Brexit Bonanza

Brexit and History

University of York

Thu 11 October 2018, 11:00 – 17:30

DESCRIPTION

Brexit and History Conference to inform debates about the origins and impact of Brexit. Speakers will discuss; Supply-Side Policy in the Context of Brexit (Nick Crafts); UK Public Procurement before, during and after the British membership of the EU (David Clayton & David Higgins); Standardisation, Popular Politics and Euroscepticism in Britain (Aashish Velkar); Lessons from the Past for Brexit? Britain and Commercial Negotiations with Europe in the Nineteenth century (John Davis); Did we ever really understand how the EU works? (Piers Ludlow); British Political Tradition and the Crisis of Brexit (Martin Smith); The UK and the EU in the Past and Future of Global Economic Order (Tony Heron).

Tea and coffee will be provided but please bring your own lunch; alternatively food is available to purchase on campus.

This event is sponsored by The Economic History Society and supported by the Department of History, University of York.

If you are interested, you can sign up here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/brexit-and-history-tickets-50268560618

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PDW report on Gender & History as an Analytical Lens

Gender and History as an Analytical Lens for Management and Entrepreneurship Research and Practice: Some thoughts from a PDW at the 2018 BAM conference

 

On the 4th September representatives from the Feminist Library (FL) in London, Gail Chester and Magda Oldziejewska, alongside Feminist Archive North’s (FAN) Jalna Hanmer, and academics from St Andrews, Aston, Birmingham and Stirling Universities, participated in a refreshingly non-strictly-academic workshop as part of the BAM 2018 conference at Bristol’s University of the West of England. The Library, along with FAN, introduced feminist libraries and archives (FLA) in the UK and talked about some of the unique practices of these organisations.

 

The FL, having been around since 1975, the height of the Women’s Liberation Movement, has since accumulated over 7,000 books, 1,500 periodical titles and countless items of archival material and ephemera, among them innumerable titles on women in education, feminist educational practices, women in management and business. FAN archive contains a wealth of contemporary material in local, regional, national and international collections donated by individuals and organisations, including conference papers, pamphlets, journals, newsletters, dissertations, oral history interviews, audio tapes, films, posters, badges, t-shirts and banners. However, far from these being like regular libraries and archives, the importance of understanding the FLA resources in the context of where they come from was highlighted, i.e. the feminist theories and practices key to the management and survival of these resources: collective working, intersectionality, diversity, and a focus on accessibility.

 

Alongside this compelling account of the construction and maintenance of the Feminist Library, including the contemporary challenges of archiving social media and of course the eternal funding challenges of this kind of work, workshop participants also addressed questions of how and why we conduct historical research with women and feminism at its centre. Organizer Hannah Dean (St Andrews) framed the workshop with an explanation of her British Academy Postdoctoral Fellowship. Dr. Dean collected and archived women’s life history accounts of business ownership, creating an invaluable resource for her own research and for future scholars. Dr. Linda Perriton (Stirling) made clear why business historians need to ‘pick up the gauntlet’ that feminist historians have thrown down, and engage fully with the messy, marginal practices that are so fundamental to mainstream/malestream accounts of most business history.

 

Professor Stephanie Decker (Aston) followed this with a clear-sighted explanation of how archives can be approached as a site for fieldwork, as well as a source repository. Participants were encouraged again to take account of the nexus of power/knowledge that all history/History is embedded within. Finally, Dr. Scott Taylor (Birmingham) talked around the possibility of feminist methodologies for history, and what they mean for how we bear witness to the lives and activities of women in business history.

 

The stimulating resulting discussion focused on the importance of preserving/uncovering the lesser known/hidden voices of women, and at least one attendee was inspired to conduct her own research into this under-explored area, focusing on women’s work in Turkey in the middle ages.

 

All in all, it was heartening to be part of such an inspiring event that brought together historians, feminists, feminist allies, social scientists, archivists, and activists. Contemporary feminist activism and archivist practices have much to say to business and management research; historical analysis of women’s experiences and feminism even more so!

CHORD conference: Retailing & Distribution in 18C

CHORD conference ‘Retailing and Distribution in the Eighteenth Century’

by Laura Ugolini

The 2018 CHORD conference on ‘Retailing and Distribution in the Eighteenth Century’

will take place at the University of Wolverhampton, UK

on 13 September 2018.

