Event at the HBS Business History Initiative

Understanding and Overcoming the Roadblocks to Sustainability

Over the past several decades, a vibrant scholarly community has generated thousands of empirical and conceptual studies on the complex relationship between business and the natural environment. At the same time, many large corporations have created positions of Corporate Sustainability Officer with the goal of achieving steady improvements in their sustainability performance. Despite substantial academic research and management attention, complex ecological challenges continue to grow. This unfortunate disconnect between aspirations and reality has begun to provoke some self-reflection in the business and natural environment literature concerning its impact and relevance.

A significant body of research on corporate sustainability has examined win-win outcomes, where firms have reduced their environmental and other impacts while reaping economic benefits. Less attention has been devoted to tensions inherent in corporate sustainability, where moving in the direction of sustainability has required managers to change their business models, form risky partnerships, and otherwise incur net costs. Recent empirical business history research appears to show that profits and sustainability have been hard to reconcile throughout history. These tensions and conflicts merit careful examination from a variety of scholarly and practitioner perspectives.

This conference will focus on the roadblocks to sustainability since the 1960s and develop a research agenda for scholars seeking to overcome those roadblocks. In addition to offering a retrospective analysis of where corporate sustainability has fallen short, the conference will explore the incentives, organizational designs, and institutional systems that would allow sustainability to take hold.

Registration details can be found on the conference registration page.

 

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Re-thinking Female Entrepreneurship

Invitation to a one day Conference on

“Re-thinking Female Entrepreneurship”

Durham University Business School, UK

Millhill Lane, Durham DH1 3LB

Thursday 21st June 2018

Time: 10.00 – 17.00

Academics and practitioners are invited to come together for a one day conference on “Re-thinking female entrepreneurship” to bring to the fore the voices of female entrepreneurs (including social entrepreneurs); explore the diversity and heterogeneity of their experiences and challenge the gendered discourse of entrepreneurship.

The conference programme promises a diversity of perspectives. It will explore various aspects of (women’s) entrepreneurial experiences and identities including entrepreneurial leadership, the representation of women’s working lives, household dynamics and growth decisions, and the impact of the entrepreneur’s values on the business. The conference will also discuss enterprise policy initiatives including the policy-practice gap and the role of activist research in closing the gap.

The conference is generously funded by the British Academy as part of part of a three year British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship which explores the journey of female entrepreneurs in Yorkshire using oral history approaches. In the introductory session of the conference, I will share with the audience the project’s main findings.

I am delighted to confirm that we have secured a really strong field of expert speakers who will present their cutting-edge research on women’s working lives including:

Prof. Sarah Carter (awarded the OBE for services to women entrepreneurs in 2008) – Professor of Entrepreneurship – University of Strathclyde 

Households as a Site of Entrepreneurial Activity

 Prof. Jackie Ford – Professor of Leadership and Organisation Studies – Durham University 

Entrepreneurial Leadership: Women’s Accounts

 Prof. Mark Learmonth – Professor of Organisation Studies – Durham University 

Women’s Work: As Represented in Disney Animations

 Prof. Claire Leitch – Chair in Entrepreneurial Leadership – Lancaster University 

Gender and the Production of Entrepreneurial Legitimacy

 Dr Patricia Lewis – Reader in Management – University of Kent 

Exploring the Lived Body of (Female) Entrepreneurship in Postfeminist Times

 Prof. Sue Marlow (holder of the Queen Award for Enterprise) – Professor of Entrepreneurship – Nottingham University 

Women’s entrepreneurship – The Empresses New Clothes?

 Prof. Julia Rouse – Professor of Entrepreneurship – Metropolitan Manchester University 

How Do We Create Change for Women in Entrepreneurship? Exploring the potential of Engaged and Activist Scholarship

 Prof. Kerrie Unsworth – Chair in Organizational Behaviour – Leeds University 

What Do You Get Out of Being an Entrepreneur? Rethinking via the Goal Hierarchy

The conference will include three panel discussions and will conclude with a discussion between practitioners and academics on how both parties can work together to better represent the experiences of women business owners and make their voices heard.

