VIU Responsible Capitalism Workshop

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CfP: Corley PDW for ECRs

Call for Papers

Corley Paper Development Workshop for Early Career Researchers Sheffield, 6th July 2019

In memory of the business historian Tony Corley who died last year, the Association of Business Historians have decided to inaugurate a new venture in the form of a Paper Development Workshop for Early Career Researchers (ECRs). This will take place on Saturday 6th July and be linked to the Association’s annual conference at Sheffield. Spaces have been reserved in the conference programme should any of those selected wish to present there as well.

Applications are welcome from any ECR working on a paper in the broad field of business history which they would like to develop with a view to publication. Up to five papers will be selected and will be developed at the workshop with leading business history scholars, including journal editors. The Association will cover the expenses of the presenters up to a maximum of £150 each. Those selected would be expected to join the Association if not already members.

Those interested should submit a 2-page application setting out an abstract of the proposed paper, a brief CV and an explanation of why they would benefit from the workshop. Applications should be sent to Professor Neil Rollings (Neil.Rollings@glasgow.ac.uk) by Monday 8th April.

Deadline approaching for the AIB-UKI doctoral colloquium!

Paper submission to the AIB – UKI Doctoral Colloquium

On 25 April 2019, as part of the AIB-UKI 2019 conference, we are organising the Doctoral Colloquium for PhD students doing research in the area of International Business. The Doctoral Colloquium provides doctoral researchers in international business with the opportunity to present and discuss their research with a panel of distinguished scholars in interactive sessions that are open to all conference delegates. Deadline: Friday, 15 February 2019

Prizes:

  • The Michael Z. Brooke Doctoral Prize (£200 and a certificate): for the best doctoral paper.
  • The Neil Hood and Stephen Young Prize (£200 and a certificate): for the most original new work.

 

AIB-UKI – Adam Smith Best Doctoral Dissertation Award

In addition, there is a competition for candidates who have obtained their doctoral degrees from a UK or Ireland based institution. To be eligible candidates must have successfully graduated within the last two academic years, i.e. after 31st August 2016. Deadline: Friday, 15th February 2018

Shortlisted candidates will be invited to make presentations at the 46th AIB-UKI conference to be hosted by the University of Sussex Business School on 25-27 April 2019.

Prize:

  • The Adam Smith Best Doctoral Dissertation Award (£500 and a certificate)

For more details about the AIB-UKI 2019 conference, please visit: https://www.aib-uki.org/conference.html

Any additional queries can be sent by email to the Convenor of Doctoral Colloquium, Dr Surender Munjal (S.Munjal@lubs.leeds.ac.uk)

CfP: Capri Summer School in Qualitative Methods

The Call for Participation for the Capri Summer School on Research Methods in Management Studies 2019, 9-13 September (VII Edition) is open!

The Capri Summer School is co-organized by Cardiff Business School, University of Naples Federico II, HEC Paris, Grenoble Ecole de Management, Open University, SciencesPo, Stockholm School of Economics and Aalto Business School, Cass Business School, Hasselt University.

The Capri Summer School was born on the impulse of Italian Academy of Management and Business Administration to foster knowledge and methodologies among young scholars settling a challenging and stimulating context in one of most charming places in the world: The Island of Capri.

This International Summer School is supported by a number of leading faculty members belonging to a network of both promoting and external universities. Among those who have already confirmed their availability, there are: Hugh Willmott (Cass Business School & Cardiff Business School), Emma Bell (Open University), Marie-Laure Djelic (SciencesPo), Afshin Mehrpouya (HEC Paris), Islam Gazi, Amanda Peticca-Harris & Marcos Barros (Grenoble Ecole de Management), Roberto Di Pietra (Universiy of Siena), Staffan Furusten (Stockholm University), Rebecca Piekkari (Aalto Business School), Patrizia Zanoni (Hasselt Unversity).

Deadlines

The submission must be done by 2nd May 2019.

The course is aimed at doctoral students and early stage researchers in the areas of management, interested in qualitative studies of accounting, management, finance, organization, etc. We would be delighted to welcome some participants from your group/institution.

