Using Historical Methods in Management and Organization Research

For the first time, Aston’s summer programme is offering this course on historical methods in management & organization research.

Course information:

Aston Business School

9 July 2018


Management and organizational researchers are increasingly interested in the opportunities for historical research. Even though history as a discipline does not have a similar understanding of methodology to the management and organization studies, in recent years there have been a number of publications and workshops demystifying historical approaches and analytical techniques. This one-day workshop will introduce participants to basic techniques and recent developments, as well as providing worked examples and on-hand advice for ongoing research projects.

Course outline

9.45 – 10.00        Welcome and introduction

10.00 – 12.00      Introduction to basic research techniques

12.00 – 13.00      Focus on participants’ projects

13.00 – 14.00      Lunch  break

14.00 – 15.00      Recent developments in organization history, introduction to key debates

15.00 – 16.00      Worked example: researching organizational corruption at Enron

16.00 – 17.00      How to publish organizational history: journals, rationales and strategies

17.00 – 17.15      Summary and end of seminar



 Stephanie Decker, Professor in History and Organization Studies

Adam Nix, Researcher in Organization History and Organizational Corruption

More information on:


Fees: One day workshop: £125. This includes University-wide wifi access; lunch and refreshments.




Program Classroom Frontiers: Business History Course Development Workshop

The Copenhagen Business School PDW Series

Classroom Frontiers: Business History Course Development Workshop


Time: Thursday, April 5, 2018, c.9am-1:30pm

Place: Baltimore Embassy Suites Inner Harbor, 222 St Paul Pl, Baltimore, MD 21202

To register for this workshop, use the BHC annual meeting registration form.


9:00am-9:30am                    Welcome – Christina Lubinski (CBS)

Classroom Frontiers: Introduction and Three Pilots: Entrepreneurial History, Public History, Financial History

9:30am-10:00am                 Entrepreneurial History – Dan Wadhwani (Univ. of the Pacific)

Dan Wadhwani (in collaboration with Noam Wasserman) is currently in the process of developing a course in “Entrepreneurial History.” The plan is to offer it as a general education course at the Greif Center of Entrepreneurship, University of Southern California. The course is structured in three modules: (i) Origins of entrepreneurial capitalism (examining the big macro entrepreneurial opportunities that have transformed capitalism); (ii) From Organization Man to Entrepreneurial History (focusing on changes in technology, policy, financing, careers, and corporate strategy, which have unleashed entrepreneurial endeavors; (iii) Making History (examining techniques by which entrepreneurs use the past to make and legitimize the future.)

10:00am-10:20am              Commentator: Bill Gartner (Babson College)

10:20am-10:30am             Coffee Break

10:30am-11:00am              Public History – Ken Lipartito (Florida International University)

Ken Lipartito teaches courses on public history, where he works with students in applying history skills to a variety of non-academic spaces—museums, historic sites, government agencies, public policy organizations.  Several of his graduates have found employment outside of academia—in the Library of Congress, for the military.  In 2016-17 he was the recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities Next Generation Ph.D Grant, to expand opportunities for history graduate students seeking employment beyond the academy.  He also runs a number of community based projects in Miami, working with institutions in creating digital archives and historical exhibits.  As a principal in the Business History Group, LLC ( he consults with business, government and non-profit entities to write organizational histories and provide historical expertise for legal, strategic and policy matters.

11:00am-11:20am              Commentator: Mads Mordhorst (Copenhagen Business School)

11:20am-11:30am              Coffee Break

11:30am-12:30pm           Financial History: The Great Depression in Real Time – Mary O’Sullivan (University of Geneva)

Mary O’Sullivan is teaching a course on international economic history, in which she includes a module titled “The Great Depression in Real Time” based on her latest research on economic history and economic policy. She uses a variety of different primary sources to discuss the way in which policymakers tried to understand and react to the crisis as it emerged. She is focusing in particular on policy makers at the Fed who were grappling with policy challenges related to the country’s domestic financial system.

12:30pm-12:50pm             Commentator: Per Hansen (Copenhagen Business School)

12:50pm-1:30pm               Concluding discussion

PhD Summer School 2017 – University of Tübingen

Reblogged from Nico Strydom:

Nicolaas Strydom

In September of last year I had the wonderful privilege of attending a PhD Summer School entitled ‘Business Beyond Businesses: Agency, Political Economy & Investors, c. 1850- 1970’. This took place at the Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen in the charming town of Tübingen, Germany. The aim of the summer school was to provide doctoral students with an overview of relevant research and of innovative tools and methodologies in the fields of Business and Economic History. Each doctoral student also had a 25 minute slot in which to present their own research, and receive extensive feedback from the academic panel as well as the fellow doctoral students present.

IMG_5889 The beautiful town of Tübingen, Germany

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Technology’s Stories blog

Management and organizational historians should be working much more collaboratively with historians of technology. The two scholarly communities have much in common as well as much to learn from one another. Org historians can check out some of the ideas, work, and reflections of historians of technology at the really wonderful Technology’s Stories blog. The blog describes is mission as follows:

We engage readers with the usable past—stories that help us make sense of contemporary technological challenges and aspirations. Technology’s Stories is a place for thinkers to share new insights on the integration of technology with our environments and our social, political, and economic lives.

