Management History Division: Get Involved and VOTE

In recent years management and organizational history has become an exciting and rapidly changing field, with new ideas and approaches transforming the field and many publication opportunities at leading journals. The AOM’s Management History Division is one of the key institutional foundations for these developments, but the Division needs involvement and support from scholars who are engaged and care about the future of the field. So please get involved. The AOM recently announced the release of the ballot for division elections. If you are already a member of the MH Division, please take time to vote!!! If you are not a member but care about management history, please join the Division, vote now, and join us in Chicago!  The instructions for joining the MH Division can be found here: http://aom.org/FAQs/Membership/How-do-I-change-or-add-an-additional-division-or-interest-group-to-my-profile-.aspx

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CFP: Business History Conference 2019, Cartagena

Reblogged from the Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

The 2019 annual meeting of the Business History Conference will be held in Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, on March 14–16. The theme of the meeting will be “Globalization and De-Globalization: Shifts of Power and Wealth.” The recent phenomena of the spread of populist and economic nationalist regimes throughout North America, Europe, Asia and elsewhere taking positions against the major trading blocks and the free movement of people and goods make the topic of this conference very timely. The conference aims to concentrate on business history research agendas that enable a nuanced understanding of the phenomena of globalization and de-globalization.

The conference theme encourages contributions from a variety of approaches to business history research, covering a broad range of geographies and periods. The program committee of Marcelo Bucheli (co-chair), Andrea Lluch (co-chair), Takafumi KurosawaEspen StorliLaura Sawyer, and Teresa da Silva Lopes (BHC president) invites paper proposals…

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Imagining Britain’s economic future, c.1800-1975

Reblogged from the Imperial & Global Forum:

Imperial & Global Forum

David Thackeray, Richard Toye, and Andrew Thompson
University of Exeter

This book considers how Britain has imagined its economic role in the wider world and how British ideas have influenced global debates about market relationships between the start of the nineteenth century and the UK’s first European referendum. In doing so, the authors explore the interplay between the high political thought of theorists, the activities of officials and businesspeople, and the everyday experience of the wider public. Across the contributions to this book there is a consideration of the competing factors which affected market decisions and the processes of ‘economic imagination’.

The economist Joseph Schumpeter put the concept of imagination at the heart of the entrepreneurial process. It was this quality which, above all, businesspeople required if they were to succeed: ‘the capacity of seeing things in a way which proves afterwards to be true, even though it cannot be…

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Postdoctoral Position in Entrepreneurial History at University of Southern California

The Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies at the Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California, seeks applicants for a postdoctoral scholar interested in entrepreneurial history.

The postdoctoral researcher will work under the supervision of Professors Noam Wasserman and Christina Lubinski of the Greif Center and in conjunction with Professor Dan Wadhwani of the University of the Pacific. Professor Wasserman is the founding director of the Greif Center’s Founder Central initiative and Professor Lubinski leads its entrepreneurial-history activities.  Founder Central’s new course on Entrepreneurial History will debut in the Spring of 2019.

The position is for 1 year, with the potential of extending this to 2 years. In addition to research, the postdoc will teach one entrepreneurship or general business course per year if qualified, and will receive mentoring in this teaching role.

The Greif Center is among the nation’s leaders in entrepreneurship education and research. Its faculty includes a diverse mix of researchers and practitioners. This year, our undergraduate entrepreneurship program was ranked #4 and our graduate program #8 by US News and World Report. The Greif Center is one of the organizers of the West Coast Entrepreneurship Research Symposium and the sponsor of the Greif Entrepreneurship Research Impact Award — given annually at the Academy of Management conference. In addition to offering courses in the school’s undergraduate and MBA programs, we offer specialized graduate degrees in social entrepreneurship (MSSE) and innovation (MSEI).

Requirements: You should have a Ph.D. (or expect to complete your Ph.D. by September 2018) in history or should have engaged in historically-oriented work in a related discipline (e.g., management, sociology, anthropology, law, economics). Candidates should be interested in historical perspectives on entrepreneurship and its role in socio-economic change. Experience with archival and primary source research is preferred. You will be expected to participate in at least one existing research project while also having time to continue developing your own research.

