JMH Special Issue on Entrepreneurship Thought and Behavior

Announcement of Special Issue in the Journal of Management History:

Entrepreneurship Thought and Behavior: Reflecting Back and Pushing Forward.

Timelines: 

  • Submissions open: August 2021
  • Submission deadline: 1st December 2021 
  • Revisions (expected): February/March 2022 
  • Final decisions (expected): May 2022 
  • Expected publication issue: Vol. 28 No. 4 in 2022 

Entrepreneurship has a long, and in many cases untold, history. Its discovery from the Irish French economist Richard Cantillon as a risk bearer was written around 1730, and ever since, entrepreneurship and the entrepreneur have remained important components of numerous economic and management theories. The entrepreneur plays a key role in the writings of Jean-Baptist Say, John Stuart Mill, Joseph Schumpeter, Frank Knight, and Friedrich Hayek, yet little historical work explores this in more depth. Moreover, while the Journal of Management History has published numerous articles exploring historical facets of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship over the years (cf., Murphy et al., 2006; Murphy, 2009; Smothers et al., 2014; Prieto and Phipps, 2014; Laudone et al., 2015; Prieto et al., 2017), to date no journal has featured entrepreneurship (broadly defined) as a topic of historical study.

Accordingly, this special issue of the Journal of Management History aims to stimulate research relating to entrepreneurship, entrepreneurs, and the historical foundations, assumptions, and roots of entrepreneurship theory and behavior. Themes may include, but are not limited to:

  1. The history and evolution of entrepreneurial thought and behavior
  2. Historical case analyses of entrepreneurs, their journeys, and their impact and influence
  3. Role and development of entrepreneurial ecosystems over time
  4. Evolution of entrepreneurship-relevant theories, their foundational assumptions and tenants, and how they have evolved over time (e.g., Bendickson et al., 2016)
  5. Emergence and history of research streams within entrepreneurship (social entrepreneurship, gender and entrepreneurship, corporate entrepreneurship, technology entrepreneurship, etc.)
  6. Historical foundations and evolution of entrepreneurial policy over time
  7. Mass proliferation of entrepreneurial support organizations (ESOs), their evolution, and impact
  8. Integration and widespread proliferation of entrepreneurship into education over time
  9. Historical role of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship in addressing the world’s biggest challenges (cf., United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, National Academy of Engineering Grand Challenges)

An intended outcome of this issue is to publish work that is relevant and capable of informing future entrepreneurship research and practice. Authors are encouraged to not just explore topics that are historically interesting, but also capable of having contemporary impact and meaningfulness. Accordingly, scholarship that is purely retrospective and offers little to no implications for contemporary entrepreneurship research and practice is likely not a great fit for the issue.

Given the intentionally wide range of topics that fit within this call for papers, and the special attention the editorial team is putting on the ability of accepted papers to inform contemporary theory and practice, prospective authors are encouraged to reach out to the lead special issue editor, Jeff Muldoon (jmuldoon@emporia.edu), with any queries they may have relating to topical fit and alignment (extended abstracts are welcome for review and feedback).

References:

Bendickson, J., Muldoon, J., Liguori, E. W., & Davis, P. E. (2016). Agency theory: background and epistemology. Journal of Management History, Vol. 22 No. 4, pp. 437-449.

Murphy, P.J., Liao, J. and Welsch, H.P. (2006), “A conceptual history of entrepreneurial thought”, Journal of Management History, Vol. 12 No. 1, pp. 12-35.

Murphy, P.J. (2009), “Entrepreneurship theory and the poverty of historicism”, Journal of Management History, Vol. 15 No. 2, pp. 109-133.

Smothers, J., J. Murphy, P., M. Novicevic, M. and H. Humphreys, J. (2014), “Institutional entrepreneurship as emancipating institutional work: James Meredith and the Integrationist Movement at Ole Miss”, Journal of Management History, Vol. 20 No. 1, pp. 114-134.

