PhDs & PostDocs at Stellenbosch University

A new generation of historians and other social scientists is reinterpreting African history using individual-level archival records. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded Biography of an Uncharted People project builds on this momentum, using micro-level evidence of groups often excluded from aggregate statistical records, charting a new biography of South Africans.

Want to be at the frontier of new methodological innovations? Want to study the lives of people often neglected in historical sources? Want to be part of an exciting team of international scholars in the beautiful university-town of Stellenbosch? Then join us in 2019.

PhD and postdoc positions are available. Specific competencies in historical geography (GIS) are highly recommended for one of the postdoc positions, but applications from all subfields of history are welcome. Please visit unchartedpeople.org for more information. Applications close 1 October 2018.

Johan Fourie
johanf@sun.ac.za

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Call for Editors – Journal of Global History

Reblogged from Imperial and Global Forum:

Imperial & Global Forum

Professor William Gervase Clarence Smith, Professor Barbara Watson Andaya, and Professor Merry Wiesner-Hanks will shortly be coming to the end of their tenure as editors of the Journal of Global History (JGH). Cambridge University Press, in collaboration with an Editorial Board search committee, is now inviting applications for their successor(s).

The deadline for applications is 30 September, 2018.

JGH addresses the main problems of global change over time, together with the diverse histories of globalization. It also examines counter-currents to globalization, including those that have structured other spatial units. The journal seeks to transcend the dichotomy between ‘the West and the rest’, straddle traditional regional boundaries, relate material to cultural and political history, and overcome thematic fragmentation in historiography. The journal also acts as a forum for interdisciplinary conversations across a wide variety of social and natural sciences.

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OS SI CfP: Power & Performativity

Organization Studies

Call for Papers

Special Issue on Power and performativity as interweaving dynamics of organizing

Guest Editors for the Special Issue

Barbara Simpson, University of Strathclyde

Nancy Harding, University of Bath

Peter Fleming, City University of London

Viviane Sergi, UQAM

Anthony Hussenot, Université Côte d’Azur

 Deadline for Submissions: 31 March 2019


Power and performativity are recurrent but distinct themes in contemporary organization studies. Each has been theorized in multiple ways, but what still remains largely unexamined is the interplay between them in the ongoing flow of organizing. It is the dynamic and co-productive potential of this confluence that provides the focus for this Special Issue. In particular we propose that by re-visioning both power and performativity through a processual lens, new possibilities for understanding their entwinements will emerge.

 Power has traditionally been understood as a property or a possession that may be seized and wielded, either overtly or in hidden ways, in order to exert ‘power over’ others (Clegg, Courpasson, & Phillips, 2006). In this context it is often conceived in dualistic terms as some ‘thing’ that is available to the few for controlling the many. By contrast, process approaches endeavour to transcend this dualistic formulation, focussing instead on how power produces movement and change in our worlds. For instance, Foucault (1979) saw power as fundamentally relational and generative, and Follett (1924) argued for a ‘power with’ perspective that continuously emerges out of the actions of people working together.

A similar scenario can be drawn for performativity (Gond, Cabantous, Harding, & Learmonth, 2016), which may refer to managerial efforts to produce outcomes (Fournier & Grey, 2000), or to tactics to help managers change the status quo (Alvesson & Spicer, 2012). From a more processual perspective though, performativity offers a theory of how language constitutes experienced ‘realities’ (Austin, 1962), how organizations are made in communication (Taylor, Cooren, Giroux, & Robichaud, 1996), and how that which appears given and unchangeable is constituted moment by moment (Butler, 1997) through intra-acting material agencies (Barad, 2003).

In this Special Issue, we want to draw attention to the possibilities that arise if both power and performativity are conceived as dynamic processes that, through their continuous swirling together and apart offer novel opportunities to engage differently with organizing. Recent developments in philosophical and theoretical thinking about organizing have clarified the distinction between ontologically oriented assumptions of emergence, continuity and becoming, and more epistemologically oriented accounts of how organizational outcomes are produced (Helin, Hernes, Hjorth, & Holt, 2014; Langley & Tsoukas, 2017). However, the uptake of process as an ontological mode of inquiry has been hampered by the paucity of conceptual and methodological devices to support empirical studies. We need new tools that allow us to unravel the alternative logics of process-as-it-happens, to engage with the evolving nature of the categories we use to define (and redefine) the phenomena of working and living, and to re-configure the boundaries of more processual understandings of organizing. Developing such tools will not only contribute new ways of studying power and performativity together, but also new ways of carrying out research into organizing more generally. As an added bonus, it may further serve to address the immediate concerns of organizational practitioners, who are so often let down by the inadequacies of conventional theory when it comes to examining their own lived experiences of work.

