Call for applications:Junior Scholars Forum In Civil Society, the Nonprofit Sector, and Philanthropy

2016 Call for applications 

Junior Scholars Forum In Civil Society, the Nonprofit Sector, and Philanthropy

pacscenter.stanford.edu/junior-scholars-forum

June 15-17, 2016

Berlin Application Deadline: February 22, 2016

The annual Stanford PACS Junior Scholars Forum brings together newer researchers, including graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty, working in the general areas of civil society, the nonprofit sector, and philanthropy to increase the sense of intellectual community and enhance the overall quality of research. The goal of the forum is to highlight exciting work being done by junior scholars and to contribute to the development of their scholarship. Background In summer 2014 the Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society hosted its inaugural Junior Scholars Forum, a gathering that brought together newer researchers with senior scholars for two days of presentations, intensive discussions and socializing. The forum highlighted exciting work being done in the fields of philanthropy and civil society. The 11 junior scholars selected were drawn from a competitive pool of applications and came from political science, economics, sociology, anthropology, and other disciplines. In 2015, the second forum was held featuring 9 junior scholars from an equally broad range of disciplines. About the Junior Scholars Forum in 2016 We are excited to announce that the 2016 JSF will be convened in Berlin, Germany June 15 – 17th, 2016 at the Hertie School of Governance. Applicants who are selected will receive funding for travel, accommodation, and eligible travel expenses. Each paper selected will have two discussants, one an established scholar working in the area of research, the other a graduate student or a postdoctoral fellow also working on the topic. The forum will provide ample time for discussion and meals together so that we can begin build an intellectual community that we hope will last beyond the event. We are open to a wide variety of topic areas.
Without limiting submissions to items on this list, here is description of some themes that we are particularly interested in and in which there is active work under way at Stanford:

  • The expansion of global governance, particularly transnational organizations and their causes and impact
  • The role of social movements and advocacy groups in policy reform or revolt efforts at measuring effectiveness in the social sector
  • The relationship between philanthropy and democracy
  • New organizational forms, ranging from hybrids to b corps, from cooperatives to for-profits with a purported social mission; corporate social responsibility; impact investing
  • Novel approaches to analyzing the role of social capital in civil society
  • New open models of public media and knowledge, ranging from journalism to encyclopedias to scientific production

Submission details

We welcome submissions by graduate students and postdoctoral fellows as well as junior faculty. We want to cast a wide net and welcome submissions from a robust variety of disciplines and professional schools. The committee will favor solo-authored papers from junior scholars, and papers that examined civil society and philanthropy through new lenses. Please submit a research paper by email to Sam Spiewak, Program Manager, at spiewak@stanford.edu. Please make your subject line: “Junior Scholars Forum.” There are no specific length or formatting requirements for the paper and advanced drafts will be accepted along with published papers. We will select eight to eleven papers for the 2016 forum. The “we” includes the faculty co-directors of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, other Stanford Faculty, and several distinguished members of the larger academic community who will join us at the June forum. We will notify all applicants of the outcomes by early April. Funding will be provided to cover travel expenses and accommodations will be arranged in Berlin.

For more information, contact Sam Spiewak (spiewak@stanford.edu).

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Applied microhistory: A workshop.

Applied microhistory: A workshop.

Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris
Tuesday, 15 March 2016.
9 am – 2 pm

As time puts things into perspective, the heated and sometimes misleading historiographical debates of the1970s and 1980s on micro-history and its focus on small subjects seem to fade away. Yet in the meantime historical micro-analysis has emerged as a useful method to approach a very diverse set of questions in different fields of social sciences and humanities.
Micro-analysis focuses on the reduction of scale as an instrument to answer theoretical general questions, maintaining a dynamic tension between ‘emic’ and ‘etic’ perspectives. In so doing, it offers a logical procedure to infer general considerations from specific cases, regardless of their statistical representativeness. At the same time, this approach implies a contingent view of the relationship between agency and structure, highlighting the creativity of the former and the complexity of the latter.
This workshop aims at discussing the contribution of micro-analytical historical approaches to research in different fields, from the most classical focus on local communities to the challenge of studying at micro level global connections and institutions, as well at the organizational level. Contributors are invited to address the
methodological issues implied in the use of a micro-analytical approach with reference to a diverse range of research fields.