Qualified candidates should email the following documents to entrepreneur@marshall.usc.edu:

  • Cover letter
  • Curriculum vitae, specifying research, teaching, and work experience
  • Research statement
  • Teaching statement
  • Two letters of recommendation

Timing: Review of applications will begin immediately, and continue until the position is filled. The position is expected to start September 2018, although the start date is flexible.

For questions about the position, please contact Christina Lubinski (cl.mpp@cbs.dk) or Noam Wasserman (nwasserm@marshall.usc.edu)

USC Marshall is renowned for its high-ranking undergraduate, graduate, international and executive education programs, an exceptional faculty engaged in leading-edge research, a diverse and creative student body, and a commitment to technological advancement. The research productivity of Marshall’s 200 full-time faculty ranks among the top 15 business schools in the world. For more information about the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California, please go to: http://www.marshall.usc.edu.

The University of Southern California (USC), founded in 1880, is located in the heart of downtown L.A. and is the largest private employer in the City of Los Angeles. USC is an equal-opportunity educator and employer, proudly pluralistic and firmly committed to providing equal opportunity for outstanding persons of every race, gender, creed and background. The University particularly encourages women, members of underrepresented groups, veterans and individuals with disabilities to apply. USC will make reasonable accommodations for qualified individuals with known disabilities unless doing so would result in an undue hardship. Further information is available by contacting uschr@usc.edu.

 

Financial History Review New Scholars workshop

New Scholars Fast-Track Workshop 

13 June 2018

Torino, Italy

Financial History Review invites submissions of research papers from advanced PhD students and recent postdoctoral researchers (with less than five years from completing their PhD) in banking, financial and monetary history for a

eabh in cooperation with Fondazione 1563 per l’Arte e la Cultura della Compagnia di San Paolo and Compagnia di San Paolo

Papers on any topic and period are welcome. Please find the Call for Papers and additional information at http://bankinghistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2018_Torino_FHR_NSW_Final.pdf

Deadline is 30 April 2018

 

Using Historical Methods in Management and Organization Research

For the first time, Aston’s summer programme is offering this course on historical methods in management & organization research.

Course information:

Aston Business School

9 July 2018

 

Management and organizational researchers are increasingly interested in the opportunities for historical research. Even though history as a discipline does not have a similar understanding of methodology to the management and organization studies, in recent years there have been a number of publications and workshops demystifying historical approaches and analytical techniques. This one-day workshop will introduce participants to basic techniques and recent developments, as well as providing worked examples and on-hand advice for ongoing research projects.

Course outline

9.45 – 10.00        Welcome and introduction

10.00 – 12.00      Introduction to basic research techniques

12.00 – 13.00      Focus on participants’ projects

13.00 – 14.00      Lunch  break

14.00 – 15.00      Recent developments in organization history, introduction to key debates

15.00 – 16.00      Worked example: researching organizational corruption at Enron

16.00 – 17.00      How to publish organizational history: journals, rationales and strategies

17.00 – 17.15      Summary and end of seminar

 

Presenters:

 Stephanie Decker, Professor in History and Organization Studies

Adam Nix, Researcher in Organization History and Organizational Corruption

More information on: http://www.aston.ac.uk/international/aston-summer-programme-2018/why-choose-using-historical-methods-in-management-and-organization-research/

 

Fees: One day workshop: £125. This includes University-wide wifi access; lunch and refreshments.

 

 

Program Classroom Frontiers: Business History Course Development Workshop

The Copenhagen Business School PDW Series

Classroom Frontiers: Business History Course Development Workshop

 

Time: Thursday, April 5, 2018, c.9am-1:30pm

Place: Baltimore Embassy Suites Inner Harbor, 222 St Paul Pl, Baltimore, MD 21202

To register for this workshop, use the BHC annual meeting registration form.

 

9:00am-9:30am                    Welcome – Christina Lubinski (CBS)

Classroom Frontiers: Introduction and Three Pilots: Entrepreneurial History, Public History, Financial History

9:30am-10:00am                 Entrepreneurial History – Dan Wadhwani (Univ. of the Pacific)

Dan Wadhwani (in collaboration with Noam Wasserman) is currently in the process of developing a course in “Entrepreneurial History.” The plan is to offer it as a general education course at the Greif Center of Entrepreneurship, University of Southern California. The course is structured in three modules: (i) Origins of entrepreneurial capitalism (examining the big macro entrepreneurial opportunities that have transformed capitalism); (ii) From Organization Man to Entrepreneurial History (focusing on changes in technology, policy, financing, careers, and corporate strategy, which have unleashed entrepreneurial endeavors; (iii) Making History (examining techniques by which entrepreneurs use the past to make and legitimize the future.)