This Special Issue seeks to advance process studies of organizing by re-imagining power and performativity as mutually constituting dynamics. Broadly we are interested in questions such as how might we better understand the performativity of power and the power of performativity, and how, in their interweaving, do power and performativity constitute the emergent becoming of organizing. We especially welcome empirical contributions that, in offering partial, localized or ephemeral accounts of power and performativity, open up new ways of engaging with these dynamic processes by entering into the emergent flow of organizing. Our specific aim is to focus more on the ‘doing of’ rather than the ‘thinking about’ process research.

Potential topics for submissions include, but are by no means limited to:

  • Research methods that engage with the processual logics of power and performativity
  • Ways of writing from/as/about material aspects of power and performativity
  • The engagement of power with performativity in the communicative constitution of organizing
  • Reflexivity, surprise and playfulness in the experience of power and performativity
  • The role of body and language in the performative accomplishment of power
  • Temporality in the entwinement of power and performativity in organizing
  • The power of performance in new collaborative practices such as freelancing and co-working
  • The performance of power in new organizational forms such as those introduced through the gig economy and democracy-based organization
  • The power of non-human agencies in the performative accomplishment of organizing
  • The performative power of contemporary research methods

Submissions

Please submit papers through the journal’s online submission system, SAGE track at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/orgstudies, create your user account (if you have not done so already), and for “Manuscript Type” please choose the corresponding Special Issue. All papers that enter the reviewing process will be double-blind reviewed following the journal’s normal review process and criteria. You will be able to submit your paper for this Special Issue between the 15th and 31st of March 2019.

Administrative support and general queries

Sophia Tzagaraki, Managing Editor, Organization Studies: OSofficer@gmail.com

For further information please contact any of the Guest Editors for this Special Issue:

Barbara Simpson: barbara.simpson@strath.ac.uk

Nancy Harding: H.N.Harding@bath.ac.uk

Peter Fleming: Peter.Fleming.1@city.ac.uk

Viviane Sergi: sergi.viviane@uqam.ca

Anthony Hussenot: anthony.hussenot @unice.fr

 References:

Alvesson, M., & Spicer, A. (2012). Critical leadership studies: The case for critical performativity. Human Relations, 65(3), 367-390.

Austin, J. L. (1962). How to do things with words. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Barad, K. (2003). Posthumanist performativity: Toward an understanding of how matter comes to matter. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 28(3), 801-831.

Butler, J. (1997). Excitable speech: A politics of the performative. New York: Routledge.

Clegg, S. R., Courpasson, D., & Phillips, N. (2006). Power and organizations. London: SAGE.

Follett, M. P. (1924). Creative experience. New York: Longmans, Green.

Foucault, M. (1979). Discipline and Punish (A. Sheridan, Trans.). New York Vintage.

Fournier, V., & Grey, C. (2000). ‘At the critical moment’: Conditions and prospects for Critical Management Studies. Human Relations, 53(1), 7-32.

Gond, J.-P., Cabantous, L., Harding, N., & Learmonth, M. (2016). What Do We Mean by Performativity in Organizational and Management Theory? The Uses and Abuses of Performativity. International Journal of Management Reviews, 18(4), 440-463.

Helin, J., Hernes, T., Hjorth, D., & Holt, R. (Eds.). (2014). The Oxford Handbook of Process Philosophy and Organization Studies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Langley, A., & Tsoukas, H. (Eds.). (2017). The SAGE Handbook of Process Organization Studies. London: Sage.

Taylor, J., Cooren, F., Giroux, N., & Robichaud, D. (1996). The communicational basis of organization: Between conversation and the text. Communication Theory, 6, 1-39.

CHORD conference: Retailing & Distribution in 18C

CHORD conference ‘Retailing and Distribution in the Eighteenth Century’

by Laura Ugolini

The 2018 CHORD conference on ‘Retailing and Distribution in the Eighteenth Century’

will take place at the University of Wolverhampton, UK

on 13 September 2018.