Due to the high calibre of the speakers we are expecting a high level of demand for conference places, so please book your place before 22 May 2018 by sending an email to business.researchadmin@durham.ac.uk.  Please make sure you can make the date before you book your place.

The conference is free of charge with lunch and refreshments included. Please advise of any dietary requirements.

We look forward to seeing you for a day-long engagement for what we expect to be some fascinating discussions and debates on gender and entrepreneurship.

Dr Hannah Dean

British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Durham University Business School

 

A Short Bio of the Keynote Speakers

Professor Sara Carter OBE FRSE is Associate Principal (Learning & Teaching) at the University of Strathclyde and Professor of Entrepreneurship at the Hunter Centre for Entrepreneurship, Strathclyde Business School. Her research examines the effects of business ownership on the individual, the economic wellbeing of entrepreneurial households, and the consequences of structural inequalities on resource access, particularly finance, on the SME sector. Sara holds several external appointments. She is a member of the Council of Economic Advisers to the First Minister of Scotland; the Enterprise & Skills Strategic Board; the Scottish Framework and Action Plan for Women in Enterprise Action Group; Non-Executive Director of Women’s Enterprise Scotland; and a member of the Leverhulme Trust Research Awards Advisory Committee. Previously, she served on the UK Government’s Women’s Enterprise Task Force, and was awarded the OBE for services to women entrepreneurs in 2008. From 2006 – 2012 Sara was Editor and Senior Editor of Entrepreneurship Theory & Practice.

Dr Hannah Dean is a British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Durham University. Hannah’s research focuses on gender and entrepreneurship using critical perspectives and innovative research methods.  Most recently Hannah extended her work to look at the experiences of social entrepreneurs.  Hannah is currently leading a three years project funded by the British Academy Postdoctoral Research Grant. The project involves collecting oral history accounts from women business owners in Yorkshire. The interviews will be deposited in “Feminist Archive North” will bring to light women’s achievements.

 Professor Jackie Ford is Professor of Leadership and Organization Studies at Durham University Business School. Throughout her career, Jackie has fostered a long-established passion for her work in critical leadership studies and in gender and organization theory, and as former 50th Anniversary Chair in Leadership and Organization Studies at Bradford School of Management and before that Professor of Leadership and Organization Studies at Leeds University, she founded an interdisciplinary research centre and led an active research group in critical leadership studies. She has been committed to develop this research field, informed by her interests in feminist, critical, poststructural, and psychosocial research methods and approaches that enable rich interpretive accounts of experiences of working and organizational life.

 Professor Mark Learmonth is Professor of Organisation Studies at Durham University. Mark spent the first 17 years of his career in management posts within the British National Health Service. Prior to taking up his post in Durham he has worked at the universities of Nottingham and York.

Mark has particular research interests in:

  • Critical perspectives on health care management and/or public sector management;
  • Leadership as discourse;
  • Debates aboutthe use of interpretative methods;
  • The nature of “knowledge” and “evidence” in management and organization studies;
  • Popular images of executives and their impact on managerial identity work.

Professor Claire Leitch holds the Chair in Entrepreneurial Leadership at Lancaster University Management School and currently is Head of Department of Leadership and Management. Her research sits at the interface between entrepreneurship and leadership and takes a critical perspective, drawing on ideas of gender and power to examine the interrelationships between the micro-level and macro-level experiences that shape women’s understanding and experiences. Recent work explores the enduring and global problem of the underrepresentation of women in leadership roles and positions of influence, including in entrepreneurial ventures. Her work has been published in a number of leading international journals and she is Editor of International Small Business Journal.

Professor Susan Marlow is Professor of Entrepreneurship and divisional research director for management at Nottingham University Business School, UK. She is holder of the Queens Award for Enterprise, an Editor for Entrepreneurship, Theory and Practice, Consulting Editor for the International Small Business Journal, Fellow of the UK Institution for Small Business and Entrepreneurship and Distinguished Visiting Professor at Manchester Metropolitan University and AUB, Beirut, Lebanon. Her research interests focus upon entrepreneurial behaviour with a particular expertise in gender issues having published in this area in top rated US and UK journals.