Pat Denaul, over at The Exchange just added a nice post about the blog. Org historians may be particularly interested in a thoughtful post of the use of varieties of counterfactual reasoning by John K. Brown.


Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Business History: Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

Solvay Brussels School of Economics & Management
Free University of Brussels (Université Libre de Bruxelles)
Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Business History (2 + 1 years)

Salary: Fellowship up to ca. 30,000-36,000 EUR, depending on level of expertise and
fiscal regulations.  Employer will provide assistance with the administrative steps to be undertaken prior to arrival at the ULB and the various formalities to be completed once in Belgium (residence permit, accommodation, health insurance, tax and social security…

Expected start date: October 1st, 2018

Application deadline: February 8th, 2018

A Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Business History is vacant at the Solvay
Brussels School of Economics and Management (SBS-EM) of the Free University of
Brussels (Université Libre de Bruxelles – ULB).

The Kurgan-van Hentenryk (hereafter KvH) Chair in Business History aims at
advancing and diffusing research on the history of the knowledge economy. The
purpose of the chair is threefold. First, it is designed to…

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Deadline Extended: EBHA 2018

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

The deadline to apply to the European Business History Association conference has been extended to Wednesday, January 31, 2018.
If you have any questions please contact Veronica Binda or Roberto Giulianelli at:

The firm and the sea: chains, flows and connections

Call for Papers, European Business History Association 2018 Conference Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona – Italy September 6-8, 2018

The sea – whether considered as open ocean or as a mass of water bordered by land masses – is an enormous economic resource for mankind. Not only is it the principal way of transportation for goods and humans but it’s also a formidable source of food. Since we want to link the sea with the business unit (the firm, as well as other organizational units like clusters, networks and global value chains) the focus of the next EBHA conference will be on two units of analysis that are both…

View original post 1,401 more words

Classroom Frontiers: Business History Course Development Workshop

The Copenhagen Business School PDW Series at the Business History Conference (BHC) Annual Meeting 2018, Baltimore , MD21202, USA

Thursday, April 5, 2018, c.9am-1:30pm

Business historians excel in the classroom. They do so by applying history to a variety of different topics and using a set of different approaches. While in recent years, business historians have started sharing collections of course syllabi,[1] there are very few opportunities to engage in discussion about how and in which contexts business history is being taught.

The workshop provides a platform for business historians to learn and share the content and techniques of what they are teaching and to discuss ways to collaborate more effectively about pedagogy. This includes not only sharing content and methods but also discussing opportunities for joint case development and staff exchanges between schools.

To allow for a focused debate, we have invited presenters with three concrete examples of courses rooted in business history but pushing its frontiers in new directions and targeting new audiences. They will present innovative new course and teaching initiatives in (i) Public History, (ii) Financial History and (iii) Entrepreneurial History. We seek to sample their concrete examples of course design, module structure and session planning as well as discuss new experimental ideas in each of these areas. All three topics can be understood as pilots when it comes to successfully introducing business history to history departments and business schools as well as engaging a broader public.

Participants will come away with usable ideas about both content and pedagogical practice for introduction in their classroom and public outreach activities. Participants are explicitly encouraged to bring their own case ideas, session plans, or module concepts for common discussion.

The workshop will take place immediately before the BHC meeting and at the same location. Participation in BHC meeting and workshop is possible. If you have any questions, please contact Christina Lubinski ( or Dan Wadhwani ( We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the “Rethinking History in Business Schools” Initiative at Copenhagen Business School’s Centre for Business History.

[1] For example, the Business History Conference website on course syllabi: or the Harvard Business School Guide to Business History Courses Worldwide:


For workshop details see, register for this workshop, use the BHC annual meeting registration form. For general information on the BHS annual meeting, see


Reminder: AoM Management History Call for Papers

The January 9th deadline for submissions to the 2018 AoM Annual Meeting is fast approaching. We invite you to submit papers or PDWs to the Management History Division. Details can be found here. Please email me if you have any questions.

Dan Wadhwani


Computers and Business History: Mira Wilkins Prize Winner

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The NEP-HIS Blog

IBM Rebuilds Europe: The Curious Case of the Transnational Typewriter
By Petri Paju (Turku) and Thomas Haigh (Wisconsin, Milwaukee).

Abstract: In the decade after the Second World War IBM rebuilt its European operations as integrated, wholly owned subsidiaries of its World Trade Corporation, chartered in 1949. Long before the European common market eliminated trade barriers, IBM created its own internal networks of trade, allocating the production of different components and products between its new subsidiaries. Their exchange relationships were managed centrally to ensure that no European subsidiary was a consistent net importer. At the heart of this system were eight national electric typewriter plants, each assembling parts produced by other European countries. IBM promoted these transnational typewriters as symbols of a new and peaceful Europe and its leader, Thomas J. Watson, Sr., was an enthusiastic supporter of early European moves toward economic integration. We argue that IBM’s humble typewriter and…

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Crafting your PhD proposal: Routes to originality in historical research

My colleague Richard Toye at Exeter wrote this interesting blog about originality in historical research – the equivalent of the theoretical contribution in management and organization studies.

Imperial & Global Forum

View original post 897 more words