CfP: MHRG annual workshop

Call for Papers: Management History Research Group annual workshop

The 2017 Management History Research Group’s workshop will be held at the People’s History Museum, Manchester on July 10th and 11th.

The full call for papers is displayed on the MHRG webpages:

http://mgt-hist.org/index.php/2017/02/26/call-for-papers-mhrg-annual-workshop-2017-peoples-history-museum-manchester-july-10-11/

Further info about the workshop, e.g. registration fees and process, will be displayed there in due course.

We look forward to receiving your abstracts and/or suggestions for panels. The deadline for the receipt of abstracts is May 5th. Please send any abstracts to this dedicated email address below:

mhrg.manchester@gmail.com

Kind regards

Prof Leo McCann (on behalf of the workshop organizing committee).

CfP: Global Histories of Capital

CALL FOR PAPERS – EXTENDED DEADLINE MAY 1ST

Global Histories of Capital: New Perspectives on the Global South

Department of History, New York University and the Heilbroner Center for Capitalism Studies

The New York University Department of History and the Heilbroner Center for Capitalism Studies at the New School are inviting abstracts for a workshop entitled Global Histories of Capital: New Perspectives on the Global South. We are seeking paper proposals from advanced graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and faculty working broadly on themes related to the history of capitalism, historical political economy, the history of economic life and new materialism. The workshop aims to connect scholars working on topics or countries considered part of the global south, international history and those engaged in comparative historical research.

The conference will take place the weekend of October 7th, 2017 in New York.

Applicants should submit a 250 – 300 word abstract to globalcapitalconference@gmail.com by May 1st, 2017. Suggested themes include but are not limited to:

Built-environments; slavery; labor; internationalisms; gender, gendered labor and unpaid work; concept histories; financialization; agrarian change; radical traditions; state structures; sovereignty; law; commodity histories; environmental historyhistories of economic thought; science, technology and the economy; culture and translation; decolonization; markets and market governance

Workshop Objectives

Our aim is to bring together graduate students working on areas of the non-west, broadly conceived, whose work approaches questions of the economic from political, environmental, intellectual and cultural perspectives. In light of growing interest in the status of the economic to social scientific inquiry — spurred by research programs from the history of capitalism to new materialism — our objective is to foster a critical conversation about how we write such histories from world-regions outside Western Europe and North America. By bringing together scholars of varied regional expertise, we hope we might more precisely reframe the relevance of categories such as the ‘global south’ and ‘non-west’ within their specific relationship to historical processes of globalization and imperialism.

Our emphasis on the ‘global’ nature of this history is not simply to fill-in a preexisting cartography that has been relatively neglected by new histories of capitalism. Rather, we intend to explore how the global emerged as a category under modern capitalism and the different moments in which it has been imagined and redefined, and perhaps misrecognized. Understanding the global spaces of capitalism requires close attention to methodological questions of comparability, scale, historical structure and unevenness. Therefore this workshop intends to group scholars thematically, rather than by region or periodization, in order to develop comparative vocabularies for doing this type of historical work.

SI of the “Workplace Review” now out

April 2017 Special Issue 

“Thinking on the Edges of Management and Organizational History”

 

Thinking on the Edges of Management and Organizational History

Management Education Feature

Case Study

Click here for the Full Issue

AOM2017 Meet the editors session

Session Type: PDW Workshop

Submission: 10093 | Sponsor(s): (MH)

 

Meet the Editors

Friday 10.30-12.00pm, Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Embassy Hall G 
Organizer: James M. Wilson, U. of Glasgow 

Presenter: Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School 

Presenter: Cheryl McWatters, U. of Ottawa 

Presenter: Paul Miranti, Rutgers U. 

The editors of Business History will provide a general discussion of their journal, describing its aims and scope, along with their general policies and practices regarding submissions. They will also discuss what they perceive to be current hot topics or emerging trends in the field of Management History. The editors and/or representatives of the Accounting History Review and Accounting History will discuss current topics and emerging interests in the field. They will also describe their journals’ general policies and practices regarding submissions. There will be sufficient time to discuss in general terms any individual projects conference attendees may have in mind for publication.

Search Terms: Business History | Editors | Journal

AOM 2017 PDW on historical methods

Session Type: PDW Workshop

Submission: 12154 | Sponsor(s): (MH, CMS)

 

Historical Methods for Management and Organizational Research

Friday 12.15-2.45pm, Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Embassy Hall E
Coordinator: Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School 

Coordinator: Diego Coraiola, U. of Alberta 

Participant: William Foster, U. of Alberta 

Participant: Sarah Robinson, U. of Leicester 

Participant: JoAnne Yates, MIT Sloan School of Management 

Participant: Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Bus, York U. 

Participant: Michael Rowlinson, U. of Exeter 

Presenter: Christina Lubinski, Copenhagen Business School 

Historical approaches to management and organizations have seen many promising developments in recent years, with several articles, special issues and edited books highlighting the important contribution that historical research can make to our understanding of contemporary organizations. Theoretical debates on the status of historical approaches within management and organization studies have dominated so far. These are important as they determine what kind of historical methods align with scholars’ epistemological and theoretical approach. Hence this PDW has two aims: to introduce scholars interested in the more practical questions of how we can use historical methods for organizational research to a range of option, and by highlighting the methodological implications of using specific historical approaches. This PDW will bring together several scholars who have used historical methodologies in their research. Their presentations will introduce participants to a range of methodologies and offer them the opportunity to subsequently discuss the relevance of these approaches for participants’ research projects in small groups in the second half of the session.