The programme, together with abstracts, registration details and further information, can be found at:
https://retailhistory.wordpress.com/2018/05/29/2018/

The programme includes:

Steven Sanders, Oxford Brookes University
The Upholder in the Age of Thomas Chippendale: Upholders as Appraisers, Brokers, and Auctioneers

Anna Knutsson, European University Institute
Selling British Contraband in Eighteenth Century Sweden

Jenni Dixon, BCU
From Cabinets to Toy-Shops: Curious Spaces in the Eighteenth-Century

Aidan Collins, University of York
Defining ‘Traders’ in Bankruptcy Proceedings, 1700-1750

Elisabeth Gernerd
Fancy Feathers: the Feather Trade in Britain and the Atlantic World

Jessica Davidson, St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford
‘Here mirth and merchandise are mix’d’: Buying and selling at the English provincial fair reconsidered

Matthew Mauger, Queen Mary University of London
Grocers’ Trade cards and the Cultural Imaginaries of China

David Fallon, University of Roehampton
Bookselling, Sociable Retailing and Identity by Distribution: The Case of Thomas Payne

Serena Dyer, University of Warwick
Stitching and Shopping: The Material Literacy of the Consumer

Clare Rose, The Royal School of Needlework, London
Quilted petticoats in eighteenth century London: genuine and imitation, bought and stolen

Jon Stobart, Manchester Metropolitan University
Clothing the countryside: textiles and haberdashery in English village shops, c.1660-1720

The conference will be held at the University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton City Campus.

The fee is £22.

Registration is via the University of Wolverhampton’s e-store, at:
https://www.estore.wlv.ac.uk/product-catalogue/conferences-events/faculty-of-social-sciences/chord-workshop-retailing-and-distribution-in-the-eighteenth-century

Or see the conference web-pages, at:
https://retailhistory.wordpress.com/2018/05/29/2018/

Or contact Laura Ugolini, at: L.Ugolini@wlv.ac.uk

Information about CHORD events can also be found here: https://retailhistory.wordpress.com/

Prof. Laura Ugolini
Professor of History

Dept. of History, Politics, War Studies
Faculty of Social Sciences
Room MH124
Mary Seacole (MH) Building
University of Wolverhampton
Wolverhampton
WV1 1LY

Nominations for Gomory and Hagley Book Prize

Ralph Gomory Prize of the Business History Conference/Deadline/November 30, 2018

by Carol Ressler Lockman

The 2018 Ralph Gomory Prize of the Business History Conference has been awarded to Edward J. Balleisen of Duke University for his book, Fraud:  An American History from Barnum to Madoff (Princeton University Press, 2017) at the Business History Conference annual meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, April 7, 2018.

 

The Ralph Gomory Prize for Business History (made possible by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation) recognizes historical work on the effect business enterprises have on the economic conditions of a country in which they operate.   A $5,000 prize is awarded annually.  Eligible books are written In English and published two years (2017 or 2018 copyright) prior to the award.   The 2019 Prize will be presented at the annual meeting of the Business History Conference to be held in Cartagena, Colombia, March 14-16, 2019.

Four copies of a book must accompany a nomination and be submitted to the Prize Coordinator, Carol Ressler Lockman, Business History Conference, PO Box 3630, 298 Buck Road, Wilmington, DE 19807-0630 USA.  Email:  clockman@hagley.orgThe deadline for submission is November 30, 2018.

 

Hagley Prize for Business History/Deadline November 30, 2018

by Carol Ressler Lockman

Hagley Museum and Library and the Business History Conference are pleased to announce the 2018 winner of the Hagley Prize:  Matatu:  A History of Popular Transportation in Nairobi (The University of Chicago Press, 2017) by Kenda Mutongi of Williams College.   Hagley Museum and Library and the Business History Conference jointly offer the Hagley Prize awarded to the best book in Business History (broadly defined) and consists of a medallion and $2,500.  The prize was awarded at the Business History Conference annual meeting held in Baltimore, Maryland, April 7th, 2018.

The prize committee encourages the submission of books from all methodological perspectives.  It is particularly interested in innovation studies that have the potential to expand the boundaries of the discipline.   Scholars, publishers, and other interested parties may submit nominations.  Eligible books can have either an American or an international focus.   They must be written in English and be published during the two years (2017 or 2018 copyright) prior to the award.

