BAFA Accounting History Special Interest Group

Inaugural Workshop on Accounting History

Aston Business School

Thursday 13th December and Friday 14th December 2018

Overview

Historical research enables us to reflect on the past in meaningful ways, provides an opportunity to reconstruct that past based on the information encountered and the experiences reflected, and offers lessons and cases that may be relevant to the present day. Historians “find” their stories from the information they gather from the archives and other documentation from and of the past. The aim of this workshop is to demonstrate the relevance of accounting history to the present day, to provide various methods for carrying out accounting history research, and reflects on the issues faced when exploring the past.

 Workshop programme

The one-day workshop includes sessions by accomplished business historians, as well as the opportunity to workshop ideas and issues in accounting history research. The Guest Presenters are:

  • Professor Stephanie Decker, Aston University – Co-Editor Business History.
    • Topic – “Research Strategies in Organization History”

Stephanie Decker is a Professor in Organization Studies and History at Aston Business School, where she has been working since 2010. She is currently the Associate Dean for Research for Aston Business School. Stephanie’s research interests include the use of historical analysis for management and organization studies. This focuses on integrating historical approaches, primarily archival research influenced by postcolonial theory, ethnographic history and microhistory into social scientific research data analysis techniques such as documentary and process-based qualitative studies. Stephanie is a co-editor of Business History.

  • Professor John Singleton, Sheffield Hallam University – Professor of Economic and Business History
    • Topic: “Pitfalls and benefits of working with organisations”

John Singleton has been a Professor at Sheffield Hallam since 2011, following 17 years at Victoria University of Wellington (NZ). While his PhD thesis was on the decline of the Lancashire cotton industry in the mid twentieth century, his main interest is British and world financial and economic history over the last 100 years. In NZ he was commissioned to write histories of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand and the Audit Office. Recent books include those on Central Banking in the Twentieth Century and Economic and Natural Disasters since 1900.

  • Dr Mike Anson, Bank of England – Archivist
    • Topic: “The role of archivists and how to approach archives”

Mike Anson is Archive Manager, at the Bank of England Archive. He joined the Bank in 2004 as researcher on its official history project and was previously at the Business History Unit, London School of Economics working on commissioned histories of British Rail, and the Channel Tunnel. He has been a Trustee of the Business Archives Council since 2004, and was elected Chair in 2013. Mike is also Chair of the Conference Committee of the Archives & Records Association UK & Ireland, and external examiner at the Centre for Archives & Information Studies, University of Dundee.

 

Target audience

The workshop is for accounting and finance researchers who are either currently working in the accounting history field or interested in doing so in the future. We welcome faculty and PhD students. This is an opportunity to learn, share and receive feedback on research ideas, and discover more about conducting research and publishing in accounting history.

Further details

The workshop will be preceded by an informal dinner at 7pm on 13th December 2018 (participants’ own cost), offering an opportunity to network and establish contact with others interested in accounting history. Details of the venue will be circulated to everyone who registers for the workshop.

The workshop will run formally from 9:00-16:30 on 14 December 2018 and costs £55 for BAFA members, which includes all presentations, refreshment breaks and lunch on the Friday.

See https://www2.aston.ac.uk/about/directions for travel information.

Details of accommodation options are available on request from the local host, Professor Carolyn Cordery, at c.cordery@aston.ac.uk

Registration

Registration is available through the BAFA website: http://bafa.ac.uk/ 

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Talk: Nostalgia at Work

Aston Business School – Work and Organisational Psychology Department – Seminar Series

Nostalgia at Work

By Prof Constantine Sedikides

https://www.southampton.ac.uk/~crsi/constantineprofile

 We are delighted to invite all colleagues and doctoral researchers to Prof Constantine Sedikides seminar taking place on the 4th December, Wednesday 12pm, Joint meeting rooms in the Work and Organisational Psychology Department, 8th floor SW, followed by lunch. Prof Constantine is currently head of the Centre for Research on Self and Identity (CRSI) and a Professor at the university of Southampton.

The seminar will address the relevance of nostalgia in organisational settings. The emotion of nostalgia will be defined and clarified. Then, representative research will showcase the role of personal nostalgia in acting as a buffer against procedural injustice. Finally, representative research will showcase the role of organizational nostalgia in acting as a buffer against employee burnout and as a resource fueling work meaningfulness.