Search Terms: Methodology | Historical Research | Management and Organization Research

AOM2017 All-Academy session on History & Nationalism

Session Type: Symposium

Submission: 18644 | Sponsor(s): (AAT, MH)

 

Business and Management in an Age of Rising Nationalism: Historical Perspectives 

Theme: At the Interface

Sunday  10.30-12.00pm, Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Spring
Chair: Daniel Wadhwani, U. of the Pacific 

Panelist: Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Bus, York U. 

Panelist: Takafumi Kurosawa, Kyoto U. 

Panelist: Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School 

History can provide management scholars with a unique lens for understanding the current rise of nationalism, and the choices that businesses, managers, and entrepreneurs face in response to those changes. In part, this is because both supporters and critics of the current wave of nationalism point to historical examples and their consequences in justifying their positions. But, even more so, historical waves of globalization and de- globalization allow us a mirror for reflecting on the options and consequences that both policymakers and managers face today. For instance, on the eve of World War I, much of the world economy was economically integrated, with the relatively free mobility of firms, people, and capital across borders. This earlier wave of global integration fell apart with the rise of nationalism and nationalist policies during the interwar period, and a different kind of globally integrated economy had to be rebuilt by policymakers and businesspeople in the post-World War II world. This panel will discuss the lessons of such earlier waves of nationalism and de-globalization for our own time. It draws together four leading business historians, with expertise in four different regions of the world as well as in different aspects of management research. The panel will examine how rising nationalism affected not only the global context in which managers operated, but also consider its implications for business strategy, organizational behavior, social and political legitimacy, labor mobility and entrepreneurship. The goal of the panel will remain focused on the relevance of history for understanding managerial choices and consequences in the face of nationalism in our own time.

Search Terms: Nationalism, History | Management, Business | De-globalization

    

History and Intellectual Property

The recent Management and Organization Review (MOR) Volume 13, Issue 1, includes a vigorous exchange on the history and debate over intellectual property discussed in the paper by Mike W. Peng, David Ahlstrom, Shawn M. Carraher, and Weilei (Stone) Shi, followed by two commentaries by Can Huang and Martin Kenney. The issue is available for free download through April 30, 2017.

History and the Debate Over Intellectual Property

Abstract: This article responds to recent calls for organizational research to address larger, more globally relevant questions and to pay attention to history, by analyzing the crucial debate over intellectual property rights (IPR) between the United States and China. Despite the recent US position, the United States has not always been a leading IPR advocate. Rather, it was a leading IPR violator during the nineteenth century. An institution-based view of IPR history suggests that both the US refusal to protect foreign IPR in the nineteenth century and the current Chinese lack of enthusiasm to meet US IPR demands represent rational choices. However, as cost-benefit considerations change institutional transitions are possible. We predict that to the same extent the United States voluntarily agreed to strengthen IPR protection when its economy became sufficiently innovation-driven, China will similarly improve its IPR protection.

BH ToC 59.4

The new issue of Business History (June 2017) is now available:

Business History

Original Articles

Keynes, Trouton and the Hector Whaling Company. A personal and professional relationship
Bjørn L. Basberg
Pages: 471-496 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1214129

 

Strategic transformations in large Irish-owned businesses
Colm O’Gorman & Declan Curran
Pages: 497-524 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1220938

 

Rehabilitating the intermediary: brokers and auctioneers in the nineteenth-century Anglo-Indian trade
Michael Aldous
Pages: 525-553 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1220939

 

The obsolescing bargain model and oil: the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company 1933–1951
Neveen Abdelrehim & Steven Toms
Pages: 554-571 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1232397

 

United we stand, divided we fall: historical trajectory of strategic renewal activities at the Scandinavian Airlines System, 1946–2012
Joseph Amankwah-Amoah, Jan Ottosson & Hans Sjögren
Pages: 572-606 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1250743

 

Who financed the expansion of the equity market? Shareholder clienteles in Victorian Britain
Graeme G. Acheson, Gareth Campbell & John D. Turner
Pages: 607-637 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1250744
Book Review

Le crédit à la consommation en France, 1947-1965. De la stigmatisation à la réglementation
Hubert Bonin
Pages: 638-639 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2015.1068515

 

Early Victorian railway excursions: ‘The million go forth’
Mark Learmonth
Pages: 639-640 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1253638

 

Du Capitalisme familiale au Capitalisme financier? Le Cas de l’Industrie Suisse des Machines, de l’Electrotechnique et de la Métallurgie au XXe Siècle
Margrit Müller
Pages: 641-642 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1269526

 

Handbook of cliometrics
Anna Missiaia
Pages: 642-643 | DOI: 10.1080/00076791.2016.1272895

Future Role of Business Archives

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

ICA-SBA-Stockholm-huvudbild

The annual conference for the International Council on Archives‘ (ICA) Section on Business Archives (SBA) is taking place right now,  5-6 April 2017, in Stockholm. A follow-up conference will be taking place 4–6 December in Mumbai. Both events are about the Future Role of Business Archives and should interest both business historians and uses of the past scholars (I’m both). In the photo below, you can see Kathrine Maher, executive director of the Wikimedia Foundation giving keynote today.  Photo courtesy of Anders Ravn Sørensen

mahler

Although I can’t be at the Stockholm conference, I am hoping to get to the one in Mumbai. The focus of the Stockholm conference in on the importance of using true stories for external brand-building communication. In Mumbai, the focus on the internal effects that historical stories can have on management decisions and organizational culture. Since my current research looks at how history influences managerial cognition and organizational…

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