GDPR & Historical Archives

You have one more week for submitting your proposal!

The deadline for submissions for the upcoming workshop ‘GDPR & Historical Archives’ expires on 1 December 2019.

This workshop – a joint effort of eabh and the European Central Bank – aims to look at the impact of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) on historical archives, in particular, but not exclusively, in the financial sector. 

The full Call for Papers is available at  http://bankinghistory.org/wp-content/uploads/GDPRHistoricalArchives_CfP.pdf

The event will be held on 23 March 2020 at the European Central Bank in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

CfP: Developing your Conference paper

We are delighted to invite you to the ‘Developing your Conference Paper and getting more from your chosen Conference: Insights for doctoral students and early career researchers ‘ workshop. 

Theme: Transforming part of your research into a paper

Date: Thursday, 12th December 2019, 9:30am – 3:00pm

Location: Room MB708C, Aston University, Main Building, Birmingham, B4 7ET

Paper submission details: Click here

We are delighted to offer the now well established, annual workshop for current Doctoral and Early Career Researchers. The aim is to enable each of you, as participants, to prepare for and leverage your attendance at high quality paper conferences such as the BAM 2020 Conference and build a strong basis for your future publications.

This ‘hands-on’ workshop aims to help Doctoral and Early Career Researchers to successfully transform part of your research into a paper. Within a safe environment, you will be able to experiment with your writing style, receive feedback on areas for improvement and development, meet prominent academicians in your field and network.

This is a huge opportunity to receive feedback outside your supervisory team by well-renowned academics in your respective field! 

To register and find out more details about the programme, please click here.

Please do not hesitate to contact the event facilitator with regards to the academic programme: Professor Nicholas O’Regan at n.oregan@aston.ac.uk 

If you have any queries with regards to the event logistics, please contact the British Academy of Management Events Officer at eventsofficer@bam.ac.uk
The BAM Team | British Academy of Management  

Capri Summer School – Research Methods in Management

Aim

Capri Summer School was born on the impulse of AIDEA (the Italian Academy of Business Administration and Management). The overall aim of the summer school is to enhance participants’ research capabilities.

Capri Summer School provides a chance for doctoral students and early career researchers to develop their understanding of research methods in management studies, benefiting from an interdisciplinary setting, under the guidance of a panel of internationally renowned scholars.

The school is organized in cooperation with the British Academy of Management (BAM).

Audience and Method

The course is aimed at doctoral students and early stage researchers in the areas of management, interested in qualitative studies of accounting, management, finance, organization, etc. Candidates who are developing interesting ideas but who still have time to be influenced by participation in the summer school will receive the strongest consideration. Admission will be on a competitive basis.

About 30 participants will be admitted: in addition to overall quality of content, factors such as position within the doctoral process and institutional representation will be taken into account. Participants will be selected by the faculty together with the organizing committee. Lectures will cover epistemological issues, data collection methods and analytic techniques such as content and discourse analysis.

Venue

The summer school will be held on the Island of Capri at Villa Orlandi, a seventeenth century villa re-stored by the University of Napoli Federico II. The Villa, surrounded by a nice park, is particularly suited for study and  includes all essential facilities. Over ten desks equipped with PCs and Internet connections are available.

How to apply

Applicants are invited to submit a single PDF file consisting of:

  1. A 4-page extended abstract of their thesis project/research idea. Clearly specifying :
    1. Originality and importance of their intended topic;
    2. Contribution of the work (expected);
    3. Methodological perspectives or epistemological positions they would think as useful to discuss during the summer school.
  2. CV;
  3. motivation letter explaining the reasons behind the application.

All materials should be sent as a single PDF file by 2nd May 2020. An email receipt of the letter will be sent to acknowledge submissions.

Fees will be limited to Euro 460,00 for each participant (not including transports and accommodation).

