Reminder: Final ESRC seminar

Seminar 6:

Organizations as heritage and history as a useful resource
Wednesday 5th April 2017

ESRC Seminar Series
Organizations and Society:
Historicising the theory and practice of organization analysis

University of Exeter Business School
Building One: Constantine Leventis Teaching Room
Reception: Xfi Building

10:15-10.30 Refreshments and welcome by seminar series organizers Michael Rowlinson, Stephanie Decker and John Hassard

10.30-11.30 Albert J. Mills (Saint Mary University and University of Eastern Finland), “Insights and Research on the study of Gender and Intersectionality in International Airline Cultures Over Time.”

11:30-11:45 Coffee and biscuits 11:45-12:30 Gabrielle Durepos (Mount Saint Vincent University) “Mobilizing Critical Management History: the example of ANTi-History”

12:30-13:15 Michael Rowlinson & David Boughey (University of Exeter) “Suncor’s Corporate History: Strategic Rhetoric or Cultural Imperative?”

13.15-14:00 Buffet lunch

14:00-14.45 Sara Kinsey (Head of Historical Archives, Nationwide Building Society) “Lights, camera, action: reflections on organizational remembering in practice.”

14:45-15.30 Michael Weatherburn (Imperial College London) “The emerging corporate knowledge gap: why we need our dark archives and ghost data more than we realize.”

15:30-15:45 Tea and biscuits 15:45-16:30 Alan Booth and Morgen Witzel (University of Exeter) “The Rowntree business ‘archives’: uncovering British management in the inter -war period”

16:30-17:15 Roundtable
Speakers: Charles Booth (University of the West of England) Peter Miskell (University of Reading) Anna Soulsby (University of Nottingham)

17:15-19:00 Reception

Please contact Kate Henderson if you plan on attending.

Registration: A limited number of ESRC sponsored free places (including refreshments, buffet lunch and evening reception) will be allocated on a “first come first served” basis to those who contact Kate Henderson asking to attend. A fee of £35.00 will be charged on additional places.

Travel & accommodation: Exeter St. Davids is the nearest train station and is a 5min drive from the university. If needed, Kate Henderson can help with your travel and accommodation arrangements, but cost will need to be covered by participants.

For further enquiries please contact: Professor Mick Rowlinson (University of Exeter Business School) or Kate Henderson.

Business History events in June

The Association of Business Historians Annual Conference 2017

The Human Factor in Business History

Centre for Business History in Scotland

University of Glasgow

29 June – 1 July 2017

The ABH 2017 Conference Programme is now available: http://www.gla.ac.uk/external/ABH/Draft%20Programme%2028.03.17.pdf

 

 

Please note the following workshop just before the conference:

Entrepreneur-Philanthropists in Theory and History

University of Glasgow
28 June 2017, 2.00 pm to 5.00 pm
Room 408F Main Building

The workshop is convened by the guest editors of the forthcoming edition of the Business History Review on Entrepreneurship and Philanthropy edited by Charles Harvey (Newcastle University, UK), Mairi Maclean (University of Bath, UK) and Roy Suddaby (University of Victoria Canada).

The workshop has been timed to take place the afternoon before the annual conference of the Association of Business Historians, which takes place in Glasgow between 29th June and 1st July 2017 and is hosted by the Centre for Business History in Scotland of the University of Glasgow. The conference will be held at the Hilton Grosvenor Hotel and takes as its theme “The Human Factor in Business History.” The workshop is not part of the ABH conference.
The workshop is being held for anyone interested in the topic and especially colleagues intending to make a submission to the forthcoming edition of the Business History Review on Entrepreneurship and Philanthropy. The session is intended as a paper development session in which potential contributors will receive feedback from the guest editors and other participants in the workshop. There will be opportunity following the workshop for 1 to 1 meetings with the editors.

Refreshments will be served in Room 408F, the Business School seminar room, from 1.00 pm. There is no charge for the workshop.