The programme, together with abstracts, registration details and further information, can be found at:
https://retailhistory.wordpress.com/2018/05/29/2018/

The programme includes:

Steven Sanders, Oxford Brookes University
The Upholder in the Age of Thomas Chippendale: Upholders as Appraisers, Brokers, and Auctioneers

Anna Knutsson, European University Institute
Selling British Contraband in Eighteenth Century Sweden

Jenni Dixon, BCU
From Cabinets to Toy-Shops: Curious Spaces in the Eighteenth-Century

Aidan Collins, University of York
Defining ‘Traders’ in Bankruptcy Proceedings, 1700-1750

Elisabeth Gernerd
Fancy Feathers: the Feather Trade in Britain and the Atlantic World

Jessica Davidson, St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford
‘Here mirth and merchandise are mix’d’: Buying and selling at the English provincial fair reconsidered

Matthew Mauger, Queen Mary University of London
Grocers’ Trade cards and the Cultural Imaginaries of China

David Fallon, University of Roehampton
Bookselling, Sociable Retailing and Identity by Distribution: The Case of Thomas Payne

Serena Dyer, University of Warwick
Stitching and Shopping: The Material Literacy of the Consumer

Clare Rose, The Royal School of Needlework, London
Quilted petticoats in eighteenth century London: genuine and imitation, bought and stolen

Jon Stobart, Manchester Metropolitan University
Clothing the countryside: textiles and haberdashery in English village shops, c.1660-1720

The conference will be held at the University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton City Campus.

The fee is £22.

Registration is via the University of Wolverhampton’s e-store, at:
https://www.estore.wlv.ac.uk/product-catalogue/conferences-events/faculty-of-social-sciences/chord-workshop-retailing-and-distribution-in-the-eighteenth-century

Or see the conference web-pages, at:
https://retailhistory.wordpress.com/2018/05/29/2018/

Or contact Laura Ugolini, at: L.Ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

Information about CHORD events can also be found here: https://retailhistory.wordpress.com/

Prof. Laura Ugolini
Professor of History

Dept. of History, Politics, War Studies
Faculty of Social Sciences
Room MH124
Mary Seacole (MH) Building
University of Wolverhampton
Wolverhampton
WV1 1LY

Nominations for Gomory and Hagley Book Prize

Ralph Gomory Prize of the Business History Conference/Deadline/November 30, 2018

by Carol Ressler Lockman

The 2018 Ralph Gomory Prize of the Business History Conference has been awarded to Edward J. Balleisen of Duke University for his book, Fraud:  An American History from Barnum to Madoff (Princeton University Press, 2017) at the Business History Conference annual meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, April 7, 2018.

 

The Ralph Gomory Prize for Business History (made possible by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation) recognizes historical work on the effect business enterprises have on the economic conditions of a country in which they operate.   A $5,000 prize is awarded annually.  Eligible books are written In English and published two years (2017 or 2018 copyright) prior to the award.   The 2019 Prize will be presented at the annual meeting of the Business History Conference to be held in Cartagena, Colombia, March 14-16, 2019.

Four copies of a book must accompany a nomination and be submitted to the Prize Coordinator, Carol Ressler Lockman, Business History Conference, PO Box 3630, 298 Buck Road, Wilmington, DE 19807-0630 USA.  Email:  clockman@hagley.orgThe deadline for submission is November 30, 2018.

 

Hagley Prize for Business History/Deadline November 30, 2018

by Carol Ressler Lockman

Hagley Museum and Library and the Business History Conference are pleased to announce the 2018 winner of the Hagley Prize:  Matatu:  A History of Popular Transportation in Nairobi (The University of Chicago Press, 2017) by Kenda Mutongi of Williams College.   Hagley Museum and Library and the Business History Conference jointly offer the Hagley Prize awarded to the best book in Business History (broadly defined) and consists of a medallion and $2,500.  The prize was awarded at the Business History Conference annual meeting held in Baltimore, Maryland, April 7th, 2018.

The prize committee encourages the submission of books from all methodological perspectives.  It is particularly interested in innovation studies that have the potential to expand the boundaries of the discipline.   Scholars, publishers, and other interested parties may submit nominations.  Eligible books can have either an American or an international focus.   They must be written in English and be published during the two years (2017 or 2018 copyright) prior to the award.

Four copies of a book must accompany a nomination and be submitted to the prize coordinator, Carol Ressler Lockman, Hagley Museum and Library, PO Box 3630, 298 Buck Road, Wilmington DE  19807-0630,  The deadline for nominations is November 30, 2018.   The 2019 Hagley Prize will be presented at the annual meeting of the Business History Conference in Cartagena, Colombia, March 16th, 2019.

