaction, and focus on personal interests may be re-framing the ways in which decisions are made in organisations.’ It was on these terms that the former-chancellor, Alistair Darling, opened the conference. He reflected on the financial crisis, the then Labour government’s response and the path that the UK and the rest of the world has followed subsequently. His message to the delegates was that political, and not economic issues have been the key impediment economic prosperity since the crisis.

Following the opening ceremony, the colloquium proper began, offering plenty for the historically-inclined organisational scholar. Sub-theme 48 set out to understand the historical forces underlying recent crises, introducing ‘historical-evolutionary organisation studies’ to theorise the link between backward-looking historical perspectives and forward-looking development. Additionally, there was a sub-plenary on Historic Turns: Objective, Rhetorical, and Retrospective, which saw speaker Candace Jones, Kate Kenny and Michael Rowlinson discuss importance of socio-historic context in understanding and interpreting organisations. Of course, the problem with such a packed programme, was the inevitable clashes that it created. As it was, I was enrolled on Sub-theme 30Realising the Potential of Historical Organisation Studies, and it was here that I spent the majority of time over the next few days.

Introducing the sub-theme, conveners Stewart Clegg, Mairi Maclean, Roy Suddaby, and Charles Harvey expressed the rise of historical organisation studies as being part of a wave, with exciting developments and momentum coming at express pace. What was needed now, they argued, was for us to compound the sense of community that had developed and lay the foundations for the field’s coherence and continued growth. Moreover, while history and organisation studies had been expressed through the linking of two separate worlds, it was time to bring them together in practice. With that, a sub-theme programme was chosen that moved away from ‘separate world’ theorising, instead undertaking the ‘getting down and doing’ of historical organisation studies.

The first day saw parallel streams in theory, institutional entrepreneurship, and rhetorical history. Gabrielle Durepos kicked off proceedings in the theory session with a presentation of work done with Russ Vince on reflexivity in historical organisation studies. Their focus here was on the under-appreciated importance of emotion in relation to historical actors, using the example of corporatisation of higher education. The institutional entrepreneurship session followed with papers on legitimacy acquisition in relation to Dubai’s Jebel Ali Free Zone (Baig and Godley) and the strategic use of aesthetic innovation and its impact on the wider market (Eisenman and Simons). These were followed with a presentation by Mairi Maclean on the link between Hilton’s international expansion and US post-war foreign policy (with Harvey and Suddaby). It was interesting here to hear about how Conrad Hilton deployed rhetoric in framing unknown variables in manner that represented them as relative certainties.

Following enjoyable parties hosted by Bath, CBS and others, the next morning was opened with a second session of rhetorical history, and one on institutions. Attending the latter, I heard stimulating presentations on the legacy of the fraternal ‘golden age’ in compounding the normativity of racial divides, as well the use of ‘crux’ classification within the Bordeaux wine region. While diverse in topic, both papers showed well the value an historical perspective can bring to understanding institutions in their contested and changing form. In addition to work Stephanie Decker and myself presented on digital history, the next session saw papers on the use of corporate archives for since-making by managers (Andrew Smith) and the potential of critical discourse analysis in linking the sociological and the historical (Huber, Bernardi and Iordanou). Before a second round of sub-plenaries, there were also sessions of memory and politics, dealing in turn with the pasts impact on parliamentary and political structures and the role memory plays in wider social life.

The final morning was initiated with papers on processes and boundaries, and entrepreneurship, before a final set of sessions on businesses interface with the public sector and the organisation of religion. Given it was both a Saturday morning and there had been much parting the evening before, it was great to see so many delegates engaging fully in these final sessions of the conference. Indeed, despite the intellectual fatigue that can set in towards the end such events, these sessions stimulated some of the most interesting discussions of the three days. It is testament to both the effort and execution of the organisers that the sub-theme generated such excellent feedback and discussion, and I know that presenters and audiences alike found it a thoroughly valuable experience. Mairi, Stewart, Roy and Charles should be congratulated along with EGOS for putting on a fine event, and must be thanked for all their efforts in bringing it to fruition.

Are you attending an event relevant to business or organisational history this summer? We’re always looking for volunteers to write reports for the network. We would particularly love to hear from anyone interested in providing content for the upcoming AoM and EBHA conferences. For further enquiries, please contact Adam Nix (adam.nix@dmu.ac.uk).