Job: Uses of the Past in International Economic Relations

Exciting opportunity at Oxford University

Research Associate – Uses of the Past in International Economic Relations

Faculty of History, George Street, Oxford

Grade 7: £31,076 p.a.

An exciting new opportunity has arisen for a Research Associate to conduct their own research and contribute to a major international project. The research will focus on international banking and financial markets to examine how the past is used in the assessment of risk, how reputation was built and what lessons were drawn from successive crises.

You will manage your own research and administrative activities, undertaking archival work as required and developing your own ideas for new projects. You will participate in project workshops and conferences, collaborate in the preparation of publications, and contribute to the project’s social media and public engagement activities.

You will hold a doctorate in a relevant subject (or show evidence that a doctorate is imminent) and have an excellent knowledge of relevant research languages. You will have the capacity for independent research along with the ability to work collaboratively with the team and a willingness to develop a knowledge of the wider historical context of your own research area. You must also have exceptional communication skills which you will use to successfully promote the project through publication and presentations.

This post is full-time for a fixed-term of 2 years, tenable from 1 September 2017 or as soon as possible thereafter. Applications are particularly welcome from women and black and minority ethnic candidates who are under-represented in Oxford.

Applications for this vacancy are to be made online. To apply for this role and for further details please contact the person below.

The deadline for applications is 12.00 noon on 30 August 2017.

Contact Person : Jeannie Scott

Vacancy ID : 129767

Contact Phone : 01865 615019

Closing Date : 30-Aug-2017

Contact Email : recruitments@history.ox.ac.uk

 

SI on Narratives & Business History now out!

I am very pleased to announce that the final issue of the year for Business History is the excellent special issue on narratives in Business History, edited by Mads Mordhorst & Stefan Schwarzkopf.

Business History, Volume 59, Issue 8, November 2017 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

Narrative Turn and Business History

This new issue contains the following articles:

Original Articles

Theorising narrative in business history
Mads Mordhorst & Stefan Schwarzkopf
Pages: 1155-1175 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1357697

The strategic use of historical narratives: a theoretical framework
William M. Foster, Diego M. Coraiola, Roy Suddaby, Jochem Kroezen & David Chandler
Pages: 1176-1200 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1224234

How business historians can save the world – from the fallacy of self-made success
Pamela Walker Laird
Pages: 1201-1217 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1251904

Narrative, metaphor and the subjective understanding of historic identity transition
Mairi Maclean , Charles Harvey & Lindsay Stringfellow
Pages: 1218-1241 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1223048

Writing business history: Creating narratives
Andrew Popp & Susanna Fellman
Pages: 1242-1260 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1250742

Narrating histories of women at work: Archives, stories, and the promise of feminism
Gabrielle Durepos, Alan McKinlay & Scott Taylor
Pages: 1261-1279 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1276900

Histories of leadership in the Copenhagen Phil – A cultural view of narrativity in studies of leadership in symphony orchestras
Søren Friis Møller
Pages: 1280-1302 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1335306
Book Reviews

La place financière de Paris au xxe siècle. Des ambitions contrariées
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 1303-1305 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1156219

Les concessions hydroélectriques dans le grand sud-ouest, Histoire et débats 1902/2015
Alain Beltran
Pages: 1305-1306 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1321165

Wall streeters: The creators and corruptors of American finance
C. Edoardo Altamura
Pages: 1306-1308 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1326434

America’s bank: The epic struggle to create the Federal Reserve
Linda Arch
Pages: 1308-1309 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1326435

Start with the future and work back: a heritage management manifesto
Daniele Pozzi
Pages: 1310-1311 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1328995

The international aluminium cartel, 1886–1978: The business and politics of a cooperative industrial institution
Valerio Cerretano
Pages: 1311-1313 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2017.1331544

 

Job: Oxford University, Global history of capitalism

Career Development Fellow – Global History of Capitalism

University of Oxford – Faculty of History

The Global History of Capitalism project is seeking a dedicated Career Development Fellow to join their team to conduct rigorous academic research and to inform debates on the history of capitalism.

The successful applicant will have an active research interest in the global history of capitalism and be able to work individually and collaboratively with researchers across disciplines. You will conduct relevant archival research as well as field-based research where relevant. You will manage your own academic research and administrative duties, contribute ideas for new projects and collaborate in the presentation of publications. You will also provide teaching relief to one of the Co-Directors and co-design a new undergraduate course in business history.

