Capri Doctoral summer school

The Call for Participation for the Capri Summer School on Research Methods in Management Studies 2019, 9-13 September (VII Edition) is open!

The Capri Summer School is co-organized by Cardiff Business School, University of Naples Federico II, HEC Paris, Grenoble Ecole de Management, Open University, SciencesPo, Stockholm School of Economics and Aalto Business School, Cass Business School, Hasselt University.

The Capri Summer School was born on the impulse of Italian Academy of Management and Business Administration to foster knowledge and methodologies among young scholars settling a challenging and stimulating context in one of most charming places in the world: The Island of Capri.

This International Summer School is supported by a number of leading faculty members belonging to a network of both promoting and external universities. Among those who have already confirmed their availability, there are: Hugh Willmott (Cass Business School & Cardiff Business School), Emma Bell (Open University), Marie-Laure Djelic (SciencesPo), Afshin Mehrpouya (HEC Paris), Islam Gazi, Amanda Peticca-Harris & Marcos Barros (Grenoble Ecole de Management), Roberto Di Pietra (Universiy of Siena), Staffan Furusten (Stockholm University), Rebecca Piekkari (Aalto Business School), Patrizia Zanoni (Hasselt Unversity)

Deadlines

The submission must be done by 2nd May 2019.

The course is aimed at doctoral students and early stage researchers in the areas of management, interested in qualitative studies of accounting, management, finance, organization, etc. We would be delighted to welcome some participants from your group/institution.

Please for further information visit the Capri Summer School Website

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BAM SIG workshop: Can History Inform Corporate Responsibility?

British Academy of Management: Management and Business History SIG

Call for Papers:

Workshop at The York Management School, University of York, UK – jointly between the BAM Management and Business History SIG, and the Management and Organizational History Research Cluster

10th January 2019

Responsible Business, Business Ethics and Management History Strategy in Conversation – Can History Inform Corporate Responsibility?

There is continued and increasing academic interest in responsible business – and how this interacts and informs management and organization strategy and practice (eg, Porter and Kramer, 2011). Recent scholarship and practice has put the UN Sustainable Development Goals and other corporate responsibility initiatives, such as B-corporation accreditation, centre stage in driving forward the agenda (eg. Voegtlin & Scherer, 2017; Moroz, et al., 2018).
At the same time, scholarship in management history has examined the origins and directions of of corporate responsibility (eg, Hoffman, 2007; Marens, 2008; Singleton, 2018) and the literature on ‘social movements’, the forerunners of contemporary concerns, is especially rich and diverse. For example, cooperatives (eg, Wilson, Webster and Vorberg-Rugh, 2013), credit unions (Ward and McKillop, 2005), mutuality (Batiz-Lazo and Billings, 2012), social entrepreneurship (eg, Murphy, et al., 2018), and religiously-grounded movements such as the Quakers (Prior and Kirby, 2006, Robertson, Korczynski and Pickering, 2007), to name a few. Though this wide range of work focuses largely on historical events and chronologies, what contemporary scholars of socially responsible management can learn from this rich and varied history has received much less attention. This special issue seeks to redress this balance.
This special issue represents the beginning of a deeper conversation about the contours of the relationship between responsible business, business ethics, and management history. Thus, we invite contributions from a broad range of management and organization disciplines on the following topics, but not limited to:
• Is there a connection between movements of the past and contemporary ‘responsibility’ movements (such as UN Global Compact, B-corporations, etc)?
• How has responsible management changed over time? How are the practices or processes shaped by their particular social, historical or religious/spiritual contexts?
• What role, if any, does religion or spirituality play in the histories of movements of the past?
• What, if any, is the relationship between endogenous and exogenous factors in the change or decline of historical movements?
• How have historical movements influenced the evolution of particular industries?
• What, if any, is the possible relationship between the organization’s corporate or legal form and responsible business and ethics?
• To what extent does Government policy, regulation and the law promote or inhibit responsible business?
• Is corporate or legal form associated with more or less responsible approaches to human resource management, supply chain management, marketing and distribution, production, decision-making or other strategic processes?
• What role, if any, do changes (strengthening/weakening) to corporate governance play in responsible business over time? What factors led to changes in corporate governance?
• What role, if any, does leadership play in the creation, renewal and/or decline of historical movements?
• What, if any, effect does significant organization change events have on its approach to responsible business (e.g., acquisition, mergers, divestment, changes in leadership, etc.)?
• Is an ‘ethical capitalism’ possible?
To present, please send an extended abstract (500 words) to Kevin at kevin.tennent@york.ac.uk.
Kevin Tennent, University of York
Nicholas Burton, Northumbria University

Archival research fellowships

Archives and Special Collections at the University of Glasgow are pleased to announce that applications for new Visiting Research Fellowships working with our collections are now open. Please could list members pass on the following information about them to any eligible researchers who might be interested?

 Supported by the Friends of Glasgow University Library and the William Lind Foundation, the University of Glasgow Library is pleased to announce new annual Visiting Research Fellowships to support scholars from across academic disciplines to come to Glasgow to work on our unique research collections.

 Glasgow is proud to have an outstanding library of old, rare and unique material, including many illuminated medieval and renaissance manuscripts of international importance, and more than 10,000 books printed before 1601. It also houses extensive collections relating to art, literature and the performing arts, as well as the University’s own institutional archive which dates back to the 13th century. It is also home to the Scottish Business Archive, with over 400 collections dating from the 18th century to the modern day. More information on our collections

 About the fellowships

The Fellowships are competitive peer-assessed awards. They are designed to provide financial support towards the costs of travel and accommodation to enable researchers to work on the unique collections held in the University Library (up to £1,000 each). The successful recipients should spend between two and four weeks over the course of a year working with the collections in Glasgow.

 One Fellowship is offered by the William Lind Foundation to support research into Scottish business history, otherwise the scope of proposals in open to applicants to define.

 How to apply

Applications forms can be downloaded here https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/library/researchfellows/ and should be submitted by email to the Library Business Team library-businessteam@glasgow.ac.uk by Noon on 19 November 2018.

 Thanks,

 Archives and Special Collections
University of Glasgow Library
Hillhead Street, Glasgow, G12 8QE, Scotland, UK

0141 330 5515

www.glasgow.ac.uk/asc

@UofGlasgowASC

CFP: A crisis in ‘coming to terms with the past’? At the crossroads of translation and memory

Reblogged from the Imperial and Global Network:

Imperial & Global Forum

A crisis in ‘coming to terms with the past’?
At the crossroads of translation and memory

1-2 February 2019
Senate House, London

Over the past decade, a particular notion of ‘coming to terms with the past’, usually associated with an international liberal consensus, has increasingly been challenged. Growing in strength since the 1980s, this consensus has been underpinned by the idea that difficult historical legacies, displaced into the present, and persisting as patterns of thought, speech and behaviour, needed to be addressed through a range of phenomena such as transitional justice, reconciliation, and the forging of shared narratives to ensure social cohesion and shore up democratic norms. 

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