AOM PDW: Frontiers of Digital History Methods

Academy of Management Meeting, Atlanta

PDW Workshop

Frontiers of Digital History Methods and Tools for Management, Organization, and History Scholars

Friday, Aug 4 2017 2:00PM – 4:00PM
Session Type: PDW Workshop
Submission: 16488
Sponsor: MH
Scheduled: Friday, Aug 4 2017 2:00PM – 4:00PM at Hyatt Regency Atlanta in Hanover Hall E

Organizer: Robin Gustafsson, Aalto U.
Organizer: Mirko Ernkvist, Ratio Institute
Presenter: Charles Edward Harvey, Newcastle U.
Presenter: Mirko Ernkvist, Ratio Institute
Presenter: Mairi Maclean, U. of Bath
Presenter: Johann Peter Murmann, U. of New South Wales
Presenter: Michael Rowlinson, U. of Exeter
Presenter: David A. Kirsch, U. of Maryland

This PDW This PDW sets out to provide a broad overview and insights to management, organization, and history scholars at large on the current research forefront in how digital databases, methods and tools could contribute to the integration of management, organization, and history research. Overall the PDW centers on the idea for outlining opportunities and current frontier work with digital methods and tools for systematic digital reconstruction of historical sources, rigor and transparency of analysis and inference from evidence. These methodological advances enable new forms of scholarship and research groups collaborations. This PDW will: (1) introduce the participants to the historical developments of digital databases, tools and methods; (2) provide perspectives by forerunner management, organization, and business history researchers on methodological advantages, challenges and opportunities with digital history methods and tools for the integration of management, organization, and historical research; (3) present leading recent research work with digital methods and tools using large-scale digitized historical sources and evidence; (4) provide ample of time for Q&As and open discussions.

Ethnography Symposium Manchester 2017

Ethnography symposium

History & Ethnography Track

Stephanie Decker & John Hassard

 

Thursday 31 August 2017

14:00-15:30         Session 1 – Ethnographies of Work, Workplaces, and Space

Guel Oczan (University of Istanbul): “At the Interface of History and Ethnography: Doing Research on Craftspeople, Shopkeepers and Apprentices in Istanbul”

Hiral Patel (University of Reading): “Exhibitions: Sites of intersection between history and ethnography”

Smitha Sebastian, Alison Hirst, Simon Down (Anglia Ruskin University) “Making sense of workplace and organizational ethnographies: A historical perspective”

Friday 1 September 2017

10:00-11:00         Session 2 – History and Ethnography in research practice

David Weir (York St. John’s University) “I have been here before:  reflections on the New Industrial Strategy”

Stella Stoycheva, Giovanni Favero (Ca’Foscari University, Venice) “Research strategies for ethnostatistics in organization studies”

11:00-11:30         Coffee break

11:30-13:00        Session 3 – Historicizing Ethnography

Budhaditya Das (Ambedkar University Delhi) “Coercion, concessions and trusteeship: a historical anthropology of state rule in post-colonial central India”

Marie Leth Meilvang (Univeristy of Copenhagen) “Historicizing professional practice”

Stephanie Decker, John Hassard: Closing remarks

13:00-14:00         Lunch

AOM2017 Meet the editors session

Session Type: PDW Workshop

Submission: 10093 | Sponsor(s): (MH)

 

Meet the Editors

Friday 10.30-12.00pm, Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Embassy Hall G 
Organizer: James M. Wilson, U. of Glasgow 

Presenter: Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School 

Presenter: Cheryl McWatters, U. of Ottawa 

Presenter: Paul Miranti, Rutgers U. 

The editors of Business History will provide a general discussion of their journal, describing its aims and scope, along with their general policies and practices regarding submissions. They will also discuss what they perceive to be current hot topics or emerging trends in the field of Management History. The editors and/or representatives of the Accounting History Review and Accounting History will discuss current topics and emerging interests in the field. They will also describe their journals’ general policies and practices regarding submissions. There will be sufficient time to discuss in general terms any individual projects conference attendees may have in mind for publication.