You will hold a relevant doctorate (or show evidence that a doctorate is imminent) and have an excellent knowledge of the languages relating to your specialism. You will be able to demonstrate a strong research record and excellent communication skills along with the ability to teach. An ability to work independently as well as collaboratively within a team is essential.

The post is full-time and fixed term for 3 years; the start date is negotiable but must be no later than January 2018.

Applicants are required to submit a research proposal as part of their application.

Applications must be made online. To apply for this role and for further details, including the job description and selection criteria, please click on the link below.

The deadline for applications is 12.00 noon on 13 September 2017.

Applications are particularly welcome from women and black and minority ethnic candidates who are under-represented in research posts in Oxford.

https://www.recruit.ox.ac.uk/pls/hrisliverecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=130104

PDW on Historical methods at AOM2017

Last Friday we ran our professional development workshop on the uses of historical methods at the Academy of Management. We had a full house, seven excellent presentations and lively discussions with the audience. We also distributed our draft bibliography on historical methods in a previous post and hope you can give us some feedback and suggestions.

Dan, Diego and I plan to run future events focused on historical methodology in management and organization studies and are open to your feedback, suggestions and requests. Below you find links to our presentations from the day.

Introduction: AOM2017_PDW Hist Meth intro

JoAnne Yates: JY history and organizational studies AOM 2017

Michael Rowlinson: AOM pdw Historical Methods

Steph Decker: AOM2017_PDW-Archival Ethnography

Bill Foster: 2017 AOM Ethnostatistics PDW presentation

Christina Lubinski: AOM Distant Markets Christina

Michael Prietula: AoM-2017-PDW-prietula-2

 

All Academy Event on economic nationalism

On Sunday the Management History division at the Academy of Management hosted an all academy symposium on historical perspectives on business and management in an age of rising nationalism.

The panel comprised of Dan Wadhwani as the host and moderator, Matthias Kipping (York University), Takafumi Kurosawa (Kyoto University) and myself, Stephanie Decker (Aston University).

We argued that history can provide management scholars with a unique lens for understanding the current rise of nationalism, and the choices that businesses, managers, and entrepreneurs face in response to those changes. In part, this is because both supporters and critics of the current wave of nationalism point to historical examples and their consequences in justifying their positions. But, even more so, historical waves of globalization and de-globalization allow us a mirror for reflecting on the options and consequences that both policymakers and managers face today.

For instance, on the eve of World War I, much of the world economy was economically integrated, with the relatively free mobility of firms, people, and capital across borders. This earlier wave of global integration fell apart with the rise of nationalism and nationalist policies during the interwar period, and a different kind of globally integrated economy had to be rebuilt by policymakers and businesspeople in the post-World War II world.

We discussed not only potential lessons of earlier waves of nationalism de-globalization, but also the uses of the past by politicians, and the way in which corporate strategies can be shaped in the long term by historical experiences.

Ultimately, the discussion revolved around the relevance of history for understanding managerial choices and consequences in the face of nationalism in our own time.

Historical Methods in Management and Organizational Research: A Bibliography

In preparation for the development workshops devoted to methods (see Clio Palooza above) we have created a preliminary bibliography of references of papers, chapters, and books devoted to historical methods in management and organizational research. If you’ve got suggested additions to the list please let us know by coming to one of the sessions or by commenting on this post.

Historical Methods in Management and Organizational Research:
A Bibliography
August 2017

Coraiola, D.M., Foster, W.M. and Suddaby, R., 2015. Varieties of history in organization studies. The Routledge companion to management and organizational history, pp.206-221.

Decker, S., 2013. The silence of the archives: Business history, post-colonialism and archival ethnography. Management & Organizational History8(2), pp.155-173.

Decker, S., 2015. Mothership reconnection. The Routledge Companion to Management and Organizational History, p.222.

Durepos, G. and Mills, A.J., 2012. Actor-network theory, ANTi-history and critical organizational historiography. Organization19(6), pp.703-721.

Forbes, Daniel P., and David A. Kirsch. “The study of emerging industries: Recognizing and responding to some central problems.” Journal of Business Venturing 26, no. 5 (2011): 589-602.

Godfrey, P.C., Hassard, J., O’Connor, E.S., Rowlinson, M. and Ruef, M., 2016. What is organizational history? Toward a creative synthesis of history and organization studies. Academy of Management Review41(4), pp.590-608.

Heller, M. (20016). ‘Foucault, Discourse and the Birth of Public Relations’, Enterprise & Society, 17(3): 651-677.