Professor Constantine’s research focuses on self and identity (including narcissism) and their interplay with emotion (especially nostalgia) as well as motivation, close relationships, and group or organisational processes. This research has been supported by grants from many national and international funding agencies, such as Economic and Social Research Council, Leverhulme Trust, British Academy, and National Institute of Health. The research has culminated in approximately 400 articles or chapters and 15 volumes. He has received several awards, including Daniel M. Wegner Theoretical Innovation Prize (Society for Personality and Social Psychology), Distinguished Lifetime Career Award (International Society for Self and Identity), Kurt Lewin Medal for Outstanding Scientific Contribution (European Association of Social Psychology), and The Presidents’ Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychological Knowledge (The British Psychological Society). Before joining University of Southampton as Director of the Centre for Research on Self and Identity, Constantine taught at University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA. He holds a BA from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, and a PhD from The Ohio State University, USA.

Please do confirm attendance by replying to this invitation via email to Linda Watts (l.watts1@aston.ac.uk).  A light lunch will be provided after the seminar.

Information Ecosystems


24th Colloquium in the History of Management and Organizations

March 27th-29th 2019 in Nice

[Conference Website]

Organised by the French Association for the History of Management and Organizations (AHMO) and Université Côte d’Azur – EDHEC Business School, GREDEG (UMR 7321) and MSHS Sud-Est (USR 3566)

« Like pipes in a wall crucial to having running water in a home, the informational infrastructure was nearly invisible. Use of information proved so routine, indeed mundane, that like using a faucet or bathroom fixtures, people did not think about it, because it was always present. It is information’s pervasive, embedded nature that perhaps accounts for why we […] have not paid much attention to it. But now we should, because as happens, once a phenomenon is named or is made obvious, it becomes easier to optimize its use. »[1]

In his book on the history of information in the United States, James W. Cortada argues for the need to understand evolving characteristics of information ecosystems. Cortada defines these ecosystems as facilitators of three activities of our contemporary societies: ‘appreciating what needs to be understood, seeing how this understanding should be developed, and seeing how it could be used’[2].

Since World War II, the amount of information stored and processed in organisations has grown exponentially, giving rise to a new category of ‘knowledge workers’ performing in horizontal information structures[3]. Based on the assumption that each firm and each industry develop idiosyncratic knowledge, organisation and strategy scholars of the 1970s introduced information as a fourth factor of production. Then, in the 1980s, the information ‘revolution’ shook up traditional industrial structures with changes in competitive rules and the introduction of new forms of competitive advantage[4].

Since then, the use of information with respect to accounting, finance, personnel, prices, logistics or customers significantly expanded, especially with the increasing computerisation that helped people to better store, process and share information to improve strategic decisions[5]. These recent changes have led to new forms of science that became necessary to support professional managers’ decisions and to develop new knowledge-based approaches.

The 24th Colloquium in the History of Management and Organizations aims to generate a historical perspective to our understanding of the use of these different forms of information in organizations. Papers aligned with four sub-themes are particularly welcomed:

  • The evolution of the use of information for organisations: While accounting information is often considered as one of the first languages in organisations, other accounts (relative to finance, personnel, price, logistics and customers) appeared relevant to store with the aim to assist decisions and strategic choices made by firms. What have these evolutions been? For which types of information? And for what aim?  
  • The history of scientific knowledge and its diffusion in management and organisation studies: The rise of information in organisations has coincided with the professionalization of managers who express the need to formalise and transfer their managerial knowledge. The diffusion of knowledge in accounting[6], finance[7], marketing[8], human resources management[9], logistics[10] or strategy[11] has attracted the attention of scholars. What trajectories have taken these diffusions? For which type of knowledge? In which institutional contexts?
  • The account of information as an intangible asset in organisations: given the immaterial nature of information and tacit knowledge, the challenge to transform this asset in value creation has long questioned scholars. Currently, the idea to re-materialise or to make more visible these information infrastructures has led to new issues and to new research avenues aligned with sociological oriented approaches dealing with materiality in organisations. Concerns related to security and standardization could also be considered[12].
  • Digital transformation and new forms of value for information: Considered by some scholarsas a fourth industrial revolution, current digital transformation is seen as a phenomenon based on unprecedented technological changes such as artificial intelligence, virtual reality and the Internet of Things. The consequences of these technological innovations, despite being very uncertain regarding their social impacts,put the user at the heart of innovation processes providing value to personal data and disrupting traditional business models. To what extent are these current transformations part of a longer history of computer science and of management information systems[13]?