Search Terms: Business History | Editors | Journal

AOM 2017 PDW on historical methods

Session Type: PDW Workshop

Submission: 12154 | Sponsor(s): (MH, CMS)

 

Historical Methods for Management and Organizational Research

Friday 12.15-2.45pm, Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Embassy Hall E
Coordinator: Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School 

Coordinator: Diego Coraiola, U. of Alberta 

Participant: William Foster, U. of Alberta 

Participant: Sarah Robinson, U. of Leicester 

Participant: JoAnne Yates, MIT Sloan School of Management 

Participant: Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Bus, York U. 

Participant: Michael Rowlinson, U. of Exeter 

Presenter: Christina Lubinski, Copenhagen Business School 

Historical approaches to management and organizations have seen many promising developments in recent years, with several articles, special issues and edited books highlighting the important contribution that historical research can make to our understanding of contemporary organizations. Theoretical debates on the status of historical approaches within management and organization studies have dominated so far. These are important as they determine what kind of historical methods align with scholars’ epistemological and theoretical approach. Hence this PDW has two aims: to introduce scholars interested in the more practical questions of how we can use historical methods for organizational research to a range of option, and by highlighting the methodological implications of using specific historical approaches. This PDW will bring together several scholars who have used historical methodologies in their research. Their presentations will introduce participants to a range of methodologies and offer them the opportunity to subsequently discuss the relevance of these approaches for participants’ research projects in small groups in the second half of the session.

Search Terms: Methodology | Historical Research | Management and Organization Research

AOM2017 All-Academy session on History & Nationalism

Session Type: Symposium

Submission: 18644 | Sponsor(s): (AAT, MH)

 

Business and Management in an Age of Rising Nationalism: Historical Perspectives 

Theme: At the Interface

Sunday  10.30-12.00pm, Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Spring
Chair: Daniel Wadhwani, U. of the Pacific 

Panelist: Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Bus, York U. 

Panelist: Takafumi Kurosawa, Kyoto U. 

Panelist: Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School 

History can provide management scholars with a unique lens for understanding the current rise of nationalism, and the choices that businesses, managers, and entrepreneurs face in response to those changes. In part, this is because both supporters and critics of the current wave of nationalism point to historical examples and their consequences in justifying their positions. But, even more so, historical waves of globalization and de- globalization allow us a mirror for reflecting on the options and consequences that both policymakers and managers face today. For instance, on the eve of World War I, much of the world economy was economically integrated, with the relatively free mobility of firms, people, and capital across borders. This earlier wave of global integration fell apart with the rise of nationalism and nationalist policies during the interwar period, and a different kind of globally integrated economy had to be rebuilt by policymakers and businesspeople in the post-World War II world. This panel will discuss the lessons of such earlier waves of nationalism and de-globalization for our own time. It draws together four leading business historians, with expertise in four different regions of the world as well as in different aspects of management research. The panel will examine how rising nationalism affected not only the global context in which managers operated, but also consider its implications for business strategy, organizational behavior, social and political legitimacy, labor mobility and entrepreneurship. The goal of the panel will remain focused on the relevance of history for understanding managerial choices and consequences in the face of nationalism in our own time.

Search Terms: Nationalism, History | Management, Business | De-globalization

    

Business History events in June

The Association of Business Historians Annual Conference 2017

The Human Factor in Business History

Centre for Business History in Scotland

University of Glasgow

29 June – 1 July 2017

The ABH 2017 Conference Programme is now available: http://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH/Draft%20Programme%2028.03.17.pdf

 

 

Please note the following workshop just before the conference:

Entrepreneur-Philanthropists in Theory and History

University of Glasgow
28 June 2017, 2.00 pm to 5.00 pm
Room 408F Main Building

The workshop is convened by the guest editors of the forthcoming edition of the Business History Review on Entrepreneurship and Philanthropy edited by Charles Harvey (Newcastle University, UK), Mairi Maclean (University of Bath, UK) and Roy Suddaby (University of Victoria Canada).