Prieto, L.C. and T.A. Phipps, S. (2014), “Capitalism in question: Hill, Addams and Follett as early social entrepreneurship advocates”, Journal of Management History, Vol. 20 No. 3, pp. 266-277

Laudone, R., Liguori, E.W., Muldoon, J. and Bendickson, J. (2015), “Technology brokering in action: revolutionizing the skiing and tennis industries”, Journal of Management History, Vol. 21 No. 1, pp. 114-134.

Prieto, L.C., Phipps, S.T.A., Osiri, J.K. and LeCounte, J.F. (2017), “Creating an interface: Aiding entrepreneurial success via critical pedagogy and insights from African-American management history”, Journal of Management History, Vol. 23 No. 4, pp. 489-506.

CfP SI Occupations and Memory in OS (JMS)

Call for Papers for a Special Issue

OCCUPATIONS AND MEMORY IN ORGANIZATION STUDIES

Submission Deadline: 30 November 2022

Guest Editors

  • Diego M. Coraiola, University of Victoria
  • Sébastien Mena, Hertie School
  • Mairi Maclean, University of Bath
  • Roy Suddaby, University of Victoria & Washington State University

JMS Editor

  • Daniel Muzio, University of York

Background

There is an intrinsic and enduring connection between occupations and memory. In the age before printing, mnemotechnics, or the “art of memory”, was a critical criterion of elite occupations in ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman societies (Yates, 1966). The medieval guilds and craft apprenticeships, similarly, adapted techniques of memory handed down from the ancients as a discipline for training experts in religion, art, literature, and architecture (Kieser, 1989). Modernity and the expansion of bureaucracy have changed our relationship to the past (Koselleck, 1985). The development of a bureaucratic culture grounded on written records and the rise of historical memory has led to the development of new occupations and the reconfiguration of social remembering into ‘culturally institutionalized heritage’ (Assmann, 1995). As a result, the role of experts and institutions in preserving, organizing, and curating the past has changed profoundly in the modern era (Levine, 1986). The change is perhaps most pronounced for those experts charged with managing social and organizational memories in support of national policies (Anderson, 1983). More recently, the advent of analog and digital technologies for recording the past and the mediatization of society has introduced yet more changes to our relationship to the past and a new host of experts and practices of remembering and forgetting (Garde-Hansen, 2011). As this brief exploration suggests, expert work is both the outcome of and the source of collective memory work. In spite of the relevance of this recursive relationship, the intersection between occupations and memory is still under-studied and not well understood within management and organization studies.

Research on Occupations and Professions in Organizations (OPO) is a vivid area of scholarly activity that encompasses the study of professions, occupations, careers, and expert work (Anteby, Chan, & DiBenigno, 2016). In addition to more traditional functionalist and conflict-based approaches, organization scholars have recently developed an institutional approach that focuses on the parallel processes of professionalization and institutionalization (Muzio, Brock, & Suddaby, 2013; Suddaby & Viale, 2011). One of the advantages of studying occupations in connection to institutions is that it allows us to understand how they coevolve over time. This is relevant because “professional institutions are often unintelligible without reference to their historical development” (Burrage, 1990, p.18). However, the literature on OPO has not yet seriously grappled with the mnemonic component implicit in that formulation. In particular, OPO research has been little affected by the increasing attention to history and memory in organization studies (Clark & Rowlinson, 2004; Foroughi, Coraiola, Rintamäki, Mena, & Foster, 2020). Although historical research on professions and occupations has been on the rise (Burrage & Torstendahl, 1990), the focus has been on using historical methods to produce ‘history to theory’ (Kipping & Üsdiken, 2014). OPO scholars have generally ignored incorporation of memory, time, and history in theory. A better understanding of the role of the past and the place of memory in the development of expert work may contribute to the development of OPO theorizing.