Dr Patricia Lewis is a Reader in Management in the Kent Business School, University of Kent. Working in the area of Gender and Organization Studies she has published in a range of journals including Organization Studies, British Journal of Management, Human Relations, Work, Employment & Society, Journal of Business Ethics, Gender, Work & Organization & International Journal of Management Reviews. Her current research involves critical use of the concept of postfeminism in understanding gendered organizational phenomena. She has recently edited (with Yvonne Benschop and Ruth Simpson) a book entitled Postfeminism and Organization, published by Routledge 2018. She is currently Joint-Editor-in-Chief of Gender, Work & Organization and previously was an Associate Editor of the journal for seven years

Professor Julia Rouse is the Director of ‘Decent Work and Productivity’, a newly formed research and knowledge exchange centre at Manchester Metropolitan University. She founded the Sylvia Pankhurst Gender and Diversity Research Centre that now sits within Decent Work and Productivity. She has a passionate interest in creating feminist research communities and was the founder of the Gender and Enterprise Network. She is developing an Engaged-Activist methodology that experiments with ways of creating change through scholarship in projects concerned with entrepreneur maternity rights and Generating Routes for Women’s Leadership (GROWL).

Professor Kerrie Unsworth is a Professor of Organisational Behaviour and Head of the Management Division at Leeds University Business School. She is Director of the Workplace Behaviour Research Centre, a research group dedicated to improving the world through better organisational behaviour. Kerrie is interested in understanding how people juggle their different goals and identities and the effect this has on their behaviours and well-being. She has published in a range of top academic journals such as Journal of Applied Psychology and has won in excess of £1.5m in public and private sector research funding.

 

 

AOM PDW on Historic CSR

Please register for the AOM PDW!

Special Issue Paper Development Workshops

Historic Corporate Responsibility:

Its Extent, Limits, and Consequences

The guest editors of the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue on Historic Corporate Social Responsibility will arrange paper development workshops at the following conferences:

  • Academy of Management (10-14 August in Chicago),
  • International Association for Business & Society (7-10 June in Hong Kong), and
  • European Business History Association (6-8 September in Ancona, Italy)[1]

During the workshops, authors will present and discuss their papers and receive feedback from discussants and peers.

Attendance at these workshops is NOT a precondition for submission to the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue.

Confirmed discussants at the Academy of Management in Chicago include Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School), Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University), Paul C. Godfrey (Brigham Young University), Stefan Hielscher (University of Bath), Michael Rowlinson (University of Exeter), Sébastien Mena (Cass Business School), and Roy R. Suddaby (University of Victoria and Newcastle University).

 

Submission Information and Deadlines

Scholars interested in one of the workshops are asked to contact the guest editors according to requirements for each conference. Please see the following table for the key dates and contact information.

  IABS conference AoM conference EBHA conference
Require-ments Elevator pitch format. Interested authors might wish to contact Rob Phillips prior to the conference. To be considered for a PDW at either AoM or EBHA, an abstract (no more than 2’000 words or 8 pages all in) should be submitted to the responsible guest editor. The guest editors will then select promising abstracts and notify the authors. After acceptance, the authors are asked to submit a full paper (8’000-10’000 words).
Submission of abstracts none May 15, 2018 June 17, 2018
Submission of full paper July 1, 2018 August 1, 2018
Date and location of workshop June 7-10, 2018

Hong Kong

August 10-14, 2018

Chicago, IL

September 6-8, 2018

Ancona, Italy

Contact Rob Phillips

rphillips@schulich.yorku.ca

Judith Schrempf-Stirling

judith.schrempf-stirling@unige.ch

Christian Stutz

Christian.stutz@fh-hwz.ch

 

[1] The workshop proposal at the EBHA is currently under evaluation—to be confirmed.

PDWs on Historic Corporate Responsibility

Special Issue Paper Development Workshops

Historic Corporate Responsibility:

Its Extent, Limits, and Consequences

The guest editors of the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue on Historic Corporate Social Responsibility will arrange paper development workshops at the following conferences:

  • Academy of Management (10-14 August in Chicago),
  • International Association for Business & Society (7-10 June in Hong Kong), and
  • European Business History Association (6-8 September in Ancona, Italy)[1]

During the workshops, authors will present and discuss their papers and receive feedback from discussants and peers.

