An extraordinary story for your Christmas break

As we are getting very close to a well-deserved winter break, I wanted to share an extraordinary story with you about how historical research uncovered the life and family history of one woman’s immortal cells. Henrietta Lacks was an African-American woman whose cells reproduced in laboratories when no others would. They have become the basis of many medical innovations, and have also played a role in medical research into the current pandemic.

However, until a few years ago, neither Lacks nor her descendants knew about her crucial role, as her cells were harvested without her consent. Despite her enormous significance for medical research, some members of her family struggled to get health insurance, as one interviewee pointed out. Her family learned about the both sad and significant medical history of their ancestor when a historian researching the history of Lacks’ cells contacted them. The BBC’s short video highlights the aftermath of the discovery of her amazing cells, her untimely death from cancer, her family’s discovery of her long legacy and their current engagement with medical research facilitated by their ancestor. It is an important story well worth watching over the holidays.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/ideas/videos/how-one-womans-immortal-cells-changed-the-world/p08wr9gf

AOM MH community blog

AOM submission dates move ever closer (14 January 2021 5pm EST). In case you were not aware that the Management History track at AOM now runs a blog with news and updates, you should visit this website and subscribe!

The PDW call for submissions can be found here: https://aom.org/events/annual-meeting/submitting/calls-for-submissions/call-for-submissions-mh-pdw

The call for the scholarly programme is here: https://aom.org/events/annual-meeting/submitting/calls-for-submissions/call-for-submissions-mh-scholarly

Survey for the FT50 list

Dear colleagues

As you may be aware, the FT50 list of journals is currently requesting feedback from the community about which journals to include in the new iteration of the list. There is currently no history journal on the list, and as a survey of published articles, which we did a few years ago, highlighted, about 65% of our authors are in Schools of Business, Management, or Accounting, Finance and Economics (Decker et al., 2018), making Business History the key journal for historical contributions to management and business research. Since 2013 our two-year impact factor has increased from 0.56 to over 1, and CiteScore to over 2. This is at the top end of history and business history journal impact factors, and comparable to elite journals in the discipline such as Past & Present (IF 0.831) or Economic History Review (IF 1.1). Submissions to Business History have steadily increased over the last few years and we now receive about 200 manuscripts per year. Our downloads were 64,538 in 2017, 79.371 in 2018, over 122,000 in 2019 and over 82,000 by July 2020. We believe this illustrates the progress we have made in the last few years, with your support, in what is a field with many dedicated journals, on which we hope to build in the future. If you would like to support this, please you spare a minute and fill out this survey (https://survey.ft.com/jfe/form/SV_8qBwlr4MLqwwQaV)  for the FT50 list of journals and suggest Business History as a journal to include.

Thank you for your continued support of the journal and wider business history community.

Happy holidays and all the best for the new year!

Neil Rollings & Stephanie Decker
Editors-in-Chief of Business History

Decker, S., Stokes, R., Colli, A., de Jong, A., Fernandez Perez, P., & Rollings, N. (2018). Change of referencing style. Business History, 60(1), 1–3.

EGOS tracks relevant to history

And as the end of the year nears, so do the January deadlines for AOM and EGOS. EGOS 2021 offers bountiful opportunities for submitting history-based and history-inspired pieces of organizational scholarship this year. Below a quick summary of the main tracks that are likely interested in historical perspectives:

Sub-theme 01: [SWG] Organization & Time: The Situated Activity of Time Enactment

Convenors:
Tor Hernes Copenhagen Business School, Denmarkth.ioa@cbs.dk
Joanna Karmowska Oxford Brookes University, United Kingdomjkarmowska@brookes.ac.uk
Claus Rerup Frankfurt School of Finance and Management, Germanyc.rerup@fs.de


Call for Papers


The third sub-theme of Standing Working Group (SWG) 01 will concern the more situated, on-going activity of time enactment in organizations. The on-going time enactment is crucial for understanding a host of issues, including the very agency of the moment, the roles of temporal structures, and the on-going interplay between evoked pasts and projected futures. It will lend focus to temporal structure, including routines, practices and materiality, through which time is enacted in organizations. It will connect the situated time enactment to different variations and combinations of near and distant pasts and futures, while considering factors such as agency, emotions and aesthetics. The empirical focus invites, but not exclusively, papers on topics such as digitalisation, creative organizations and start-ups.

