Management History Division: Get Involved and VOTE

In recent years management and organizational history has become an exciting and rapidly changing field, with new ideas and approaches transforming the field and many publication opportunities at leading journals. The AOM’s Management History Division is one of the key institutional foundations for these developments, but the Division needs involvement and support from scholars who are engaged and care about the future of the field. So please get involved. The AOM recently announced the release of the ballot for division elections. If you are already a member of the MH Division, please take time to vote!!! If you are not a member but care about management history, please join the Division, vote now, and join us in Chicago!  The instructions for joining the MH Division can be found here: http://aom.org/FAQs/Membership/How-do-I-change-or-add-an-additional-division-or-interest-group-to-my-profile-.aspx

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New history piece in AMR!

I am very pleased to see Alistair’s work on how history reframes our understanding of institutional logics in print, especially in AMR. Congratulations!Academy of Management Review Vol. 43, No. 2Articles

Practice, Substance, and History: Reframing Institutional Logics

Published Online:https://doi.org/10.5465/amr.2015.0303

 

Roger Friedland’s characterization of institutional logics as a combination of substance and practices opens the door to a more complex reading of their influence on organizational life. His focus suggests attention to feelings and belief as much as cognition and choice. In this article I use history to develop these ideas by paying attention to the perennial features of our embodied relations with the world and other persons. Historical work draws our attention to neglected domains of social life, such as play, which can have profound impacts on organizations. The study of history suggests that such institutions have a long-run conditioning influence that calls into question accounts that stress individual agential choice and action in bringing about change. Analytical narratives of the emergence of practices can provide the means to combine the conceptual apparatus of organization theory with the attention to temporality of history.

CFP: Business History Conference 2019, Cartagena

Reblogged from the Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

The 2019 annual meeting of the Business History Conference will be held in Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, on March 14–16. The theme of the meeting will be “Globalization and De-Globalization: Shifts of Power and Wealth.” The recent phenomena of the spread of populist and economic nationalist regimes throughout North America, Europe, Asia and elsewhere taking positions against the major trading blocks and the free movement of people and goods make the topic of this conference very timely. The conference aims to concentrate on business history research agendas that enable a nuanced understanding of the phenomena of globalization and de-globalization.

The conference theme encourages contributions from a variety of approaches to business history research, covering a broad range of geographies and periods. The program committee of Marcelo Bucheli (co-chair), Andrea Lluch (co-chair), Takafumi KurosawaEspen StorliLaura Sawyer, and Teresa da Silva Lopes (BHC president) invites paper proposals…

View original post 730 more words

Imagining Britain’s economic future, c.1800-1975

Reblogged from the Imperial & Global Forum:

Imperial & Global Forum

David Thackeray, Richard Toye, and Andrew Thompson
University of Exeter

This book considers how Britain has imagined its economic role in the wider world and how British ideas have influenced global debates about market relationships between the start of the nineteenth century and the UK’s first European referendum. In doing so, the authors explore the interplay between the high political thought of theorists, the activities of officials and businesspeople, and the everyday experience of the wider public. Across the contributions to this book there is a consideration of the competing factors which affected market decisions and the processes of ‘economic imagination’.

The economist Joseph Schumpeter put the concept of imagination at the heart of the entrepreneurial process. It was this quality which, above all, businesspeople required if they were to succeed: ‘the capacity of seeing things in a way which proves afterwards to be true, even though it cannot be…

View original post 675 more words

ToC: BH 60,5 SI on Institutional Change

Special issue in: Historical research on institutional change

Special issue introduction: Historical research on institutional change
Stephanie Decker, Behlül Üsdiken, Lars Engwall & Michael Rowlinson
Pages: 613-627 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1427736

Interfield Dynamics: Law and the creation of new organisational fields in the nineteenth-century United States
R. Daniel Wadhwani
Pages: 628-654 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1346610

Moral dividends: Freemasonry and finance capitalism in early-nineteenth-century America
Pamela A. Popielarz
Pages: 655-676 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1248946

Hey DJ, don’t stop the music: Institutional work and record pooling practices in the United States’ music industry |
Neil Thompson
Pages: 677-698 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1308485

Managing the paradox of unwanted efficiency: The symbolic legitimation of the hypermarket format in Finland, 1960–1975
Jarmo Seppälä
Pages: 699-727 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1304540

Change dynamics in institutional discontinuities: Do formal or informal institutions change first? Lessons from rule changes in professional American baseball
Aya S. Chacar, Sokol Celo & William Hesterly
Pages: 728-753 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1342811

From data problems to questions about sources: elements towards an institutional analysis of population-level organisational change. The case of British building societies, 1845–1980
Olivier Butzbach
Pages: 754-777 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1274304
Corrigendum

Correction to: Interfield Dynamics: Law and the creation of new organisational fields in the nineteenth-century United States
Pages: x-x | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2018.1432458

PDWs on Historic Corporate Responsibility

Special Issue Paper Development Workshops

Historic Corporate Responsibility:

Its Extent, Limits, and Consequences

The guest editors of the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue on Historic Corporate Social Responsibility will arrange paper development workshops at the following conferences:

  • Academy of Management (10-14 August in Chicago),
  • International Association for Business & Society (7-10 June in Hong Kong), and
  • European Business History Association (6-8 September in Ancona, Italy)[1]

During the workshops, authors will present and discuss their papers and receive feedback from discussants and peers.