These sub-themes are non-exhaustive and given the main theme of the colloquium, pluridisciplinary research is particularly encouraged (within management studies or with other sciences such as computer science, law, sociology, economics, psychology, etc.).

../KeyNote/Cortada,JW.jpg

Keynote Speaker: James W. Cortada is a business historian and Senior Research Fellow at the University of Minnesota.  Dr. Cortada spent nearly 40 years working at IBM in sales, consulting, management and executive positions.  He is the author of both ICT management books and business history.  He is the author of All the Facts: A History of Information in the United States Since 1870 (2016) and IBM: The Rise and Fall and Reinvention of a Global Icon (2019).

Doctoral workshop

The Colloquium will start with a doctoral workshop organised on 27 March at EDHEC Business School. Ph.D. students who seek to present their work should send a ten-page document presenting research area (theme, research questions), theoretical framework, methodology, first results and main bibliographical references.

First- or second-year Ph.D. students or Ph.D. students incorporating a historical dimension in their dissertation in management are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Important deadlines

  • Submission of Papers: Short papers (3000 words) written either in English or French should be submitted no later than 14 December 2018. Full texts will be accepted.
  • Notification of Acceptance: Notification of papers accepted for inclusion in the conference program will be made by 25 January 2019.
  • Final version of papers(30,000 in 50,000 signs): 22 February 2019. Final papers should be written either in English or French with summaries in French and English.

Scientific Committee

Lise Arena, Université Côte d’Azur

Régis Boulat, Université de Haute-Alsace

Ludovic Cailluet, EDHEC Business School

Muriel Dalpont-Legrand, Université Côte d’Azur

Mathieu Floquet, Université de Lorraine

Patrick Fridenson, EHESS

Gérald Gaglio, Université Côte d’Azur

Eric Godelier, Ecole Polytechnique

Hélène Gorge, Université Lille 2-Skema Business School

Nicolas Guilhot, Université Lyon 3, IFROSS

Pierre Labardin, Université Paris-Dauphine

Eve Lamendour, Université de La Rochelle

Cheryl McWatters, University of Ottawa

Nathalie Oriol, Université Côte d’Azur

Paulette Robic, Université de Nantes

Béatrice Touchelay, Université Lille

Philippe Véry, EDHEC Business School

Elisabeth Walliser, Université Côte d’Azur

Proposals should include:

  • A research question;
  • A fieldwork / primary sources or a corpus

Proposals should be sent to: jhmo2019@gmail.com


[1] Cortada, J.W. 2016. All the Facts – A History of Information in the United-States since 1870. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

[2] Ibid: 303.

[3] Regarding this, cf. pioneering work conducted by M. Aoki on Japanese (versus American) firms and their information structures in the 1980s – Aoki, M. 1986. « Horizontal versus Vertical Information Structure of the Firm. » American Economic Review 76(5): 971-983. 

[4] Porter, M.E., and V.E. Millar. 1985. « How Information Gives You Competitive Advantage. » Harvard Business Review 63(4): 149-160.

[5] The use of information in decision-making was discussed much earlier in 1960s by: Simon, H. A. 1960. The New Science of Management Decision. New-York: Harper & Row.

[6] Lamendour, E., and Y. Lemarchand. 2015. « La magie du chiffre. » Entreprises et Histoire 79(2).

[7] Hautcoeur, P.-C., and A. Riva. 2012. « The Paris Financial Market in the Nineteenth Century : Complementarities and competition in microstructures ». Economic History Review 65(4): 1326-1353.

[8] Cochoy, F. 1999. Une histoire du marketing – discipliner l’économie de marché. Paris : La Découverte.

[9] Collings, D.G., and G. Wood. 2009. Human Resource Management: A Critical Approach. London: Routledge.

[10] Van Creveld, M. 1977. Supplying War – Logistics from Wallenstein to Patton. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

[11] Cailluet, L. 2008. « La fabrique de la stratégie : Regards croisés sur la France et les États-Unis ». Revue Française de Gestion 188-189(8) : 143-159.

[12] Murphy, C.N., and J. Yates. 2009. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO): Global Governance through Voluntary Consensus. London: Routledge.

[13] Bounfour, A. (coord.) 2010. « De l’informatique aux systèmesd’information dans les entreprises ». Entrepriseset Histoire. 60(3).