The rise of Organizational Memory Studies (OMS) is associated with a renewed interest in memory in management and organization studies fostered by a realization that the past is not a given but is instead a social construction (Rowlinson, Booth, Clark, Delahaye, & Procter, 2010; Suddaby, Foster, & Trank, 2010). The past can be used to achieve organizational goals and generate competitive advantage (Foster, Coraiola, Suddaby, Kroezen, & Chandler, 2017; Maclean, Harvey, Sillince, & Golant, 2014; Suddaby, Coraiola, Harvey, & Foster, 2020). Indeed, empirical research has been largely based on single case studies and focused on the way top managers strategically use the past (e.g., Anteby & Molnár, 2012; Maclean, Harvey, Sillince, & Golant, 2018; Schultz & Hernes, 2013; Sinha, Jaskiewicz, Gibb, & Combs, 2020). This has limited the focus of studies to an organizational level of analysis, obscuring the connection between organizational memory and social institutions (Coraiola, Suddaby, & Foster, 2018; Ocasio, Mauskapf, & Steele, 2016). It has also attributed much agency to managers in shaping understandings of the past, with limited attention to other communities and occupations engaged in memory work (e.g., Cailluet, Gorge, & Özçağlar-Toulouse, 2018; Foroughi, 2020; Foster, Wiebe, Coraiola, Bastien, & Suddaby, 2021; Mena, Rintamäki, Fleming, & Spicer, 2016). There has been little work on how state institutions may seek to prevent remembering by marginalized communities (Maclean, Harvey, & Stringfellow, 2017). In other words, the micro and macro aspects of collective memory work are still poorly understood. More research is then needed to uncover how social institutions of memory impact organization and how the remembering and forgetting take place through the efforts of experts in organizational roles and outside of organizational boundaries.

Aims and Scope

The goal of this proposal is to foster the mutual development of the research on OPO (Anteby et al., 2016; Muzio et al., 2013) and OMS (Foroughi et al., 2020; Rowlinson et al., 2010). OMS is concerned with processes of remembering, forgetting, and representing the past in and around organizations (Coraiola, Barros, Maclean, & Foster, 2021). OPO studies the creation and legitimation of expert knowledge, the emergence of occupational communities, and the formation of boundaries and jurisdictions around professions (Abbott, 1988). So far, there has been limited cross-fertilization between these two research areas. Given the relevance of memory to the work of experts and the fundamental role experts play developing collective memory work, we call for more research on the intersection of the literature on OPO and OMS.

OMS scholars have focused on how the past can be reinterpreted and leveraged to achieve corporate goals (Suddaby et al., 2010; Wadhwani, Suddaby, Mordhorst, & Popp, 2018). They have paid less attention to the people doing memory work. Empirical research has focused on leaders and top managers, leaving other actors such as rank-and-file employees (e.g., Aeon & Lamertz, 2021; Foroughi & Al-Amoudi, 2020), the media (e.g., Cailluet et al., 2018), partner professional organizations (e.g., Coraiola & Derry, 2020) and other stakeholders such as NGOs (e.g., Mena et al., 2016) under-researched. Yet, many organizations hire professionals of memory such as archivists to manage their pasts (Foster et al., 2021; Lasewicz, 2015), often in dedicated archives and museums to preserve the memory of the company (Maclean et al., 2014; Nissley & Casey, 2002; Ravasi, Rindova, & Stigliani, 2019). Indeed, many organizations have realized that the past constitute social memory assets (Foster, Suddaby, Minkus, & Wiebe, 2011) that can be explored for marketing, advertising, and public relations (Illia & Zamparini, 2016; Misiura, 2006; Urde, Greyser, & Balmer, 2007). Apart from the memory work organizations do themselves, there are several professionals organizations that provide mnemonic services for a multiplicity of organizations such as The History Factory in the US (e.g., Weindruch, 2016), Grifo in Brazil, and the Centre for Business History in Sweden. The field of cultural memory and heritage has touched on content writers, tour guides, historical reenactors, museum curators, journalists, photographers, filmmakers, and influencers, but they still remain under-studied. With its focus on expert knowledge, the research on OPO can enrich our understanding of processes of remembering, forgetting, and representing the past taking place in and around organizations, and in particular the role of institutions and occupations therein.