OS SI CfP: Institutional Change

Organization Studies

Special Issue on: Organizing for Social and Institutional Change in Response to Disruption, Division, and Displacement

Guest Editors

 W.E. Douglas Creed | University of Rhode Island, USA & University of Melbourne, Australia

Barbara Gray | Pennsylvania State University, USA

Charlotte M. Karam | American University of Beirut, Lebanon

Markus A. Höllerer | WU Vienna, Austria & UNSW Sydney, Australia

Trish Reay | University of Alberta, Canada

Contact: douglascreed@uri.edu

Deadline for paper submissions: October 31st 2018

The world today is experiencing jarring manifestations of disruption, division, and displacement, making for a troika of societal and institutional upheaval. In its 2018 Report on Global Risks, the World Economic Forum identified risks stemming from disruptions in five distinct categories: economical, technological, environmental, geopolitical, and social.  In terms of economic risks, inequality in wealth distribution is increasing across the globe (Anand & Segal, 2015); Oxfam reports that the richest 1% has accumulated more wealth than the rest of the world’s population combined (BBC News, 2016). Technological risks threaten privacy and security of individuals, organizations, and nations. Extreme weather conditions and the failure to mitigate climate change are among the most pressing environmental risks.  Finally, a rise in religious and national identity conflicts has created geopolitical and social risks resulting in a substantial increase in global migration and a variety of tensions and fault lines. According to the UN High Commission for Refugees, there is an estimated 65.3 million forcibly displaced persons in the world, with 21.3 million numbering as refugees. Forces such as populism, nationalism, coupled with increasing economic inequity, sectarianism, and extreme political polarization look to be undermining the ‘habits of the heart’ that are fundamental to democracy (Putnam, 2000). Some even argue that the very heart of democracy is in need of healing and we must work for a politics commensurate with human dignity (Palmer, 2011). Separately and together, patterns of disruption, division, and displacement will likely rock global society for the foreseeable future – and call for robust organizational and/or institutional responses.

For this Organization Studies Special Issue, we encourage organizational scholars to address these and related grand challenges through the development of research that attempts to further investigate and better understand such disruption, division, and displacement as well as their consequences from varied perspectives and levels of analysis. We see that organizational scholars have much to contribute in these domains and we believe that this Special Issue can be a space for reflection, investigation, and sowing the seeds for future robust action. Although we see strong potential for research from an institutional perspective, we equally welcome submissions grounded in many other research traditions. Our key goal in the Special Issue is to bring together scholarship that sheds new light on organizing for social and institutional change that addresses these forms of upheaval.

We see significant potential for researchers to build on the growing interest in understanding both how organizational and institutional paradoxes (Tracey & Creed, 2017) are implicated in such grand challenges and how organizations of various sorts can respond. Complex or ‘wicked’ problems (Rittel & Webber, 1973) are likely to require complex solutions involving many different stakeholders (Gray & Purdy, 2018). A variety of tensions may be involved, such as: democracy versus authoritarianism; civil discourse versus demagoguery and intolerance; global versus local; nationalism versus internationalism/globalism; the North versus the ‘Global South’; wealth versus poverty; urban versus rural; and multiculturalism versus ethnocentrism and/or xenophobia. Research focused on the organizational and institutional implications of such tensions and how to address them could reveal valuable insights.

In framing this call for papers, we see particular value in Ferraro et al.’s (2015) pragmatist perspective that outlines ways of responding to grand challenges based on the concept of robust action.  They draw attention to three strategies which we, as scholars, can also apply in building our knowledge base: creating new participatory architectures that enable prolonged, productive engagement among diverse stakeholders; promoting and sustaining cooperation and coordination through activities that sustain multiple voices, diverse interpretations, and interrelated goals; and experimenting in ways that promote small wins, evolutionary learning, and increased engagement.

We suggest that exploring the organizational and institutional implications of disruption, division, and displacement may require a deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of entrenched oppression and latent power dynamics (Gray & Kish-Gephardt, 2013; Karam & Jamali, 2015; Marti & Mair, 2009; Mair et al., 2016; Creed et al., 2010). We encourage scholars to investigate cases addressing where and how individuals, groups, or organizations have mobilized in attempts to overcome such deep-rooted problems. Further, we see that addressing the multifarious divisions that run through these problems requires engaging in emotionally fraught encounters and change processes that involve mechanisms spanning the micro, meso, and macro levels of analysis (Hochschild, 2016; Creed & Scully, 2000; Creed et al., 2014; Lok et al., forthcoming). More attention to these processes and their effects is important and encouraged.

With this call for papers, we hope to foster academic attention to this broad topical area.  Consistent with the mandate of Organization Studies, we aim to promote the understanding of organizations, organizing, and the organized, and the social relevance of that understanding in relation to the challenges identified here.