Harvey, C. and Press, J., 1996. Databases in historical research: Theory, methods and applications. London: Macmillan.

Kirsch, D., Moeen, M. and Wadhwani, R.D., 2014. Historicism and industry emergence: industry knowledge from pre-emergence to stylized fact. Organizations in time: History, theory, methods217.

Kipping, M., Wadhwani, R.D. and Bucheli, M., 2014. Analyzing and interpreting historical sources: A basic methodology. Organizations in time: History, theory, methods, pp.305-329.

Lipartito, K., 2014. Historical sources and data. Organizations in time: History, theory, methods, pp.284-304.

Maclean, M., Harvey, C. and Clegg, S.R., 2016. Conceptualizing historical organization studies. Academy of Management Review41(4), pp.609-632.

Maclean, M., Harvey, C. and Clegg, S.R., 2017. Organization Theory in Business and Management History: Present Status and Future Prospects. Business History Review91(4), forthcoming.

Murmann, J. P. (2010). “Constructing Relational Databases to Study Life Histories on Your PC or Mac.” Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History 43(3): 109 – 123.

Pfefferman, T., 2016. Reassembling the archives: business history knowledge production from an actor-network perspective. Management & Organizational History11(4), pp.380-398.

Rowlinson, M., Hassard, J. and Decker, S., 2014. Research strategies for organizational history: A dialogue between historical theory and organization theory. Academy of Management Review39(3), pp.250-274.

Stutz, C. and Sachs, S., 2016. Facing the Normative Challenges: The Potential of Reflexive Historical Research. Business & Society, p.0007650316681989.

Taylor, S., 2015. Critical hermeneutics for critical organizational history. The Routledge Companion to Management and Organizational History, p.143.

Vaara, E. and Lamberg, J.A., 2016. Taking historical embeddedness seriously: Three historical approaches to advance strategy process and practice research. Academy of Management Review41(4), pp.633-657.

Taylor, S., Bell, E. and Cooke, B., 2009. Business history and the historiographical operation. Management & Organizational History4(2), pp.151-166.

Wadhwani, R.D., 2016. Historical Methods for Contextualizing Entrepreneurship Research. In A Research Agenda for Entrepreneurship and Context. Edward Elgar Publishing, Incorporated.

Wadhwani, R.D. and Decker, S. 2017. “Clio’s Toolkit: The Practice of Historical Methods in Organization Studies,” (with Stephanie Decker) In Sanjay Jain and Raza Mir (eds.) Routledge Companion to Qualitative Research in Organization Studies New York: Taylor and Francis, pp. 113-127.

JoAnne Yates, “Understanding Historical Methods in Organization Studies,” in Marcelo Bucheli and R. Daniel Wadhwani, eds., Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods (Oxford: Oxford University Press: 2013), pp. 265-283.

JoAnne Yates, “Time, History, and Materiality,” in Materiality and Time: Historical Perspectives on Organizations, Artefacts and Practices, ed. Francois-Xavier de Vaujany, Nathalie Mitev, Pierre Laniray, Emmanuelle Vaast (London: Palgrave McMillan: 2014), pp. 17-33.

 

CfP: Special issue on War & Peace in Organizational Memory

Management and Organizational History

Call for papers

 Special Issue: War and Peace in Organizational Memory

 

Theme

Organizations are known for marking their own centennial, bicentennial and other anniversaries. These celebrations are good opportunities for organizations to reflect on their past. The commissioned corporate history that often stems from these events helps the organization to understand its past. This work can then be used externally to form part of its marketing strategy or internally as a way to firm up its identity (Suddaby, Foster and Quinn Trank 2016). The past and longevity also confers legitimacy upon the organization (Roowaan 2009). Other commemorative dates and remembrance ceremonies are of similar importance. While not the traditional focus of business historians, these dates are nevertheless observed by organizations as they participate in the social process of remembering events. This is especially apparent in the experience of war and, as we have seen more recently, terrorist attacks.