Similarly, memory and history are assumed in OPO theories but hardly unpacked (Suddaby, Foster, & Mills, 2014). Although there has been growing historical research on occupations and professions (Burrage & Torstendahl, 1990), the past has been used as a field for testing OPO theories instead of a construct within OPO theorizing. Prior studies have focused on the emergence and diffusion of occupational categories (Baron, Dobbin, & Jennings, 1986; Dobbin, 1994), the transmission of professional norms and culture (Becker, Geer, Hughes, & Strauss, 1961; Orr, 1996), the historical gendering of professions (Arndt & Bigelow, 2005; Davies, 1996), and how professionals change and maintain institutions (Greenwood, Suddaby, & Hinings, 2002; Wright, Zammuto, & Liesch, 2017). These studies use constructs such as professionalization and institutionalization that assume that a community with claims about a body of knowledge becomes progressively accepted and endures over time (Abbott, 1988; Suddaby & Viale, 2011). In addition, institutional approaches to OPO use a variety of historical metaphors such as ‘sedimentation’ (Cooper, Hinings, Greenwood, & Brown, 1996), ‘layering’ (Thelen, 2004), and ‘legacies’ (Schneiberg, 2007) to capture the cumulation of remnants from the past and their translation across time and space (Daudigeos, 2013; Goodrick & Reay, 2011; Kipping & Kirkpatrick, 2013). OPO research also focuses on processes of categorization, socialization, and legitimation (Berger & Luckmann, 1967; Douglas, 1986), which presume the transmission of institutional contents and practices across generations of occupational members and the influence of past actions and decisions upon the present. OMS research can make explicit these assumptions about the past and help conceptualize the role of history and memory in OPO research (Kipping & Üsdiken, 2014).

This special issue builds on some disparate initial efforts connecting the two literatures. For example, Quattrone (2009) shows how the success of accounting was attached to the ancient practice of the art of memory. Suddaby & Greenwood (2005) report how history was used as a symbolic resource to gather legitimacy by a big accounting firm. Foster et al (2021) develop a model of memory work of corporate historians and archivists in Fortune 500 companies. Coraiola and Derry (2020) describe the central role played by lawyers and law firms in sustaining the strategy of social forgetting undertaken by US Big Tobacco. Blagoev, Felten, Kahn (2018) analyze how curators and catalogers constructed new affordances for technologies of memory within the British Museum. Nilsson & Blume (2021) reflect on the historical influence of gendering in the professionalization of textile conservators in Sweden. Crawford, Coraiola, & Dacin (In press) theorize how the memory work of boat guides contributed to preserve the Grand Canyon. Schultz & Hernes (2013) and Hatch and Schultz (2017) study the changes induced by external consultants’ revisiting of the organizational collective memory in Lego and Carlsberg. And Mena and Rintamäki (2020) together with Stutz and Schrempf-Stirling (2020) discuss the responsibility of managers and corporate archivists in reconstructing the past of the organization in relation to corporate social responsibility.

Topics of Interest

We encourage contributions focused on, but not limited to, the following four themes:

1. Institutions of memory and the institutionalization of mnemonic practices: Institutions ‘direct and control’ (Douglas, 1986) the memory of a community. At the same time, social institutions are influenced by collective memory (Ocasio et al., 2016). Modernity fostered the emergence of new areas of expertise about the past encapsulated in ‘institutions of memory’, i.e. schools, archives, libraries, museums (Anderson, 1983). Recently, several other organizations have been influencing the way we define, engage with, and understand the past (e.g., Ancestry, Facebook, me too, Black Lives Matter). These developments raise several questions such as: How expertise about the past has changed with the rise of new technologies? How do new forms of expertise and organization shape the way we see the past? How do they impact on the memory work of organizations and their narratives about the past? How do experts inside and outside organizations contribute to the remembering, forgetting, and representing the past? What is the role of the media and social media in shaping our understanding of the past? How do social movements change the texture of the past?