Please for further information visit the Capri Summer School Website

CfP: ABH 2019 – Business Transformation in an Uncertain World

Deadline extended!

Call for Papers
Association of Business Historians Annual Conference
‘Business Transformation in an Uncertain World‘
Sheffield Hallam University, 4-6 July 2019

Businesses have always operated in a shifting and uncertain environment. Such
uncertainty has stemmed from a variety of factors including the surprising behaviour of rivals, the advent of new and sometimes disruptive technologies (such as steam power or electricity), changes in consumer tastes, the tightening or relaxation of regulation, macroeconomic disturbances (such as depressions), natural and industrial disasters, nationalization, political crises and war. The conference seeks to explore how businesses (and business organizations) in the past charted their way through an uncertain world, whether reactively or creatively through reorganization and the development of new strategies to secure an advantage. Failure may be as interesting as success.
Proposals for individual papers, or for full sessions, panel discussions or other session formats, are invited on this topic, broadly conceived, dealing with any historical period or region of the world, and using any relevant academic methodology. Some examples of themes that could be addressed are given below, but this list is not meant to be exhaustive.

  • The impact of disruptive technologies from the perspective of the innovator and/or the businesses threatened
  • Disruptive business models such as mail order, supermarkets, online retailing, flatpack furniture
  • The ways in which firms and industries have tried to predict and anticipate the actions of rivals: for example by developing forecasting tools
  • Moulding, identifying and responding to changes in consumer tastes and values: for example the targeting of women consumers by tobacco firms in the 1920s
  • Influencing and reacting to changes in the national and international regulatory environment: for example the tightened regulation of banking and financial services around the world after the 1930s depression
  • Reconfiguring the organizational structure of the firm or industry in order to create a new advantage, or respond to a new threat
  • The behaviour of management under stress, for example at times of financial crisis, or during a natural disaster or industrial accident (such as a mining explosion)
  • The development of management thought on how to cope with uncertainty from the early twentieth century onwards
  • Businesses and political uncertainty, including war, nationalization, and the threat of nationalization, and the collapse of existing political structures (e.g. decolonization of the British and French empires, or the break-up of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.)

As always, we also welcome proposals that are not directly related to the conference
theme.

How to submit a paper or session proposal
The programme committee will consider both individual papers and entire panels.
Individual paper proposals should include a one-page (up to 300-word) abstract and
5 line curriculum vitae (CV). Panel proposals should include a cover letter stating
the rationale for the panel and the name of its contact person; one-page (300-word)
abstract and author’s CV for each paper; and a list of preferred panel chairs and
commentators with contact information. Note that each academic session lasts 90
minutes, allowing time for 3 or at a pinch 4 papers. The deadline for submissions is
31 January 2019.

If you have any questions please contact j.singleton@shu.ac.uk.
Submissions must be made online at: https://unternehmensgeschichte.de/db/public/C7
Begin by selecting between uploading a single paper or a full panel. Have your abstract and CV ready. The software will guide you through the uploading and submission process.

Any other suggestions for the conference – workshops, poster sessions, panel
discussions – should be made to the programme committee through
j.singleton@shu.ac.uk.

 

Tony Slaven doctoral workshop & Francesca Carnevali travel grants

Call for Applications
Tony Slaven Doctoral Workshop in Business History
Sheffield Hallam University, 4th July 2019

The ABH will hold its seventh annual Tony Slaven Doctoral Workshop on 4 July 2019. This event immediately precedes the 2019 ABH Annual Conference at Sheffield Hallam University. Participants in the Workshop are encouraged to attend the main ABH Annual Conference following the Workshop. The Workshop is an excellent opportunity for doctoral students to discuss their work with other research students and established academics in business history in an informal and supportive environment. Students at any stage of their doctoral studies, whether in their first year or very close to submitting, are urged to apply. In addition to providing new researchers with an opportunity to discuss their work with experienced researchers in the discipline, the Workshop will also include at least one skills-related session. The Workshop interprets the term ‘business history’ broadly, and it is intended that students in areas such as (but not confined to) the history of international trade and investment, financial or economic history, agricultural history, the history of not-for-profit organisations, government-industry relations, accounting history, social studies of technology, and historians or management or labour will find it useful. Students undertaking topics with a significant business history element but in disciplines other than economic or business history are also welcome. We embrace students researching any era or region of history.
Skills sessions are typically led by regular ABH members; in the past these have included ‘getting published’, ‘using historical sources’, and ‘preparing for your viva examination’ sessions. There will be ample time for discussion of each student’s work and the opportunity to gain feedback from active researchers in the field.