10:00am-10:20am              Commentator: Bill Gartner (Babson College)

10:20am-10:30am             Coffee Break

10:30am-11:00am              Public History – Ken Lipartito (Florida International University)

Ken Lipartito teaches courses on public history, where he works with students in applying history skills to a variety of non-academic spaces—museums, historic sites, government agencies, public policy organizations.  Several of his graduates have found employment outside of academia—in the Library of Congress, for the military.  In 2016-17 he was the recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities Next Generation Ph.D Grant, to expand opportunities for history graduate students seeking employment beyond the academy.  He also runs a number of community based projects in Miami, working with institutions in creating digital archives and historical exhibits.  As a principal in the Business History Group, LLC (http://www.businesshistorygroup.com) he consults with business, government and non-profit entities to write organizational histories and provide historical expertise for legal, strategic and policy matters.

11:00am-11:20am              Commentator: Mads Mordhorst (Copenhagen Business School)

11:20am-11:30am              Coffee Break

11:30am-12:30pm           Financial History: The Great Depression in Real Time – Mary O’Sullivan (University of Geneva)

Mary O’Sullivan is teaching a course on international economic history, in which she includes a module titled “The Great Depression in Real Time” based on her latest research on economic history and economic policy. She uses a variety of different primary sources to discuss the way in which policymakers tried to understand and react to the crisis as it emerged. She is focusing in particular on policy makers at the Fed who were grappling with policy challenges related to the country’s domestic financial system.

12:30pm-12:50pm             Commentator: Per Hansen (Copenhagen Business School)

12:50pm-1:30pm               Concluding discussion

PhD Summer School 2017 – University of Tübingen

Reblogged from Nico Strydom:

Nicolaas Strydom

In September of last year I had the wonderful privilege of attending a PhD Summer School entitled ‘Business Beyond Businesses: Agency, Political Economy & Investors, c. 1850- 1970’. This took place at the Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen in the charming town of Tübingen, Germany. The aim of the summer school was to provide doctoral students with an overview of relevant research and of innovative tools and methodologies in the fields of Business and Economic History. Each doctoral student also had a 25 minute slot in which to present their own research, and receive extensive feedback from the academic panel as well as the fellow doctoral students present.

IMG_5889 The beautiful town of Tübingen, Germany

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Technology’s Stories blog

Management and organizational historians should be working much more collaboratively with historians of technology. The two scholarly communities have much in common as well as much to learn from one another. Org historians can check out some of the ideas, work, and reflections of historians of technology at the really wonderful Technology’s Stories blog. The blog describes is mission as follows:

We engage readers with the usable past—stories that help us make sense of contemporary technological challenges and aspirations. Technology’s Stories is a place for thinkers to share new insights on the integration of technology with our environments and our social, political, and economic lives.

Pat Denaul, over at The Exchange just added a nice post about the blog. Org historians may be particularly interested in a thoughtful post of the use of varieties of counterfactual reasoning by John K. Brown.

Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Business History: Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

Solvay Brussels School of Economics & Management
Free University of Brussels (Université Libre de Bruxelles)
Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Business History (2 + 1 years)

Salary: Fellowship up to ca. 30,000-36,000 EUR, depending on level of expertise and
fiscal regulations.  Employer will provide assistance with the administrative steps to be undertaken prior to arrival at the ULB and the various formalities to be completed once in Belgium (residence permit, accommodation, health insurance, tax and social security…

Expected start date: October 1st, 2018

Application deadline: February 8th, 2018

A Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Business History is vacant at the Solvay
Brussels School of Economics and Management (SBS-EM) of the Free University of
Brussels (Université Libre de Bruxelles – ULB).

The Kurgan-van Hentenryk (hereafter KvH) Chair in Business History aims at
advancing and diffusing research on the history of the knowledge economy. The
purpose of the chair is threefold. First, it is designed to…

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