Attendance at these workshops is NOT a precondition for submission to the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue.

Confirmed discussants at the Academy of Management in Chicago include Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School), Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University), Paul C. Godfrey (Brigham Young University), Stefan Hielscher (University of Bath), Michael Rowlinson (University of Exeter), Sébastien Mena (Cass Business School), and Roy R. Suddaby (University of Victoria and Newcastle University).

Submission Information and Deadlines

Scholars interested in one of the workshops are asked to contact the guest editors according to requirements for each conference. Please see the following table for the key dates and contact information.

  IABS conference AoM conference EBHA conference
Require-ments Elevator pitch format. Interested authors might wish to contact Rob Phillips prior to the conference. To be considered for a PDW at either AoM or EBHA, an abstract (no more than 2’000 words or 8 pages all in) should be submitted to the responsible guest editor. The guest editors will then select promising abstracts and notify the authors. After acceptance, the authors are asked to submit a full paper (8’000-10’000 words).
Submission of abstracts none May 15, 2018

(extended deadline)

June 17, 2018
Submission of full paper July 1, 2018 August 1, 2018
Date and location of workshop June 7-10, 2018

Hong Kong

August 10-14, 2018

Chicago, IL

September 6-8, 2018

Ancona, Italy

Contact Rob Phillips

rphillips@schulich.yorku.ca

Judith Schrempf-Stirling

judith.schrempf-stirling@unige.ch

Christian Stutz

Christian.stutz@fh-hwz.ch

 [1] The workshop proposal at the EBHA is currently under evaluation—to be confirmed.

CfP: 50 years of Management Learning

Call for Papers: Anniversary Special Issue of Management Learning
Celebrating 50 years of Management Learning:
Historical reflections at the intersection of the past and future

Deadline for submissions: June 01, 2018
Guest Editors:
Gabrielle Durepos, Mount Saint Vincent University, Canada
Rafael Alcadipani, FGV-EAESP, Brazil
Mairi Maclean, University of Bath, UK
Stephen Cummings, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
Management Learning marks its 50th anniversary in 2020. Management Learning has a
long history of publishing critical, reflexive scholarship on organizational knowledge and learning. This special issue provides a forum to celebrate and build on this history
through critical and reflective engagement with the past, present and future of
management learning, knowledge and education. Taking a historical approach is all the
more pressing given recent and impending crises – geo-political, technological,
environmental and humanitarian – since some crises only make sense when seen in the
fullness of time (Casson and Casson, 2013). We therefore encourage scholarship that
challenges the disciplinary past of management knowledge, learning and education and
enables more diverse, innovative futures to be imagined.
There are a growing variety of approaches and conceptual frameworks in management
and organization studies for writing histories of organizations (Maclean, Harvey and
Clegg, 2016; Rowlinson, Hassard and Decker, 2014), management thought (Bucheli and
Wadhwani, 2014; Cummings, Bridgman, Hassard and Rowlinson, 2017) and researching
management in historically conscious ways (Jacques, 1996; Kieser, 1994). This has been
accompanied by a rise in critical organizational histories (Cooke, 1999; Ibarra-Colado,
2006; Scott, 2007). Although diverse, this scholarship is characterized by reflexivity
(Cunliffe, 2002), anti-performativity – history is generated for reasons beyond improving
future business efficiency and effectiveness – and commitment to an agenda of denaturalizing both hegemonic organizations, by exposing problematic pasts, and dominant historiography like positivism that seeks unitary truth (Fournier and Grey, 2000). The rise of critical history research has involved scholarship on management learning and education that challenges the dominant history of management thought in a number of ways (Jacques, 1996; Genoe Mclaren, Mills and Weatherbee, 2015). While some have exposed processes of exclusion and marginalization of management knowledge in textbooks (Cummings and Bridgman, 2011; Grant and Mills, 2006), others have uncovered knowledge politics and marginalization around geographical boundaries.

 

Full details are here: http://journals.sagepub.com/pb-assets/cmscontent/MLQ/ML%2050%20anniversary%20SI.pdf

EBHA prize for the best doctoral dissertation

Dear colleagues,

The European Business History Associaton awards a prize for the best dissertation published in the field of business history submitted to a European University every two years. The next prize will be awarded at the EBHA Conference this summer, and we are keen to encourage submissions from candidates who have obtained their PhD in the last two years. The deadline for submissions was originally 15 April, but this has now been extended to 30 April 2018.

It is perfectly possible for a dissertation to be considered for both the EBHA prize and the Coleman Prize simultaneously.

If you have had your PhD dissertation accepted in the last two years, or know of colleagues who are in this position, please do consider applying (or encouraging them to apply).

Further details on the prize, the submission process and the judging criteria can be found here:

http://www.ebha.org/?seite=dissertation_prize

 

With kind regards

Peter Miskell

 

Article discussion: Reinventing entrepreneurial history

The NEP-HIS blog, had Nicholas Wong (Newcastle Business School) discuss a piece by Dan and Christina (my co-editors here at OHN):

Reinventing Entrepreneurial History

By R. Daniel Wadhwani (University of the Pacific, USA) and Christina Lubinski (Copenhagen Business School, Denmark)

Business History Review, 2017, 91 (4): 767-799

The executive editors of Business History Review have given free access to this article for a limited time.

Please find the review and link to the article here http://www.nephis.org

 

 

 

 

 

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