 

The Archives Advantage: Indian Edition

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

The Economic Times has published a short but interesting story about how India’s Tata Group uses its corporate archives in Pune to maintain its competitive advantage. This story is particularly interesting to me for while there is a growing body of literature on how firms in the West and in Japan use history,  much less has been published about the uses of the past in emerging market multinationals.

More information about the Tata Central Archives can be found here.

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CfP: Alternative organizational forms in the economy

Call for Papers:
International PhD Workshop

“Alternative Organizational Forms in the Economy”


June 21-22, 2017

Hertie School of Governance Berlin


We invite PhD students from universities worldwide to participate in a workshop to be hosted at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin on June 21-22. The event is supported by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) and funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) as part of the IPID4all programme. Financial support is available for students from universities abroad.

The workshop is organized in cooperation with Prof. Johanna Mair, the Knowledge Initiative on Organizations and Society (KIOS, https://www.hertie-school.org/kios) and the research cluster “Organisation, Management and Leadership”.

Economic crises and complex social problems such as inequality and poverty are calling into question the sustainability of traditional models of organizing the economy and providing public goods in both advanced and developing economies. Alternative organizational forms include social entrepreneurship, public-private partnerships, impact investing, and corporate social responsibility and innovation, among others.

Associated with these organizational forms are practices such as governing with stakeholders, evaluating impact, and measuring progress that defy established ways of doing things following a more sectorial approach that distinguishes between the private, public and social sector. We are interested in why and how these organizations and their practices emerge and take root in different institutional contexts. We therefore invite papers studying the drivers, challenges, and outcomes of these organizational forms drawing on different perspectives from organization studies, sociology, public administration, management, and comparative political economy. Papers should focus on one or more of the following aspects:

  • Social enterprises and entrepreneurship
  • Public-private partnerships and governance implications
  • Provision of public goods through private partners
  • Institutions and alternative forms of organizing from a comparative perspective: field-level dynamics, varieties of capitalism, institutional legacies, welfare state implications
  • Corporate social responsibility
  • Nonprofit sector activity and new forms of philanthropy
  • The constitution and role of social problems in motivating and legitimizing social change organizations
  • Configurations of hybrid organizing

In the workshop, we will discuss these issues and invite PhD students to submit papers speaking to any of the aspects mentioned. We are open to different theoretical and methodological approaches.

Workshop format:
Each participant will present a 10-page paper in one of about five sessions (with 2-3 papers each). Fellow PhD students and senior scholars from the Hertie School and partner schools will be present to discuss the papers.

Please apply by submitting your proposal or extended abstract (max. 2 pages) and a CV by April 15, 2017.

Participants will be informed by May 2 and are expected to send an extended version 1-2 weeks before the workshop.

Please send your applications to: phd-team@hertie-school.org

Participants from universities outside of Germany will receive a travel lump sum depending on the country of residence and a per diem lump sum to cover accommodation costs.

Contact:
Hertie School of Governance GmbH | Graduate Programmes Hertie School of Governance GmbH | KIOS

Verena Neumann, M.A. | Associate for PhD Affairs Dr. Nikolas Rathert | Postdoctoral Researcher

Friedrichstr. 180 | 10117 Berlin |Germany Friedrichstr. 180 | 10117 Berlin |Germany

phd-team@hertie-school.org rathert@hertie-school.org

Resource on management history

I have just come across this new YouTube channel (thanks to Scott Taylor) about the History of Management.

New History of Management channel is a repository for videos that look at the history of management in new and interesting ways in order to encourage thinking differently about management and management education today. It is named after the book A New History of Management, written by Stephen Cummings, Todd Bridgman, John Hassard & Michael Rowlinson, which will be published by Cambridge University Press later in 2017.