A special Issue of Management and Organizational History will be timed to coincide with 11th November 2018 as the 100th year anniversary of Armistice Day. It will be devoted to the examining the impact that war, as a social and political event, had upon organizational identity. How did organizations understand and rationalize their national, regional, religious or racial identity and behavior in times of conflict? What objects, rituals and ceremonies organizations initiate to remember and commemorate the lives lost in war – if at all? To what extent were memorials or commemorations specific to organisations themselves, albeit embedded within wider systems of meaning? How does the end of conflict and peace time change these gestures or attitudes towards other nations or groups? We welcome empirical and theoretical papers that consider case studies or adopt long run historical analysis as well as encouraging the submission of work that utilizes new approaches to concepts of memory. Papers that examine the influence of World War I would be pertinent contributions to the issue but it is not confined to focusing on this war alone. Submissions that consider other wars or conflicts, such as the Hundred Years War, Wars of Independence, Civil Wars, Napoleonic War, World War II, the Cold War, would be relevant and we invite papers from all periods and geographical zones.

Since the ‘historic turn’, a shift has begun to take place in the study of organizational change whereby business historians and historical analysis more generally has taken a greater role. Using history in forming organizational identity often involves sense-making by companies (Ravasi and Schultz, 2006). Recent research has included analysis of ceremonies, rituals and objects. Rituals, as historic events, contain rich levels of symbolism and follow a set of established conventions (Dacin et al., 2010). Objects, such as ornaments, portraits, other paraphernalia and even architecture or museums, exist as a manifestation of a collective memory, a historical record of the organization’s past (Decker 2014; Suddaby, Foster and Quinn Trank 2016, Barnes and Newton, 2017). They serve as ‘talking points’ or a ‘show and tell’ to explain organizational culture, an event or the meaning of an act which has taken place (Ames, 1980; Rafaeli and Pratt, 1993). Textual and oral memory forms can be used as memory cues, which enable those in the present to construct organizational identity that complies with current and future requirements (Schultz and Hernes 2013, 4). While the past can be used and manipulated, it is not always controlled by those with power at the top of the hierarchy (Rowlinson and Hassard 1993; Maclean et al. 2014).

There is a wealth of literature on the memorialization of war at the individual, national, European and international level.  Mosse examines the commemoration of soldiers after war, and the role this has in turning war into a sacred event (1990).  The role that remembering of war has in creating both national and European identities is considered by Niznik (2013) and its role in influencing post-war European politics is analyzed by Muller (2002). Others consider an international perspective (Sumartojo and Wellings, 2014), whilst the role of museums in remembering war is considered by Williams (2007) and Kjeldbaek (2009). Yet less has been written about how organizations remember war and how such remembering (or forgetting) influences their identify.

This call for papers invites potential contributions from those that employ innovative methodologies to examine individuals, groups or organizations and their experience of war.

Potential topics might include:

  • Corporate acts, events, rituals or memorials that remember the war and lives lost
  • Decisions not to mark or otherwise commemorate war and/or conflict
  • War reparations and other related acts
  • The organization’s narrative of its involvement in the war
  • The disruptive atmosphere of war and crisis management on staff
  • The impact of war or peace on the organization’s national, regional, religious or racial identity
  • Approach of multinational firms to this issue and uniformity or difference in subsidiary organisations
  • Remembering as a means of connecting with local stakeholders, such as customers and the general public
  • Debates about retaining war memorials and the issues with existing stakeholders

Process and timeline

Those interested in potentially contributing should contact the two guest editors at the earliest opportunity:

Victoria Barnes: Barnes@rg.mpg.de

Lucy Newton: L.A.Newton@henley.ac.uk

A paper development workshop will be held in Henley Business School, University of Reading in December 2017.

Manuscripts are to be submitted to Management and Organization History in the normal way. Authors should make it clear that the paper is intended to be part of the Special Issue.

The deadline for submission of papers for the Special Issue is February 28th 2018 with an aim to get final versions accepted by September 2018 for publication.

The Special Issue is timed to coincide with Armistice Day and will appear in November 2018 (Vol. 13, No. 4).

References

Ames, K.L., 1980. Material Culture as NonVerbal Communication: A Historical Case Study. J. Am. Cult. 3, 619–641. doi:10.1111/j.1542-734X.1980.0304_619.x

Dacin, M.T., Munir, K., Tracey, P., 2010. Formal Dining at Cambridge Colleges: Linking Ritual Performance and Institutional Maintenance. Acad. Manage. J. 53, 1393–1418. doi:10.5465/AMJ.2010.57318388

Decker, Stephanie. 2014. ‘Solid Intentions: An Archival Ethnography of Corporate Architecture and Organizational Remembering’. Organization 21 (4): 514–42. doi:10.1177/1350508414527252.

Kjeldbæk, Esben (ed.). 2009. The power of the object : museums and World War I.  Edinburgh : Museums Etc.