Apply online at:  http://www.caprisummerschool.it/

Feminist Library reopens after successful fundraising

After a successful fundraising campaign earlier this year and over a year of hard work, the Feminist Library is very pleased to announce that it has now signed the lease and has the keys to its new building – the Sojourner Truth Community Centre at 161 Sumner Road in Peckham. We’re planning to open for our first ever event on the 31st January. More details about that coming soon. 

You can read more about the good news here

EGOS Subtheme 31 CFP: Imprints, Path Dependencies and Beyond

The second EGOS track devoted to history is on the theme of “Intricacies of Organizational Stability and Change: Historical Imprints, Path Dependencies, and Beyond.” For more information, see below or click here.

Sub-theme 31: Intricacies of Organizational Stability and Change: Historical Imprints, Path Dependencies and Beyond

To upload your short paper, please log in to the Member Area.
Convenors:
Christopher Marquis
Cornell University, USA
Georg Schreyögg
Freie Universität Berlin, Germany, & University of Graz, Austria
Jörg Sydow
Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

Call for Papers


This sub-theme seeks to bring together researchers from all over the world who study how organizations deal with change when they are confronted with processes that promote stability, including imprinting, path dependence and inertia more generally. The aim is to foster exchange of fresh empirical insights and new theoretical ideas to further understand stabilizing and destabilizing mechanisms in organizations and inter-organizational relations. The sub-theme connects to the general theme of the 36th EGOS Colloquium – “Organizing for a Sustainable Future: Responsibility, Renewal & Resistance – by examining the dynamics of resistance and renewal in and between organizations. It focuses on the dialectics of making use of routines, its reinforcement and unintended consequences in terms of rigidities, dysfunctional flips, organizational conservatism, and related processes.

The field of stabilizing dynamics – or more generally, the tension between stability and change – provides a particularly advantageous context for exploring the consequences of change efforts as they are developing on different levels: group, organizational, inter-organizational and organizational field, embedded in different institutional environments and numerous strategic contexts. At the same time, research on such types of processes and the evolution of organizational dynamics could benefit from EGOS, as the Colloquium provides a particularly fruitful context for bringing together research from a wide variety of disciplines, theoretical backgrounds, and institutional settings.

The sub-theme wishes to attract both high-quality contributions that are ready to be submitted to a research journal as well as research in progress that explores these challenging issues. It seeks to provide an opportunity for engaging in constructive dialogue and to encourage mutual learning among participating scholars.

We particularly invite contributions that focus on one or more of the following issues:

  • The role of initial conditions, internal and external to an organization, for triggering stabilizing dynamics in terms of imprinting, path dependence and inertial alignments
  • Making stabilizing dynamics reflexive in everyday organizing
  • Stabilizing processes as systemic forces that transcend individual routine compliance
  • Self-reinforcing processes as drivers of stabilizing dynamics
  • Diffusion of stabilizing and change dynamics and contextual factors that foster their emergence
  • Processes and interventions likely to modify or to stop stabilizing dynamics (e.g. external shocks, paradoxical interventions, charismatic leadership or unlearning)
  • Re-conceiving the tension between stabilizing and change dynamics as multi-level-phenomena

Papers studying such issues and related topics, empirically or conceptually, comparatively or monographically, with regard to recent or historical developments, are cordially invited.