 

CfP: Use of Methodology in MH

Special issue call for papers from Journal of Management History

USES OF METHODOLOGY IN MANAGEMENT HISTORY

Guest Editors:
Wim van Lent, Montpellier Business School
Gabrielle Durepos, Mount Saint Vincent University

Submission deadline: 1 February 2018

Background

Ever since the “historical turn” in organisation studies (Clark and Rowlinson 2004), the importance of history to understanding organisations and institutions has been increasingly recognized (e.g. Sydow, Schreyogg and Koch 2009, Ocasio, Mauskapf and Steele 2015, Suddaby 2016, Durepos and Mills 2012). Since history provides an alternative to the dominant science paradigms in organisation studies (Zald 1993), studies using a historical approach are contributing to and even shaping a growing number of scholarly debates (Decker, Kipping and Wadhwani 2015). The growing appreciation of historical approaches to building and testing organisation theory has spawned a body of work on how to engage in historical analysis with the specific aim of bridging the gap between the historical and organisational scientific communities (e.g. Rowlinson, Hassard and Decker 2014, De Jong, Higgins and Van Driel 2015, Whittle and Wilson 2015, Suddaby 2016, Durepos 2015). The fundamental insight that emerges from it is that history is no less fragmented than organisational theory (Rowlinson et al. 2014: 269). According to Bowden (2016), management scholars are essentially divided along a continuum with on the one extreme De Jong et al.’s (2015) position that history should be empirical and theory-oriented, and on the other extreme Whittle and Wilson’s (2015) “ethnomethodological” perspective, which is rooted in postmodernism and takes a more critical perspective on history-writing. Scholars find themselves either on the continuum with genealogy (Decker et al. 2015) and rhetorical history (Suddaby, Foster and Quinn Trank 2010) and even beyond with ANTi-History (Durepos and Mills 2012, 2017).
Although methodological diversity could impede moving the field forward, the variety that they encompass comes with potential, for example in terms of diversity of research questions and richness of historical knowledge (Decker et al. 2015). Fortunately, the conditions for the further development of management history (also in relation to other fields) seem to be in place: despite history’s growing permeation of organisation studies, there is still a lot of evidence enclosed in corporate archives with which management historians can formulate novel insights into the working of organisations and institutions (Rowlinson et al. 2014, Mills and Helms Mills 2017). However, in order to fully realize this potential, management history will have to go beyond “merely” continuing the proliferation of research using alternative types of historical data and analysis. Most importantly, research should be multidisciplinary (Bucheli and Wadhwani 2014), connecting an understanding of organisational theory and methods with historical contexts and source material (Rowlinson et al. 2014), or involving multiple sources and methods for data analysis (Bowden 2016). In addition, since histories are not uncontested records, management history is greatly helped by methodological reflexivity (Rowlinson et al. 2014). That is, when researchers are aware of their role in selecting certain traces over others, what their sources cover, and how and why they were put together, as well as the shaping influence of the historical context within which they construct theoretical arguments, they may improve the plausibility of their analyses and better identify scope conditions (Bowden 2016).

Aims and Scope
This special issue has two broad purposes: 1) to move forward the methodological debates in management history and 2) to demonstrate the use of / refine historical methods in organisational research through empirical analysis. We therefore welcome both theoretical and empirical papers. Below we suggest a non-exhaustive list of specific topics that contribute to the above two goals. Papers focusing on topics that are not included but sufficiently related to the goals highlighted above would also be welcome as submissions to the special issue.
•    Epistemology and management history
•    Typification of research methodologies
•    Novel research methods in management history
•    Ways in which different methods can be combined for richer empirical insights
•    Empirical demonstrations of the use of one or several methodologies
•    Methodological refinement through empirical analysis
•    Benefits / drawbacks of research methods for a management history audience

Submission Process
Submitted papers must conform to the submission guidelines of the Journal of Management History. Manuscripts are due by 1 February 2018 and must be submitted using the JMH submission system at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jmh. Authors should indicate that they would like their document to be considered for the special issue “Uses of Methodology in Management History”. Authors of papers invited to be revised and resubmitted will be expected to work within a tight timeframe for revisions.