Please send any enquiries to Giovanni Favero (Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia) – gfavero@unive.it
Papers to be discussed (provisional titles):
Roser Cusso (Université Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne), Micro-history and the IO: the case of LoN’s minorities section.
Stephanie Decker (Aston Business School), Mothership reconnection: Microhistory and institutional work compared.
Giovanni Favero (Ca’ Foscari University of Venice), Putting micro-history at work: Exception and norm, observation and experiment.
Per Hansen (Copenhagen Business School), A sense-making approach to the response of central banks to the Austrian finacial crisis of 1931.
Miki Sugiura (Hosei University), Maintaining polycentric cities under de-urbanization: Local merchants’ real estate strategies in Bolsward, Friesland.
Discussants:
Monica Martinat (Université Lumière Lyon 2), Simona Cerutti (EHESS Paris), Andrew Popp (University of Liverpool), Francesca Trivellato (Yale University)
References:
Decker, Stephanie (2015) Mothership reconnection: Microhistory and institutional work compared. In T.G Weatherbee, P.G. McLaren, & A.J. Mills (Eds.), The Routledge Companion to Management and Organizational History (pp. 222-237). London: Routledge.
Fellman, Susanna & Rahikainen, Marjatta (Eds.) (2012) Historical Knowledge: In Quest of Theory, Method and Evidence. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
Magnússon, Sigurour G. & Szijártó, Istvan M. (2013) What is Microhistory? Theory and Methods. London: Routledge.
Trivellato, Francesca (2011). Is there a future for Italian microhistory in the age of global history? California Italian Studies Journal, 2(1).

Report on the Digitisation of Cultural Heritage

Love it or loathe it, digitisation and digital humanities are becoming and increasingly important area for anyone interested in historical research on organizations. Yet the report by eNumerate, formerly an EU funded project aimed at creating statistical data about the digitization, of cultural heritage in Europe, shows that there is still a long way to go for most archives:

“On average 23% of European collections have been digitised, with Museums leading the way with the highest proportion (31%) up from 24% in the 2014 survey (Core Survey 2- CS2). However at the other end of the scale, only 13% of record office/archive collections and 19% of library collections have been digitised. This is possibly down to the vast amount of records these institutions hold, which could result in a longer digitisation process.”

As this infographic shows, digitisation remains a major area that the UK government and the EU are investing in. Yet the impact this is likely to have on research practices or the availability of documents from private organization archives remains unclear.

Infographic: Digitisation landscape in 2015 from eNumerate

You can read the summary and the full report here: eNumerate Digitisation in Cultural Heritage 2015 : Key findings | TownsWeb Archiving.

4 days left to submit your EGOS short paper!

There are 4 days left to submit your EGOS short paper to SWG8!

If you have never been to EGOS – the system does not accept any late submissions, so please make sure that you have paid your EGOS membership and submitted your paper by Monday 11 January 2016!

Sub-theme 08: (SWG) History and Organization Studies: The Ways Forward

Convenors:

Daniel Wadhwani, University of the Pacific, USA, and Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

dwadhwani@pacific.edu

Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada

mkipping@schulich.yorku.ca

Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School, UK

s.decker@aston.ac.uk

Call for Papers

Historical sources, methods, and theoretical constructs have gained considerable attention in management and organizational studies in recent years (Üsdiken & Kipping, 2014). Researchers have mades a range of notable conceptual (Bucheli & Wadhwani, 2014; Rowlinson et al., 2014) and empirical contributions (O’Sullivan & Graham, 2010; Rowlinson et al., 2014; Kipping & Üsdiken, 2014) that have laid the foundations for a diverse array of approaches to historical research and reasoning in organization studies. Moreover leading journals, such as Organization Studies and Academy of Management Review, have supported these developments by announcing special issues devoted to historical research and theory. Indeed, one could fairly state that the nature and value of historical research has come to be more broadly understood and accepted than when the EGOS Standing Working Group (SWG) on “Historical Perspectives in Organization Studies” was formed.