Maclean, M., Harvey, C., Sillince, J.A.A., Golant, B.D., 2014. Living up to the past? Ideological sensemaking in organizational transition. Organization 21, 543–567. doi:10.1177/1350508414527247

Mosse, George L. 1990. Fallen soldiers: reshaping the memory of the world wars.  New York and Oxford : Oxford University Press.

Müller, Jan-Werner (ed.). 2002.  Memory and power in post-war Europe: studies in the presence of the past.  Cambridge, UK; Cambridge University Pres..

Niżnik, Józef (ed.). 2013.  Twentieth century wars in European memory.  Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang.

Rafaeli, A., Pratt, M.G., 1993. Tailored Meanings: On the Meaning and Impact of Organizational Dress. Acad. Manage. Rev. 18, 32–55. doi:10.5465/AMR.1993.399750

Ravasi, D. M. and Schultz, Majken. 2006. ‘Responding to Organizational Identity Threats: Exploring the Role of Organizational Culture’. Academy of Management Journal 49 (3): 433-458

Roowaan, Reis. 2009. A Business Case for Business History: How Companies Can Profit from their Past. Amsterdam: Uitgeverij Boom.

Rowlinson, Michael and Hassard, John. 1993. ‘The Invention of Corporate Culture: A History of the Histories of Cadbury’. Human Relations 46: 299-326.

Suddaby, Roy, William M. Foster, and Chris Quinn Trank. 2016. ‘Re-Membering: rhetorical history as identity work’. In The Oxford Handbook of Organizational Theory and Behaviour, edited by Michael G. Pratt, Majken Schultz, Blake E. Ashforth and David Ravasi. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Sumartojo, Shanti and Ben Wellings, (eds.). 2014. Nation, memory and Great War commemoration: mobilizing the past in Europe, Australia and New Zealand.  Bern, Switzerland : Peter Lang.

Williams, Paul Harvey. 2007. Memorial museums: the global rush to commemorate atrocities. Oxford : Berg.

 

Clio Palooza at Academy of Management

This year, the Paper Development Workshops sponsored by the Management History Division at the Academy of Management will feature a series of sessions on historical methods. If you are attending the AoM, please consider joining us. And please let others who may be interested know about these sessions. A listing of sessions, presenters, and locations can be found below.

Historical Methods for Management and Organizational Research

Aug 4, 12:15-2:45pm, Hyatt Embassy Hall E

Coordinator: Stephanie DeckerAston Business School

Coordinator: Diego CoraiolaU. of Alberta

Participant: William FosterU. of Alberta

Participant: JoAnne YatesMIT Sloan School of Management

Participant: Matthias KippingSchulich School of Bus, York U.

Participant: Michael RowlinsonU. of Exeter

Presenter: Christina LubinskiCopenhagen Business School

 

Some Words, A Story, Some Methods, and a Weapons Platform

Aug 4, 12:15pm-2:15pm, Hyatt Embassy Hall G

Coordinator: Andrew CardowMassey U.

Participant: Mie AugierNaval Postgraduate School

Participant: Maciej WorkiewiczESSEC Business School

Participant: M J PrietulaEmory U.

 

Frontiers of Digital History: Methods and Tools

Aug 4, 2:00pm – 4:00pm, Hyatt Hanover Hall E

Presenter: Michael RowlinsonU. of Exeter

Organizer: Robin GustafssonAalto U.

Presenter: Charles Edward HarveyNewcastle U.

Presenter: Mirko ErnkvistRatio Institute

Presenter: Mairi MacleanU. of Bath

Presenter: Johann Peter MurmannU. of New South Wales

Organizer: Mirko ErnkvistRatio Institute

Moderator: Robin GustafssonAalto U.

Presenter: David A. KirschU. of Maryland

 

The Linguistic Turn in Management and Organizational History

August 5, 12:30pm-2pm. Hyatt, Embassy Hall A

Participant: Michael HellerBrunel U.

Participant: Michael RowlinsonU. of Exeter

Participant: Ulf ThoeneU. de La Sabana

Participant: Ellen KorsagerCopenhagen Business School

Participant: Anders SorensenCopenhagen Business School

 

Using Accounting Records for Management History

August 5, 2:45-pm-4:15pm Hyatt, Harris

Organizer: James M. WilsonU. of Glasgow

Presenter: Kirsten KininmonthU. of Glasgow

Presenter: Sam McKinstryU. of the West of Scotland