Four copies of a book must accompany a nomination and be submitted to the prize coordinator, Carol Ressler Lockman, Hagley Museum and Library, PO Box 3630, 298 Buck Road, Wilmington DE  19807-0630,  The deadline for nominations is November 30, 2018.   The 2019 Hagley Prize will be presented at the annual meeting of the Business History Conference in Cartagena, Colombia, March 16th, 2019.

BAM council elections

In case you are member of the British Academy of Management, please remember to vote!

From January 2019 there will be vacant places on the BAM Council. 32 candidates have been nominated, representing a diverse range of research backgrounds and interests.

These elections are important as they will decide who will serve as members of Council for the next three years (Jan 2019 – Dec 2021) and will help to shape the academy going into the future.

The closing date for votes to be returned is 12.00 on Friday 24th August

The Candidates (In Alpabetical Order)

  • Dr Tony Abdoush
  • Dr Ijeoma Ogochukwu Anaso
  • Dr Norin Arshed
  • Professor Thankom Arun
  • Professor Charles Baden-Fuller
  • Dr Brendan Canavan
  • Dr Fariba Darabi
  • Professor Stephanie Decker
  • Dr Alison J. Glaister
  • Dr Russ Glennon
  • Dr Dieu Hack-Polay
  • Dr Qile He
  • Dr Inge Hill
  • Dr Emmanuel Idowu
  • Mr James Johnston
  • Dr Susan Kirk
  • Dr Smirti Kutaula
  • Professor Jonathan Liu
  • Dr Mark Loon
  • Dr Nnamdi Madichie
  • Dr Maktoba Omar
  • Kingsley Omeihe
  • Professor Emma Parry
  • Professor Emmanuella Plakoyiannaki
  • Dr Ijaz A. Qureshi
  • Dr Stefanie Reissner
  • Dr Ashley Roberts
  • Dr Sukanlaya Sawang
  • Dr Usha Sundaram
  • Dr Wen Wang
  • Dr Svetlana Warhurst
  • Dr Kemi Yekini

BAM Members – Cast Your Vote

To read statements from each of the nominees and for information on how to vote, please click here:

View Candidate Profiles (Available to Active BAM Members Only)

Please click here to vote in the BAM2019-2021 Council Elections

The closing date for votes to be returned is 12.00 Friday 24th August.

Kind regards,

Lewis

Lewis Johnson | Membership and Communications Administrator
—————————————————————————————–
British Academy of Management, 137 Euston Road London, NW1 2AA, UK
T: +44 (0)2073 839 794 | F: +44 (0) 2073 830 377 | ljohnson@bam.ac.uk
—————————————————————————————–
Join BAM | Conference | LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter | bam.ac.uk

CfP: BHC 2019

Globalization and De-Globalization: Shifts of Power and Wealth

Annual Meeting of the Business History Conference
Hilton Cartagena de Indias, Colombia
March 14 – 16, 2019
Proposals due October 1, 2018 

The theme of the 2019 Business History Conference annual meeting will be “Globalization and De-Globalization: Shifts of Power and Wealth.” The recent phenomena of the spread of populist and economic nationalist regimes throughout North America, Europe, Asia and elsewhere taking positions against the major trading blocks and the free movement of people and goods make the topic of this conference very timely. The conference aims to concentrate on business history research agendas that enable a nuanced understanding of the phenomena of globalization and de-globalization.

The conference theme encourages contributions from a variety of approaches to business history research, covering a broad range of geographies and periods. The program committee of Marcelo Bucheli (co-chair), Andrea Lluch (co-chair), Takafumi Kurosawa, Espen Storli, Laura Sawyer, and Teresa da Silva Lopes (BHC president) invites papers proposals addressing on the following topics, but not limited to:

  • the contribution of firms and the entrepreneurs to globalization and de-globalization;
  • the role and responsibility of business in shifts of power, wealth and inequality;
  • the rise of emerging markets and the globalization of firms from those markets;
  • globalization and environmental and social sustainability;
  • business and gender during waves of globalization and de-globalization
  • and risk management during globalization waves

While we encourage proposals to take up this theme, papers addressing all other topics will receive equal consideration by the program committee in accordance with BHC policy. Proposals may be submitted for individual papers or for entire panels. Each proposal should include a one-page abstract and one-page curriculum vitae (CV) for each participant. Panel proposals should have a cover letter containing a title, a one-paragraph panel description, and suggestions for a chair and commentator, with contact information for the panel organizer. To submit a proposal go to <http://thebhc.org/2019-bhc-meeting> and click on the link Submit a Paper/Panel Proposal.

