CfP: ABH 2019 – Business Transformation in an Uncertain World

Deadline extended!

Call for Papers
Association of Business Historians Annual Conference
‘Business Transformation in an Uncertain World‘
Sheffield Hallam University, 4-6 July 2019

Businesses have always operated in a shifting and uncertain environment. Such
uncertainty has stemmed from a variety of factors including the surprising behaviour of rivals, the advent of new and sometimes disruptive technologies (such as steam power or electricity), changes in consumer tastes, the tightening or relaxation of regulation, macroeconomic disturbances (such as depressions), natural and industrial disasters, nationalization, political crises and war. The conference seeks to explore how businesses (and business organizations) in the past charted their way through an uncertain world, whether reactively or creatively through reorganization and the development of new strategies to secure an advantage. Failure may be as interesting as success.
Proposals for individual papers, or for full sessions, panel discussions or other session formats, are invited on this topic, broadly conceived, dealing with any historical period or region of the world, and using any relevant academic methodology. Some examples of themes that could be addressed are given below, but this list is not meant to be exhaustive.

  • The impact of disruptive technologies from the perspective of the innovator and/or the businesses threatened
  • Disruptive business models such as mail order, supermarkets, online retailing, flatpack furniture
  • The ways in which firms and industries have tried to predict and anticipate the actions of rivals: for example by developing forecasting tools
  • Moulding, identifying and responding to changes in consumer tastes and values: for example the targeting of women consumers by tobacco firms in the 1920s
  • Influencing and reacting to changes in the national and international regulatory environment: for example the tightened regulation of banking and financial services around the world after the 1930s depression
  • Reconfiguring the organizational structure of the firm or industry in order to create a new advantage, or respond to a new threat
  • The behaviour of management under stress, for example at times of financial crisis, or during a natural disaster or industrial accident (such as a mining explosion)
  • The development of management thought on how to cope with uncertainty from the early twentieth century onwards
  • Businesses and political uncertainty, including war, nationalization, and the threat of nationalization, and the collapse of existing political structures (e.g. decolonization of the British and French empires, or the break-up of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.)

As always, we also welcome proposals that are not directly related to the conference
theme.

How to submit a paper or session proposal
The programme committee will consider both individual papers and entire panels.
Individual paper proposals should include a one-page (up to 300-word) abstract and
5 line curriculum vitae (CV). Panel proposals should include a cover letter stating
the rationale for the panel and the name of its contact person; one-page (300-word)
abstract and author’s CV for each paper; and a list of preferred panel chairs and
commentators with contact information. Note that each academic session lasts 90
minutes, allowing time for 3 or at a pinch 4 papers. The deadline for submissions is
31 January 2019.

If you have any questions please contact j.singleton@shu.ac.uk.
Submissions must be made online at: https://unternehmensgeschichte.de/db/public/C7
Begin by selecting between uploading a single paper or a full panel. Have your abstract and CV ready. The software will guide you through the uploading and submission process.

Any other suggestions for the conference – workshops, poster sessions, panel
discussions – should be made to the programme committee through
j.singleton@shu.ac.uk.

 

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Tony Slaven doctoral workshop & Francesca Carnevali travel grants

Call for Applications
Tony Slaven Doctoral Workshop in Business History
Sheffield Hallam University, 4th July 2019

The ABH will hold its seventh annual Tony Slaven Doctoral Workshop on 4 July 2019. This event immediately precedes the 2019 ABH Annual Conference at Sheffield Hallam University. Participants in the Workshop are encouraged to attend the main ABH Annual Conference following the Workshop. The Workshop is an excellent opportunity for doctoral students to discuss their work with other research students and established academics in business history in an informal and supportive environment. Students at any stage of their doctoral studies, whether in their first year or very close to submitting, are urged to apply. In addition to providing new researchers with an opportunity to discuss their work with experienced researchers in the discipline, the Workshop will also include at least one skills-related session. The Workshop interprets the term ‘business history’ broadly, and it is intended that students in areas such as (but not confined to) the history of international trade and investment, financial or economic history, agricultural history, the history of not-for-profit organisations, government-industry relations, accounting history, social studies of technology, and historians or management or labour will find it useful. Students undertaking topics with a significant business history element but in disciplines other than economic or business history are also welcome. We embrace students researching any era or region of history.
Skills sessions are typically led by regular ABH members; in the past these have included ‘getting published’, ‘using historical sources’, and ‘preparing for your viva examination’ sessions. There will be ample time for discussion of each student’s work and the opportunity to gain feedback from active researchers in the field.

How to Apply for the Tony Slaven Workshop
Your application should be no more than 4 pages sent together in a single computer file: 1) a one page CV; 2) one page stating the name(s) of the student’s supervisor(s), the title of the theses (a proposed title is fine), the university and department where the student is registered and the date of commencement of thesis registration; 3) an abstract of the work to be presented.