2. Professional projects, collective identities and institutional work: Experts engage in collective projects to achieve legitimacy and establish jurisdictions. The past can be a source of symbolic resources for the development of professional projects and institutional work. The past can also be an arena in which different occupations compete to legitimate their knowledge. Within an organizational field, professional organizations and experts alike may find in the past a source for constructing a distinctive identity and innovate in the creation of new categories. Some related questions include: What role does memory play in collective action? How is memory work and institutional work related? What is the role of tradition in expert practice? How do professions and organizations rework the past for institutional change and maintenance? How are past rituals, ceremonies and attire used for the construction professional identities? How our changing relationship with the past contributes to the emergence of new occupations (e.g., fact checker, genealogist, living historian) and the revitalization of old crafts (e.g., brewmaster, tailor, leatherworker)?

3. Professionals in organizations and professional organizations: Memory work can be internalized or outsourced. The challenges memory experts face, the way they behave and use their expert judgement, and the practices they engage into may vary depending on the autonomy given to expert workers and the form of governance in which they are organized. The state has been the traditional home for memory experts. However, the recognition of the past as a source of competitive advantage has led many business organizations to create corporate archives and history departments, and to develop other projects based on the past. In addition, growing demand has fostered the emergence of a heritage industry with several professional organizations dedicated to managing the past. Some possible questions in this theme include: What role do archivists and historians play in organizations? How do they use their expert judgement? How have these new organizational occupations developed? How does internal and external memory work differ? How do professional organizations develop memory work? How do heritage experts and organizations rework and represent the past? How has the cultural heritage industry coevolved with heritage experts?

4. Politics of remembering, professional responsibility and ethics: Memory is power-laden. Social groups and organizations often compete in their interpretations of the past. In addition, every act of remembering, forgetting, and representing the past involves a powerful moral and normative component. The way we remember the past sets the tone for what we do in the present and how it should be remembered for the future. The past can be either a source of pride or shame. Expert knowledge is used to remember and forget the good and the bad in different communities of memory. In this sense, there are important implications connecting the work of experts with issues of social and historical responsibility and ethics. Questions related to this theme would include: What are the ethical standards binding the work of memory experts? How do they manage the ethical dilemmas of managing the past? How are memory and professional misconduct related? How do experts deal with the dark past of organizations? What is the role of experts in processes of historical (in)justice?

Submission Process and Deadlines

Manuscript Development Workshop

The authors asked to revise and resubmit (R&R) their papers will also be invited to a manuscript development workshop (to be held in the first half of 2023; location and other details to be announced at a later date). During the workshop they will have the opportunity to present and discuss their papers with other attendees and the guest editors. Please note that participation in the workshop does not guarantee acceptance of the paper in the Special Issue. Likewise, attendance is also not a prerequisite for paper acceptance.

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Urde, M., Greyser, S. A. and Balmer, J. M. (2007). ‘Corporate brands with a heritage’. Journal of Brand Management, 15, 4-19.

Wadhwani, R. D., Suddaby, R., Mordhorst, M. and Popp, A. (2018). ‘History as Organizing: Uses of the Past in Organization Studies’. Organization Studies, 39, 1663-83.

Weindruch, B. (2016). Start With the Future and Work Back: A Heritage Management Manifesto. Lanham, MD: Hamilton Books.

Wright, A. L., Zammuto, R. F. and Liesch, P. W. (2017). ‘Maintaining the Values of a Profession: Institutional Work and Moral Emotions in the Emergency Department’. Academy of Management Journal, 60, 200-37.

Yates, F. A. (1966). The Art of Memory. London: Routledge.

University of Victoria PhD program

PhD Program in International Management and Organization

The Gustavson School of Business at the University of Victoria is accepting applications for our PhD Program in International Management and Organization. We hope that you will pass along the attached poster to your students who may be interested in pursuing a research-focused PhD program upon the completion of their Masters level program. Our PhD program is designed to train those bound for academic careers in management and we welcome applications from students in business, as well as from a wide variety of disciplines.

At Gustavson, our school’s strategy supports and encourages research to be interdisciplinary, cross-disciplinary or multidisciplinary in nature. Our past/current students have backgrounds and experiences in the areas of Public Health, History, Anthropology, Development Studies, Environmental Studies, Public Administration, Indigenous Communities, International/Cultural Studies, as well as Business. These areas provide rich context and enhance the study of organizations and change. Aligned with the University of Victoria’s research strategic plans, we strive to conduct research that will make meaningful change and is impactful in today’s dynamic world. 