Attendance at these workshops is NOT a precondition for submission to the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue.

Confirmed discussants at the Academy of Management in Chicago include Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School), Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University), Paul C. Godfrey (Brigham Young University), Stefan Hielscher (University of Bath), Michael Rowlinson (University of Exeter), Sébastien Mena (Cass Business School), and Roy R. Suddaby (University of Victoria and Newcastle University).

Submission Information and Deadlines

Scholars interested in one of the workshops are asked to contact the guest editors according to requirements for each conference. Please see the following table for the key dates and contact information.

  IABS conference AoM conference EBHA conference
Require-ments Elevator pitch format. Interested authors might wish to contact Rob Phillips prior to the conference. To be considered for a PDW at either AoM or EBHA, an abstract (no more than 2’000 words or 8 pages all in) should be submitted to the responsible guest editor. The guest editors will then select promising abstracts and notify the authors. After acceptance, the authors are asked to submit a full paper (8’000-10’000 words).
Submission of abstracts none May 15, 2018

(extended deadline)

June 17, 2018
Submission of full paper July 1, 2018 August 1, 2018
Date and location of workshop June 7-10, 2018

Hong Kong

August 10-14, 2018

Chicago, IL

September 6-8, 2018

Ancona, Italy

Contact Rob Phillips

rphillips@schulich.yorku.ca

Judith Schrempf-Stirling

judith.schrempf-stirling@unige.ch

Christian Stutz

Christian.stutz@fh-hwz.ch

 [1] The workshop proposal at the EBHA is currently under evaluation—to be confirmed.

EBHA prize for the best doctoral dissertation

Dear colleagues,

The European Business History Associaton awards a prize for the best dissertation published in the field of business history submitted to a European University every two years. The next prize will be awarded at the EBHA Conference this summer, and we are keen to encourage submissions from candidates who have obtained their PhD in the last two years. The deadline for submissions was originally 15 April, but this has now been extended to 30 April 2018.

It is perfectly possible for a dissertation to be considered for both the EBHA prize and the Coleman Prize simultaneously.

If you have had your PhD dissertation accepted in the last two years, or know of colleagues who are in this position, please do consider applying (or encouraging them to apply).

Further details on the prize, the submission process and the judging criteria can be found here:

http://www.ebha.org/?seite=dissertation_prize

 

With kind regards

Peter Miskell

 

CfP Hagley workshop

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Seeing Like a Capitalist:

Histories of Commercial Surveillance in America

A Conference at the Hagley Museum and Library

Wilmington, Delaware, November 8-9, 2018

 

The history of surveillance is often associated with the history of the state. However, commercial organizations in the United States – from insurance companies to audience rating firms and database marketers, to corporate personnel and auditing departments – also exercise power over citizens through systems of identification, classification, and monitoring.  The history of commercial surveillance thus intersects with key issues concerning the history of privacy, information, social sorting and discrimination, and technologies of discipline and control.

 

For a conference sponsored by the Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society on November 8-9, 2018, we invite proposals that explore the history of commercial surveillance in the United States, from settlement to the present. These (non-state) surveillance activities might be found in a variety of business settings and industries, involve a range of formal or informal practices, and might be directed at customers, media audiences, borrowers, consumer markets, employees, or labor. The long history of commercial surveillance serves to illuminate the precursors, continuities, and logic of today’s “surveillance capitalism.”