You may apply via email to Dr Mitch Larson at mjlarson@uclan.ac.uk. Please use the subject line “Tony Slaven Workshop” and submit by the 31 January 2019.

Francesca Carnevali Travel Grant for PhD Students

Students whose papers are accepted for either the Slaven Doctoral Workshop or the main ABH meeting may apply for funds to partially defray their travel costs by applying to the Francesca Carnevali Travel Grant for PhD Students. A limited number of scholarships are available from the Francesca Carnevali fund of the ABH to contribute towards the travel, accommodation, and registration costs of students doing a PhD in the United Kingdom, who are presenting in the Slaven Workshop or the ABH conference. These will be awarded competitively prior to the Workshop. Please indicate in your application whether you would like to be considered for one of these travel grants.

 

Coleman Prize for the best doctoral thesis in Business History 2019

Coleman Prize for Best PhD Dissertation
Sheffield Hallam University, 4-6 July 2019

Named in honour of the British business historian Donald Coleman (1920-1995), this prize is awarded annually by the Association of Business Historians to recognise excellence in new research in Britain. It is open to PhD dissertations in Business History (broadly defined) either having a British subject or completed at a British university. All dissertations completed in the previous calendar year to that of the Prize are eligible. In keeping with the ABH’s broad understanding of business history, applications are strongly encouraged from candidates in economic history, social history, labour history, intellectual history, cultural history, environmental history, the history of science and technology, the history of medicine, or any
other subfield. The value of the prize is £500, sponsored by the Taylor & Francis Group, a scholarly publisher.

To be eligible for the Prize, finalists must present their findings in person at the Association’s annual conference, held on 4-6 July 2019. A complete list of previous winners may be found at: http://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH/coleman.html

How to Apply for the Coleman Prize
Supervisors are encouraged to nominate recent PhDs, and self-nominations are also strongly welcomed. Please send a PDF including the title of your PhD dissertation and a brief abstract (up to 2 double-spaced pages) to christine.leslie@glasgow.ac.uk by 31 January 2019.
Shortlisted candidates will be requested to submit electronic copies of their theses by 21 February 2019. Finalists will be notified by 21 March 2019.
Everyone appearing on the programme must register for the meeting. PhD students whose papers are accepted for the meeting may apply for funds to partially defray their travel costs by applying to the Francesca Carnevali Travel Grant for PhD Students. A limited number of scholarships are available from the Francesca Carnevali fund of the ABH to contribute towards the travel, accommodation and registration costs of students doing a PhD in the United Kingdom, who are
presenting in the Slaven Workshop, the ABH conference or the Coleman Prize.
For more details: https://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH/

CfP: Uses of the Past in International Economic Relations

Uses of the Past in International Economic Relations

St. Hilda’s College
University of Oxford
9-10 May 2019

How do policymakers and economic actors use the past in their decision-making? One of the many exceptional aspects of the global financial crisis of 2008 was the prominence policymakers and commentators gave to the importance of history in helping to determine their response to the crisis. Comparisons with the Great Depression of the 1930s were a recurrent feature of assessments of the depth and spread of the global financial crisis and reveal the extent to which policymakers sought to ‘learn’ from the past. But how relevant is the past as a guide to the present, or even the future, and how is it used when policymakers, bankers and the public are faced with difficult economic challenges?

The main objective of the conference is to build an understanding of how policymakers and economic actors have used the past as a foundation for their decisions, how they created and discriminated among different interpretations of the past according to their preconceptions, and how they were conditioned by the experiences of their predecessors.

Examples may include (but are not limited to) the development of regulation, the reaction to economic or financial crises, the opening of overseas branches or subsidiaries, and the assessment of the credit-worthiness of customers. We welcome all proposals related to this theme across the 19thand 20thcenturies.

PhD students, early career researchers, and confirmed researchers are invited to submit proposals. Applications should comprise a 1 page abstract/summary and short CV. We have some limited funds to support travel costs and accommodation of speakers.

Please send to:  upier@history.ox.ac.uk

For further information please contact Chloe Colchester: upier@history.ox.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals: 25thJanuary 2019

Conference Committee:

  • Catherine Schenk (University of Oxford)
  • Mary O’Sullivan (Universite de Geneve)
  • Mats Larsson (Uppsala University)
  • Stefano Battilossi (Carlos III Madrid)
  • Emmanuel Mourlon-Druot (University of Glasgow)

The UPIER project is financially supported by the HERA Joint Research Programme 3 Uses of the Past which is co-funded by AHRC, AKA, BMBF via DLR-PT, CAS, CNR, DASTI, ETAg, FWF, F.R.S. – FNRS, FWO, FCT, FNR, HAZU, IRC, LMT, MIZS, MINECO, NWO, NCN, RANNÍS, RCN, SNF, & VIAA.

The UPIER project has also received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 649307