References

  • Farjoun, M. (2010): “Beyond Dualism: Stability and Change as a Duality.” Academy of Management Review, 35 (2), 202–225.
  • Gilbert, C.G. (2005): “Unbundling the Structure of Inertia: Resource versus Routine Rigidity.” Academy of Management Journal, 48 (5), 741–763.
  • Kremser, W., & Schreyögg, G. (2016): “The Dynamics of Interrelated Routines. Introducing the Cluster Level.” Organization Science, 27 (3), 698–721.
  • Marquis, C., & Kunyuan, Q. (2018): “Waking from Mao’s Dream: Communist Ideological Imprinting and the Internationalization of Entrepreneurial Ventures in China.” Administrative Science Quarterly, first published online on September 14, 2018; https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0001839218792837
  • Marquis, C., & Tilcsik, A. (2013): “Imprinting: Toward a Multilevel Theory.” Academy of Management Annals, 7 (1), 195–245.
  • Schreyögg, G., & Sydow, J. (2010): “Organizing for Fluidity? Dilemmas of New Organizational Forms.” Organization Science, 21 (6), 1251–1262.
  • Sydow, J., Schreyögg, G., & Koch, J. (2009): “Organizational Path Dependence: Opening the Black Box.” Academy of Management Review, 34 (4), 689–709.
  • Tripsas, M. (2009): “Technology, Identity, and Inertia Through the Lens of ‘The Digital Photography Company’.” Organization Science, 20 (2), 441–460.
Christopher Marquis is currently Samuel C. Johnson Professor in Sustainable Global Enterprise at Cornell University, USA. His recent research focuses on global sustainability and imprinting, especially how these processes have unfolded in China and emerging markets.
Georg Schreyögg is Professor emeritus at Freie Universität Berlin, Germany, and Professor of Managment und Organizational Capabilities at the University of Graz, Austria. He was a member of the editorial board of several national and international journals. Georg’s current research interests include organizational change, routines, organizational capabilities and path dependence.
Jörg Sydow is Professor of Management and Inter-firm Cooperation at the School of Business & Economics of Freie Universität Berlin, Germany. His recent research focuses on creative industries, inter-firm networking, especially in service and science-based industries.
To upload your short paper, please log in to the Member Area.

Opening up the archive of the Basel Mission

Mission 21 Evangelisches Missionswerk Basel

This position requires fluency in German.

Per 01.01.2020 oder nach Vereinbarung suchen wir für ein Jahr (befristete Anstellung) eine/n

Projektmitarbeiter*in – Erschliessung Archiv der Basler Handelsgesellschaften (100%)

Das weltweit bekannte Archiv der Basler Mission und von Mission 21 steht zu Forschungszwecken den Interessierten offen. Forschende aus Fachgebieten wie Geschichte, Ethnologie, Anthropologie, Missions-wissenschaften, Religionswissenschaften, Geografie, Ökonomie oder Linguistik finden bei uns Archivalien (Akten, historische Bilder und Karten) ab dem frühen 19. Jahrhundert. Hinzu kommen neuere Archivalien aus weiteren Ländern in Afrika, Asien und Lateinamerika, in denen sich Mission 21 und ihre Trägervereine engagieren, sowie das Archiv der Missions-Handlungs-Gesellschaft.

Die Unterlagen der Basler Handelsgesellschaften, inklusive United Trading Company (UTC) sind Teil des Archivs von Mission 21. Mit einem Umfang von rund 80 Laufmetern dokumentiert dieser Bestand in einmaliger Weise die wirtschaftlichen Beziehungen einer bedeutenden Schweizer Unternehmung mit Asien und Afrika im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert und die Verflechtungen innerhalb der Schweiz. Mit der Erschliessung wird der Bestand für die in- und ausländische Forschung zugänglich gemacht.

Aufgaben
• Erschliessen des Bestandes nach archivischen Standards
• Beschreibung der Unterlagen und Positionierung in den nationalen und internationalen Kontext
• Beantworten von Anfragen aus Forschungskreisen
Voraussetzungen
• Abgeschlossenes Masterstudium im Bereich Geschichte oder Ökonomie
• Kenntnisse in Betriebswirtschaft/Buchhaltung und Geschichte der internationalen Wirtschaftsbeziehungen
• Erfahrung im Erschliessen von Archivbeständen
• Ausdauer Sorgfalt, Genauigkeit, selbstständige Arbeitsweise
• Gute Englisch- und PC-Anwenderkenntnisse (Datenbanken)
• Kenntnisse in Kurrentschrift sind von Vorteil

