BizHizColl talk TODAY!

Historical Cognition and Strategic Entrepreneurship

Date: 25/09/2020 @ 16.00 hrs London
Speaker: Diego Coraiola, University of Alberta
Chair: Nicholas Wong, Northumbria University

Register hereSee abstract below.

Abstract

There is an emerging ‘historical turn’ in strategy and entrepreneurship research. Scholars are realizing that history can be a source of competitive heterogeneity and foster entrepreneurial action. However, scholars disagree upon the reasons why history matters. Objective approaches have theorized the inertial and path dependence effects of historically acquired resources and competencies. Contrarily, narrative approaches argue that history can be conceived as a form of rhetoric used to generate competitive advantage. Thus, in spite of the recognized importance of history for entrepreneurial and strategic behaviour, we lack an overarching theoretical framework clarifying the role of history in strategic entrepreneurship. In this chapter, we develop an integrative approach to history grounded on the notion of historical consciousness. Our cognitive view of history integrates previous approaches and outlines new avenues for the study of strategic entrepreneurship.

Accounting History International Emerging Scholars’ Colloquium

Call for Research Proposals

The Accounting History International Emerging Scholars’ Colloquium

Portsmouth, United Kingdom, 8 September 2021

The Accounting History International Emerging Scholars’ Colloquium (AHIESC) will be held as part of the eleventh Accounting History International Conference (11AHIC) being held in Portsmouth, United Kingdom during 8-10 September 2021.

This international forum is designed for emerging scholars of all ages and career stages, including doctoral degree students, new faculty and other emerging accounting researchers who have an interest in accounting history, and who seek to obtain feedback from senior faculty members on their historical accounting research projects in an intellectually stimulating environment.

Please find attached the ‘Call for Research Proposals’. Further details about the 11AHIC can be found at the following site: https://www.port.ac.uk/11AHIC

Please also note these important dates:

  • 2 November 2020 Submission opening
  • 19 March 2021 Submission deadline

Best wishes

Carolyn, Carolyn and Laura

Carolyn Cordery, Carolyn Fowler and Laura Maran

Editors, Accounting History

EBHA E-Congress

This week our blog comes out on Monday to highlight the EBHA eConference taking place this week Friday – below the registration details and the day’s timetable.

September 11th, 2020

Hosted by CUNEF – Madrid (Zoom platform)

Registration: https://ebha.org/public/C3

Globalization Challenged

Keynote Speech

9.15 – 10.15 am (CEST) Introduction and Chair: Andrea Colli, EBHA President

Keynote speech: Martin Wolf, Financial Times

Discussant: Teresa da Silva Lopes, EBHA Vice-president

Globalization Challenged: the perspective of Business History

10.30 – 12.15 pm (CEST) Introduction and Chair: Bram Bouwens, Utrecht University and EBHA Council member

Panelists:

  • Tomasz Olejniczak, Department of Management, Kozminski University (Warsaw)
  • Grace Ballor, Harvard Business School
  • Ann-Kristin Bergquist, Unit of Economic History and Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics, Umeå University
  • Edoardo Altamira, Department of International History, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (Geneva)

EBHA Annual General Meeting

12.30 – 1.15 pm (CEST) Separate virtual room.

EBHA members can register at: https://ebha.org/public/C5

Roundtable “Teaching Business History in Distance Learning”

2.30 – 4.00 pm (CEST) Coordinator: Maiju Wuokko, University of Turku

Panelists:

  • Adoración Álvaro-Moya, CUNEF University (Madrid) and EBHA Secretary
  • Ludovic iCaullet, Edhec Business School (Roubaix)
  • Andrea Colli, Bocconi University Milan and
  • EBHA President Andrew Smith, University of Liverpool 

1st Organization Theory Winter Workshop

November 13–14, 2020 [online]

The Organization Theory (OT) Winter Workshop is aimed at organization and management researchers who wish to write high quality and impactful theoretical papers for journal publication (in Organization Theory, Organization Studies, Academy of Management Review, or elsewhere).

Call for Papers

The 1st Organization Theory (OT) Winter Workshop 2020 will offer detailed coaching and hands-on feedback sessions on participants’ papers as well as plenary sessions by members of the OT editorial team on key aspects of developing and writing theory (developing a theory contribution, construct clarity, genres of theory writing).
 
This will be the first edition of an annual workshop that will bring together organization and management scholars, the editors of Organization Theory, and senior academics with experience in writing theory papers as additional facilitators and mentors.
 
Applications for the OT Winter Workshop 2020 are now open (please see details below); we encourage both senior researchers as well as researchers in earlier stages of their careers to submit conceptual papers to be considered for this workshop. We are open to theoretical perspectives from outside the ‘mainstream’ and are keen to support the development of papers which are currently not under review. – Please note that empirical papers (those with either quantitative or qualitative data) will NOT be accepted.
 
This workshop will be online, with sessions taking place via ZOOM [tbc].