How to Apply for the Tony Slaven Workshop
Your application should be no more than 4 pages sent together in a single computer file: 1) a one page CV; 2) one page stating the name(s) of the student’s supervisor(s), the title of the theses (a proposed title is fine), the university and department where the student is registered and the date of commencement of thesis registration; 3) an abstract of the work to be presented.

You may apply via email to Dr Mitch Larson at mjlarson@uclan.ac.uk. Please use the subject line “Tony Slaven Workshop” and submit by the 31 January 2019.

Francesca Carnevali Travel Grant for PhD Students

Students whose papers are accepted for either the Slaven Doctoral Workshop or the main ABH meeting may apply for funds to partially defray their travel costs by applying to the Francesca Carnevali Travel Grant for PhD Students. A limited number of scholarships are available from the Francesca Carnevali fund of the ABH to contribute towards the travel, accommodation, and registration costs of students doing a PhD in the United Kingdom, who are presenting in the Slaven Workshop or the ABH conference. These will be awarded competitively prior to the Workshop. Please indicate in your application whether you would like to be considered for one of these travel grants.

 

Coleman Prize for the best doctoral thesis in Business History 2019

Coleman Prize for Best PhD Dissertation
Sheffield Hallam University, 4-6 July 2019

Named in honour of the British business historian Donald Coleman (1920-1995), this prize is awarded annually by the Association of Business Historians to recognise excellence in new research in Britain. It is open to PhD dissertations in Business History (broadly defined) either having a British subject or completed at a British university. All dissertations completed in the previous calendar year to that of the Prize are eligible. In keeping with the ABH’s broad understanding of business history, applications are strongly encouraged from candidates in economic history, social history, labour history, intellectual history, cultural history, environmental history, the history of science and technology, the history of medicine, or any
other subfield. The value of the prize is £500, sponsored by the Taylor & Francis Group, a scholarly publisher.

To be eligible for the Prize, finalists must present their findings in person at the Association’s annual conference, held on 4-6 July 2019. A complete list of previous winners may be found at: http://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH/coleman.html

How to Apply for the Coleman Prize
Supervisors are encouraged to nominate recent PhDs, and self-nominations are also strongly welcomed. Please send a PDF including the title of your PhD dissertation and a brief abstract (up to 2 double-spaced pages) to christine.leslie@glasgow.ac.uk by 31 January 2019.
Shortlisted candidates will be requested to submit electronic copies of their theses by 21 February 2019. Finalists will be notified by 21 March 2019.
Everyone appearing on the programme must register for the meeting. PhD students whose papers are accepted for the meeting may apply for funds to partially defray their travel costs by applying to the Francesca Carnevali Travel Grant for PhD Students. A limited number of scholarships are available from the Francesca Carnevali fund of the ABH to contribute towards the travel, accommodation and registration costs of students doing a PhD in the United Kingdom, who are
presenting in the Slaven Workshop, the ABH conference or the Coleman Prize.
For more details: https://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH/

CfP: Uses of the Past in International Economic Relations

Uses of the Past in International Economic Relations

St. Hilda’s College
University of Oxford
9-10 May 2019

How do policymakers and economic actors use the past in their decision-making? One of the many exceptional aspects of the global financial crisis of 2008 was the prominence policymakers and commentators gave to the importance of history in helping to determine their response to the crisis. Comparisons with the Great Depression of the 1930s were a recurrent feature of assessments of the depth and spread of the global financial crisis and reveal the extent to which policymakers sought to ‘learn’ from the past. But how relevant is the past as a guide to the present, or even the future, and how is it used when policymakers, bankers and the public are faced with difficult economic challenges?