Kontakt
Wir freuen uns auf Ihre Bewerbung bis per E-Mail an: bewerbung@mission-21.org
Myriam Pellet, Leiterin Personal, Mission 21, Missionsstrasse 21, 4009 Basel, Telefon +41 (0)61 260 22 73
Weitere Informationen erhalten Sie von Patrick Moser, Projektleiter, Telefon +41 (0)61 260 22 57, patrick.moser@mission-21.org
http://www.bmarchives.org
http://www.mission-21.org

Coleman Prize 2019 goes to Joseph Lane

Coleman Prize 2019

From the ABH Newsletter:

The Coleman Prize 2019 was awarded at the Association’s Annual Conference hosted at Sheffield Hallam. This year’s finalists were Joe Lane who completed his PhD at the London School of Economics and Leigh Gleason who completed at De Montfort University. They both presented key findings for their PhD Dissertations in a plenary session. Joe’s dissertation entitled, Networks, innovation and knowledge: the North Staffordshire Potteries, 1750-1851, whilst Leigh’s is, Canvassed and Delivered: Direct Selling at Keystone View Company, 1898-1910.
The panel selected Joe Lane as the winner of the 2019 Coleman Prize! Congratulations to him and Leigh for two excellent dissertations and presentations.

Reflections on ABH 2019

Joseph Lane, Coleman Prize Winner 2019

The Steel City shone brightly this summer for the Association of Business Historian’s Annual Conference. Sheffield Hallam University, and in particular, John Singleton, hosted delegates for two days of academic discussion on business history topics ranging from trade, risk and war in the Early Modern period, and digital disruption from the late twentieth century. Nestled amongst striking architectural reminders of Sheffield’s historic relationship with business and industry, the modern Cantor building served as a hub for the conference, and a venue for lively conversation over refreshments and lunches. As a northerner and researcher of industrial clusters, I couldn’t help but notice the aptness of the site of one of the most iconic historic British industrial clusters (and my old stomping ground as a kid) was the setting for a gathering of business historians engaged in discussion, debate and collaboration. I feel it is my duty to invoke Marshall: business and industry were once again ‘in the air’.

This was my second ABH conference after my introduction to the association at the 2016 conference in Berlin as a PhD student. Having missed two years, I was pleased to be back in at the deep end attending as a panel co-chair and presenter, and potential Coleman Prize nominee (my thanks to the Association for selecting my work as the winning thesis!). A jam-packed schedule over both days emphasised why we gather each year: to promote and celebrate the study of business history, in all its varieties. This year did not disappoint; a total of fifty-nine papers were presented across twenty panels alongside a Keynote, and book-ended by the Tony Slaven Doctoral workshop and the Corley Paper Development Workshop for Early Career Researchers. A truly eclectic conference programme.
Top marks to the organising committee who selected the timely conference theme, ‘Business Transformation in an Uncertain World’, that captured and framed research on topics including the complexities and uncertainties of warfare and its aftermath, trust (or lack thereof) in the upper echelons of management and attempts to rebuild it, and female entrepreneurship and family firms in nineteenth-century Britain.

2007 Coleman Prize Winner Professor Stephanie Decker delivered a thought-provoking Keynote (an incentive for me to work hard!). Her lecture spoke directly to the conference themes of uncertainty and transformation. An intriguing delve into African advertising at Barclays Bank DCO in the 1950s revealed corporate strategy and legitimisation practices in the context of decolonisation and Africanization. A lesson in the value and use of corporate archives.
I was sad to miss the session devoted to innovative methods in business history (my own session ran at the same time). One of the characteristics that first attracted me to business history, and continues to do so, is the multiplicity of approaches that business historians are willing and able to adopt and draw on. Papers on transatlantic trade were rich with detail from seventeenth-century personal correspondence, close case studies of armaments and shipbuilding in Britain and Finland used photographic evidence from the first half of the twentieth century, and the appointment diaries of Margaret Thatcher were analysed using quantitative network analysis.