Below we offer our initial thoughts on possible questions and opportunities. However, we stress that this list is not meant to narrow our collective vision. In the spirit of robust academic engagement that is participatory and multi-vocal, and that builds on and contributes to engaged organizational scholarship, we encourage innovative, thoughtful, and provocative submissions from scholars at all stages of their academic careers.

Opportunities for Theorizing and Praxis

  • What mechanisms explain social and institutional change processes in the context of displacement, disruption, and division?
  • What are tools and mechanisms for organizing around these challenges?
  • What are the implications of displacement and disruption for institutional stability and embeddedness, as well as for the persistence of, or change in distinct inequality regimes?
  • How can we buttress civil society and civility in the face of such challenges?
  • Can conflict be beneficial in promoting voice and resistance to power in this current era of displacement, disruption, and division – and if so, how?
  • What are the multilayered and multi-leveled processes for dealing with resistance and conflict in the face of grand challenges and wicked problems?
  • How can institutions, organizations, and individuals, including scholars, respond more effectively to refugee issues, disenfranchisement, and economic dislocation?

Levels of Analysis

  • What are the bottom-up and top-down processes behind mobilizing for change at and across different levels of organizing, and how are they shaping organizational, institutional, and societal responses to these types of upheaval?
  • How can the examination of organizing around displacement, disruption, and division assist in better understanding the microfoundations of institutional change?
  • What practices, unfolding at the micro and meso levels, foster civility and contribute to the healing of polarizing societal rifts?
  • In what ways can civil society innovations be facilitated in the face of multiple and multifaceted global threats?

Global and Local Forms of Organizing

  • How do geographical and place-based dynamics affect action and possibilities for change?
  • What are examples of novel forms of organizations and organizing around these wicked problems and what can be learned from them?
  • What are the key forces, patterns, and players involved in building local collaborations against a backdrop of global disruption and global agendas?
  • In what ways can local collaborative partnerships be scaled up and replicated?
  • What is the role of local organizations (e.g., SMEs, cooperatives, non-profits, public sector organizations, and civil society) in responding to disruption and displacement? What are innovative local patterns of organizing for responding to and mitigating the difficulties of disruptive global shifts (Höllerer et al., 2017)?

Institutional and Collective Identity Building Efforts

  •  What are the possibilities for cross-sectoral collaboration in the face of power differences?
  • What are the possible roles for conflict management and peacemaking?
  • How do we cultivate civility, engagement, and listening in the face of the polarization, hostility, and social demonization that arise as a consequence of displacement, disruption, and division? How do we reach across the ‘empathy wall’ (Hochschild, 2016), and what are the practical next steps?
  • What are the identity dynamics (e.g., gender, race, class, religious) involved and what are the implications for various forms of tensions and responses, ranging from exclusionary backlash to inclusion? What can be learned through applying an identity lens to (re)analyzing disruption and displacement?
  • What are the difficulties in working across differences in privilege and power and how can they be addressed?
  • How are ‘deep stories’ and identities implicated in how persons and local populations respond to disruption, displacement, and division?

Submissions

To be considered for publication in the Special Issue, papers must be submitted via the OS website at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/orgstudies by October 31, 2018. There you can also find guidelines for submission and information on the review procedures.

 References

Anand, S. & P. Segal. 2015. The Global Distribution of Income. In: A. B. Atkinson and F. Bourguignon (Eds.), Handbook of Income Distribution. Volume 2A, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 937-979.

BBC News. 2016. Oxfam Says Wealth of Richest 1% Equal to Other 99%. January 2018.

http://www.bbc.com/news/business-35339475

Creed, W.E.D., R. DeJordy, & J. Lok. 2010. Being the Change: Resolving Institutional Contradiction through Identity Work. Academy of Management Journal 53(6), 1336-1364.

Creed, .E.D., B.A. Hudson, G. Okhuysen, & K. Smith-Crowe. 2014. Swimming in a Sea of Shame: Emotion in Institutional Maintenance and Disruption. Academy of Management Review, 39(3) 275-301.

Creed, W.E.D. & M. Scully. 2000. Songs of Ourselves: Employees’ Deployment of Social Identity in Work Place Encounters. Journal of Management Inquiry 9(4), 391-412.

Ferraro, F., D. Etzion & J. Gehman. 2015. Tackling Grand Challenges Pragmatically: Robust Action Revisited. Organization Studies 36(3), 363–390.

Gray, B. & J. Kish-Gephart. 2013. Encountering Social Class Differences at Work: How “Class Work” Perpetuates Inequality. Academy of Management Review 38(5), 670-699.