All sessions take place at the Hilton Hotel Cartagena. Rooms (all suites) are $169/night single and $189/double occupancy (plus tax) and include a full breakfast. General questions regarding the BHC’s 2019 annual meeting may be sent to conference coordinator Roger Horowitz, rh@udel.edu.

The K. Austin Kerr Prize will be awarded for the best first paper delivered by a new scholar at the annual meeting.  A “new scholar” is defined as a doctoral candidate or a Ph. D. whose degree is less than three years old. You must nominate your paper for this prize on the proposal submission page where indicated. Please check the appropriate box if your proposal qualifies for inclusion in the Kerr Prize competition.

The deadline for receipt of all paper and panel proposals is 1 October 2018. Acceptance letters will be sent by 15 December 2018. Everyone appearing on the program must register for the meeting. Graduate students and recent PhDs (within 3 years of receipt of degree) whose papers are accepted for the meeting may apply for funds to partially defray their travel costs; information will be sent out once the program has been set.

The BHC awards the Herman E. Krooss Prize for the best English-language dissertation in business history by a recent Ph.D. in history, economics, business administration, the history of science and technology, sociology, law, communications, and related fields. To be eligible, dissertations must be completed in the three calendar years immediately prior to the 2019 annual meeting, and may only be submitted once for the Krooss prize. After the Krooss committee has reviewed the proposals, it will ask semi-finalists to submit copies of their dissertations. Finalists will present summaries of their dissertations at a plenary session and will receive a partial subsidy of their travel costs to the meeting. Proposals accepted for the Krooss Prize are not eligible for the Kerr Prize. If you wish to apply for this prize please send a cover letter indicating you are applying for the Krooss prize along with a one-page CV and one-page (300 word) dissertation abstract via email to BHC@Hagley.org. The deadline for proposals for the Krooss prize is 1 October 2018.

The BHC Doctoral Colloquium in Business History will be held in conjunction with the BHC annual meeting. This prestigious workshop, funded by Cambridge University Press, will take place in Cartagena Wednesday March 13 and Thursday March 14. Typically limited to ten students, the colloquium is open to early stage doctoral candidates pursuing dissertation research within the broad field of business history, from any relevant discipline. Topics (see link for past examples) may range from the early modern era to the present, and explore societies across the globe.  Participants work intensively with a distinguished group of BHC-affiliated scholars (including at least two BHC officers), discussing dissertation proposals, relevant literatures and research strategies, and career trajectories.  Applications are due by 1 November 2018 via email to BHC@Hagley.org and should include: a statement of interest; CV; preliminary or final dissertation prospectus (10-15 pages); and a letter of support from your dissertation supervisor (or prospective supervisor). Questions about the colloquium should be sent to its director, Edward Balleisen, eballeis@duke.edu. All participants receive a stipend that partially defrays travel costs to the annual meeting.  Applicants will receive notification of the selection committee’s decisions by 1 December 2018.

On the 14th March 2019 there will be a special workshop on ‘Latin American Business in a Global and Historical Perspective’ which will be in the Spanish and Portuguese languages and aims to attract papers by academics who prefer to present their research in their native languages. The deadline for submissions is 1 October 2018. For more details about the call for papers and the submission process contact Joaquin Viloria De la Hoz (Banco de la República / Central Bank of Colombia) at: jvilorde@banrep.gov.co.

Slaven doctoral colloquium 2018

Workshop report by Julia Fernando, doctoral student at Aston Business School:

This year, I had the pleasure of attending the seventh annual Tony Slaven Doctoral workshop held by the Association of Business Historians (ABH) conference. The workshop is designed to enable doctoral students to share their research with academics and other students from the field of business history and receive feedback.

I submitted my proposal to the workshop with some hesitation – my academic and professional background is firmly rooted in Work and Organisational Psychology, with a particular focus on the experiences of women in the world of work. My current research, however, is inter-disciplinary, drawing on Area Studies, Work Psychology and Business History to explore the contemporary and historical factors influencing the patterns of female entrepreneurship in Uganda.