The Gustavson PhD program focuses specifically on international management in the areas of business sustainability, business strategy, organizational behavior and theory, and cross national and human resource management. Students enter our program, as part of a cohort, and take a set of 12 courses (including methods courses) in their first two years of their program that will set the foundation for their dissertation work in the last two years of the program. During the four years of the PhD program, students will actively engage in research and teaching experiences. Students can pursue both quantitative and qualitative research. All admitted students are provided with a competitive financial package to cover living expenses and tuition. 

PhD students will have the opportunity to learn from and work closely with internationally recognized research faculty members who serve on editorial boards and have published in highly ranked journals. These journals includes Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, Human Relations, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Business Venturing, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Management, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Organization Studies, Journal of World Business, and Strategic Management Journal, among others. We have a small and focused cohort of students who have, upon graduation, taken tenure track positions at leading universities around the world. 

At the Gustavson School of Business, we believe business, and management education, has a central role to play in creating meaningful change for a better world. We aspire to prepare graduates who think differently, act responsibility and have a global mindset. The school is home to the Centre for Social and Sustainable Innovation (CSSI), and we are in the 5% of business schools worldwide who hold both AACSB and EQUIS accreditation. The Gustavson School of Business is located in beautiful Victoria, British Columbia, Canada – our University of Victoria campus provides the perfect backdrop for inspiration of new research. Our deadline is January 30, 2022 for September 2022 admissions, and I encourage interested students to contact Wendy Mah, our PhD Program Manager, at wendymah@uvic.ca early on in the process to discuss the program and application process. We would also be pleased to give a presentation (on Zoom) about our program to groups of interested students. 

Sincerely, 

Roy Suddaby, PhD

Associate Dean, Research and Faculty Development

Peter B. Gustavson School of BusinessUniversity of Victoria

Accounting History Virtual Seminar

Dear colleagues

This is a friendly reminder that registrations are open for the Accounting History Virtual Seminar (AHVS) which will be held from 09:00-11:00 (BST) on 9 September 2021 (AEST 18:00-20:00 and NZ DST 20:00-22:00). Thank you to those that have already registered, we’ll send you the sign in information in due course and for those that are still to register please follow this link:  https://www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/accounting-history-virtual-seminar-tickets-159336605075

The programme includes:

Curated conversation with the winners of the Robert Gibson Award 2020– Dominic Detzen and Sebastian Hoffmann

  • Curator: Stephen Walker, Professor of Accounting, University of Edinburgh

Panel: Innovation in accounting historiography – where to from here?

Panellists: 

  • Carolyn Cordery, Adjunct Professor, Victoria University of Wellington; 
  • Delfina Gomes, Associate Professor, University of Minho; 
  • Giulia Leoni, Senior Lecturer, University of Genoa; 
  • Karen McBride, Reader, University of Portsmouth; and 
  • Christopher Napier, Professor of Accounting, Royal Holloway University of London.

Research paper: Accounting for natural disasters in historical perspective – a literature review and research agenda

  • Massimo Sargiacomo, Professor of Accounting and Public Sector Management, University of Chieti-Pescara.

Register for this free and engaging virtual seminar by 1 September 2021 here:  https://www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/accounting-history-virtual-seminar-tickets-159336605075.

This invitation may be freely distributed amongst your networks. 

Carolyn Cordery, Carolyn Fowler and Laura Maran. 

CfP: History of Insurance in a Global Perspective

Posted on behalf of Grietjie Verhoef:

International Conference University of Basel, Switzerland 20–22 July 2022, https://history-of-insurance.dg.unibas.ch/en/

Deadline for Proposals: 30th of September 2021

The dynamic nature of financial markets was highlighted during the wave of demutualisations that occurred towards the end of the 20th century. In the 1980s and 1990s mutual insurers, mutual banks and mutual building societies demutualised in response to a number of incentives and pressures. In their wake large financial services companies emerged changing the landscape of financial markets.  Three decades on, it is timely to review the outcomes of this phase in insurance and financial history. Have the performance expectations of demutualised companies been fulfilled?