The workshop has been timed to take place the afternoon before the annual conference of the Association of Business Historians, which takes place in Glasgow between 29th June and 1st July 2017 and is hosted by the Centre for Business History in Scotland of the University of Glasgow. The conference will be held at the Hilton Grosvenor Hotel and takes as its theme “The Human Factor in Business History.” The workshop is not part of the ABH conference.
The workshop is being held for anyone interested in the topic and especially colleagues intending to make a submission to the forthcoming edition of the Business History Review on Entrepreneurship and Philanthropy. The session is intended as a paper development session in which potential contributors will receive feedback from the guest editors and other participants in the workshop. There will be opportunity following the workshop for 1 to 1 meetings with the editors.

Refreshments will be served in Room 408F, the Business School seminar room, from 1.00 pm. There is no charge for the workshop.

 

Extended deadline: History & Ethnography

Conference submission deadline extended to 31 March!!

12th Annual International Ethnography Symposium

“Politics and Ethnography in an Age of Uncertainty”

29 August – 1 September 2017 
Alliance Manchester Business School

Stream 3: History and Ethnography

Stephanie Decker and John Hassard

History and ethnography have largely evolved in parallel, despite some significant research contributions from historical ethnography and ethnographic history (Rowlinson, Hassard, & Decker, 2014). To a large extent, organizational ethnographers research ‘literate’ settings in which social actors essentially self-document their experience through a variety of genres of anthropological and sociological writing. However, as Paul Atkinson and Amanda Coffey have pointed out, “many qualitative researchers continue to produce ethnographic accounts of complex, literate social worlds as if they were entirely without documents or text” (Atkinson & Coffey, 2011, p. 78). In this stream, we aim to bring the practices of historical research (largely but not exclusively text-based) closer to the practices of organizational ethnographers (largely focused on direct observation).

History and ethnography appear to overlap in many ways: First, there is the history of organizational ethnography that has not seen extensive exploration. Attempts to understand the disciplinary, intellectual and organizational origins of a field are made as research areas mature and become more established (Hassard, 2012; O’Connor, 1999). Such an approach to history helps to challenge present-day understanding and open up new areas for research.

Second, as indicated in the quotation above, ethnographers encounter history during their fieldwork in a variety of ways. Ethnographies of museums or symbolic sites are obvious examples, but equally important are the oral histories elicited through interviewing, the public histories that organizations or its members produce, and in some cases the academic business histories about organizations that become reference points for action and identities (Yanow, 1998). History and memory overlap closely here, but nevertheless remain conceptually distinct. Histories are mobilized for particular organizational purposes in the present (Ybema, 2014) and form part of a wider organizational rhetoric (Suddaby, Foster, & Quinn Trank, 2010).

Third, historians have frequently taken an ethnographic sensibility to their research. Italian microhistory in the 1980s was an obvious case (Ginzburg, 2012; Levi, 1991), and cultural history has focused on research questions and methodological approaches that are closely related to ethnographic debates. Archival research can be approached just as entering a research site, and historians often serendipitously encounter the everyday among more standardized organizational documentation (Decker, 2013; McKinlay, 2002).

We welcome submissions dealing with the intersection between history and ethnography. Please submit a 500 word abstract or proposal by Tuesday 28th February 2017 to s.decker@aston.ac.uk.

ESRC final seminar: Organizations as heritage and history as a useful resource

Final event in the ESRC research seminar series “Historicising the theory and practice of organization analysis”

Seminar 6

Organizations as heritage and history as a useful resource

Wednesday 5th April 2017
University of Exeter Business School
Building One: Constantine Leventis Teaching Room
Reception: Xfi Building
Programme:

10:15-10.30 Refreshments and welcome by seminar series organizers Michael Rowlinson, Stephanie Decker and John Hassard

10.30-11.30 Albert J. Mills (Saint Mary University and University of Eastern Finland), “Insights and Research on the study of Gender and Intersectionality in International Airline Cultures Over Time.”

11:30-11:45 Coffee and biscuits 11:45-12:30 Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University) “Mobilizing Critical Management History: the example of ANTi-History”

12:30-13:15 Michael Rowlinson & David Boughey (University of Exeter) “Suncor’s Corporate History: Strategic Rhetoric or Cultural Imperative?”

13.15-14:00 Buffet lunch

14:00-14.45 Sara Kinsey (Head of Historical Archives, Nationwide Building Society) “Lights, camera, action: reflections on organizational remembering in practice.”