The main objective of the conference is to build an understanding of how policymakers and economic actors have used the past as a foundation for their decisions, how they created and discriminated among different interpretations of the past according to their preconceptions, and how they were conditioned by the experiences of their predecessors.

Examples may include (but are not limited to) the development of regulation, the reaction to economic or financial crises, the opening of overseas branches or subsidiaries, and the assessment of the credit-worthiness of customers. We welcome all proposals related to this theme across the 19thand 20thcenturies.

PhD students, early career researchers, and confirmed researchers are invited to submit proposals. Applications should comprise a 1 page abstract/summary and short CV. We have some limited funds to support travel costs and accommodation of speakers.

Please send to:  upier@history.ox.ac.uk

For further information please contact Chloe Colchester: upier@history.ox.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals: 25thJanuary 2019

Conference Committee:

  • Catherine Schenk (University of Oxford)
  • Mary O’Sullivan (Universite de Geneve)
  • Mats Larsson (Uppsala University)
  • Stefano Battilossi (Carlos III Madrid)
  • Emmanuel Mourlon-Druot (University of Glasgow)

The UPIER project is financially supported by the HERA Joint Research Programme 3 Uses of the Past which is co-funded by AHRC, AKA, BMBF via DLR-PT, CAS, CNR, DASTI, ETAg, FWF, F.R.S. – FNRS, FWO, FCT, FNR, HAZU, IRC, LMT, MIZS, MINECO, NWO, NCN, RANNÍS, RCN, SNF, & VIAA.

The UPIER project has also received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 649307

BAFA Accounting History Special Interest Group

Inaugural Workshop on Accounting History

Aston Business School

Thursday 13th December and Friday 14th December 2018

Overview

Historical research enables us to reflect on the past in meaningful ways, provides an opportunity to reconstruct that past based on the information encountered and the experiences reflected, and offers lessons and cases that may be relevant to the present day. Historians “find” their stories from the information they gather from the archives and other documentation from and of the past. The aim of this workshop is to demonstrate the relevance of accounting history to the present day, to provide various methods for carrying out accounting history research, and reflects on the issues faced when exploring the past.

 Workshop programme

The one-day workshop includes sessions by accomplished business historians, as well as the opportunity to workshop ideas and issues in accounting history research. The Guest Presenters are:

  • Professor Stephanie Decker, Aston University – Co-Editor Business History.
    • Topic – “Research Strategies in Organization History”

Stephanie Decker is a Professor in Organization Studies and History at Aston Business School, where she has been working since 2010. She is currently the Associate Dean for Research for Aston Business School. Stephanie’s research interests include the use of historical analysis for management and organization studies. This focuses on integrating historical approaches, primarily archival research influenced by postcolonial theory, ethnographic history and microhistory into social scientific research data analysis techniques such as documentary and process-based qualitative studies. Stephanie is a co-editor of Business History.

  • Professor John Singleton, Sheffield Hallam University – Professor of Economic and Business History
    • Topic: “Pitfalls and benefits of working with organisations”

John Singleton has been a Professor at Sheffield Hallam since 2011, following 17 years at Victoria University of Wellington (NZ). While his PhD thesis was on the decline of the Lancashire cotton industry in the mid twentieth century, his main interest is British and world financial and economic history over the last 100 years. In NZ he was commissioned to write histories of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand and the Audit Office. Recent books include those on Central Banking in the Twentieth Century and Economic and Natural Disasters since 1900.

  • Dr Mike Anson, Bank of England – Archivist
    • Topic: “The role of archivists and how to approach archives”

Mike Anson is Archive Manager, at the Bank of England Archive. He joined the Bank in 2004 as researcher on its official history project and was previously at the Business History Unit, London School of Economics working on commissioned histories of British Rail, and the Channel Tunnel. He has been a Trustee of the Business Archives Council since 2004, and was elected Chair in 2013. Mike is also Chair of the Conference Committee of the Archives & Records Association UK & Ireland, and external examiner at the Centre for Archives & Information Studies, University of Dundee.