In this, the final year of the SWG 08, we seek a broad range of empirical papers that explicitly build on the foundations that have been established but move the conversation between history and organization studies forward in interesting and novel ways. We also welcome innovative conceptual papers based on previous research. Some of the ways in which this might be done includes:

  • Building new bridges between history and other approaches to the study of organizations that are sensitive to time and context, such as process research, institutional theory, and evolutionary theory.
  • Extending the work that has been done on history and organization theory to related domains, including strategy and entrepreneurship.
  • Introducing new or underused methods for interpreting historical sources related to organizations and organizing.
  • Exploring novel types of historical source material.
  • Examining new and understudied historical periods or regions.
  • Considering new ways in which the past is used in organizations and organizing

Short paper submissions should not only describe the empirical research conducted and elaborate on theoretical claims, but should also explicitly engage the extant work on historical approaches to management and organization studies and point to promising new theoretical, methodological, and empirical directions.

References

  • Bucheli, M., & Wadhwani, R.D. (eds.) (2014): Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Kipping, M., & Üsdiken, B. (2014): “History in organization and management theory: more than meets the eye.” Academy of Management Annals, 8 (1), 535–588.
  • O’Sullivan, M., & Graham, M.B.W. (2010): “Moving Forward by Looking Backward: Business History and Management Studies.” Journal of Management Studies, 47 (5), 775–790.
  • Rowlinson, M., Hassard, J., & Decker, S. (2013): “Strategies for organizational history: A dialogue between historical theory and organization theory.” Academy of Management Review, 39 (3), 250–274.
  • Rowlinson, M., Casey, A., Hansen, P.H., & Mills, A.J. (2014): “Narratives and Memory in Organizations.”Organization, 21 (4), 441–446.
  • Üsdiken, B., & Kipping, M. (2014): “History and organization studies: A long-term view.” In: M. Bucheli & R.D. Wadhwani (eds.): Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 33–55.
  1. Daniel Wadhwaniis Fletcher Jones Associate Professor of Management at University of the Pacific, USA, and Visiting Professor at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark. His research has used historical approaches to study a range of organizational issues, including the emergence of new markets, the nature of entrepreneurial agency, and the processes of categorization and value determination in organizational fields. He is co-editor (with Marcelo Bucheli) of “Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods” (Oxford University Press, 2014), which examines the role of historical research and reasoning in organization studies.

Matthias Kipping is Professor of Policy and Chair in Business History at the Schulich School of Business, York University in Toronto, Canada. His research has focused on the development and role of the different institutions of management knowledge, namely management consulting and business education. In his publications, as well as in his teaching, he has been trying to link historical research with organizational theory. He is active in a variety of scholarly associations in both business history and management and organization studies.

Stephanie Decker is Professor of Organization Studies and History at Aston Business School, UK. As a historian working at a business school, most of her work is concerned with the relation between organization theory and history. She is co-editor of ‘Business History’ and is the recipient of the prestigious Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship 2014–15, as well as the principal organizer of a seminar series on organizational history funded by the Economic and Social Science Research Council (UK). She co-authored “Research Strategies for Organizational History” (Academy of Management Review, 2014) with Michael Rowlinson and John Hassard.

To upload your short paper, please log in to the Member Area.

Organizational History in AMLE

At OHN we are delighted to see that Bill Cooke & Rafael Alcadipani have published an historical article in AMLE in December!

Academy of Management Learning  Education December 2015; Vol. 14, No. 4 http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4?etoc

 

From the Editors: A Year of Living Gratefully
Christine Quinn Trank
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:437-438 doi:10.5465/amle.2015.0360
http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/437?etoc

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Research & Reviews
—————————————————————–
An Investigation of the Emotional Outcomes of Business Students’ Cheating: “Biological Laws” to Achieve Academic Excellence
Mohammed El Hazzouri, Sergio W. Carvalho, and Kelley J. Main
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:440-460 doi:10.5465/amle.2013.0031  http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/440.abstract?etoc

Engagement in Cultural Trigger Events in the Development of Cultural Competence
Rebecca J. Reichard, Shawn A. Serrano, Michael Condren, Natasha Wilder, Maren Dollwet, and Wendy Wang
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:461-481 doi:10.5465/amle.2013.0043  http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/461.abstract?etoc

Toward a Global History of Management Education: The Case of the Ford Foundation and the São Paulo School of Business Administration, Brazil
Bill Cooke and Rafael Alcadipani
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:482-499 doi:10.5465/amle.2013.0147  http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/482.abstract?etoc