Memorialization & place – UK’s Prof Olivette Otele

Reblogged from Imperial & Global Forum:

Here is another interesting video interview about history, memory, and empire with the UK’s first female black professor in history – Olivette Otele (see: BBC News )

The ‘Bordering on Brexit: Global Britain and the Embers of Empire‘ Conference was held last weekend at Garrison Library, Gibraltar. Professor Richard Toye, Director of Exeter’s Centre for Imperial and Global History, interviews Prof. Olivette Otele (Bath Spa) on the question of contested and controversial history and memorialisation in Bristol.

Feminist Library fundraiser appeal

Our friends from the Feminist Library have moved their collections (open to researchers) and as a charity are now looking for more support:

It’s official! The Feminist Library has finally found a new home!! J

 But we now need your support more than ever. We urgently need to raise at least £30,000 to be able to fund our move to the new space, and we need to leave our current premises in Spring 2019.

 After our long struggle against eviction (read more about our struggle to save the Library here.), the move is actually quite unexpectedly exciting! We’ll have a new, (much needed!) bigger space, based within a community centre in Peckham, and named after a woman abolitionist and feminist – Sojourner Truth! The bigger space will allow us to expand our collections and run even more and bigger exciting community events.

 Yet we have no choice but to leave our current premises with little notice and next to no funds, and need to fundraise for the new space urgently – we need to raise at least £30,000 in order for us to be able to move.

 Please help us protect this vital community resource! Help save the Feminist Library! Donate to our crowdfunding campaign and read more about it here:

 www.crowdfunder.co.uk/help-the-feminist-library-build-its-new-home/

Professor in Business History at CBS

Copenhagen Business School invites applications for a vacant full Professorship in History at the Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy.

Profile of the position    

In announcing a full Professorship in History, the Department seeks applicants with excellent qualifications and expertise in business and/or economic history. The Professor will be affiliated with the Department’s Centre for Business History. We particularly welcome applications from candidates who can demonstrate an interest in cultural and interdisciplinary approaches and who have a proven track record in developing new and innovative approaches and perspectives in the field.

Research areas of interest to the Centre include but are not limited to

  •  Entrepreneurship and innovation
  •  Narratives and uses of history in organizations and society
  •  History of capitalism
  •  Financial history
  •  Business, markets, government and society
  •  Consumption, marketing and branding

Applicants should have an outstanding teaching and publication record and preferably have published both monographs and articles in high ranking journals in the fields of history, business history and economic history, and/or other business school related journals.

The position is a full Professorship with research and teaching obligations.

Successful applicants must have an international profile, a strong record of research publications, and teaching experience in history. They must be capable of providing dynamic leadership in the development of research and teaching, in securing external research funding, and in establishing strong ties with industry.

To fulfill the research requirements of the position, the applicant chosen is expected to be physically present on a regular basis and actively participate in the teaching and research activities of the Department as well as maintaining and establishing broad links across CBS.

Responsibilities 

  • Personal research meeting high international standards, including responsibility for publishing, scientific communication and research-based teaching.
  • The academic development of discipline.
  • Research management, initiation of research projects, supervision of PhD students, international research co-operation, reviewing for academic journals.
  • Research education and further training of researchers, supervision of assistant professors and assessment committee work.
  • Teaching and associated examination in existing CBS programs, including Executive Education.
  • Promoting CBS’s academic reputation.
  • Initiating, fund raising and coordinating research projects.
  • Promoting the teaching and research capabilities of Copenhagen Business School and other relevant assignments at Copenhagen Business School.
  • Contributing to the administrative responsibilities of the Department and to CBS-wide tasks.
  • Communicating findings to the public in general and to CBS’s stakeholders in particular.
  • Active participation in the regular research activities, such as research seminars, workshops and conferences.

Qualifications 

Candidates must document a high degree of relevant, original and up-to-date scientific publications at an international level within the areas covered by the department.

Importance is put on the candidate’s ability to undertake research management and other relevant management functions.

The candidate should be able to document pedagogical qualifications, good teaching evaluations, and the ability to innovate within the educational field.

CBS emphasises the candidate’s ability to establish productive contacts with the business community.

The applicant must have professional proficiency in English (written and spoken).

Copenhagen Business School has a broad commitment to the excellence, distinctiveness and relevance of its teaching and research programmes. Candidates who wish to join us should demonstrate enthusiasm for working in an organisation of this type (highlighting, for example, relevant business, educational and dissemination activities).