Prior to my doctoral studies, I had come across historical methods in my wider reading of the social sciences but had never perceived a compatibility between the two disciplines. My lack of knowledge about history and historical methods threatened to dissuade me from applying to the workshop. However, the workshop’s reputation of having an informal and supportive atmosphere fought back the pangs of imposter syndrome and I successfully submitted a proposal.

The workshop preceded the annual ABH conference 2018, at the Open University, Milton Keynes. Upon arrival, I was invited to join a small selection of doctoral students and academics, who were congregating around the refreshments in the upstairs foyer of the Michael Young Building. My nerves immediately eased as we were warmly welcomed by Mitchell Larson and given an overview of the day.

The workshop comprised of presentations by doctoral students and skills sessions led by experienced academics. The day kicked off with two excellent student presentations on the history of banking and finance in the UK. Carolyn Keber discussed her research on UK investment trusts before WW1 and Oluwatoyin Olojido shared insights from her study on the role of aristocracy in British new share issues in 1891-1914.

A roundtable on doctoral examinations followed the morning’s presentations. I learnt about the common challenges facing final year students and the ways to best prepare for your final year defence from the perspective of experienced examiners in the room. As a first-year student, I listened in with great interest but a degree of psychological detachment – stressors for next year, I reminded myself…

After lunch, Professor Peter Miskell shared fascinating insights in his interactive session on the publication patterns of business historians. Learning that the Business History of Africa remains partial and less frequented, only further sparked my motivation for adopting historical methods in my study of female entrepreneurship in Uganda.

Beatriz Rodriguez and I presented our research on the Business History of developing economies. Beatriz shared her proposed research design investigating the financing varieties of capitalism in Colombia after 1950 and I gave an overview of my research and motivations to contribute a Business History of women entrepreneurs in Uganda. A lively discussion followed both of our presentations, which spilled over into side conversations and discussions sometime after the workshop closed.

I walked into the Tony Slaven Workshop unclear about how historical methods could precisely complement the research question I am pursuing. I walked out with a sense of direction, pages of recommended reading and contact details of the academics who have already offered me extensive, informal support. I have felt hugely supported by the Tony Slaven Workshop organisers, attendees and the ABH community as a whole and would thoroughly recommend the workshop to any doctoral students incorporating an element of business history in their research.

The Slaven doctoral colloquium will run again next year, please go to the ABH website for updates: http://www.abh-net.org/ 

 

Conf: Transmission of Financial Knowledge in Historical Perspective

The Transmission of Financial Knowledge in Historical Perspective, 1840-1940

March 8-9, 2019

German Historical Institute, Washington, DC

Conveners: Nicholas Osborne (Ohio University) and Atiba Pertilla (GHI Washington)

Submission Deadline: August 1, 2018

(Call for Papers Stable URL: https://www.ghi-dc.org/events-conferences/event-history/2019/conferences/financial-knowledge.html?L=0)

Nicholas Osborne, PhD

Lecturer, Honors Tutorial College

Ohio University

Columbia University, GSAS ’14

Department of History

Peter Miskell: Content & Practice of Business History

Last weekend at the Association of Business Historians’ Conference, Peter Miskell (Henley Business School) gave a really insightful talk about the current state of business history. He kindly agreed to share the slides and write up a short summary for the Organizational History Network.

Who are business historians, and what is it that they do? Or more bluntly, what is business history? These are questions that have troubled professional business historians for at least a couple of decades, and to which no clear consensus has yet emerged. In one sense, this doesn’t seem to matter greatly. Business history conferences continue to be relatively well attended, attracting scholars from a range of related disciplines; business history journals are publishing an increasing quantity of articles; and business history related sub-groups are evident within wider scholarly communities such as the Academy of Management, the American Historical Association, and the European Group on Organisation Studies. On this evidence business history is thriving. Yet if pressed to define the intellectual core of the discipline – the central questions it addresses and the methods it uses to tackle them – it is difficult to identify a clear answer on which all can agree. If business historians appear to lack an agreed sense of intellectual mission, they also lack a common institutional home. Those of us who may have the confidence to self-identify as business historians at social gatherings are not, as a rule, employed in departments of business history. Within our workplaces we are often lone scholars, and in many cases our identity as business historians co-exists with (or is subordinate to) another disciplinary identity. In this sense business history is not an academic disciplines on a par with, say, economics or psychology or communication studies. It is a sub-discipline, but it is not entirely clear (even among its practitioners) what it is a sub-discipline of.