He Who Laughs Best, Leaves Last: The Influence of Humor on the Attitudes and Behavior of Interns
Filipe Sobral and Gazi Islam
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:500-518 doi:10.5465/amle.2013.0368  http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/500.abstract?etoc

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Exemplary Contributions
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Against Evidence-Based Management, for Management Learning
Kevin Morrell and Mark Learmonth
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:520-533 doi:10.5465/amle.2014.0346
http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/520.abstract?etoc

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Essays, Dialogues & Interviews
—————————————————————–

From the Special Section Editors: Questions Business Schools Don’t Ask
Christopher Mabey, Carolyn P. Egri, and Ken Parry
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:535-538 doi:10.5465/amle.2015.0302
http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/535?etoc

Challenging the Perceived Wisdom of Management Theories and Practice
Denise Baden and Malcolm Higgs
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:539-555 doi:10.5465/amle.2014.0170
http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/539.abstract?etoc

Questioning Neoliberal Capitalism and Economic Inequality in Business Schools
Marianna Fotaki and Ajnesh Prasad
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:556-575 doi:10.5465/amle.2014.0182
http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/556.abstract?etoc

Teaching Leadership Critically: New Directions for Leadership Pedagogy
David Collinson and Dennis Tourish
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:576-594 doi:10.5465/amle.2014.0079
http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/576.abstract?etoc

Is Narcissism Undermining Critical Reflection in Our Business Schools?Leah Tomkins and Eda Ulus
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:595-606 doi:10.5465/amle.2014.0107
http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/595.abstract?etoc

Aesthetics of Power: Why Teaching About Power Is Easier Than Learning for Power, and What Business Schools Could Do About It
Ian Sutherland, Jonathan R. Gosling, and Jasna Jelinek
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:607-624 doi:10.5465/amle.2014.0179
http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/607.abstract?etoc

Can Business Schools Humanize Leadership?
Gianpiero Petriglieri and Jennifer Louise Petriglieri
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:625-647 doi:10.5465/amle.2014.0201
http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/625.abstract?etoc

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Books & Resource Reviews
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Trouble in the Middle: American–Chinese Business Relations, Culture, Conflict and Ethics
Robin S. Snell
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:649-650 doi:10.5465/amle.2015.0240
http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/649?etoc

Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility: Stakeholders, Globalization, and Sustainable Value Creation
Timothy J. Hargrave
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:651-653 doi:10.5465/amle.2015.0241  http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/651?etoc

Applied Crisis Communication and Crisis Management: Cases and Exercises
Jennifer F. Wood
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:654-656 doi:10.5465/amle.2015.0239  http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/654?etoc

Global Leadership Practices: A Cross-Cultural Management Perspective  Christof Miska and Hale Öner
ACAD MANAG LEARN EDU 2015; 14:657-659 doi:10.5465/amle.2015.0238  http://amle.aom.org/content/14/4/657?etoc

Discover Academy of Management Discoveries Watch our first Animated Whiteboard Read the From the Editors feature

 

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Copyright (c) 2015 by the Academy of Management.

 

Reminder: EGOS submission SWG8

There are 4 days left to submit your EGOS short paper to SWG8!

If you have never been to EGOS – the system does not accept any late submissions, so please make sure that you have paid your EGOS membership and submitted your paper by Monday 11 January 2016!

Sub-theme 08: (SWG) History and Organization Studies: The Ways Forward

Convenors:
R. Daniel Wadhwani, University of the Pacific, USA, and Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
Matthias Kipping, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada
Stephanie Decker, Aston Business School, UK

Call for Papers


Historical sources, methods, and theoretical constructs have gained considerable attention in management and organizational studies in recent years (Üsdiken & Kipping, 2014). Researchers have mades a range of notable conceptual (Bucheli & Wadhwani, 2014; Rowlinson et al., 2014) and empirical contributions (O’Sullivan & Graham, 2010; Rowlinson et al., 2014; Kipping & Üsdiken, 2014) that have laid the foundations for a diverse array of approaches to historical research and reasoning in organization studies. Moreover leading journals, such as Organization Studies and Academy of Management Review, have supported these developments by announcing special issues devoted to historical research and theory. Indeed, one could fairly state that the nature and value of historical research has come to be more broadly understood and accepted than when the EGOS Standing Working Group (SWG) on “Historical Perspectives in Organization Studies” was formed.