 

We are interested in original, empirically-grounded unpublished essays that consider one or more of the following questions:

 

  • How have commercial surveillance systems contributed to the production of knowledge about individuals or populations? To what extent have private-sector classification systems shaped categories of identity and social status in the United States?
  • In what ways have commercial surveillance systems contributed to understandings of gender and race in the United States? How have these understandings been formalized or institutionalized?
  • How does the development of commercial surveillance fit into broader social, political, or economic efforts to discipline behavior or control risk?
  • To what extent have commercial surveillance systems overlapped – or collaborated – with state surveillance systems, such as law enforcement, social services, or statistical data gathering?
  • What legal issues have attended the history of commercial surveillance? How have commercial surveillance practices been regulated, particularly with regard to discrimination and privacy?
  • To what extent have distinctions between work and leisure been blurred by commercial surveillance?
  • How does the history of commercial surveillance help contextualize the development of big data and predictive analytics in our own time? What underlying structures, norms, or business objectives can be discerned?
  • What technologies have been developed, and for what specific purposes, to facilitate commercial surveillance?

 

Sarah E. Igo (Vanderbilt University) will open the conference with a keynote address on the evening of November 8. She will discuss her new book, The Known Citizen: A History of Privacy in Modern America, to be published by Harvard University Press in May 2018.

 

If you are interested in proposing a paper, please submit proposals of no more than 500 words and a one-page C.V. to Carol Lockman at clockman@hagley.org by May 1, 2018. We welcome submissions from historians as well as ethnographically oriented social scientists.  Presenters will receive lodging in the conference hotel and up to $500 to cover their travel costs.

This conference was initiated by Josh Lauer (University of New Hampshire), and he is joined on the program committee by Roger Horowitz (Hagley Museum and Library) and Ken Lipartito (Florida International University).

Video: Business & Management in the Age of Nationalism

And at long last, here is the video from the All Academy session on business & management in the Age of Nationalism: http://aom.org/Multi-Media/2017-Select-All-Academy-Theme-Sessions–Global-Events-and-Management-Scholarship/Business-and-Management-in-the-Age-of-Nationalism.aspx

(And as usual, they could not have found a still from the video in which I do not look terrible. I know people say this a lot but this really is a bad one…)

AOM PDW on Historic CSR

AOM accepted a great PDW for this year’s conference on the role of history and corporate social responsibility – come along if you are attending this year!

Call for Papers

Historic Corporate Responsibility: Its Extent, Limits, and Consequences

The guest editors of the Journal of Business Ethics Special Issue on Historic Corporate Social Responsibility will arrange a paper development workshop at the Academy of Management Conference in Chicago.

There is a growing awareness of the critical but understudied role of time and history in the challenges we face in the present and the future. Businesses, universities, governments, and organizations in myriad industries and of all sizes are increasingly held to account for the actions of prior generations of leaders. The lingering effects of Monsanto’s Agent Orange, Yale University’s decision to change the name of Calhoun College, and controversies around the world concerning commemorations of leaders with complicated pasts (e.g., indigenous peoples, slavery) barely scratch the surface of this global phenomenon.

Scholars in management theory have become aware of an important  “historical turn” in organizational theory (Bucheli & Wadhwani, 2014; Maclean, Harvey, & Clegg, 2016; Mills, Suddaby, Foster & Durepos, 2016; Rowlinson, Hassard, & Decker, 2014). A recent issue of Academy of Management Review (Godfrey, Hassard, O’Connor, Rowlinson, & Ruef, 2016) included two articles addressing corporate (ir-)responsibility for long ago actions (Mena, Rintamäki, Fleming, & Spicer, 2016; Schrempf-Stirling, Palazzo, & Phillips, 2016). Though this work focuses largely on legacies of bad behavior, it may also be interesting to consider organizations with a history of being first movers on historically controversial issues. Similarly, recent work on the role of time and temporality in encouraging sustainable management practices (i.e. Slawinski & Bansal, 2015) and the observation that our implicit models of history affect our capacity to effect social change (Suddaby & Foster, 2017) reaffirms the importance of adopting a historical consciousness (Suddaby, 2016) when analyzing sustainability and corporate social responsibility (Stutz & Sachs, 2018). These contributions represent the beginning of a deeper and broader conversation about historic corporate responsibility.

PDW Overview

Each selected participant will present a brief summary of their work and include research appetizers (questions) for five minutes.