Sub-theme 24: Craft in Modern Society

Convenors:
Jochem Kroezen University of Cambridge, United Kingdomj.kroezen@jbs.cam.ac.uk
Innan Sasaki University of Warwick, United Kingdominnan.sasaki@wbs.ac.uk
Pursey P.M.A.R. Heugens Erasmus University, The Netherlandspheugens@rsm.nl


Call for Papers


The last two decades have witnessed an extraordinary resurgence of interest in craft and craftsmanship. Once thought to be an obsolete mode of organizing and producing for modern society, now craft movements appear to be reconfiguring entire sectors, with examples ranging from beer brewing (Kroezen & Heugens, 2019), to watchmaking (Raffaelli, 2019), to barbering (Ocejo, 2017) and to maker spaces (Browder et al., 2019). In addition to the transformative powers of craft production, there is also a surprisingly broad range of instances where heritage crafts have managed to survive despite pressures of modernization and globalization, such as the case in musical instrument making (Cattani et al., 2017) or Japanese family firms (Sasaki et al., 2019). Increasingly, management and organization scholars are paying attention to these phenomena across various strands of research and are contributing to a growing understanding of (1) what defines craft as opposed to established theories of organizing and (2) how empirically craft may be valued and organized differently across time and space. This sub-theme intends to offer a setting for scholars interested in craft and craftsmanship to advance our collective understanding of the concept and related phenomena and firmly establish craft as an object of investigation and theorization in its own right.

Sub-theme 33: Historical Organization Studies in Action: Strategy, Entrepreneurship, and Social Innovation

Convenors:
Mairi Maclean University of Bath, United Kingdomkmm57@bath.ac.uk
Roy Suddaby University of Victoria, Canadarsuddaby@uvic.ca
Stewart Clegg University of Technology, Sydney, Australiastewart.clegg@uts.edu.au


Call for Papers


Historical organization studies is ‘organizational research that draws on historical sources, methods and knowledge to explore, refine and develop theoretical ideas and conceptual insights’ (Maclean et al., 2016). Put simply, it seeks to blend history and organization studies. Its status is that of emergent academic movement rather than established community of practice. For over two decades, organization theorists have emphasized the need for more and better research recognizing the importance of the past in shaping the present and future (Clegg, 2006; Kieser, 1994). Some have identified a distinct historic turn in organization studies led by scholars who perceive the field to have been constrained by its orientation towards contemporary cross-sectional studies covering limited periods of time (Clark & Rowlinson, 2004; Mills et al., 2016). By historicising organizational research, it is argued, the contexts and forces bearing upon organizations might be more fully recognized and analyses of organizational dynamics might be improved. But how, precisely, might a traditionally empirically-oriented discipline, such as history, be incorporated into a theoretically-oriented discipline such as organization studies? In recent years this has been the topic of extensive debate, giving rise to a number of ground-breaking publications (Bucheli & Wadhwani, 2014; Kipping & Üsdiken, 2014; Rowlinson et al., 2014; Suddaby et al., 2010) and a flurry of Special Issues in journals including, inter alia. Academy of Management ReviewOrganization StudiesManagement Learning, and Organization.

Sub-theme 49: Organizational Memory Studies: Toward an Inclusive Research Agenda

Convenors:
Hamid Foroughi University of Portsmouth, United Kingdom foroughi.hamid@gmail.com
Sébastien Mena City, University of London, United Kingdom sebastien.mena.1@city.ac.uk
William M. Foster University of Alberta, Canada wfoster@ualberta.ca