In this, the final year of the SWG 08, we seek a broad range of empirical papers that explicitly build on the foundations that have been established but move the conversation between history and organization studies forward in interesting and novel ways. We also welcome innovative conceptual papers based on previous research. Some of the ways in which this might be done includes:

  • Building new bridges between history and other approaches to the study of organizations that are sensitive to time and context, such as process research, institutional theory, and evolutionary theory.
  • Extending the work that has been done on history and organization theory to related domains, including strategy and entrepreneurship.
  • Introducing new or underused methods for interpreting historical sources related to organizations and organizing.
  • Exploring novel types of historical source material.
  • Examining new and understudied historical periods or regions.
  • Considering new ways in which the past is used in organizations and organizing

Short paper submissions should not only describe the empirical research conducted and elaborate on theoretical claims, but should also explicitly engage the extant work on historical approaches to management and organization studies and point to promising new theoretical, methodological, and empirical directions.

References

  • Bucheli, M., & Wadhwani, R.D. (eds.) (2014): Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Kipping, M., & Üsdiken, B. (2014): “History in organization and management theory: more than meets the eye.” Academy of Management Annals, 8 (1), 535–588.
  • O’Sullivan, M., & Graham, M.B.W. (2010): “Moving Forward by Looking Backward: Business History and Management Studies.” Journal of Management Studies, 47 (5), 775–790.
  • Rowlinson, M., Hassard, J., & Decker, S. (2013): “Strategies for organizational history: A dialogue between historical theory and organization theory.” Academy of Management Review, 39 (3), 250–274.
  • Rowlinson, M., Casey, A., Hansen, P.H., & Mills, A.J. (2014): “Narratives and Memory in Organizations.”Organization, 21 (4), 441–446.
  • Üsdiken, B., & Kipping, M. (2014): “History and organization studies: A long-term view.” In: M. Bucheli & R.D. Wadhwani (eds.): Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 33–55.
R. Daniel Wadhwani is Fletcher Jones Associate Professor of Management at University of the Pacific, USA, and Visiting Professor at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark. His research has used historical approaches to study a range of organizational issues, including the emergence of new markets, the nature of entrepreneurial agency, and the processes of categorization and value determination in organizational fields. He is co-editor (with Marcelo Bucheli) of “Organizations in Time: History, Theory, Methods” (Oxford University Press, 2014), which examines the role of historical research and reasoning in organization studies.
Matthias Kipping is Professor of Policy and Chair in Business History at the Schulich School of Business, York University in Toronto, Canada. His research has focused on the development and role of the different institutions of management knowledge, namely management consulting and business education. In his publications, as well as in his teaching, he has been trying to link historical research with organizational theory. He is active in a variety of scholarly associations in both business history and management and organization studies.
Stephanie Decker is Professor of Organization Studies and History at Aston Business School, UK. As a historian working at a business school, most of her work is concerned with the relation between organization theory and history. She is co-editor of ‘Business History’ and is the recipient of the prestigious Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship 2014–15, as well as the principal organizer of a seminar series on organizational history funded by the Economic and Social Science Research Council (UK). She co-authored “Research Strategies for Organizational History” (Academy of Management Review, 2014) with Michael Rowlinson and John Hassard.
To upload your short paper, please log in to the Member Area.

 

Funded PhD in Organizational History

Cross-posted from The Past Speaks – if interested, please email Andrew Smith at ULMS.

For September 2016 entry, the University of Liverpool Management School (ULMS) will be awarding a number of PhD Studentships as part of its established doctoral funding scheme.

Consistent with our current research strengths we encourage applications in the areas of:

  • History and Institutions
  • Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management
  • Leadership, People and Management
  • Supply Chain Management, Lean Production and Agility
  • Marketing and Experiential Consumption
  • Corporate Finance, Financial Markets and Risk
  • Societal and Economic Development
  • International Business
  • Econometrics (Theory and Applied), Micro and Macro Economic Theory

 The studentships are funded by the School and represent a significant investment to further consolidate its position as a vibrant and distinct research community, as indicated by publications in top-tier journals across the above-stated areas. In addition, the school hosts a number of editorships in prestigious academic journals.

The full set of information for this call and details of how to apply is available on our website

 Closing Date for Applications: 5pm, Friday 29th January 2016