After the research appetizers have been presented, there will be roundtable discussions. The roundtables will provide the opportunity for further elaboration and in-depth discussion of the presented research topics. The discussions will be facilitated by mentors who read the submitted papers in advance. Confirmed discussants include Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School), Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University), Paul C. Godfrey (Brigham Young University), Stefan Hielscher (University of Bath), Michael Rowlinson (University of Exeter), Sébastien Mena (Cass Business School), and Roy R. Suddaby (University of Victoria and Newcastle University).

The roundtable discussions will last about 20 minutes. After the discussion, the workshop participants will reconvene into a larger group to report their findings.

Submission Information and Deadlines

Scholars interested in presenting their work are asked to submit an abstract (no more than 2’000 words or 8 pages all in) to the PDW organizers at judith.schrempf-stirling@unige.ch by April 15, 2018 (please use AOM PDW in the subject line).

Accepted authors will be asked to submit a full paper (8,000-10,000 words) by July 1, 2018.

We welcome submissions on the following topics and questions amongst others:

  1. Contours and Extent of Historic Corporate Responsibility
  • What, if anything, can current leaders do to recognize or mitigate responsibility today for past actions?
  • What is the role of forgetting and selective remembering?
  • Can the past be a strategic advantage for the organization? Is this an ethical aim given our limits on knowing the truth about the past?
  1. Boundaries and Limits of Historic Corporate Responsibility
  • How do different legal, political, economic, social, or cultural contexts of the past pose problems to current organizations that face historic corporate responsibility?
  • How does the changing nature of the corporation influence our working understanding of historic corporate responsibility?
  • When has a corporation done enough in regards to its historic responsibilities?
  1. Consequences of Historic Corporate Responsibility
  • Can an organization apologize and who can accept it? Could an apology benefit current and future societies?
  • Should stigma attach to individuals who were participants in past transgressions? How do we define participants and to what extent did they have choices in their past actions?
  • If there is no “single truth” about the past, then why should organizations engage in historic corporate responsibility?
  1. Historical inquiry into the “history” of CSR, the transformation of business-society relationships and the evolution CSR practices
  • How have CSR practices changed over time? How are they shaped by their particular historical contexts?
  • Does the examination of socially responsible business practices in particular historical settings shed new light on contemporary CSR scholarship?
  • What can we learn from historical contextualization of past academic insights?

References

Bucheli, M., & Wadhwani, R. D. (Eds.). (2014). Organizations in time: History, theory, methods. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Godfrey, P. C., Hassard, J., O’Connor, E. S. O., Rowlinson, M., & Ruef, M. (2016). What is organizational history? Toward a creative synthesis of history and organization studies. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 590–608.

Maclean, M., Harvey, C., & Clegg, S. R. (2016). Conceptualizing historical organization studies. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 609–632.

Mena, S., Rintamäki, J., Fleming, P., & Spicer, A. (2016). On the forgetting of corporate irresponsibility. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 720–738.

Mills, A. J., Suddaby, R., Foster, W. M., & Durepos, G. (2016). Re-visiting the historic turn 10 years later: Current debates in management and organizational history – an introduction. Management & Organizational History, 11(2), 67–76.

Rowlinson, M., Hassard, J., & Decker, S. (2014). Research strategies for organizational history: A dialogue between historical theory and organization theory. Academy of Management Review, 39(3), 250–274.

Schrempf-Stirling, J., Palazzo, G., & Phillips, R. A. (2016). Historic corporate social responsibility. Academy of Management Review, 41(4), 700–719.

Slawinski, N., & Bansal, P. (2015). Short on Time: Intertemporal Tensions in Business Sustainability. Organization Science, 26(2), 531–549.

Stutz, C., & Sachs, S. (2018). Facing the normative challenges: The potential of reflexive historical research. Business & Society, 57(1), 98–130.

Suddaby, R., & Foster, W. M. (2017). History and Organizational Change. Journal of Management, 43(1), 19–38.

Suddaby, R. (2016). Toward a historical consciousness: Following the historic turn in management thought. M@n@gement, 19(1), 46–60.

 

VIU Summer School in responsible capitalism 2018

Responsible Capitalism: Micro and Macro-institutional Conditions of Transformation

III Edition
June 25 – 28, 2018

The summer school on Responsible Capitalism is an initiative of VIU in cooperation with the two member universities Ca’ Foscari University of Venice and University of Lausanne.