Gray, B. & J.M. Purdy. 2018. Collaborating for Our Future: Confronting Complex Problems through Multi-Stakeholder Partnerships. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Hochschild, A.R. 2016. Strangers in their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right. New York: The New Press.

Höllerer, M.A, P. Walgenbach, & G.S. Drori. 2017. The Consequences of Globalization for Institutions and Organizations. In R. Greenwood, R. Meyer, C. Oliver & T. Lawrence (ds.) Handbook of Organizational Institutionalism, 2nd Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Karam, C.M. & D. Jamali. 2015. A Cross-Cultural and Feminist Perspective on CSR in Developing Countries: Uncovering Latent Power Dynamics. Journal of Business Ethics. doi:10.1007/s10551-015-2737-7

Lok, J., W.E.D. Creed, R. DeJordy, & M. Voronov. 2017. Living Institutions: Bringing Emotions into Organizational Institutionalism. In R. Greenwood, R. Meyer, C. Oliver & T. Lawrence (Eds.) Handbook of Organizational Institutionalism, 2nd Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Mair, J., M. Wolf & C. Seelos. 2016. Scaffolding: A Process of Transforming Patterns of Inequality in Small-Scale Societies. Academy of Management Journal 59(6), 2012-2044.

Marti, I. & P. Fernández. 2013. The Institutional Work of Oppression and Resistance: Learning from the Holocaust. Organization Studies 34(8), 1195-1223.

Palmer, P. J. 2011. Healing the Heart of Democracy; The Courage to Create a Politics Worthy of the Human Spirit. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Rittel, H.W. & M.M. Webber. (1973). Dilemmas in a General Theory of Planning. Policy Sciences 4, 155-169.

Tracy, P. & W.E.D Creed. 2017. Beyond Managerial Dilemmas: The Study of Paradoxes in Organizational Theory. In: W.K. Smith, M.W. Lewis, P. Jarzabkowski, & A. Langley (Eds.). The Oxford Handbook of Organizational Paradox. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

World Economic Forum, Global Risks Report 2018. Geneva: Switzerland. http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GRR18_Report.pdf

BAM council elections

In case you are member of the British Academy of Management, please remember to vote!

From January 2019 there will be vacant places on the BAM Council. 32 candidates have been nominated, representing a diverse range of research backgrounds and interests.

These elections are important as they will decide who will serve as members of Council for the next three years (Jan 2019 – Dec 2021) and will help to shape the academy going into the future.

The closing date for votes to be returned is 12.00 on Friday 24th August

The Candidates (In Alpabetical Order)

  • Dr Tony Abdoush
  • Dr Ijeoma Ogochukwu Anaso
  • Dr Norin Arshed
  • Professor Thankom Arun
  • Professor Charles Baden-Fuller
  • Dr Brendan Canavan
  • Dr Fariba Darabi
  • Professor Stephanie Decker
  • Dr Alison J. Glaister
  • Dr Russ Glennon
  • Dr Dieu Hack-Polay
  • Dr Qile He
  • Dr Inge Hill
  • Dr Emmanuel Idowu
  • Mr James Johnston
  • Dr Susan Kirk
  • Dr Smirti Kutaula
  • Professor Jonathan Liu
  • Dr Mark Loon
  • Dr Nnamdi Madichie
  • Dr Maktoba Omar
  • Kingsley Omeihe
  • Professor Emma Parry
  • Professor Emmanuella Plakoyiannaki
  • Dr Ijaz A. Qureshi
  • Dr Stefanie Reissner
  • Dr Ashley Roberts
  • Dr Sukanlaya Sawang
  • Dr Usha Sundaram
  • Dr Wen Wang
  • Dr Svetlana Warhurst
  • Dr Kemi Yekini

BAM Members – Cast Your Vote

To read statements from each of the nominees and for information on how to vote, please click here:

View Candidate Profiles (Available to Active BAM Members Only)

Please click here to vote in the BAM2019-2021 Council Elections

The closing date for votes to be returned is 12.00 Friday 24th August.

Kind regards,

Lewis

Lewis Johnson | Membership and Communications Administrator
—————————————————————————————–
British Academy of Management, 137 Euston Road London, NW1 2AA, UK
T: +44 (0)2073 839 794 | F: +44 (0) 2073 830 377 | ljohnson@bam.ac.uk
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OS SI CfP: Connectivity

Organization Studies

 Call for Papers

 Special Issue on: Connectivity in and around Organizations

 Guest Editors 

Darl G. Kolb, Graduate School of Management, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Marleen Huysman, KIN Research Group, VU University, The Netherlands

Kristine Dery, Center for Systems Information Research, MIT, Australia & USA

Anca Metiu, Senior Editor, Organization Studies, ESSEC Business School, France

 

Deadline for paper submissions: September 30th 2018

The journal is seeking papers for a Special Issue that reflects and considers the impact of ubiquitous and near-constant connectivity in and around organizations.