All this thought-provoking talk and research left delegates hungry and thirsty, which stood us in good stead for a short trip across the city for our reception and dinner on the first day. A good meal and chance to unwind after a long day sparked off interesting and wide-ranging conversations. Of the many conversations I had at the conference, two stand out – one about the importance of research grants and the digitisation of archival sources, and another about Harry Potter studio tours (I’ll leave the readers to determine which was with an old PhD colleague and which was with an ABH committee member!) The main point being the ABH is a place where PhD students, archivists and business historians (novice and experienced) meet and dispense with formalities to discuss that which we do and love: interpretation of the past.

My final reflection on this year’s conference is one of collegiality and warmth. From the many cups of coffee enjoyed with others during the breaks, to the reception and dinner, by way of rigorous and intriguing paper presentations, it was easy to find a friendly face. As the new academic year begins, I look forward to Nottingham in 2020 and my role as chair of the Coleman Prize Committee. Save-the-date for what promises to be another judicious conference theme: ‘Bubbles and Crises; Mayhem and Misery; Corruption and Disruption’

PDW CfP: Uses of the Past- Perspectives, Forms and Concepts in Business History

CBS Paper Development Workshop

Business History Conference, Charlotte, NC, March 12, 2020

In the past years, uses of the past has become a prominent research theme for business historians and organization scholars alike. Studies on the usefulness and appropriation of the past have appeared across diverse fields such as business history, organization studies, marketing, learning & education, and CSR. Uses of history is fashionable. But where will the field go in the future?

In the CBS PDW we seek to focus on questions that have yet to asked, and we would like to explore the theories and methods that might take the field forward.

The workshop offers an opportunity to get feedback and generate ideas of how to develop concrete paper drafts that deal, one way or the other, with uses of the past. In addition, the PDW will serve as a forum where we can discuss future directions and opportunities (and potential dead ends) going forward with a ‘uses-of-the-past’ agenda. What are the questions and research that are yet to be explored, and what are the role for business historians in shaping a ‘uses-of the past’ research agenda?

Themes to be explored in the papers could include, amongst others:

  • Uses of the past for branding, strategy and identity purposes
  • Corporate and public museums
  • The use (and abuse?) of organizational anniversaries
  • Uses of history in action
  • The role and practices of historical consultancies (e.g. Winthrop GroupThe History Factory and others)
  • Historical CSR
  • Theoretical and methodological perspectives connected to uses of the past.
  • Critical perspectives on uses of the past

Submitted texts could take form as extended abstracts or full paper drafts. The important thing is that readers can identify the key arguments, theories and empirical material, for them to provide useful feedback, suggestions and comments.

Depending on the submitted abstracts and full papers, the participants and organizers could potentially explore the opportunity of a subsequent special issue on uses of the past in a relevant academic publication, such as, for example Business History.

Participants are expected to read all circulated papers. Please submit a paper draft or extended abstract before January 10, 2020 to the workshop organizers.

Anders Ravn Sørensen, ars.mpp@cbs.dk

Morten Tinning, mti.mpp@cbs.dk

ToCs for MOH 14, 2 March 2019

Articles

Members only: the Victorian gentlemen’s club as a space for doing business 1843–1900
Marrisa Joseph
Pages: 123-147 | DOI: 10.1080/17449359.2019.1580589

The problem with women: a feminist interrogation of management textbooks
Kristin S. Williams & Albert J. Mills
Pages: 148-166 | DOI: 10.1080/17449359.2019.1598436

From royal family-based ownership to state business management: Mangkunegara’s sugar industry in Java from the middle of the 19th to early 20th century
Wasino, Endah Sri Hartatik & Nawiyanto
Pages: 167-183 | DOI: 10.1080/17449359.2019.1614462

Strategy of a top agriculture co-operative in the central planned economy. The differentiation of the organization in perspective social system theory
Eva Šerá
Pages: 184-211 | DOI: 10.1080/17449359.2019.1660682