It aims at the development of ideas that promote a more sustainable future by bringing together young scholars from all over the world to discuss their ideas on the future of Capitalism from the microlevel of individual decision-making to the organizational and the societal level.

It gives participants the opportunity to discuss with eminent scholars in management theory and to test their ideas and present their work.

Participants will be made familiar with recent research from a broad set of disciplines. They will work on their ability to engage in the transdisciplinary discourse which is required for the development of innovative answers to grand sustainability challenges.

Who is it for?
Applications are welcome from current PhD students, post-doc researchers in Management, Strategy, Organization Theory, Finance, Economic Sociology, and related disciplines from universities worldwide.

Deadline for submissions
February 28, 2018; admitted candidates will be notified by March 7, 2018.

Program theme
Capitalism is facing a historically unprecedented legitimacy crisis. Accumulating social and environmental side effects, disconnected financial markets, and a growing gap between the rich and the poor create grand challenges which require fundamental changes in how we produce and consume. While the importance and urgency of sustainability is rarely challenged, deep processes of transformation usually face numerous institutional and psychological barriers that have to be overcome. As Jared Diamond described in his book “Collapse”, civilizations often react to a crisis of which they do not understand the causalities by reinforcing the routines that might have created the crisis in the first place. Understanding the institutional and psychological forces that block and/or enable deep transformations is a key aspect of responsible capitalism. The Venice Summer School 2018 will investigate those forces on the individual, organizational and societal level.

Faculty
Francesco Zirpoli, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia (Coordinator)
Marie-Laure Djelic, Sciences Po
Giovanni Favero, Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia
Johanna Mair, Hertie School of Governance/ Stanford University
Guido Palazzo, University of Lausanne
Juliane Reinecke, King’s Business School

Credits
A Certificate of attendance will be issued at the end of the course.
Number of ECTS credits allocated: 2

Application via VIU website now available (see box in this page)

The Program will admit 15 student participants.

Fees 
Students of VIU member universities: € 200 incl. VAT.
Students of other universities: € 300 incl. VAT.

The fees will cover tuition, course materials, accommodation in multiple rooms at the VIU campus, lunches in the VIU cafeteria and Social events.
Student participants will be responsible for covering their own travel expenses to and from Venice and local transportation.

 

For further information: summerschools@univiu.org

Global Neoliberalism conference

Global Neoliberalisms: Lost and Found in Translation

This conference aims to provide a truly global account of the rise and entrenchment of the modern neoliberal order. Contributors will consider how neoliberal ideas travelled (or did not travel) across regions and polities; and analyse how these ideas were translated between groups and regions as embodied behaviours and business practices as well as through the global media and international organisations. As the fate of neoliberalism appears in question across many regions, it is an opportune moment to make sense of its ascendancy on a global scale.

Convenors:
Professor James Mark, University of Exeter
Professor Richard Toye, University of Exeter
Dr Ljubica Spaskovska, University of Exeter
Dr Tobias Rupprecht, University of Exeter

Speakers include:
Professor Jennifer Bair, University of Virginia
Professor Susan Bayly, University of Cambridge
Professor Johanna Bockman, George Mason University
Professor Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School
Mr Julian Gewirtz, University of Oxford
Professor Vanessa Ogle, UC Berkeley
Professor Daisuke Ikemoto, Meijigakuin University
Professor Artemy Kalinovsky, University of Amsterdam
Dr Alexander Kentikelenis, University of Oxford
Professor Pun Ngai, Hong Kong University
Professor Pal Nyiri, University of Amsterdam
Professor David Priestland, University of Oxford
Professor Bernhard Rieger, University of Leiden
Professor Quinn Slobodian, Wellesley College and Harvard University
Dr Jorg Wiegratz, University of Leeds

Registration:
A registration fee is payable at the time of booking. For further information and details of how to book please click on ‘Book event’.

Standard Admission: £95 for both days; £50 for one day
Early Bird booking (before 31 January 2018): £75 for both days; £40 for one day
Concessions: £36 for both days; £20 for one day

BOOK EVENT