Coleman Prize session is going digital this year

Unfortunately, the ABH conference is not taking place due to COVID-19, but the Coleman Prize session will now be held virtually on Thursday, 25 June, 14:00-15:00 (UK time).

What is the Coleman Prize

Named in honour of the British Business Historian Donald Coleman, this prize is awarded annually by the Association of Business Historians to recognise excellence in new research in Britain. It is open to PhD dissertations in Business History either having a British subject or completed at a British University. All dissertations completed in the previous two calendar years to that of their submission are eligible (with the exception of previous submissions). It is a condition of eligibility for the Prize that shortlisted finalists will present their findings at the Association’s annual conference.

Sponsors

The value of the prize is £500 and it is sponsored by Taylor & Francis Group. It is a scholarly publisher, which makes available original manuscript collections, rare printed books and other primary source materials in microform and electronic format.

On the shortlist this year are:

  • Akram Beniamin, “Cotton, Finance and Business Networks in a Globalised World: The Case of Egypt during the first half of the Twentieth century “.
  • Adam Nix, “The Social Foundations of Organisational Corruption”.
  • David Paulson, “Small and medium sized Enterprises in Britain and West Germany c.1949-1979”.

If you would like to attend, please email Professor Neil Rollings (Neil.Rollings[at]Glasgow.Ac.Uk) for the joining details.

List of former Coleman Prize winners.

Online seminars in Business History

In a mix up of our normal publishing schedule, I am running our weekly blog tonight to make you all aware of the start of a great initiative tomorrow afternoon: A new series of online seminars in Business History, facilitated by the GUG.

The aims of this series of online seminars is to help ECRs/PHDs to disseminate work in the absence of physical conferences. You can find the current schedule of events here: https://unternehmensgeschichte.de/Online-Seminare

If you have any questions about the event, please get in touch with Nicholas Wong (nicholas.d.wong@northumbria.ac.uk), who has disseminated the event on behalf of a group colleagues, who put this great initiative together.

SEJ Special Issue: Historical Approaches to Entrepreneurship Research

Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal has published a special issue devoted to historical approaches to entrepreneurship research.  The contributions highlight the value of a range of methods — socioeconomic history, cultural history, microhistory, comparative history, and historical case studies — in entrepreneurship research. The introduction discusses how these approaches advance theoretical views of the nature of entrepreneurial opportunities and action. The full, open-access special issue can be found here.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Context, Time, and Change: Historical Approaches to Entrepreneurship Research 
R. Daniel Wadhwani, David Kirsch, Friederike Welter, William B. Gartner, Geoffrey Jones

The Household as a Source of Labor for Entrepreneurs: Evidence from New York City During Industrialization
Martin Ruef

Reintroducing Public Actors in Entrepreneurial Dynamics: A Co-evolutionary Approach to Categorization
Benoit Demil

Historicizing Entrepreneurial Networks
Matthew Hollow

Different Expectations: A Comparative History of Structure, Experience and Strategic Alliances in the U.S. and U.K. Poultry Sectors, 1920-1990
Andrew C. Godley, Shane Hamilton

Innovation, Intermediation, and the Nature of Entrepreneurship: A Historical Perspective
Steven Toms, Nick Wilson, Mike Wright

BH ToC 62,3

Our April copy features a special issue on:

Between Coercion and Private Initiative: Entrepreneurial Freedom of Action during the ‘Third Reich’

Special Issue Articles

Introduction: The room for manoeuvre for firms in the Third Reich
Ralf Banken
Pages: 375-392 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2020.1713105

Sewing for Hitler? The clothing industry during the ‘Third Reich’
Roman Köster & Julia Schnaus
Pages: 393-409 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1502749

The Munich Re: an internationally-oriented reinsurer in the Nazi era
Christopher Kopper
Pages: 410-420 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1259312

A hard-to-untangle business conglomerate: The economic empire of the German labour front
Rüdiger Hachtmann
Pages: 421-437 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1691799

Between values orientation and economic logic: Bosch in the Third Reich
Johannes Bähr
Pages: 438-450 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1691343

Commercial expansion in the steel industry of World War II: The case of Henry J. Kaiser and Friedrich Flick
Tim Schanetzky
Pages: 451-467 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1691336

Property, control and room for manoeuvre: Royal Dutch Shell and Nazi Germany, 1933–1945
Marten Boon & Ben Wubs
Pages: 468-487 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1205034

Original Articles

The country-of-origin effect and the international expansion of Spanish fashion companies, 1975–2015
José Antonio Miranda
Pages: 488-508 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1374370

Microfinances in the banking houses of Rio de Janeiro in 1864
Carlos Eduardo Valencia Villa
Pages: 509-535 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1454432

Book Reviews

La sidérurgie française et la maison de Wendel pendant les Trente Glorieuses
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 536-538 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1326573

Policy signals and market responses: a 50-year history of Zambia’s relationship with foreign capital
Simone Halleen
Pages: 539-540 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1483863

Small business, education, and management. The life and times of John Bolton
Silvia Milanesi
Pages: 541-542 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1483866

Les bassins industriels des territoires occupés, 1914–1918. Des opérations militaires à la reconstruction
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 543-544 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1326575