This session invites scholars to engage in different aspects of the post-demutualisation operations of insurance corporations in different geographies since the beginning of the twenty-first century. Historians and insurance specialists are called upon to address the nature of the demutualised insurance environment in various markets. 

The following questions are considered:

  • In what ways has the demutualisation trend been related to parallel trends such as bancassurance and securitization? What does that indicate about the nature of change in financial markets?
  • What was the nature of the organisational structure of post-demutualisation insurance corporations?
  • How stable have organisational structures been? Specifically what does the demutualised entity look like 3 decades on?
  • Have changes in organisational and ownership form influenced post-demutualisation investment operations, that is actual investment behaviour or related strategies?
  • How has the financial performance of demutualised insurance companies compared to the mutual phase of operations?
  • How has the global configuration of insurance companies developed?
  • What have been the strategic foci of demutualise insurance companies?
  • How did corporate governance develop in the demutualised insurance corporations?
  • How has insurance penetration developed post-demutualisation?
  • How have ex mutuals fared during the various financial crises experienced in the last 2 decades?

Proposals can be submitted by email to the session organisers by 30 September 2021.

Session Organisers: 

Grietjie Verhoef ; University of Johannesburg/ Monash University gverhoef@uj.ac.za / Grietjie.Verhoef@monash.edu

Monica Keneley ; Deakin University, Australia    mkeneley@deakin.edu.au

Antti Talonen ;  Helsinki University, Finland.     Antti.talonen@helsinki.fi

Much appreciated

Grietjie

Brands and Architecture

I am endlessly fascinating by organizations and the buildings they create for themselves, and the meanings they ascribe to them. So I was delighted to see that there is Hagley History Hangout episode on a similar subject – see the message from the Hagley team below.

New episode is available in the Hagley History Hangout

Ben Spohn interviews Grace Ong Yan about her recent book, Building Brands: Corporations and Modern Architecture. In her book, Ong Yan explores the development of corporate Modernism through architectural branding. She does this by examining the design and construction of four corporate headquarters: the PSFS Building by George Howe and William Lescaze, the Johnson Wax Administration Building by Frank Lloyd Wright, Lever House by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and the Röhm & Haas Building by Pietro Belluschi. Ong Yan  draws on company archives to detail the relationships between company leaders and architects to communicate their company’s identity and messaging to the general public through the medium of architecture. 

Grace Ong Yan, Ph.D. is an author, architectural historian, educator, and designer. She is currently Assistant Professor in Interior Design & Interior Architecture at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. Ong Yan Co-edited Architect: In the Words of the Pritzker Prize Laureates.  She is also an architect and interior designer as Ong Yan Studios. 

The audio-only version of this program is available on our podcast.

 Interview available at  https://www.hagley.org/research/history-hangout-grace-ong-yan.

Recorded on Zoom and available anywhere once they are released, our History Hangouts include interviews with authors of books and other researchers who have use of our collections, and members of Hagley staff with their special knowledge of what we have in our stacks. We began the History Hangouts earlier this summer and now are releasing programs every two weeks on alternate Mondays. Our series is part of the Hagley from Home initiative by the Hagley Museum and Library. The schedule for upcoming episodes, as well as those already released, is available at  https://www.hagley.org/hagley-history-hangout

Update on CHRONOS event

Posted on behalf of Elena Giovannoni:

Following my earlier message, I am delighted to announce that Prof. Christof Brandtner and Prof. Renate Meyer will join Prof. Martin Kornberger on 23 September 2021 for ‘CHRONOS 2021 distinguished on-line lecture’. They will jointly present their co-authored paper titled “The emergence of a social actor: the case of the Vienna city administration at the fin the siècle” 

You can find the abstract and bios of our three distinguished speakers below.

You will soon receive an updated MS teams invite. If you have already accepted it, you do not need to accept it again. If you have not received it, please email: elena.giovannoni@rhul.ac.uk (please use your institutional email address to receive the invite)

On behalf of CHRONOS research centre, I take this chance to wish you all a happy Summer!