In 2008, Organization Studies published an article entitled, ‘Exploring the Metaphor of Connectivity: Attributes, Dimensions and Duality’  (Kolb, 2008). A lot has happened in the world of connectivity in the past 10 years. Following the BlackBerry (‘CrackBerry’) era, the release of the iPhone in 2007 accelerated the ‘smartphone’ era. To be sure, the topics of mobile communication practice (Dery, Kolb, & MacCormick, 2014; MacCormick, Dery, & Kolb, 2012; Mazmanian, Orlikowski, & Yates, 2013; Sergeva, Huysman, van den Hooff, & Soekijad, 2017) virtual work and collaboration (Fayard & Metiu, 2014; Kolb, Collins, & Lind, 2008), work-life balance (Bakker & Leiter, 2010; Mazmanian, 2013), perceptions of proximity (Leonardi, Treem, & Jackson, 2010; Wilson, O’Leary, Metiu, & Jett, 2008), cognitive and socio-emotional effects of hyper-connectivity (Carr, 2010; Turkle, 2011) have received considerable attention in the years since the past decade. However, with some notable exceptions (Bakker & Leiter, 2010; Flyverbom, Leonardi, Stohl, & Stohl, 2016; Leonardi & Barley, 2010; Orlikowski & Scott, 2008), theoretical developments have been relatively sparse in this relatively new, yet important field of inquiry.

We believe the time is right for a dedicated collection of scholarly work that advances our theoretical and practical understanding of the unprecedented connective context within and around organizations. Our intent is to produce a provocative and memorable Special Issue of Organization Studies. We therefore invite refreshing scholarly discourse on what constitutes connectivity (what it is and/or what it means), including its antecedents, its social materiality and the conceptual relationships that underpin and/or define connectivity, thereby offering advances in theory. Meanwhile, we expect critical evaluations of some of the ‘consequences’ and implications for practice. We are also seeking empirical studies that illuminate the subject and provide evidence and evocation for theory-building or theory-challenging.

Objectives of the Special Issue:

  • To advance our understanding of how connectivity affects organizational life
  • To stimulate dialogue and debate on connectivity as a dimension of contemporary life
  • To offer fresh, empirically-based insights into the practice of connecting with others through technology

We invite papers that will address, but are not limited to the following themes:

  • new perspectives on mobile human-computer interaction,
  • advancements and/or challenges to socio-technical and sociomaterial theoretical lenses,
  • the integration of work and non-work dimensions of life,
  • the stresses and strains associated with work-life integration, and
  • isolation and alienation that accompany and contradict increased connectedness.

We are particularly interested in papers that provoke new ways of thinking about questions such as, but not limited to:

  • How do face-to-face organisational processes and practices compete for attention with ubiquitous personal connective technologies?
  • Who decides when and how much organizational members connect or disconnect?
  • What are the implications of near-constant connectivity on health and wellness?
  • The paradox of autonomy: How do independent individuals still work collaboratively?
  • How are work practices co-evolving with connective technologies?
  • How are organizational structures co-evolving with connective technologies?

Papers may be conceptual, theoretical and/or empirical in nature, with a preference for empirical-based theoretical work.  While qualitative research may be most appropriate for supporting new theoretical directions and critical perspectives, quantitative research is also welcome, as long as it addresses new questions and contributes to the conceptual conversation in straightforward (accessible) language.

The scope of papers is intentionally broad, but papers should have a bearing on ‘organizational’ phenomena, as per the overall purpose and general guidelines of Organization Studies.

Submissions

Please submit papers through the journal’s online submission system, SAGE track, by visiting http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/orgstudies. Create your user account (if you have not done so already), and for “Manuscript Type,” choose the corresponding Special Issue. All papers that enter the review process will be double-blind reviewed, following the journal’s normal review process and criteria. You may submit papers for this Special Issue through SAGE Track between September, 15th and 30th 2018.

For administrative support and general queries, please contact:

Sophia Tzagaraki, Managing Editor, Organization Studies: osofficer@gmail.com.

 

References

Bakker, A. B., & Leiter, M. P. (2010). Work Engagement: A handbook of essential theory and research. New York: Psychology Press: Taylor and Francis Group.