 

Target audience

The workshop is for accounting and finance researchers who are either currently working in the accounting history field or interested in doing so in the future. We welcome faculty and PhD students. This is an opportunity to learn, share and receive feedback on research ideas, and discover more about conducting research and publishing in accounting history.

Further details

The workshop will be preceded by an informal dinner at 7pm on 13th December 2018 (participants’ own cost), offering an opportunity to network and establish contact with others interested in accounting history. Details of the venue will be circulated to everyone who registers for the workshop.

The workshop will run formally from 9:00-16:30 on 14 December 2018 and costs £55 for BAFA members, which includes all presentations, refreshment breaks and lunch on the Friday.

See https://www2.aston.ac.uk/about/directions for travel information.

Details of accommodation options are available on request from the local host, Professor Carolyn Cordery, at c.cordery@aston.ac.uk

Registration

Registration is available through the BAFA website: http://bafa.ac.uk/ 

BAM SIG workshop: Can History Inform Corporate Responsibility?

British Academy of Management: Management and Business History SIG

Call for Papers:

Workshop at The York Management School, University of York, UK – jointly between the BAM Management and Business History SIG, and the Management and Organizational History Research Cluster

10th January 2019

Responsible Business, Business Ethics and Management History Strategy in Conversation – Can History Inform Corporate Responsibility?

There is continued and increasing academic interest in responsible business – and how this interacts and informs management and organization strategy and practice (eg, Porter and Kramer, 2011). Recent scholarship and practice has put the UN Sustainable Development Goals and other corporate responsibility initiatives, such as B-corporation accreditation, centre stage in driving forward the agenda (eg. Voegtlin & Scherer, 2017; Moroz, et al., 2018).
At the same time, scholarship in management history has examined the origins and directions of of corporate responsibility (eg, Hoffman, 2007; Marens, 2008; Singleton, 2018) and the literature on ‘social movements’, the forerunners of contemporary concerns, is especially rich and diverse. For example, cooperatives (eg, Wilson, Webster and Vorberg-Rugh, 2013), credit unions (Ward and McKillop, 2005), mutuality (Batiz-Lazo and Billings, 2012), social entrepreneurship (eg, Murphy, et al., 2018), and religiously-grounded movements such as the Quakers (Prior and Kirby, 2006, Robertson, Korczynski and Pickering, 2007), to name a few. Though this wide range of work focuses largely on historical events and chronologies, what contemporary scholars of socially responsible management can learn from this rich and varied history has received much less attention. This special issue seeks to redress this balance.
This special issue represents the beginning of a deeper conversation about the contours of the relationship between responsible business, business ethics, and management history. Thus, we invite contributions from a broad range of management and organization disciplines on the following topics, but not limited to:
• Is there a connection between movements of the past and contemporary ‘responsibility’ movements (such as UN Global Compact, B-corporations, etc)?
• How has responsible management changed over time? How are the practices or processes shaped by their particular social, historical or religious/spiritual contexts?
• What role, if any, does religion or spirituality play in the histories of movements of the past?
• What, if any, is the relationship between endogenous and exogenous factors in the change or decline of historical movements?
• How have historical movements influenced the evolution of particular industries?
• What, if any, is the possible relationship between the organization’s corporate or legal form and responsible business and ethics?
• To what extent does Government policy, regulation and the law promote or inhibit responsible business?
• Is corporate or legal form associated with more or less responsible approaches to human resource management, supply chain management, marketing and distribution, production, decision-making or other strategic processes?
• What role, if any, do changes (strengthening/weakening) to corporate governance play in responsible business over time? What factors led to changes in corporate governance?
• What role, if any, does leadership play in the creation, renewal and/or decline of historical movements?
• What, if any, effect does significant organization change events have on its approach to responsible business (e.g., acquisition, mergers, divestment, changes in leadership, etc.)?
• Is an ‘ethical capitalism’ possible?
To present, please send an extended abstract (500 words) to Kevin at kevin.tennent@york.ac.uk.
Kevin Tennent, University of York
Nicholas Burton, Northumbria University