Call for Papers


Collective memories are powerful factors in shaping both individual perceptions and social behaviour, and as such, are important for organizing processes. Organizations are also arenas for the engagement of various social actors in collective processes of remembering and forgetting. While organizational research has tended to adopt a psychological metaphor of storage and retrieval of knowledge to understand organizational memory (e.g., Walsh & Ungson, 1991; Ren & Argote, 2011), recent advances have also engaged with sociological perspectives on memory (e.g., Hatch & Schultz, 2017; Foroughi, 2019; Mena et al., 2016; Ravasi et al., 2019). For instance, the interest in the social construction of organizational mnemonics (Coraiola et al., 2015) has fuelled the development of theoretical approaches on the practices of remembering and the uses of the past in achieving organizational strategies (e.g., Foster, et al., 2017; Wadhwani et al., 2018). Others have also looked at the importance of organizations for broader processes of social remembering and forgetting, such as the perpetuation of inequalities or the collective forgetting of corporate irresponsibility (e.g., Cutcher et al., 2019; Mena, et al., 2016). Yet, others have highlighted the role of diverse stakeholders, such as employees, customers and investors/donors, in shaping an organizational memory (Bell & Taylor, 2016; Foroughi & Al-Amoudi, 2019). Altogether, these examinations of memory in and around organizations from various perspectives have been called ‘Organizational Memory Studies’ (OMS) (Rowlinson et al., 2010).

Sub-theme 59: Organizing in the Age of Nationalism

Convenors:
Alexei Koveshnikov Aalto University, Finland alexei.koveshnikov@aalto.fi
Sally Riad Victoria Universiy of Wellington, New Zealand sally.riad@vuw.ac.nz
Eero Vaara University of Oxford, United Kingdom eero.vaara@sbs.ox.ac.uk


Call for Papers


Nationalism is a fundamentally important dynamic force in contemporary society (Billig, 1995; Gellner & Breuilly, 1983; Wodak, 2017). There are different interpretations of what nationalism is and a multitude of approaches to study it (Delanty & Kumar, 2006). Among these, Benedict Anderson’s (1983) idea of nations as “imagined communities” is based on the assumption that people in societies can imagine their unity and develop a sense of belonging by way of myths, symbols, and stories that help them to identify with and as a community that is (seen as) the nation. It applies well to studying contemporary nationalism in its multiple forms, and it has proved to be useful for moving discussions from objectivist to subjectivist conceptions of national unity (Segal & Handler, 2006). It is especially relevant today as we enter an era of “post-truth” politics and “alternative facts” (Knight & Tsoukas, 2019) where nationalism and constructions of nationalism become increasingly prominent parts of language games played by powerful societal actors such as politicians and corporate executives for the purposes of political mobilization and legitimation.

Recording of Peter Buckley’s distinguished lecture on “The Structural Reshaping of Globalization”

I am pleased to share the recording of the distinguished lecture with Peter Buckley, Professor of International Business at Leeds University Business School, who talked on The Structural Reshaping of Globalization. Alain Verbeke, Professor of International Business Strategy at the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary served as a discussant. The lecture took place November 20, 2020; you can find the recording here:  https://dan.uwo.ca/news/2020/dl_buckley_verbeke.html

This talk examines the role of theory, specifically internalization theory, in examining the structural reshaping of globalization. Four empirical changes in the global economy are identified.

  1. The fracture in the global economy between the USA and China, including “the splinternet”. 
  2. “Systemic Competition” and its consequences. 
  3. Rising VUCA (Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity) and corporate responses. 
  4. Innovation. The theoretical response is presented by nested theories of internalization, relying on common principles and concepts.

For more information about Professor Peter Buckley, you can refer to https://business.leeds.ac.uk/divisions-international-business/staff/248/peter-j-buckley-

For more information about Professor Alain Verbeke, you can refer to https://www.ucalgary.ca/verbeke/

PhD studentship opportunity: Women & Work in the City of London, 1870-1970

The University of Oxford, in partnership with the Baring Archive, are offering a 3-4 year PhD studentship on the topic of Women and Work in the City of London, 1870-1970. The studentship will begin in autumn (Michaelmas term) 2021, and the main data source is the Baring Archive Ltd. More information on this exciting opportunity can be found here:

https://www.oocdtp.ac.uk/women-and-work-in-the-city-of-london-1870-1970

The deadline for applying is 8th January 2021.