Carr, N. (2010). The shallows: How the internet is changing the way we think, read and remember. London: Atlantic.

Dery, K., Kolb, D. G., & MacCormick, J. (2014). Working with flow: The evolving practice of smartphone technologies. European Journal of Information Systems, 23(5), 558-570.

Fayard, A.-L., & Metiu, A. (2014). The role of writing in distributed collaboration. Organization Science, 25(5), 1391-1413.

Flyverbom, M., Leonardi, P. M., Stohl, C., & Stohl, M. (2016). The management of visibilities in the digital age. Interntional Journal of Communication, 10, 98-109.

Kolb, D. G. (2008). Exploring the metaphor of connectivity: Attributes, dimensions and duality. Organization Studies, 29(1), 127-144.

Kolb, D. G., Collins, P. D., & Lind, E. A. (2008). Requisite connectivity: Finding flow in a not-so-flat world. Organizational Dynamics, 37(2), 181-189.

Leonardi, P. M., & Barley, S. R. (2010). What’s under construction here? Social action, materiality, and power in constructivist studies of technology and organizing. The Academy of Management Annals, 4(1), 1-51.

Leonardi, P. M., Treem, J. W., & Jackson, M. H. (2010). The connectivity paradox: Using technology to both decrease and increase perceptions of distance in distributed work arrangements. Journal of Applied Communications Research, 38(1), 85-105.

MacCormick, J., Dery, K., & Kolb, D. G. (2012). Engaged or just connected?: Smartphones and employee engagement. Organizational Dynamics, 41(3), 194-201.

Mazmanian, M. (2013). Avoiding the trap of constant connectivity: When congruent frames allow for heterogeneous practices. Academy of Management Journal, 56(5), 1225-1250.

Mazmanian, M., Orlikowski, W. J., & Yates, J. (2013). The autonomy paradox: The implications of mobile email devices for knowledge professionals. Organization Science, 24(5), 1337-1357.

Orlikowski, W. J., & Scott, S. V. (2008). Sociomateriality: Challenging the separation of technology, work and organization. The Academy of Management Annals, 2(1), 433-474.

Sergeva, A., Huysman, M., van den Hooff, B., & Soekijad, M. (2017). Through the eyes of others: How onlookers shape the use of mobile technology at work. MIS Quarterly, 41(4), 1153-1178.

Turkle, S. (2011). Alone together: Why we expect more from technology and less from each other. New York: Basic Books.

Wilson, J. M., O’Leary, M. B., Metiu, A., & Jett, Q. R. (2008). Percieved proximity in virtual work: Explaining the paradox of far-but-close. Organization Studies, 29(7), 979-1002.

Hagley Museum & Library Research Fellow

The Hagley Museum and Library’s Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society is recruiting for a twelve month Research Fellow and Intern commencing September 1, 2018, or soon thereafter. The position requires approximately two days per week of work which must be conducted at Hagley, and permits the Fellow to make use of a private office for his/her own research activities in addition as well. It may be held in conjunction with other employment (eg teaching or fellowships) so long as those do not interfere with Hagley responsibilities, especially Thursday events.

Responsibilities include:

  • To be present at Hagley on average two days per week, including attending and assisting as assigned at the Center’s author talks, seminars, conference, and brown bags.
  • Conduct research interviews with visiting scholars that will be included in the Center’s Stories from the Stacks
  • Obtain and edit blog articles from visiting scholars that will appear in Hagley’s Research and Collection News.
  • Prepare promotional materials for the Center to post on Hagley’s web page and manage social media for the Center.
  • Network with resident scholars at Hagley and enhance Hagley’s scholarly community.
  • Engage in and share personal scholarship while at Hagley.

 

Compensation:

  • $24,000 for eleven months of work in a twelve month period
  • Private office and computer accessible during Hagley’s regular business hours
  • Status as funded scholar, providing use of Hagley mail, Internet, interlibrary loan, etc.
  • $1,500 for travel to scholarly events or for personal research.
  • No healthcare or other benefits provided

 

Qualifications:

  • Master’s degree in history or related discipline; ABD status or above preferred
  • Research interests relevant to Hagley’s collections
  • Experience with programming and/or event coordination
  • Knowledge of social media, spreadsheets, and web page software
  • Well-organized and self-motivated

 

Application Procedure

Send a letter and c.v. to Roger Horowitz, Director, Center for the History of Business, Technology and Society, Hagley Museum and Library, rhorowitz@Hagley.org. The letter should address the following: the applicant’s research interests, programming experience, and social media experience. Applications should be sent as soon as possible and will be accepted until the position is filled.