14:45-15.30 Michael Weatherburn (Imperial College London) “The emerging corporate knowledge gap: why we need our dark archives and ghost data more than we realize.”

15:30-15:45 Tea and biscuits 

15:45-16:30 Alan Booth and Morgen Witzel (University of Exeter) “The Rowntree business ‘archives’: uncovering British management in the inter -war period”

16:30-17:15 RoundtableSpeakers: Charles Booth (University of the West of England) Peter Miskell (University of Reading) Anna Soulsby (University of Nottingham)

17:15-19:00 Reception

Please contact Kate Henderson (r.henderson2@exeter.ac.uk) if you plan on attending. 

Registration: A limited number of ESRC sponsored free places (including refreshments, buffet lunch and evening reception) will be allocated on a “first come first served” basis to those who contact Kate Henderson asking to attend. A fee of £35.00 will be charged on additional places. 

Travel & accommodation: Exeter St. Davids is the nearest train station and is a 5min drive from the university. If needed, Kate Henderson can help with your travel and accommodation arrangements, but cost will need to be covered by participants.   

For further enquiries please contact: Professor Mick Rowlinson (University of Exeter Business School) or Kate Henderson.  

Final ESRC seminar in Organization History

The final ESRC seminar will take place at Exeter University, Wednesday 5 April 2017.

Speakers will include Albert Mills (Saint Mary’s University, Canada), Gabie Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University, Canada), and Sarah Kinsey (Corporate Archivist, Nationwide Building Society), among others.

The programme and joining instructions will follow shortly. Any inquiries should go to Mick Rowlinson (m.c.rowlinson@exeter.ac.uk).

History & Ethnography conference

12th Annual International Ethnography Symposium

“Politics and Ethnography in an Age of Uncertainty”

29 August – 1 September 2017 
Alliance Manchester Business School

Stream 3: History and Ethnography

Stephanie Decker and John Hassard

History and ethnography have largely evolved in parallel, despite some significant research contributions from historical ethnography and ethnographic history (Rowlinson, Hassard, & Decker, 2014). To a large extent, organizational ethnographers research ‘literate’ settings in which social actors essentially self-document their experience through a variety of genres of anthropological and sociological writing. However, as Paul Atkinson and Amanda Coffey have pointed out, “many qualitative researchers continue to produce ethnographic accounts of complex, literate social worlds as if they were entirely without documents or text” (Atkinson & Coffey, 2011, p. 78). In this stream, we aim to bring the practices of historical research (largely but not exclusively text-based) closer to the practices of organizational ethnographers (largely focused on direct observation).

History and ethnography appear to overlap in many ways: First, there is the history of organizational ethnography that has not seen extensive exploration. Attempts to understand the disciplinary, intellectual and organizational origins of a field are made as research areas mature and become more established (Hassard, 2012; O’Connor, 1999). Such an approach to history helps to challenge present-day understanding and open up new areas for research.

Second, as indicated in the quotation above, ethnographers encounter history during their fieldwork in a variety of ways. Ethnographies of museums or symbolic sites are obvious examples, but equally important are the oral histories elicited through interviewing, the public histories that organizations or its members produce, and in some cases the academic business histories about organizations that become reference points for action and identities (Yanow, 1998). History and memory overlap closely here, but nevertheless remain conceptually distinct. Histories are mobilized for particular organizational purposes in the present (Ybema, 2014) and form part of a wider organizational rhetoric (Suddaby, Foster, & Quinn Trank, 2010).

Third, historians have frequently taken an ethnographic sensibility to their research. Italian microhistory in the 1980s was an obvious case (Ginzburg, 2012; Levi, 1991), and cultural history has focused on research questions and methodological approaches that are closely related to ethnographic debates. Archival research can be approached just as entering a research site, and historians often serendipitously encounter the everyday among more standardized organizational documentation (Decker, 2013; McKinlay, 2002).

We welcome submissions dealing with the intersection between history and ethnography. Please submit a 500 word abstract or proposal by Tuesday 28th February 2017 to s.decker@aston.ac.uk.