New historical article in JMS

The January issue of JMS features a really interesting piece by Andrew Smith and Miriam Kaminishi about the historical origins of the concept of the ‘Confucian entrepreneur’. As anyone who has taught on the basis of international business textbooks can attest, the way in which Confucianism in drawn upon to explain phenomena in China’s political economy is often quite odd and uncomfortable. Below is the reference and abstract. Happy reading!

Confucian Entrepreneurship: Towards a Genealogy of a Conceptual Tool

Andrew Smith

Miriam Kaminishi

First published: 16 February 2019 

https://doi.org/10.1111/joms.12439

Abstract

The concept of the ‘Confucian Entrepreneur’ is now used by many scholars to understand entrepreneurship in China and other East Asian countries. This paper traces the development of this concept from its roots in the writings of nineteenth‐century Western authors to its use in modern management journals. We show that while this conceptual tool has been adapted over time, the claims associated with it have remained largely similar. Use of the term Confucian entrepreneur implies belief that Confucian ideas induce Chinese entrepreneurs to behave differently than their Western counterparts, a claim for which the empirical foundations are weak. We do not go so far as to say that those who research Chinese entrepreneurship should discard the concept of the Confucian entrepreneur simply because of its historical origins in colonialism. However, we do call on researchers to reflect on the historical origins of their conceptual tools. By historicising our theories of entrepreneurship, this paper should encourage greater scholarly reflexivity and thus the development of entrepreneurship and management theory with greater predictive power.

ToCs: MOH 14,3

A new issue of Management & Organizational History is out:

Articles

Symbolism in bank marketing and architecture: the headquarters of National Provincial Bank of England |
Victoria Barnes & Lucy Newton
Pages: 213-244 | DOI: 10.1080/17449359.2019.1683038

Organizational structure, public policy, and technological change: the origins of the dominion steel industries
Malcolm Abbott
Pages: 245-265 | DOI: 10.1080/17449359.2019.1683039

Divestment cycles in the Portuguese electrical and electronics industry – an historical, multilevel analysis (1975–2015)
Pedro Silva & Antonio Moreira
Pages: 266-293 | DOI: 10.1080/17449359.2019.1698438


Original ArticlesSpeaking frankly – parrhesia and public service
Edward Barratt
Pages: 294-310 | DOI: 10.1080/17449359.2019.1698439

TOCs BH 62,1 „The Brand & its history“

Business History, Volume 62, Issue 1, January 2020 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

The Brand and its History, Part II: Branding, Culture, and National Identity

Introduction

Cross-cultural factors in international branding
Rafael Castro & Patricio Sáiz
Pages: 1-25 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2019.1592157

Articles

The transformation of global luxury brands: The case of the Swiss watch company Longines, 1880–2010
Pierre-Yves Donzé
Pages: 26-41 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1291632

Making Italian fashion global: Brand building and management at Gruppo Finanziario Tessile (1950s‒1990s)
Elisabetta Merlo & Mario Perugini
Pages: 42-69 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1329299

Brand image, cultural association and marketing: ‘New Zealand’ butter and lamb exports to Britain, c. 1920–1938
Felicity Barnes & David M. Higgins
Pages: 70-97 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1344223

The expansion of branding in international marketing: The case of olive oil, 1870s–1930s
Ramon Ramon-Muñoz
Pages: 98-122 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1344224

The making of Labatt ‘Blue’: The quest for a national lager brand, 1959–1971
Matthew J. Bellamy
Pages: 123-150 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1310195

The emergence of Italy as a fashion country: Nation branding and collective meaning creation at Florence’s fashion shows (1951–1965)
Valeria Pinchera & Diego Rinallo
Pages: 151-178 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1332593

Dreaming of the West: The power of the brand in Soviet Lithuania, 1960s–1980s
Brigita Tranavičiūtė
Pages: 179-195 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1379505

CfP EBHS Conference

The 45th Annual Economic and Business History Society (EBHS) Conference will be held at the Sheraton in downtown Atlanta between May 28 and May 30 2020. 

The call for papers can be viewed here:

http://www.ebhsoc.org/conference/index.php/ebhsoc/Atlanta2020

Call for Papers is open until January 15, 2020. 

Our general theme is Economic and Business History at the Crossroads. Here we would encourage reflections on ‘crossroads’, as sign of cultural and commercial interchange, geographic meeting places, exchanges and entrepots, and temporal and historical moments of divergence and contingency. However, individual proposals for presentations on any aspect of economic, business, or financial history are welcome, as are proposals for whole panels. We also encourage submissions from graduate students and non-academic affiliates.If you have any queries, please get in touch with either myself or Craig McMahon (Program Chair): craig.mcmahon@villanova.edu