Rather than attempting to identify the core intellectual identity of business history, or to outline a grand vision of how the (sub-)discipline should develop in the coming years, perhaps it would be more useful to pause and take stock of what the business community actually looks like. Where is it that business historians actually work? Who pays their (our) salaries? What are the institutional ‘rules of the game’ within which they (we) work?

In attempting to address these questions I decided to set myself the simple task of finding out which academic departments business historians are affiliated to. Academic departments in universities, I would argue, constitute the key institutional structures within which most intellectual disciplines function. Different academic disciplines have their own institutional norms and conventions, which are typically learned and reinforced within academic departments through mechanisms such as recruitment practices, mentoring, tenure and promotion systems. In most cases the health (and viability) of these departments is measured by their ability to attract students. (There are some countries where departments are also explicitly measured on the quality of their research outputs, but these provide indications of reputation or prestige rather than of financial viability). Departments which fail to attract a sufficient volume of students are at risk of closure or merger, as exemplified by the fate of many departments of economic history in the UK. This means that business historians (like most academics) ultimately make a living through their teaching rather than their research. And since there are very few students applying to study business history degrees (and thus no departments of business history), this in turn means one of two things for business historians: either they need to teach business history in such a way as to make it relevant and interesting to students whose primary focus is elsewhere; or they need to teach subject matter that would not normally be regarded as business history at all (which might be marketing, entrepreneurship, strategy, or perhaps 19th century literature, or 20th century European history). The types of academic departments within which business historians find themselves may be more a matter of necessity than of choice. Mapping out the institutional contexts within which business historians work is an important step in understanding the nature of the discipline, and the challenges (and opportunities) with which it is presented.

The way I have chosen to do this is by collecting data on every article published in the three leading business history journals during the five year period from 2013-2017. In each case the first-named author has been identified, along with their home institution, their academic department, as well as information about the article itself (period, sector and geographical focus of the study). Not all of the authors identified this way would identify themselves primarily as business historians (though much the same could be said of many people who attend business history conferences). By looking at those individuals who have taken the trouble to submit their research to the main business history journals, and whose work has been accepted after a process of peer review, we at least have access to a community of scholars who have shown a willingness to engage in ideas and debates that are of interest to business historians.

I do not pretend that the methodology employed here constitutes a comprehensive census of business history around the world. The exclusive focus on English language journals is one obvious limitation, the focus on journal articles rather than books is another. But the trends which emerge are, I think, important ones. I hope the slides that accompany this post, at least provide some empirical evidence in relation to claims and assertions that are often made about business history, and the institutional contexts within which it is conducted. I plan to work this up into a paper for publication (perhaps in one of the three journals referred to here), but in the meantime would be very happy to receive any thoughts or comments from those who are interested.

Peter Miskell, Henley Business School, UK

 

2018 Hagley Prize winner

Hagley Museum and Library and the Business History Conference are pleased to announce the 2018 winner of the Hagley Prize:  Matatu:  A History of Popular Transportation in Nairobi (The University of Chicago Press, 2017) by Kenda Mutongi of Williams College.   Hagley Museum and Library and the Business History Conference jointly offer the Hagley Prize awarded to the best book in Business History (broadly defined) and consists of a medallion and $2,500.  The prize was awarded at the Business History Conference annual meeting held in Baltimore, Maryland, April 7th, 2018.

The prize committee encourages the submission of books from all methodological perspectives.  It is particularly interested in innovation studies that have the potential to expand the boundaries of the discipline.   Scholars, publishers, and other interested parties may submit nominations.  Eligible books can have either an American or an international focus.   They must be written in English and be published during the two years (2017 or 2018 copyright) prior to the award.

Four copies of a book must accompany a nomination and be submitted to the prize coordinator, Carol Ressler Lockman, Hagley Museum and Library, PO Box 3630, 298 Buck Road, Wilmington DE  19807-0630,  The deadline for nominations is November 30, 2018.   The 2019 Hagley Prize will be presented at the annual meeting of the Business History Conference in Cartagena, Colombia, March 16th, 2019.