Further information

Questions pertaining to this special issue may be directed to:
•    Wim van Lent (w.vanlent@montpellier-bs.com)
•    Gabrielle Durepos (gabrielle.durepos@msvu.ca)
•    Bradley Bowden (b.bowden@griffith.edu.au)

For questions about submitting to the special issue contact the JMH Publisher, Patti Davis (pdavis@emeraldinsight.com).

References

Bowden, B (2016) Editorial and note on the writing of management history. Journal of Management History, Vol. 22, No. 2, pp. 118-129.
Bucheli M and Wadhwani D (2014) Organizations in time: history, theory, methods. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Clark P and Rowlinson M (2004) The treatment of history in organisation studies: toward an “historic turn”? Business History, Vol. 46, No. 3, pp. 331-352.
De Jong A, Higgins DM and Van Driel H (2015) Towards a new business history? Business History, Vol. 57, No. 1, pp. 5-29.
Decker S, Kipping M and Wadhwani D (2015) New business histories! Plurality in business history research methods. Business History, Vol. 57, No.1, pp. 30-40.
Durepos G (2015) ANTi-history: Toward amodern histories, in P Genoe McLaren, AJ Mills and T Weatherbee (Eds.), The Routledge companion to management and organisational history (pp. 153-180). New York: Routledge.
Durepos G and Mills A (2012) ANTi-history: Theorizing the past, history, and
historiography in management and organizational studies. Charlotte, NC:
Information Age Publishing.
Durepos G and Mills A (In press, 2017) ANTi-history: An alternative approach to historiography, in C Cassell, A Cunliffe and G Grandy (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of qualitative business and management research methods. London: Sage.
Mills A and Helms Mills J (In press, 2017) Archival research, in C Cassell, A Cunliffe and G Grandy (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of qualitative business and management research methods. London: SAGE.
Ocasio W, Mauskapf M and Steele CWJ (2016) History, society, and institutions: the role of collective memory in the emergence and evolution of societal logics, Academy of Management Review, Vol. 41, No. 4, pp. 676-699.
Rowlinson M, Hassard J and Decker S (2014) Research strategies for organisational history: a dialogue between historical theory and organization theory, Academy of Management Review, Vol. 39, No. 3, pp. 250-274.
Suddaby R (2016) Toward a historical consciousness: following the historic turn in management thought, M@n@gement, Vol. 19, No. 1, pp. 46-60.
Suddaby R, Foster W and Quinn Trank C (2010) Rhetorical history as a source of competitive advantage, Advances in Strategic Management, Vol. 27, pp. 147-173.
Sydow J, Schreyögg G and Koch J (2009) Organisational path dependence: opening the black box, Academy of Management Review, Vol. 34, No. 4, pp. 689-709.
Whittle A and Wilson J (2015) Ethnomethodology and the production of history: studying ‘history-in-action’, Business History, Vol. 57, No. 1, pp. 41-63.
Zald M (1993) Organisation studies as a scientific and humanistic enterprise: towards a reconceptualization of the foundations of the field, Organisation Science, Vol. 4, No. 4, pp. 513-528.

New directions in the history of imperial and global networks

Reblogged from Imperial and Global Forum:

Imperial & Global Forum

New directions in the history of imperial and global networks

An ECR workshop at the University of Exeter, in collaboration with the History & Policy Global Economics and History Forum. 23 June, Reed Hall, Exeter (12-5pm)

Following the Brexit vote and the election of Donald Trump on a protectionist programme much debate has focused on the future of economic, political and humanitarian networks and the apparent challenges to globalisation present today. This, in turn, has stimulated interest in earlier histories of imperial and global networks. In Britain, for example, there has been a great deal of discussion of the potential value of reviving historical trade links with the Commonwealth, a move which has pejoratively been referred to as ‘Empire 2.0’ by its critics.

