CFP: A crisis in ‘coming to terms with the past’? At the crossroads of translation and memory

Reblogged from the Imperial and Global Network:

Imperial & Global Forum

A crisis in ‘coming to terms with the past’?
At the crossroads of translation and memory

1-2 February 2019
Senate House, London

Over the past decade, a particular notion of ‘coming to terms with the past’, usually associated with an international liberal consensus, has increasingly been challenged. Growing in strength since the 1980s, this consensus has been underpinned by the idea that difficult historical legacies, displaced into the present, and persisting as patterns of thought, speech and behaviour, needed to be addressed through a range of phenomena such as transitional justice, reconciliation, and the forging of shared narratives to ensure social cohesion and shore up democratic norms. 

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New Postdoc Position with Exeter History

Reblogged from Imperial and Global Forum:

Imperial & Global Forum

Job title: Postdoctoral Research Associate

Job reference: P64462

Date posted: 10/10/2018

Application closing date: 07/11/2018

Location: Exeter

Salary: The starting salary will be from £29,515 up to £34,189 on Grade E, depending on qualifications and experience.

Package: Generous holiday allowances, flexible working, pension scheme and relocation package (if applicable).

Job category/type: Academic

Job description

The above full-time post is available from December 1st 2018 until 30th November 2019 on a fixed-term basis.

The University of Exeter is a Russell Group university in the top 200 of universities worldwide. We combine world-class teaching with world-class research, and have achieved a Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework Award 2017. We have over 22,000 students and 4600 staff from 180 different countries and have been rated the WhatUni2017 International Student Choice. Our research focuses on some of the most fundamental issues facing humankind today, with 98% of our research rated as…

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Historical Perspectives on Entrepreneurship and Public Policy

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

Special issue call for papers from Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy
Guest Editor:
Michael J. Douma, Georgetown University, McDonough School of Business


Rationale for the special issue: 
1.    Promote historical understanding of entrepreneurship.
2.    Recognize the impact of entrepreneurs on historical change.
3.    Reconceptualize historians as entrepreneurs.
4.    Consider ways to add entrepreneurial activity to the syllabus and curriculum of business and economic history.

Overview:
Josef Schumpeter lamented that historians generally believe that “all that is needed to explain a given historical development is to indicate conditioning or causal factors.” (Schumpeter, 1947). Schumpeter countered that the “creative response” that actors have to certain conditions and factors is less predictable. Indeed, historians can never know all of the conditions or factors contributing to change. We know that cause and effect can never been seen, but that it must be intuited from the evidence. By recognizing the creative responses of individual…

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Business Historians at the SMS 2018

Reblogged from the Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

A number of business historians are presenting at the Strategic Management Society conference, which is being held this week in Paris. The presence of a number of business historians at SMS in encouraging to me, as it is a sign that business historians are now increasingly participating in debates in strategy. In a sense, these business historians are building on the success of those business historians who have made inroads into the field of organization studies. Earlier this month, I got to hear Juha-Antti Lamberg and Jari Ojala, both of the University of Jyvaskyla, present an important paper on the relationship between business history and strategy.

Even though my own co-authored paper was not accepted by the SMS organizers, I would like to extend warm congratulations to the business historians mentioned here.

Monsanto’s Black Box: Technology, Strategy, and Resource Ownership and Control

Shane Hamilton, University of York
Beatrice D’Ippolito, University…

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Post-Doc at Hagley

Post-Doctoral Fellowship Opportunity at the Hagley Library

The NEH-Hagley Fellowship on Business, Culture, and Society supports residencies in Hagley’s Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society by scholars who have received their doctoral degrees. Recent PhD recipients as well as advanced scholars are eligible to apply. In accordance with NEH requirements, these postdoctoral fellowships are restricted to United States citizens or to foreign nationals who have been living in the United States for at least three years. These fellowships are made possible by support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Hagley is the pre-eminent research library in the United States on business and its impact on the world. It holds more than seven miles of manuscript materials, more than 300,000 published sources, and visual items in excess of 3 million. Publications drawn from our collections provide foundational knowledge for the rise and influence of big business on politics and society as well as the cultural history of modern consumer society. Documentation of the extensive international operations of firms have provided entry for scholars exploring business and business influences in all areas of the world. While historical research is the principal purpose for most scholars, its active research grant program has funded projects from many fields in the social sciences and humanities.

Two postdoctoral fellowships are available, one of four months and one for eight months. The eight-month fellowship must be taken during the September through May academic year. The fellowships provide a monthly stipend of $4,200, amounting to $33,600 for the eight-month fellowship and $16,800 for the four-month fellowship. Fellows receive complimentary lodging in the scholar’s housing on Hagley’s property for the duration of their residency, as well as office space and the full privileges of visiting scholars, including special access to Hagley’s research collections. They are expected to be in regular and continuous residence and to participate in the Center’s scholarly programs. They must devote full time to their study and may not accept teaching assignments or undertake any other major activities during their residency. Fellows may hold other major fellowships or grants during fellowship tenure, in addition to sabbaticals and supplemental grants from their own institutions, but only those that do not interfere with their residency at Hagley. Other NEH-funded grants may be held serially, but not concurrently.

Applications are due December 1 and should be sent as a .pdf file and include, in the following order:

  • A current CV
  • A 3,000-word explanation of the project and its contributions to pertinent scholarship
  • A statement of no more than 500 words explaining how residency at Hagley would advance the project, particularly the relevance of our research collections.
  • A statement indicating a preference for the four or eight month fellowship.

Applicants also should arrange for two letters of recommendation to arrive separately by the application deadline. These should sent directly to Hagley.