For further information please contact:  Head of Department Lotte Jensen, e-mail: lje.mpp@cbs.dk or Group Leader Mads Mordhorst, e-mail: mmo.mpp@cbs.dk. Information about the department may be found at www.cbs.dk/mpp.

The appointment will be made on contractual terms corresponding to a salary grade 37 plus a personal allowance.

Application 

Application must be sent via the electronic recruitment system, using the link below.

Application must include:

  1. A statement of application.
  2. Proof of qualifications and a full CV.
  3. Documentation of relevant, significant, original research at an international level, including publications in the field’s internationally recognized journals and citations in the Social Science Citation Index and/or Google Scholar.
  4. Documentation of teaching qualifications or other material for the evaluation of his/her pedagogical level. Please see guidelines for teaching portfolios.
  5. Information indicating experience in research management, industry co-operation and international co-operation.
  6. A complete, numbered list of publications (indicating titles, co-authors, page numbers and year) with an * marking of the academic productions to be considered during the review. A maximum of 10 publications for review are allowed. Applicants are requested to prioritise their publications in relation to the field of this job advertisement.
  7. Copies of the publications marked with an *. Only publications written in English (or another specified principal language, according to research tradition) or one of the Scandinavian languages will be taken into consideration.

 

Recruitment procedure  

The Recruitment Committee will shortlist minimum two applicants; when possible five or more applicants will be shortlisted. The shortlisted applicants will be assessed by the Assessment Committee. All applicants will be notified of their status in the recruitment process shortly after the application deadline.

The applicants selected for assessment will be notified about the composition of the Assessment Committee and later in the process about the result of the assessment.

Once the recruitment process is completed each applicant will be notified of the outcome of their application.

Copenhagen Business School must receive all application material, including all appendices (see items above), by the application deadline.

Details about Copenhagen Business School and the department are available at www.cbs.dk.

Closing date: 3 January 2019.

Capri Doctoral summer school

The Call for Participation for the Capri Summer School on Research Methods in Management Studies 2019, 9-13 September (VII Edition) is open!

The Capri Summer School is co-organized by Cardiff Business School, University of Naples Federico II, HEC Paris, Grenoble Ecole de Management, Open University, SciencesPo, Stockholm School of Economics and Aalto Business School, Cass Business School, Hasselt University.

The Capri Summer School was born on the impulse of Italian Academy of Management and Business Administration to foster knowledge and methodologies among young scholars settling a challenging and stimulating context in one of most charming places in the world: The Island of Capri.

This International Summer School is supported by a number of leading faculty members belonging to a network of both promoting and external universities. Among those who have already confirmed their availability, there are: Hugh Willmott (Cass Business School & Cardiff Business School), Emma Bell (Open University), Marie-Laure Djelic (SciencesPo), Afshin Mehrpouya (HEC Paris), Islam Gazi, Amanda Peticca-Harris & Marcos Barros (Grenoble Ecole de Management), Roberto Di Pietra (Universiy of Siena), Staffan Furusten (Stockholm University), Rebecca Piekkari (Aalto Business School), Patrizia Zanoni (Hasselt Unversity)

Deadlines

The submission must be done by 2nd May 2019.

The course is aimed at doctoral students and early stage researchers in the areas of management, interested in qualitative studies of accounting, management, finance, organization, etc. We would be delighted to welcome some participants from your group/institution.

Please for further information visit the Capri Summer School Website

BAM SIG workshop: Can History Inform Corporate Responsibility?

British Academy of Management: Management and Business History SIG

Call for Papers:

Workshop at The York Management School, University of York, UK – jointly between the BAM Management and Business History SIG, and the Management and Organizational History Research Cluster

10th January 2019

Responsible Business, Business Ethics and Management History Strategy in Conversation – Can History Inform Corporate Responsibility?