As well as showcasing new research in the history of imperial and global networks this workshop will include a seminar on training in public engagement, focused…

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History & Policy Brexit event

Commonwealth Trade after Brexit: historical reflections

History & Policy‘s Global Economics and History Forum

Wednesday, 15 March 2017 from 14:00 to 17:00 (GMT)

London, United Kingdom

Event Details

Based on historical experiences, what economic opportunities might the Commonwealth of Nations offer a post-Brexit Britain?

As the UK seeks a new place in the global economy post-Brexit, the Commonwealth of Nations is often touted as a possible alternative. In a week in which Commonwealth leaders meet the Commonwealth Trade Conference, historians, policy makers and other experts meet to consider the potential of Commonwealth economic relations in historical perspective.

CHAIR: Dr Marc-William Palen, Lecturer, University of Exeter and Co-director, Global Economics and History Forum (History & Policy)

SPEAKERS:

Tim Hewish, Director of Policy & Research, The Royal Commonwealth Society and Co-Founder, Commonwealth Exchange

Dr Surender Munjal, Director, James E. Lynch India and South Asia Business Centre, University of Leeds

Dr Andrew Dilley, Senior Lecturer, University of Aberdeen and Co-director, Global Economics and History Forum (History & Policy)

Be sure to register if you’d like to attend. Only a few spots left!

Click Here to Register

Do you have questions about Commonwealth Trade after Brexit: historical reflections? Contact History & Policy

CFP:’Time Preference and Time Horizon in Historical Perspective’

Reblogged from The Past Speaks:

The Past Speaks

AS: I’m sharing this CFP for a very interesting workshop on the history of time preferences. The CFP is particularly important in light of the ongoing research on so-called patient capital, which is the subject of the current issue of the Socio-Economic Review.

I haven’t yet read the paper mentioned in the CFP, so I’m wondering whether the focus of the workshop will be solely on cross-national and cross-temporal variations in the time preferences of individuals or whether changes in the revealed time preferences of business corporations and other large organizations will also be a theme of the workshop. I ask because the time preferences of US corporations appear to have changed dramatically in the last generation (for the current debates on short-termism, see here, here, and here) while there isn’t much evidence that the mix of time preferences among the individuals who make up the US population. The…

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CfP: EBHA doctoral summer school

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

9th EBHA DOCTORAL SUMMER SCHOOL BUSINESS HISTORY: DEBATES, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

The 9th edition of the EBHA (European Business History Association) Summer School will take place in Ancona (Italy) from Monday, September 4th to Saturday, September 9th, 2017. The school aims at providing doctoral students with an overview of relevant research results and of innovative tools and methodologies in the field of Business History. It is organised jointly by the European Business History Association (EBHA), the Università Politecnica delle Marche and the Italian Association for Business History (ASSI). Students will be accommodated in the beautiful town of Ancona debating and discussing their research with leading international scholars.

The title of the school will be Business History: Debates, challenges and opportunities. The school will focus on theoretical, methodological and practical issues which are of relevance for advanced research in business history. The main aim of the school is to provide students with a full understanding of the newest trends in research in the field and to provide a friendly atmosphere in which to discuss their preliminary findings with leading scholars as well as among their peers. In this respect, the program features both lectures and seminars given by faculty and student presentations of their research projects. Each student will have 20 minutes maximum to present her/his project, stressing especially: research questions and goals, methodology, sources, challenges and provisional outcomes. After her/his presentation, each student will receive questions and comments from other students and from faculty members (approx 15-20 minutes).

The organisers will cover all local costs (accommodation in a double or triple room and food), but participants are expected to pay their own travel expenses. Participation will be limited to 15-20 PhD students.

Those interested in attending the summer school should send the following documents by e-mail to the academic organiser Dr. Veronica Binda (veronica.binda@unibocconi.it): 1) a brief CV (not exceeding one page); 2) a summary of their dissertation project (not exceeding three pages); 3) (if possible) an example of their work in progress, e.g. a draft chapter or a working paper (in any language).

The deadline for applications is May 14th, 2017. A maximum of 20 participants will be selected from these applications and will be notified by June 4th, 2017.