All applications materials, including recommendations letters, should be sent to Carol Lockman, clockman@Hagley.org and must be received by that date for the application to be considered by the selection committee. The committee will make decisions by February 1, with residency beginning as early as July 1. Questions regarding this fellowship may be sent to Carol Lockman as well.

Business Historian Podcast Alert: Wharton’s Natalya Vinokurova On Whether the U.S. Headed for Another Mortgage Crisis?

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

From the Knowledge@Wharton blog:

Ten years after the mortgage-fueled Great Recession, several of the market and structural components remain in place that could set the environment for the next crisis. In her latest research, Wharton management professor Natalya Vinokurova takes a historical look at the development of mortgage-backed securities and finds fascinating parallels to the present day. She spoke to Knowledge@Wharton about her papers, “Failure to Learn from Failure: The 2008 Mortgage Crisis as a Déjà vu of the Mortgage Meltdown of 1994” (Business History) and “How Mortgage-Backed Securities Became Bonds: The Emergence, Evolution, and Acceptance of Mortgage-Backed Securities in the United States, 1960–1987,” (Enterprise and Society) and why one should heed the warnings of history.

You can listen to the podcast here.

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PhDs & PostDocs at Stellenbosch University

A new generation of historians and other social scientists is reinterpreting African history using individual-level archival records. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded Biography of an Uncharted People project builds on this momentum, using micro-level evidence of groups often excluded from aggregate statistical records, charting a new biography of South Africans.

Want to be at the frontier of new methodological innovations? Want to study the lives of people often neglected in historical sources? Want to be part of an exciting team of international scholars in the beautiful university-town of Stellenbosch? Then join us in 2019.

PhD and postdoc positions are available. Specific competencies in historical geography (GIS) are highly recommended for one of the postdoc positions, but applications from all subfields of history are welcome. Please visit unchartedpeople.org for more information. Applications close 1 October 2018.

Johan Fourie
johanf@sun.ac.za

Call for Editors – Journal of Global History

Reblogged from Imperial and Global Forum:

Imperial & Global Forum

Professor William Gervase Clarence Smith, Professor Barbara Watson Andaya, and Professor Merry Wiesner-Hanks will shortly be coming to the end of their tenure as editors of the Journal of Global History (JGH). Cambridge University Press, in collaboration with an Editorial Board search committee, is now inviting applications for their successor(s).

The deadline for applications is 30 September, 2018.

JGH addresses the main problems of global change over time, together with the diverse histories of globalization. It also examines counter-currents to globalization, including those that have structured other spatial units. The journal seeks to transcend the dichotomy between ‘the West and the rest’, straddle traditional regional boundaries, relate material to cultural and political history, and overcome thematic fragmentation in historiography. The journal also acts as a forum for interdisciplinary conversations across a wide variety of social and natural sciences.

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CfP: History, Memory, and the Past

CALL FOR PAPERS
HISTORY, MEMORY, AND THE PAST IN MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION STUDIES

RAE-Revista de Administração de Empresas
(Journal of Business Management)
Deadline: June 30th 2019
Guest editors: Amon Barros (FGV´s Sao Paulo School of Business Administration – EAESP),
Diego M. Coraiola (University of Alberta), Mairi Maclean (University of Bath), William M. Foster (University of Alberta)

Details of the call can be found here.

Call for papers. ‘Business and the law: historical perspectives on legal change.’ Deadline extended to 31 October.

Special Issue of Management and Organizational History: Business and the Law. Historical Perspectives on Legal Change

Firms act in tightly regulated legal environments. Yet as new products, production processes, and economic practices emerged that environment has been constantly questioned, undermined, and rebuilt. At the same time, legal innovations challenged established economic practices like the ban on child labor or new cartel laws. Assuming that innovations were always in line with the legal system or that firms simply complied with new laws is misleading. Usually, the more accurate picture was that of a highly contingent process of negotiation and rule breaking. In the long term, firms needed to succeed in positioning their products and services as legitimate and inside the law. To see this process as a one way street of political primacy would be historically incorrect and a bad assumption to solve current problems of regulation. Given the fundamental importance of the alignment, legal change figures as a central explanatory problem for understanding the course of economic development.
The aim of the SI is to understand legal change as a contingent change in routines that affected the way businesses and courts interpreted the “rules of the game”. Such a change could manifest itself in written law or lead to a fundamentally different way of interpreting it. In both cases the focus of the papers should be on economic and legal practices, i.e. on the question what the law meant in its historical context and how it actually affected economic actions. We are looking for theoretical work as well as empirical case studies that help to shed light on the historical transformations of legal institutions at the intersection of businesses and the law. Specifically, we are looking for papers that address at least one of the following research questions.

1. The Relation of Firm Behavior and the Law: Conceptual Clarifications and Historical Perspectives
2. Direct Intervention: The Practice of Political Entrepreneurship and Its Effects
3. Subtle Evasion: The Stubbornness of Business Routines in the Face of Legal Change
4. Legal Provocations: Schumpeterian “Rule Breaking” and Business Scandals

Each submission will initially be reviewed by the guest editors to determine its suitability for the special issue. Before final acceptance papers will also be double-blind reviewed. Publication of the special issue is planned for the year 2019.
For further information, please contact sebastian.teupe@uni-bayreuth.de
The deadline for submissions is 31 October 2018.

Editorial information

Guest Editor: Sebastian Teupe, University of Bayreuth, Germany (Sebastian.teupe@uni-bayreuth.de)
Guest Editor: Louis Pahlow, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt/Main, Germany (Pahlow@jur.uni-frankfurt.de)