There is continued and increasing academic interest in responsible business – and how this interacts and informs management and organization strategy and practice (eg, Porter and Kramer, 2011). Recent scholarship and practice has put the UN Sustainable Development Goals and other corporate responsibility initiatives, such as B-corporation accreditation, centre stage in driving forward the agenda (eg. Voegtlin & Scherer, 2017; Moroz, et al., 2018).
At the same time, scholarship in management history has examined the origins and directions of of corporate responsibility (eg, Hoffman, 2007; Marens, 2008; Singleton, 2018) and the literature on ‘social movements’, the forerunners of contemporary concerns, is especially rich and diverse. For example, cooperatives (eg, Wilson, Webster and Vorberg-Rugh, 2013), credit unions (Ward and McKillop, 2005), mutuality (Batiz-Lazo and Billings, 2012), social entrepreneurship (eg, Murphy, et al., 2018), and religiously-grounded movements such as the Quakers (Prior and Kirby, 2006, Robertson, Korczynski and Pickering, 2007), to name a few. Though this wide range of work focuses largely on historical events and chronologies, what contemporary scholars of socially responsible management can learn from this rich and varied history has received much less attention. This special issue seeks to redress this balance.
This special issue represents the beginning of a deeper conversation about the contours of the relationship between responsible business, business ethics, and management history. Thus, we invite contributions from a broad range of management and organization disciplines on the following topics, but not limited to:
• Is there a connection between movements of the past and contemporary ‘responsibility’ movements (such as UN Global Compact, B-corporations, etc)?
• How has responsible management changed over time? How are the practices or processes shaped by their particular social, historical or religious/spiritual contexts?
• What role, if any, does religion or spirituality play in the histories of movements of the past?
• What, if any, is the relationship between endogenous and exogenous factors in the change or decline of historical movements?
• How have historical movements influenced the evolution of particular industries?
• What, if any, is the possible relationship between the organization’s corporate or legal form and responsible business and ethics?
• To what extent does Government policy, regulation and the law promote or inhibit responsible business?
• Is corporate or legal form associated with more or less responsible approaches to human resource management, supply chain management, marketing and distribution, production, decision-making or other strategic processes?
• What role, if any, do changes (strengthening/weakening) to corporate governance play in responsible business over time? What factors led to changes in corporate governance?
• What role, if any, does leadership play in the creation, renewal and/or decline of historical movements?
• What, if any, effect does significant organization change events have on its approach to responsible business (e.g., acquisition, mergers, divestment, changes in leadership, etc.)?
• Is an ‘ethical capitalism’ possible?
To present, please send an extended abstract (500 words) to Kevin at kevin.tennent@york.ac.uk.
Kevin Tennent, University of York
Nicholas Burton, Northumbria University

Archival research fellowships

Archives and Special Collections at the University of Glasgow are pleased to announce that applications for new Visiting Research Fellowships working with our collections are now open. Please could list members pass on the following information about them to any eligible researchers who might be interested?

 Supported by the Friends of Glasgow University Library and the William Lind Foundation, the University of Glasgow Library is pleased to announce new annual Visiting Research Fellowships to support scholars from across academic disciplines to come to Glasgow to work on our unique research collections.

 Glasgow is proud to have an outstanding library of old, rare and unique material, including many illuminated medieval and renaissance manuscripts of international importance, and more than 10,000 books printed before 1601. It also houses extensive collections relating to art, literature and the performing arts, as well as the University’s own institutional archive which dates back to the 13th century. It is also home to the Scottish Business Archive, with over 400 collections dating from the 18th century to the modern day. More information on our collections

 About the fellowships

The Fellowships are competitive peer-assessed awards. They are designed to provide financial support towards the costs of travel and accommodation to enable researchers to work on the unique collections held in the University Library (up to £1,000 each). The successful recipients should spend between two and four weeks over the course of a year working with the collections in Glasgow.

 One Fellowship is offered by the William Lind Foundation to support research into Scottish business history, otherwise the scope of proposals in open to applicants to define.

 How to apply

Applications forms can be downloaded here https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/library/researchfellows/ and should be submitted by email to the Library Business Team library-businessteam@glasgow.ac.uk by Noon on 19 November 2018.

 Thanks,

 Archives and Special Collections
University of Glasgow Library
Hillhead Street, Glasgow, G12 8QE, Scotland, UK

0141 330 5515

www.glasgow.ac.uk/asc

@UofGlasgowASC

CFP: A crisis in ‘coming to terms with the past’? At the crossroads of translation and memory

Reblogged from the Imperial and Global Network:

Imperial & Global Forum

A crisis in ‘coming to terms with the past’?
At the crossroads of translation and memory

1-2 February 2019
Senate House, London

Over the past decade, a particular notion of ‘coming to terms with the past’, usually associated with an international liberal consensus, has increasingly been challenged. Growing in strength since the 1980s, this consensus has been underpinned by the idea that difficult historical legacies, displaced into the present, and persisting as patterns of thought, speech and behaviour, needed to be addressed through a range of phenomena such as transitional justice, reconciliation, and the forging of shared narratives to ensure social cohesion and shore up democratic norms. 

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