Convenors

Eva Boxenbaum | Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
Joep Cornelissen | Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Penny Dick | University of Sheffield, United Kingdom
Joel Gehman | University of Alberta, Canada
Markus Höllerer | UNSW Sydney, Australia
Juliane Reinecke | King’s College London, United Kingdom
David Seidl | University of Zurich, Switzerland

This year’s theme: “New Theoretical Perspectives on Organizations, Organizing and the Organized”

Over the past years, we have witnessed a growing criticism of the standard model of theorizing through propositions and hypotheses (“if, then” clauses), and the degree to which this model can by itself conceptually capture the complexity and dynamics of organizational phenomena. Based on this criticism, there has been a repeated call for alternative ways of theorizing that unsettle, challenge and extend our current ways of knowing and understanding organizations and processes of managing and organizing, including key topics such as CSR and sustainability, power and resistance, strategy, identity, change, design, knowledge, leadership, technology, sensemaking, routines, practices, and institutions.
Whilst the standard model has its strengths and limitation, it’s not the only viable way to develop theory (Cornelissen & Höllerer, 2020). There are other ways of theorizing and writing, including various forms of critique, process theorizing, provocative thought experiments, meta-theorizing, and hermeneutic inquiries, amongst other forms. The new EGOS journal Organization Theory (OT) is open to these different forms of theorizing, and in doing so aims to be the driving force behind intellectual pluralism and theoretical developments in our field.
In line with this pluralistic ethos and our aim of opening up new theoretical perspectives, we seek contributions for the OT Winter Workshop 2020 from a wide range of theoretical perspectives and on different topic areas. Specifically, our intention is to offer an open forum and supportive environment for theory development in the broadest possible sense; we aim to provide opportunities for authors to draw novel connections across proximate disciplines, including management studies, philosophy, social and political theory, sociology, and ethics, to name a few, while retaining a clear focus on organizations and practices of organizing. We are keen to receive work that challenges existing theory, as well as papers that significantly deepen and stretch our understanding of current organizational theories and topics. Furthermore, we explicitly encourage submissions which introduce theoretical ideas from different scholarly communities around the world and aim to disclose these to a broader international audience.
Following the workshop, the best papers from the workshop can be submitted for a fast-track review process for possible publication in Organization Theory. Details on this process will be shared during the workshop.

Submissions

The 1st Organization Theory Winter Workshop will take place online on November 13 & 14, 2020.


  • Those interested in participating should submit an abstract by September 7, 2020 through the OT Workshop website: https://osofficer.wixsite.com/otworkshop. – Abstracts should not comprise more than 1,000 words.
    Authors will be notified of acceptance or otherwise by September 21, 2020.
  • Full papers must be submitted by October 20, 2020.
  • Further details on the logistics of the workshop will be published through the OT Workshop website.

Reference

Cornelissen, J., & Höllerer, M.A. (2020): “An Open and Inclusive Space for Theorizing: Introducing Organization Theory.”
Organization Theory, 1 (1); first published on December 5, 2019
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2631787719887980

BAM2020 and how history can help us to “Take Race Seriously”

It’s been a great start to the BAM2020 Conference in the Cloud today. A genuinely nice way to start the new academic years, which is nearly upon us (and promises to be a genuinely strange experience at universities everywhere). And as it is 2020, the conference is of course virtual, and consequently in a different format. Individual presentations only take place asynchronously, so I am not clear how much feedback and engagement anyone who has submitted papers will receive, but it is an interesting innovation.

The main conference is now a series of panel discussion around key topics, which so far have been informative and practical (such as “The Art of Reviewing”) as well as timely and topical. The BAM fellows session addressed issues of “Taking Race Seriously”, and highlighted not just what is happening in businesses and other organizations, but also in academia. Prof Nelarine Cornelius emphasised the role that a more critical approach to teaching business and imperial history could play in making our curricula more diverse. She particularly referred to the role of chartered companies, such as the East India company, and merchant venturers as creating the institutions that anchored global trade – an influence that continues to the present day. Including any history in business school curricula, either as standalone modules or within existing ones, is often advocated (particularly when there’s a crisis on) but it is not clear how to engage students in history when this is not what they came to management and business schools for. Mention anything before the year 2000, and enjoy the puzzled look in your students faces (back when you could actually still see them).

When it comes to thinking about how to draw on history to raise awareness for the racist and violent expansion of imperialist powers in the “First Global Economy”, it brings with it a critical and at times subversive view on the very models and approaches that we teach. Whether it is the origins of management ideas in the plantation economy of the antebellum South US (and therefore in the management of slave labour) or a more general reassessment of how we think management ideas were developed – this kind of knowledge challenges what we thing we know about the past as much as the present.

But it also raises the issue that perhaps not enough of this research has taken place and that there is a scarcity of material out there that we can teach our students about. It is not solely WHAT to teach them (although that is an issue as well), but also HOW to link this into the broader curriculum and learning objectives. It is of course one way in which business and management schools could decolonise the curriculum, but finding and integrating such resources is not always easily done. This was particularly highlighted by a very interested talk I chaired for the Business History Collective (on Twitter: @bizhiscol) last week. Profs Leon C Prieto and Simone Phipps talked about their research about the ‘hidden’ pioneers of African-American management thought, focusing on three individuals few management scholars may have heard of, because their contribution to business history and management ideas were ignored in many ways, both at the time and by posterity. You can access a recording of their talk here (you will need to enter this password: 0?bUF83n).

Going forward, we will hopefully see more of this kind of research that we can bring into our teaching. While business and management journals, of course, continue to publish a wide variety of research, there is a noticeable shift in many mainstream journals towards engaging with these issues. See, for example, a recent issue in AMLE featuring articles bringing historical and postcolonial perspectives to bear on management education. Nevertheless, such work still needs to contribute to theory and address the key concerns of journals by making a connection to existing conversations. Tomorrow, BAM2020 will start with our regular Meet the Editors session – again chaired by yours truly. Even if you cannot be there, do make sure you watch the really informative advance video of the editors of BJM, IJMR, EMJ and JMS, which is a great resource to better understand how to get published in these journals. As historical research is becoming more mainstream and the issues with what we think we know about the origins of management practices and thought ever more apparent and controversial, it is important to join these wider conversations.